HIRAM M. LUCAS. The life record of Hiram M. Lucas of Licking township, is an exemplification of well directed and intelligent industry, of devotion to the best interests of the community, and of promotion of the best tenets of agriculture. Born in this township, he has passed his entire career within its borders, practically all of his life being spent on the farm on which he now resides, and his long term of industrious and well-directed labor has been rewarded by the accumulation of a handsome property of 160 acres and the attainment of the esteem and regard of those with whom he has been brought into contact. Mr. Lucas was born on a farm in Licking township, Blackford county, Indiana, December 6, 1869, and is a son of Noah and Elizabeth (McCausland) Lucas.

Adam Lucas was born in German, about 1770, and was brought to the United States about the time of the Revolutionary War, the family settling in York county, Pennsylvania, where he spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. He and his wife lived to advanced ages and became the parents of a large family of children. Jacob Lucas, son of Adam, and grandfather of Hiram M. Lucas, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, and in his youth adopted the vocation of his father, thoroughly training himself as an agriculturist. He was married in York county to Miss Elizabeth Emig, who was born in that county in 1804 of German parentage and had there been reared and educated in the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas were married in 1823, and immediately after their union started on a trip overland in teams to what was then Richland (now Morrow) county, Ohio, where Mr. Lucas entered land. At first they were compelled to live in their wagon for want of better shelter, but Mr. Lucas soon erected a log cabin, and into this the young couple moved their modest household effects. Settling down to agricultural operations, they continued to be so engaged during the remainder of their lives, becoming substantial and highly respected people of the community. Both attained advanced years, Mrs. Lucas passing away May 27, 1885, when in her eighty-first year, while Mr. Lucas died January 16, 1880, when seventy-nine years of age. Jacob and Elizabeth (Emig) Lucas were the parents of seven children, as follows: Noah; Eli, who is residing in Nebraska; Epsiba, Catherine, Sarah and Julia, who all grew up, were married, had children, and are now deceased; and one daughter who died single in infancy.

Noah Lucas, father of Hiram M., was born in the little log cabin home in Morrow county, Ohio, February 29, 1824, and grew up on the old home place, his education being secured in the public schools. Mr. Lucas continued to reside on the old farm as a bachelor until January 19, 1869, when he was married to Miss Elizabeth McCausland, who was born April 12, 1846, and died April 19, 1884, at the home in Licking township. She was a woman of many estimable qualities and was much interested in church and Sunday school work, rearing her children to lives of industry. Noah Lucas is still living, and although more than ninety years of age retains his faculties in a remarkable degree and still takes a keen interest in all activities that go on about him. He was for years democrat, but recently has become a supporter of progressive principles. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Lucas, namely: Hiram M., of this review; Ada, born November 11, 1871, educated in the public schools, married Harry Vanderbur, and had two children, - Ethel and Herbert, the former married and the mother of one child; and for her second husband Ada married Lewis Eberling, of Dunkirk, Indiana; and Harrison N., born February 16, 1873, engaged in farming in Licking township, married Eva Cook, and has three children, - Clifford, Esther and Lester.

Hiram M. Lucas was only four months of age when his parents came to section 21, Licking township, and settled on a part of his present farm, they becoming the owners of eighty acres of land. On this farm he grew to manhood, in the meanwhile securing his education in the district schools, and when his father was ready to retire from active life he assumed the management of the homestead, to which he has since added an additional eighty acres. He has the entire property under a good state of cultivation, and raises oats, wheat and rye, with fine clover and grass land for the feeding of all kinds of stock. The land is well drained, and boasts of the latest improvements, including two sets of substantial buildings. A man of scrupulous honor, during his entire life he has observed fairness and consideration toward his fellow men, and his standing in his community is that of a well balanced, progressive and energetic citizen, intensely interested in all that pertains to the general welfare.

