RICHARD KENNEY ERWIN, attorney-at-law, Decatur, Indiana, is a native of Adams County, born in Union Township, July 11, 1860. He is the second of six sons and one of ten children of David and Mary Ellen (Need) Erwin, natives of Ohio, the father of Scotch-Irish and the mother of Irish descent. Richard was reared a farmer, remaining at home until nineteen years of age, when having received a good education, attending the district schools supplemented by one terma the Fort Wayne Methodist Episcopal College, Fort Wayne, he engaged in teaching and followed that vocation a short time in Allen County and six years in Adams County, still however, spending the summer months on the farm. In 1884 he was elected justice of the peace, but resigned his office after serving one year. In 1886 he began the study of law in the office of France & Merryman, and was admitted to the bar at Decatur in the spring of 1887, and at once engaged in practice at Decatur. He is a member of Kekionga Lodge, No. 65 K. of P. In politics he is a Democrat. He was married January 17, 1883, to Luella Wass, of Monroeville, Indiana, daughter of W. L. B. and Lizzie (Pottoff) Wass. They have two children - Harry George and Mabel.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



SILAS WRIGHT HALE, senior member of the firm of S. W. Hale & Brother, at Geneva, dealers in grain and produce, was born in Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana, September 18, 1844, the second in a family of four sons of Bowen and Mary A. (Deam) Hale. His father was of Scotch and his mother of German parentage. He was reared at Bluffton, where he received his education in the common and high schools, and graduated from the Bluffton High School in the class of 1864. In December, 1864, he enlisted in the war of the Rebellion as a private, to serve three years, and was assigned to Company E, One Hundred and Fifty-third Indiana Infantry. He was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, at the close of the war, in September, 1865, when he returned to Bluffton and entered the store of A. Deam & Co. as clerk, being thus employed until the winter of 1870. May 27, 1869, he was married at Bluffton to Miss Phoebe C. McFadden, a daughter of John and Elizabeth McFadden, who were pioneers of Wells County. Mrs. Hale was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, but was reared from childhood in Bluffton, and is a graduate of the high school of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Hale have three children living - William, clerking in his father's office, and Frank and Clara attending school. In the winter of 1870 Mr. Hale became associated with his brother, John D., dealing in grain and produce, under the firm name of J. D. Hale & Brother, until 1872, when they removed from Bluffton to Geneva, Adams County, where they continued in business until 1878. From 1873 until 1878 he was also engaged as telegraph operator in the office of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company, at Geneva, and during 1876-77 he was station agent of the same road at Geneva. In 1878 our subject retired from the firm of J. D. Hale & Brother, and engaged in the same business at Portland, Jay County, until 1883, when he returned to Geneva and again became associated with his brother, John D., in the grain and produce business, under the firm name of S. W. Hale & Brother. In politics Mr. Hale is a Democrat. From 1883 until 1886 he served as a member of the school board of Geneva. In the fall of 1886 he was elected State Senator by the district composed of Adams, Jay and Blackford counties, Indiana. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hale are members of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



JOHN W. RAY, a pioneer of Adams County, Indiana, is a native of Cecil County, Maryland, born April 16, 1817, a son of Jonathan and Deborah Ray, also natives of Maryland. When he was six years of age his parents moved to Jefferson County, Ohio, and ten years later to Harrison County, the same State. He is the third of ten children, but two beside himself now living - Levi and Mary. He spent his youth and early manhood in Ohio, and in the fall of 1851 came to Adams County, Indiana, and settled on 160 acres of timber land in Monroe Township. He erected a log house, and began the work of clearing, and by hard work made of his land one of the finest farms in the township. He lived on his farm until 1884, when he moved to the village of Salem, where he now lives. Mr. Ray was married October 27, 1842, to Mercy Smith, a native of Jefferson County, Ohio, and to them were born nine children - Catherine, wife of Baldwin Clark; Mary, wife of Joshua Day; Levi W., deceased; James H., of Willshire, Ohio; David S., of Jay County, Indiana; Margaret, wife of Pinkney Gilpin, of Jay County; Martha, wife of David Tricker; Rosa, wife of David Hendricks, and Lemuel, of Monroe, Indiana. Mrs. Ray died January 19, 1880, and January 24, 1884, Mr. Ray married Rebecca Campbell, widow of George Campbell, and daughter of Elijah and Etha Gilpin, early settlers of Adams County. She had seven children by her first marriage - Atha A., wife of John Beatty; Sarah J., deceased; William, George, Elijah; Cynthia, wife of Freeman Miller, and Roxana, deceased. Mr. Ray is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church. In politics he is a Prohibitionist.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



