E. R. ESKRIDGE, harness and saddle-maker of Washington ‹•edianapolis, and during the four subsequent years practiced his profession in Greene County. He attended Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating thence in 1875, and then came to Daviess County and practiced at Odon until 1883, when he removed to Washington, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of his profession and meeting with very flattering success. In 1863 he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Seventeenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving as a private during his term of enlistment--six months. In politics he is a Republican, and is an Odd Fellow. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while Mrs. Dagley is a Baptist. Mr. and Mrs. Dagley have had five children, four of whom are living: Martha C., Susan E., Ella May and Craggy.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 762


JEREMIAH EGAN. The Egan family are the descendants of Irish ancestors, and the older ones of the family now living were natives of Ireland. In the fall of 1837 Patrick Egan and his family came to the United States. They landed in New Orleans, but came on to Indiana and settled in Daviess County. The entire family did not come at first, but after selecting a location they sent back for the rest of the family, who came in 1838. Patrick was born in 1792. In Ireland he was a merchant, but after coming to America he became a tiller of the soil.

The mother's Bridget (LOUREGAN) Egan, death occurred in February, 1873. They were the parents of twelve children, three of whom are now living: Catherine, Martin and Jeremiah. Martin was born probably in 1820, although no record of his birth has been preserved. He was about eighteen when he came to the United States, and was reared on a farm, securing a limited education. He has been afflicted ever since a small boy with "white swelling." He has never married, but makes his home with his brother, Jeremiah, who was born in the "Emerald Isle" June 5, 1827, being the seventh of the family. Like his brother he secured a limited education, and his father died when he was young. He remained with his mother until his marriage, when she made her home principally with him, and died at his residence.

At the age of thirty-one he married and settled where he now lives. He has developed his farm of 280 acres from a wilderness to one of the best farms in the county. September 13, 1858, he married Jane E. JUIGLEY, a native of the county, born February 21, 1838. They became the parents of nine children, six now living: Bridget, Patrick, Joseph, Martin, Catherine and Anna. The family are Catholics, and our subject has always been a Democrat politically, and is one of the prosperous farmers of the county.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 761


JOHN W. DOYLE, reverend father of St. Simon's Church, Washington, Ind., was born in Madison, Ind., August 1, 1851, and is a son of John and Ellen Doyle, both natives of Ireland. Father Doyle was raised with his parents in his native place, and obtained a fair education at the local parish school. At the age of sixteen he entered St. Meinrad's College, in Spencer County, Ind., where he began his studies for the priesthood. Two years later he attended St. Thomas' and St. Joseph's Colleges, at Bardstown, Ky.

He began his theological studies at the Grand Seminary of Montreal, Canada, and completed them at Indianapolis, Ind., where he was ordained priest by Bishop St. Palais, May 25, 1875. He then took charge of St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, near Vincennes, Ind., remaining there, however, only a short time, when he took charge of St. Mary's Church, in Barr Township, Daviess County. In 1879 he was transferred to Washington as priest in charge of St. Simon's Church of that city, where he still remains the efficient and popular priest.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 762


NELSON CUNNINGHAM, dec'd, was a native of Clark County, where he was born June 17, 1821. His parents, Thomas and Martha (MATHEWS) Cunningham, were natives of Virginia and South Carolina, respectively.

Our subject attended the common schools, and remained with his parents until twenty-one years old. In 1844 he was married to Mary M. LITTLE, to whom were born three children: Sarah A., Nancy I. and Martha E., all now deceased. His wife died in 1851, and he was married to Elizabeth JOHNSON, January 18, 1854. She is a daughter of James and Mary (MILLER) Johnson, and was born in Pennsylvania and reared in Kentucky. Mr. Cunningham settled near Odon, Daviess County, soon after marriage, where he remained nine years, and then removed to the place where Mrs. Cunningham now lives. These five children were born to them: James, Mary E., Charles A., Maggie A. and Bluford (deceased). After settling in this county they engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Cunningham died May 26, 1870, of pneumonia. He was not a member of any secret society, but was a member of the Christian Church a number of years. He owned 140 acres of land. The wife was also a member of the Christian Church.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 758


PHILLIP CRUSE, dec'd, was born Aug. 4, 1795, in North Carolina. His parents, Henry C. and Susan Cruse, were native Germans. They moved to Hamilton, Ohio, at an early period, where the father followed farming. Phillip assisted his father for eight years and then was apprenticed to a man in Cincinnati to learn the tailor's trade. After mastering his trade he tramped to Lexington, Ky., with only one half dollar in his pocket. He soon saved $100, and then walked to Louisville, Ky., where he worked at his trade.