On April 28, 1900, Mr. Lucas was married to Miss Nellie Wagner, who was born in Union county, Indiana, January 11, 1871, and educated there until she was sixteen years of age, at which time she came to Blackford county with her parents, George W. and Mary J. (Leonard) Wagner, natives of Union county. Mr. Wagner was born January 29, 1845, a son of George C. and Elizabeth (McAfee) Wagner, the former born in Maryland, June 4, 1798, and died in Union county, Indiana, January 28, 1878, and the latter born in Ohio in 1803, died June 10, 1849. Mrs. Mary J. (Leonard) Wagner died October 4, 1910, having been the mother of eight children: Mrs. Lucas; Mattie, born October 2, 1872, now the wife of Mason Weaver, of Dunkirk, Indiana; Daniel, a farmer of Adams county, Indiana, married Minnie Burns, and has one son, - Virgil; Lissie, the wife of Carey Reynolds, living on a farm in Blackford county, has one daughter Helen; Orval, a farmer of Jay county, Indiana, married Nellie Barnes, and has two children, - Maybelle and Don; Arlie, a farmer of Licking township, Blackford county, operating eighty acres of Mr. Lucas' farm, married Ethel Wingate of Delaware county, and has three children, - Cleo, Gail and Ruth Ileen; Myrtle, the wife of Jesse Stoker, of Dunkirk, has one child, - Mildred; and Herbert, single, who is engaged in railroad work. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas have one child, - Audrey, born August 17, 1907, who is attending the graded schools. They are connected religiously with the United Brethren church. In political matters Mr. Lucas is a progressive.

Blackford and Grant Counties, Indiana A Chronicle of their People Past and Present with Family Lineage and Personal Memoirs Compiled Under the Editorial Supervision of Benjamin G. Shinn
Volume I Illustrated
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York 1914
Submitted by Peggy Karol


RENNER STOCK FARM. One of the finest properties in Blackford county, Indiana, is a tract of 530 acres lying in section 6, and known as the Renner Stock Farm, which has a state-wide reputation for breeding fine cattle, hogs and horses. Much of the success of this enterprise is due to the excellent management and ability of it superintendent, Adam C. Clippinger, who during the seven years that he has been in charge has so capably handled its affairs as to win a place for himself among the men whose activities have made this one of the leading agricultural sections of the state. Mr. Clippinger was born near Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio, September 20, 1860, and is a son of Adam and Sarah (Everson) Clippinger.

Adam Clippinger, the grandfather of Adam of this review , was the founder of the family in Ohio, going thence from his home in Greencastle, Pennsylvania, in 1832. He was a farmer by vocation and for many years carried on successful operations in Butler county, where he died when about sixty years of age. His widow survived him for a long period and was past ninety years of age at the time of her death. Adam Clippinger, their son and the father of Adam of this review, was born at Greencastle, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1824, and was eight years of age when he accompanied his parents to Butler county, Ohio. He grew up amid rural surroundings and was given ordinary educational advantages in the district schools of his day and community, and when he embarked upon his own career adopted agricultural pursuits for his field of endeavor. Through a life of industry and earnest effort he accumulated a good property, and died one of the substantial men of his community, in March, 1903, being within a few days of eighty years of age. He was married in 1843 to Miss Elizabeth White, who died in middle life, July 19, 1857, leaving seven children, all of whom were married and had children and five of whom are still living. On January 29, 1858, Mr. Clippinger married Sarah Everson, who died in January, 1904, in the faith of the United Brethren church. Mr. Clippinger was a whig at first and later a republican, and his religious affiliation was with the Lutheran church. Four children were born to Adam and Sarah J. Clippinger; Jennie, who married (for her second husband) Joseph Hughes and lives at Van Wert, Ohio, the mother of two daughters; Adam C., of this review; Emma, a widow living in California and the mother of two sons; and Jacob, living on a farm at Middletown, Ohio, is married, but has no children.

Adam Clippinger was given good educational advantages in Butler county, Ohio, while being reared to manhood on his father's farm, and for twenty years was engaged in carrying on farming on his own account. In 1907, however, he accepted the superintendency of the Renner Stock Farm, in section 6, Licking township, Blackford county, Indiana, although he is still the owner of an eighty-acre property on Dry Fox Creek, Hamilton county, Ohio.