JOSEPH CLEM, farmer, section 3, Union Township, was born in Monroe Township, Allen County, Indiana, January 29, 1853, where he was reared and educated in the common schools. His parents are Noah H. and Magdalene (Ridenour) Clem. He was married October 25, 1876, to Miss Mary A. Baker, who was born in Richland County, Ohio, May 29, 1855. When she was a year and a half old her parents removed to Paulding County, where she was reared and married. Her parents were Henry and Anna (Kurshner) Baker. The father was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, September 2, 1818, and when a boy removed to Richland County, Ohio, and lived there until after his marriage. He afterward removed to Paulding County, where he still resides. The mother was born in Schuylkill, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1822, and when thirteen years of age removed to Richland County. The parents have six living children and five deceased - Oswald W., Samuel L., Catherine M., Mary A., Eliza J. and Leonard J. The five deceased died very young, the oldest one being but two years old. Mr. and Mrs. Clem have had four children - Charles A., born August 18, 1877, died when two weeks old; Melvin A., born May 13, 1880; Harry, born November 22, 1882, and Clarence G., born November 16, 1885. Mrs. Clem's grandfather, Christian Baker, died in Richland County, Ohio. Her grandmother, Margaret (Kissell) Baker, died in Paulding County, same State, in 1881.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



HENRY MARTZ, one of the old and respected pioneers of Adams County, who is now deceased, was born in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1792, his parents being natives of Germany. On coming to America they settled in Pennsylvania, where they lived till their death. The father was killed while assisting to raise the framework of a mill. Henry Martz, our subject, was reared on the home farm in Pennsylvania. He was first married to Julia A. Timberly, who was born in Frost-town, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, and to this union were born seven children, three sons and four daughters. Mrs. Martz died in Pennsylvania in 1824. In 1828 Mr. Martz went with his children to Ohio, and after visiting different parts of the State, located in Knox County, where he was married to Catherine Lydick, a native of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, born November 10, 1807. Her parents were also natives of Pennsylvania, where they spent their lives, and her grandparents came from Germany. Six children were born to this union - Mrs. Lydia Wagoner, George H., Mrs. Catherine Whiteherst, Mrs. Ellen Swiger, James K. and Mrs. Frances Hartnett. After living in different parts of Ohio Mr. Martz, in 1839, came with his family to Adams County, Indiana and settled on section 11, Monroe Township. He first entered forty acres, and afterward purchased land until he had 140 acres. The surrounding country was then new and covered with timber. The family camped out three days and nights until Mr. Martz, assisted by his sons, erected their log cabin, in which they lived until their hewed-log house was erected, in 1852. Here the parents lived until their death, Mr. Martz dying May 20, 1870 and Mrs. Martz, February 3, 1884. Mr. Martz was a prominent man in his township, and took and active interest in all public affairs. In politics he was a Democrat, and voted at the first election held in Monroe Township, when he was elected justice of the peace. He held that office continuously for twenty-one years by election, and also filles other local offices, including trustee and clerk. He was a member of the Maryland militia during the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of Baltimore Heights. For his services in that war he received two land warrants for 160 acres, and after his death his wife received a pension.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