The Renner Stock Farm, as before stated, is a tract of 530 acres, the greater part being under a high state of cultivation. Here are grown all the cereals under the most approved modern methods, and about half the land is reserved for pasture for the famous stock which comes from this property. The land has four barns, two being particularly commodious, one 80 x 100 feet and the other 60 x 80 feet, and five homes are also here, in which live the employees, from four to six in number, in addition to the superintendent. The farm supports 100 head of the finest cattle, large droves of Hampshire hogs and many fine saddle horses. These latter are now known as among the finest in the country, including the great grand champion, "Poetry of Motion," the undefeated show horse for several years, which was born and bred on this farm. Other prize-winning road and saddle horses have been bred on Renner. The individual at the head of the fine herd of cattle is "Bullion IV," a double standard Poland-Hereford bull, that was bred, and made an unparalleled record in Canada, a famous champion weighing over 1700 pounds and as a two-year old valued at more than $2,000. Another bull, "Dominion," which weighed over 2200 pounds when three years old, was bred on this farm. Every animal on this property is registered and high bred, the herd comparing with the finest in the United States, while the demand for this farm's stock is usually far in advance of the supply, orders frequently coming from outside countries. A Pennsylvania railroad station, known as Renner, is maintained here, four trains arrive and leave daily, and all the stock is shipped over this line. The property is now owned by B. Johnson, of Richmond, Indiana, and has been known as the Renner Stock Farm for twenty-two years. During the past several years Mr. Clippinger has been in complete control of the operations on this land, handling it as though it were his own and being given full authority to use his own judgment in hiring its employees, in buying and selling its stock and in planning and erecting its buildings. He has shown himself a thorough and competent business man, with excellent executive ability and a masterful knowledge of farming and stock raising conditions and methods.

Mr. Clippinger was married to Miss Rebecca Wear, of Butler county, Ohio, who died there in 1886, at the age of twenty-four years, leaving two children: Earl, a railroad engineer, who is single and past twenty-five years of age; and Wilbur, who lives on his father's farm in Ohio, married Elsie Taylor, and has a son, Marion, born February 29, 1912. Mr. Clippinger was married at Harrison, Ohio, February 24, 1890, to Miss Josephine Yeager, who was born at Harrison, Hamilton county, Ohio, December 10, 1859, and educated in the graded and high schools, daughter of Joseph and Jane (Brown) Yeager. Mr. Yeager was born in 1810, in Pennsylvania, moved to Ohio in young manhood and was there engaged in farming throughout his life, dying in 1882. Mrs. Yeager was born in 1814, in Hamilton county, Ohio, of Welsh ancestry, and died in 1875, at Harrison.

Mr. and Mrs. Clippinger are the parents of two children: Rose, aged twenty-two years, graduated from the Hartford City High school and the normal department of Miami University, and is now a teacher in the schools of Troy, Ohio, where she is popular with those who know her; and Harry, born November 2, 1896, a sophomore in the Hartford City High school. Mr. and Mrs. Clippinger are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics he is a republican, but has not taken an active part in political affairs, although the welfare of his community has ever held his interest. His career has been one of activity and usefulness and has been crowned with well-merited success and the esteem of those who have met him in either a business or social way.

Blackford and Grant Counties, Indiana A Chronicle of their People Past and Present with Family Lineage and Personal Memoirs Compiled Under the Editorial Supervision of Benjamin G. Shinn
Volume I Illustrated
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York 1914
Submitted by Peggy Karol


WILLIAM Y. WILLIAMS. The most gratifying compensations of agricultural experience have rewarded the good judgment and untiring industry of William Y. Williams, the owner of a finely cultivated farm of eighty acres, located in Licking township and a man whose progress and enterprise have been demonstrated in numerous ways. Like a number of the successful men of Blackford county, he has spent his entire life on the farm which he now owns, and although still a young man has had broad experience which enables him to accomplish the best results from his operations.