JOHN MEIBERS, proprietor of the Meibers Opera House, and general insurance agent at Decatur, where he is ranked among the leading citizens, is a native of Germany, born in the Kingdom of Hanover, January 6, 1822. In his seventeenth year he immigrated to America, landing at Philadelphia in July, 1839, and a few days later started over the Allegheny Mountains for Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained two weeks. He then went to Minister, Ohio, but not being able to find employment at that place, he went to St. Mary's, Ohio, where he was employed for one year on the reservoir then being constructed. In 1840 he went to Salina, Ohio, and found employment on the reservoir then being constructed at that place, remaining there until 1841. In the spring of the same year he came to Adams County, arriving at Decatur April 4, where he was principally engaged in farming until 1845. He then bought property in Decatur, and soon after purchased the mills, which became known as Meibers & Shearer Saw-Mills, which he operated until 1847. In that year he returned to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was employed as clerk in a wholesale grocery until June, 1849, when he returned to Decatur. In the meantime he had disposed of his interest in the mills, and on his return to Decatur engaged in contracting and building, which he followed until 1858, and during this time he had again invested in property in Decatur. In 1859 he engaged in the grocery and dry goods business, which he followed at Decatur until 1866, when he sold out his business and became associated with William G. Spencer in the hardware business, this partnership existing until 1868, when, being elected treasurer of Adams County, he sold his interest to attend to the duties of his office. In 1870 he was re-elected to the same office, and served as treasurer two terms of two years each, with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents. In 1871 he again engaged in the hardware business, forming a partnership with James H. Stone, with whom he was associated for three years under the firm name of Meibers & Stone. On retiring from the firm in 1874, he went to Geneva, Adams County, where he was engaged in general merchandising for two years, and from 1876 until 1877 he was associated with his son-in-law, Joseph H. Voglewede, in the boot and shoe business, when he engaged in farming. He now devotes his attention to his insurance business, and attending to his property. In 1883 he erected the Meibers Block and Opera House on Second street, of which he is still proprietor. In 1868 he purchased his present farm of eighty acres, adjoining Decatur, a part of which is Meibers' addition to Decatur. Mr. Meibers was married in February, 1843, in the Catholic church at Fort Wayne, by Rev. Father Rodulph, to Miss Catherine Hideman, who was formerly a resident of St. Mary's, Ohio. She died at Decatur in 1856, leaving four children - Elizabeth, now the wife of Benedict Uhl, of Toledo, Ohio; Christine, now the wife of George W. Archbold, of Pleasant Mills, Adams County; Mary, now the wife of Joseph H. Voglewede, of Decatur, and Henry G., now living in Michigan. Mr. Meibers was again married February 17, 1859, at St. Mary's Catholic Church at Decatur, by Rev. Father Meyers, to Miss Margaret Smith, a daughter of Ludwig and Catherine (Miller ) Smith, of Decatur. They have six children living - Ettie, wife of Joseph Tonellier, of Decatur; John W., of Chicago, and Anna, Charles, Rosa and Michael still at home. Mr. Meibers commenced life with a capital of $600 given him by his father, and fom this small beginning he has by his persevering industry and excellent business management accumulated a large and valuable property. He is one of the public-spirited men of Decatur, and gives liberally of his means toward any enterprise which he deems of benefit to his town or county, and by his fair and honorable dealings and genial and accommodating manners he has made many friends, and gained the confidence and respect of all who know him. In 1874 he became a stockholder in the Adams County Bank, and soon after was chosen one of its directors, a position he still holds. Both Mr. and Mrs. Meibers and their children are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church at Decatur.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



ABRAHAM MANGOLD, farmer, resides on section 24, Preble Township, where he owns 160 acres of land. He came to this county in 1863, with wife and seven children, settling upon his present farm, which was mostly improved. He was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, August 31, 1823, and was reared in his native county. He was also married there, August 13, 1844, to Mary C. Slabaugh, who was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, February 8, 1818. She remained at her birthplace until sixteen years of age, when the family removed to Fairfield County, Ohio. Her parents were Jacob and Elizabeth (Brussman) Slabaugh, both natives of Berks County, Pennsylvania. The father was born September 20, 1796, and died in Fairfield County, Ohio, March 15, 1877. The mother was born in 1797, and died in Licking County, Ohio, May 1, 1870; both are buried at St. Jacob's Church. Mr. Mangold's parents were Frederick and Anna (Gunzenhauser) Mangold, natives of Switzerland. They came to America, bringing one child, and settled in Fairfield County, Ohio, where the father died, aged forty-five years. The mother died in this county, in 1872, supposed to be eighty-eight years old. Mr. and Mrs. Mangold have had seven children, five of whom are living - Jacob, born March 17, 1845; Noah, born April 22, 1853; Sarah, born March 12, 1855; Mary M., born May 25, 1857; William Henry, born May 23, 1860; Elizabeth A., born in 1868, aged twenty years and two months; Abraham E., died May 5, 1879, aged twenty-eight years. Mr. Mangold was elected justice of the peace in the spring of 1864, and served three terms, and was elected the fourth, but resigned before the last term expired. He is a member of the Reformed church, and in politics is a Democrat.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



GEORGE F. COOK, engaged in general farming on section 13, Wabash Township, was born in Wabash Township, Adams County, Indiana, the date of his birth being June 30, 1842. He grew to manhood in his native township, receiving a fair common-school education. August 14, 1862, he enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, and was assigned to Company I, Eighty-ninth Indiana Infantry, his regiment forming a part of the Sixteenth Army Corps. He participated in the battles of Munfordville, Kentucky, Fort de Russy and Pleasant Hills, Louisiana, Tupelo, Mississippi, Nashville, Tennessee, Fort Blakely, beside other battles and skirmishes of minor importance. He served until July 19, 1865, when he was discharged at Mobile, Alabama, when he returned to his home in Wabash Township. He was married March 28, 1869, to Miss Sarah E. Rumple, a native of Butler County, Ohio, born January 18, 1842, a daughter of John Rumple, an early settler of Jefferson Township, Adams County. They are the parents of seven children - James S., Thomas J., Daniel, William, Stella, Bertha and George. Mr Cook bought his farm while in the army, which consisted of forty acres, thirty acres under cultivation. Mrs. Cook has about fifty-four acres located in Jefferson Township. John Cook, the father of our subject, who was one of the old and honored pioneers of Adams County, was born in Trumble County, Ohio, January 28, 1814, and was of Scotch origin. He grew to manhood in his native county, and in 1834 was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Baker, who was born in Pennsylvania June 7, 1811, of German ancestry, a daughter of George F. Baker, who was a soldier in the war of 1812. They reared a family of six children, three sons and three daughters. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. John Cook followed agricultural pursuits in Hancock County, Ohio. In 1842 they came to Adams County, Indiana, and settled on section 23, Wabash Township, remaining there until the fall of 1856. They then removed to Henderson County, Illinois, and two years later returned to Adams County and purchased a farm on section 13, Wabash Township, where they made their home till their death, the father dying January 2, 1877, and the mother February 2, following. Both were members of the Protestant Methodist church and respected members of society.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



SIMEON HAIN, farmer, Washington Township, was born in Bavaria, Germany, February 17, 1837, son of George and Mary Hain. He lived in his native country until seventeen years of age, when he immigrated to America, landing in New York City, and spent about six years in Saratoga County, New York. In the fall of 1860 he came to Adams County, and for fourteen months was employed by J. D. Nutman. Subsequently he was for some time engaged in the hack business. In April, 1862, he was married to Anna G. Muegenburg, who died July 18, 1881. Of their seven children six are living - Charles, Mary, Minnie, Lena, Simeon and Elizabeth. Mr. Hain was married the second time December 28, 1883, to Mrs. Louisa Smith, of Adams County, formerly of Ohio. They have one child, George. Mr. Hain settled upon his present farm in the spring of 1866. He commenced with forty acres in the woods and now owns eighty acres of excellent land, free from all incumbrance, worth $75 an acre. He is a Democrat in politics. He has served several terms as road supervisor.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



JAMES K. MARTZ, engaged in farming and stock-raising in Monroe Township, where he resides on section 15, is a son of Henry Martz, one of the early settlers of Adams County, Indiana. He was born on his father's homestead in Monroe Township, Adams County, the date of his birth being May 1, 1846. He grew to manhood in his native township, receiving the benefits of a common-school education. He helped his father on the farm until 1866, when he went to Ohio, and for two years was engaged in the lumber business, and also spent two years in the pineries of Michigan. Mr. Martz was united in marriage, November 17, 1872, to Rachel A. Hahn, who was born August 22, 1852, a daughter of G. W. Hahn , who settled in Monroe Township, Adams County, in an early day. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Martz - Ida V., born May 22, 1874; Lillie F., born August 23, 1876; Mary J., born May 23, 1879; Daisy D., born December 4, 1881, and Webster C., born December 10, 1884. Immediately after his marriage Mr. Martz on his farm on section 15, Monroe Township, where he has since resided, his farm containing 160 acres of land under good cultivation. In politics he is a Democrat. He was elected by his pary a member of the central committee in 1876, serving for six years in that capacity.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



HENRY HOMER HART, miller at the City Flouring Mills, Decatur, Indiana, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, December 25, 1846, a son of Jacob S. and Elisabeth (Krick) Hart. When he was six months old his parents moved to Decatur, Indiana, where he was reared and educated. In 1862, when but fifteen years of age, although he was often taken for eighteen, he enlisted in the defense of his country and was assigned as musician to Company I, Eighty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was promoted to Drum-Major of his regiment. He was discharged at Mobile, Alabama, July 19, 1865. He participated in the engagements at Munfordville, Fort De Russy, Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, Marskville Prairie, Tupelo, Nashville, Mobile and numerous skirmishes. At the battle of Munfordville he was taken prisoner and was in the Confederate's hands two days, when he was paroled, and was exchanged the following December. During the spring of 1863 his regiment was stationed at Fort Pickering, Tennessee, and while there he was taken sick and off duty about ten weeks. After his discharge he returned to Decatur and worked in his father's flour-mill until 1874, when he left the mill for a year and engaged in the lumber business. From 1875 till 1883 he was employed in the mill, and then for two years engaged in the restaurant business at Columbus, Indiana. In 1885 he returned to Decatur and since then has been at work in his father's mill. December 14, 1871, he was married at Kendallville, Indiana, to Frankie Burt. They have two children - Nellie and Jessie. Mr. Hart is a comrade of Sam Henry Post, No. 63, G. A. R., of which he is the present commander.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