Mr. Williams was born on his present farm, in section 20, Licking township, Blackford county, Indiana, January 8, 1885, and is a son of Alonzo and Emma (Gettys) Williams, natives of Blackford county, where the former was born in 1864 and the latter in 1866. Both parents were reared and educated in this county and after their marriage settled on a small farm, to which they added as the years passed until they finally possessed 300 acres. Industrious and thrifty, hard-working and persevering, they accumulated a handsome competence, so that in November, 1913, they were able to retire to Hartford City, dividing their property up amongst their married sons. They now have a comfortable residence. Located on a large lot on South Jefferson street, and are known as among the most substantial people of the city. Politically Mr. Williams is a republican, but he has not cared for public life. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, namely: John, born in 1888, reared and educated in Licking township, where he resides on his father's farm, married Nellie Armitage, daughter of Liberty T. Armitage, a sketch of whose career appears elsewhere in this volume, and has three children: William Y.; Charles E., aged twenty-eight years, residing on a farm in Licking township, married Terpola Townsend and has one daughter, - Ruth H., Lydia, who is the wife of Ira Gross, a farmer of Licking township, and has no children; Deborah, residing at home, a high school student of the class of 1915; and Helen J., who is a student in the graded schools.

William Y. Williams received good educational advantages in his youth, and for a few years was engaged in teaching, but eventually turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in which he has continued to be engaged to the present time. Mr. Williams is now the owner of one of the good farms of the township, with eighty acres under a high state of cultivation, the land fitted with the most modern improvements, and a fine set of buildings, including a large five-room white house and a commodious and substantial barn. He has devoted the greater part of his attention to raising grain and hay, in which he has met with success because of intelligent methods and good management, and has also been an extensive stock raiser, having good cattle, horses and hogs, which find a ready market and command top-notch prices. Like his father, Mr. Williams has not cared for public life, although a stanch supporter of all good movements in his community. His political adherence is given to the republican party.

Mr. Williams was married March 4, 1908, to Miss Florence E. Stover, and they have two children: Samuel M., born April 15, 1909; and Robert P., born April 11, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Williams attend the Methodist church in the work of which she has been particularly active. Both are popular among a wide circle of acquaintances, than whom their friends are no less.

Blackford and Grant Counties, Indiana A Chronicle of their People Past and Present with Family Lineage and Personal Memoirs Compiled Under the Editorial Supervision of Benjamin G. Shinn
Volume I Illustrated
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York 1914
Submitted by Peggy Karol


JOHN A. NEWBAUER. The combination of talents that makes for success in several lines of human endeavor I not a common one, for in these days of keen competition to successfully pursue even one given vocation calls for abilities of more than an ordinary character. It is not often that the professional man becomes a successful financier; the mechanic seldom gains a full measure of prosperity in agricultural pursuits; nor do those versed in the higher arts and sciences always succeed in the marts of trade and commerce. In the career of John A. Newbauer, however, there is to be found and illustration of the possession of versatile talents, combining to make him at once a successful farmer, merchant and financier, with a keen and analytical mind, a taste for literature and a nature that makes him a welcome addition to any social circle. Although now living somewhat retired from active business life, Mr. Newbauer still takes a keen and active interest in affairs of his community, and is known as one of Hartford City's most representative men.