JACOB COOK, general farmer, section 13, Wabash Township, is a native of Ohio, born in Wayne County, May 10, 1840, a son of John Cook. He was brought by his parents to Adams County, Indiana, where he was reared to manhood on the homestead farm in Wabash Township, where he now lives. He was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting August 14, 1862, in Company I, Eighty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was discharged at Mobile, Alabama, July 19, 1865. He was in active service with his regiment except while in the hospital at Memphis, Tennessee. He was wounded while in the service, and was in hospital about six months, when he returned to his regiment, remaining with it until receiving his final discharge at the close of the war. He now draws a pension from the effects of his wounds. After the war he returned to his home in Wabash Township, and December 8, 1867, he as married to Miss Frances Abnet, a native of Pickaway County, Ohio, born November 8, 1843, a daughter of William and Maria (Miller) Abnet. Her father was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, February 12 1808, and her mother was a native of Maryland, born March 21, 1817. They were married in Franklin County, Ohio, March 5, 1840, and in 1845 came to Adams County, Indiana, settling in Jefferson Township. They afterward removed to section 1, Wabash Township, where they lived till their death, the father dying in 1853, and the mother in 1855. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They had a family of six children, two sons and four daughters. To Mr. and Mrs. Cook have been born seven children, whose names are as follows - Carrie M., John W., Rosa E., Mary E., Jesse L., Joseph M. and Jacob A. Mr. and Mrs. Cook are members of the Christian church. Mr. Cook has eighty aces of valuable land where he resides, which he has brought under a high state of cultivation, and is classed among the respected men of his township.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



LEVI BARKLEY, of the firm of Barkley & Steele, Decatur, Indiana, wa born in Wayne County, Ohio, August 19, 1838. When he was eleven years of age his parents moved to Adams County, Indiana, and in this county he was reared. When he was eighteen years old his father died, and he remained on the farm assisting his mother until of age. In 1859 he became associated with John H. Bender, and with his carried on a tannery in Union Township several years, when they moved to Monroeville, Allen County. In 1871 he withdrew from the firm and returned to Adams County, and with J. H. Steele formed the present firm of Barkley & Steele, dealers in all kinds of fresh and salt meats. They have a good trade, having one of the best markets in the city. Mr. Barkley was married November 6, 1865, to Margaret Jane Phipps. They have seven children - Lulu, Minnie, Nellie, Tessa, Brenton, Willie and Franklin. Mr. Barkley is a member of the Decatur Lodge, No. 571, A. F. & A. M. Mrs. Barkley is a member of the United Brethern church. Mr. Barkley's parents, Jacob and Harriet (Dougherty) Barkley, were natives of Pennsylvania, of German and Irish descent. In an early day they moved to Wayne County, Ohio, and thence in 1849 to Adams County, Indiana, locating on a farm in Union Township, where the former died in 1856. He was a Whig in politics, and served several years as justice of the peace. The mother died in 1876. They had a family of eight children.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



LEWIS ANDREWS, one of the oldest settlers of Washington Township, was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, March 1, 1829, son of Hazel and Martha Andrews, also natives of Ohio. About 1837 his parents removed to this county and settled in Washington Township, on section 29. The land was then in its original state. He first built his log cabin, then commenced to clear his farm, having entered eighty acres, and remained there until his decease. He was the father of ten children, six of whom are living - Mary, Thomas, Perry, Louis, Louisa and Lovina. He was universally respected, and in his demise Adams County lost one of her best citizens. Lewis Andrews was reared in Adams County, receiving a very limited education, as the school advantages of those days were very meager. He has experienced all phases of pioneer life. He used to pound corn to make bread, the nearest mill being at Fort Wayne. He was married April 13, 1856, to Miss Jane Quinn, born May 30, 1832, in Harrison County, Ohio, and daughter of James and Rachel Quinn, natives of Ohio, who came to Adams County in 1853, settling in Washington Township, where they remained until their decease. Mr. and Mrs. Andrews have had ten children, nine of whom are living - Jose, Martha, Rachel, Hazel J., Inez, Hattie, James W., Addie and Osman P. Mrs. Andrews' parents had ten children, six of whom are living - Thomas, David, Jane, Mary, James and Barton W. Mr. Andrews owns a good farm of eighty acres, and resides on section 28. Politically he is a Republican.

Biographical and Historical Record - Adams and Wells Co. Indiana Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago, IL 1887



Deb Murray