The grandparents of Mr. Newbauer were natives of Alsace-Lorraine, and were married in the state of Alsace, when it was under French control, continuing to reside there during their lives and become well-to-do and respected people. They were the parents of several sons, including Jacob Newbauer, the father of John A. He was born in Alsace in 1824 and grew up there, being married to Elizabeth Lorenz, who was born there about 1826, and, like her husband, was of French-German parentage. Owing to lack of harmony in the home, Jacob Newbauer decided to leave and seek a new country in which to live. He had heard wonderful tales of the opportunities awaiting the ambitious and determined in the land across the ocean, and accordingly took passage on a vessel bound for America. A journey of forty days and forty nights followed, in which the emigrants suffered many hardships, but eventually they landed at New York City, from whence they made their way to Pennsylvania, where their first child was born. Later they went to Cleveland, Ohio, and later, about 1846 moved to Darke county, Ohio, where they improved a farm near Greenville, there in the woods clearing a farm and building a log cabin, and, in time, becoming successful people. At this time the country in Darke county was practically in its primitive state. Wild turkeys were to be found in abundance, small game was plentiful in the dense timber, squirrels and wild hogs still destroyed crops continually unless carefully watched. Neighbors were few and far between, and educational advantages were to be obtained only during several months of each winter, and then usually only after a long and difficult tramp to the primitive little log cabin that served as the schoolroom. Amid these surroundings John A. Newbauer was born October 17, 1847. He grew up on his father's farm, which he helped to cultivate, and in spite of his lack of opportunities secured an excellent education, being always at the head of his class. On one occasion, when a mere lad, he "spelled down" all the spellers of Union City and won as a prize a fifteen-dollar Webster's dictionary. Always ambitious and aspiring, a great reader and student, he became well informed on many subjects of importance, and is today one of the best educated men in his community. He gave the same assiduous attention to learning every detail of farm work, and thus was able to take his place among the agriculturists of his section, and to win success in his competition with them. In 1873 he first came to Hartford City, and here purchased a half interest in a meat market. It was at that time that the great financial panic came on, business was at a standstill, it was impossible to collect money, and firm after firm and business man after business man went down to ruin. Although he was still a young man, with but little experience in business, Mr. Newbauer was able to weather this financial storm, and came out with colors flying, where many older men had been compelled to acknowledge defeat. For fifteen years he continued to successfully conduct this venture, and he then again turned his attention to pursuits of an agricultural nature. He still owns 110 acres of fine farming land adjoining Hartford City, and continues to give it the benefit of his able management and supervision. In addition he has forty-seven and one-half acres located in Darke county, Ohio, and this land, like the other, is under a high state of cultivation. He has a valuable gravel pit on his farm in the vicinity of Hartford City, and various other interests have attracted his attention and enlisted his abilities at different times. For twenty-two years he was engaged in dealing in farming implements, building supplies, etc., but this is being conducted at this time by his sons, while he gives his attention to the management of his farm. For five years he was cashier of the Blackford County Bank, of which he was the organizer in 1892, and continues to be vice-president and a member of the board of directors thereof. In financial matters, as in business, he has ever held the full confidence of his associates, not alone in a business way, but because of his well-known integrity and straightforward dealing. His beautiful home is located at No. 220 South High street, and is furnished with every modern comfort and convenience. Mr. Newbauer is enjoying life in a manner befitting one who has labored long and faithfully and who has won the right of rest from his strenuous toil of former years. In his political views a democrat, he has served as township trustee for more than seven years, served as a member of the city council for several terms, and was recently elected a county council but declined to serve. In his official capacities, he endeavored to aid his community in every way, thus proving himself a helpful and public-spirited citizen.

Mr. Newbauer was married in Hartford City, to Miss Elizabeth Bolner, who was born in the vicinity of Hartford City, and lived with her brother during her earlier years, having lost her parents when still a child. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Newbauer: Hazel, who died at the age of nine years; George H., a sketch of whose career appears on another page of this work; Altha, the wife of George Harvey, engaged in draying in Hartford City; Robert L., single, who is manager of his father's farming implement business; Eva V., deputy in the county treasurer's office under her brother, George H., and one child who died in infancy. The children have been given good educational advantages, passing through the public and high schools of Hartford City, and have been well fitted for the honorable positions they are now filling in life. All have proved a credit to their community and to their training. Mr. Newbauer has been much interested in work of a fraternal nature, and has been connected with the various orders of Odd-fellowship for over forty years. He has been district deputy grand master for a period of fifteen years, financial secretary for sixteen years, and was the organizer of the lodge and encampment, as well as the canton, of the order at Hartford City. He has also been a member of the Red Men for twenty-five years and was recently elected a representative to the great council of Indiana.

Blackford and Grant Counties, Indiana A Chronicle of their People Past and Present with Family Lineage and Personal Memoirs Compiled Under the Editorial Supervision of Benjamin G. Shinn
Volume I Illustrated
The Lewis Publishing Company Chicago and New York 1914
Submitted by Peggy Karol


Deb Murray