He and a friend then went to New Orleans on flat-boats. Our subject worked there four months and then returned to Ohio via boat to Philadelphia; thence to Baltimore, Washington, D. C., Alexandria and Uniontown, Va.; thence by boat to Pittsburgh; thence to Portsmouth, Ohio, and finally reached Maysville, Ky., where he remained one month and then went to Terre Haute, Ind., and in the spring went to Vincennes.

Later he came to Washington, Daviess County, where he worked at his trade for several years, and then kept a general merchandise store about the same length of time. He then began keeping hotel where the present Presbyterian Church stands, and after working at that for several years engaged in the hardware business on a small scale, and soon had an extensive trade. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics was a Federalist, Whig, Abolitionist and Republican.

He was married three times; the first time to Sarah RODICK, who bore him these children: Seth H., Minerva, John R., Joseph W. and Elizabeth. Only John is now living. His second wife was Elizabeth BRUCE, who became the mother of one child, Martha (deceased). His third marriage was to Sarah CARNAHAN, born May 21, 1813, in Kentucky, daughter of Jane and Elizabeth (AIKMAN) Carnahan, born in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Cruse were married March 5, 1837, and became the parents of these children: James P., who was a soldier in the war and died at Washington of typhoid fever, and Charles F. who died in infancy.

The sons were all Masons. Mr. Cruse died June 16, 1885, in the ninetieth year of his age. He was respected by all and was a thoroughly self-made man. He owned eighty acres of land, and property to the amount of $6,500. He was a valuable citizen and was noted for his kindness and charity to the poor. Mrs. Cruse is an active and intellectual old lady of seventy years. She presented a flag to the first company of Daviess Couty soldiers that left for the war, and delivered the memorial oration, which was noted for its eloquence.

NOTE: The father of Sarah Carnahan is listed as Jane in the biography. dsf

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 757


A. D. COLBERT was born in Daviess County, Ind., in March, 1837. He is a son of L. D. and Jane (BIRCH) Colbert, who were born in 1818 and 1819, respectively. The mother died when our subject was quite young, and he made his home with his father until twenty-one years of age, when he was married to Sarah WALKER, daughter of Solomon and Martha Jane Walker, natives of East Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Colbert are the parents of the following children: George, Emma, Minnie (deceased), Herbert, Edgar, Benjamin, Mildred, Maggie, John, Seth, Charles and William. After his marriage he lived two years in Veal Township, and August 1, 1863 enlisted in Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteers and served two years, when he was transferred to the One Hundred and Twentieth Indiana Regiment. He was in the East Tennessee campaign and in several engagements, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea. He was with Thomas at Nashville and Schofield at Franklin. He was at the capture of Wilmington. On the 19th of Janaury, 1866, he was mustered out at Raleigh, N. C. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Lincoln. He has been a member of the Christian Church thirty years and his wife of the same for forty years.

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"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 756


Martin Cahill, a well known business man of Cannelburg, Daviess county, Ind., is a native of County Galway, Ireland, was born October 8, 1849, is the youngest of the six children of Patrick and Julia (Gillane) Cahill (four of whom still survive) and was confirmed, at the age of thirteen years, by the Bishop of Kilmacduagh.

Mr. Cahill received an excellent education in the national schools of his native land, as it was in contemplation to fit him for a position in the post office, but the untimely death of his father changed the course of his life. The sad event led to the coming of the mother and her children to America, and on June 27, 1867, they landed at Castle Garden, New York City, whence they came directly to Daviess County, Ind., and located at Washington. For a time young Martin attended school in Olney, Richland County, Ill., but in 1868 removed to Benton County, Ind., and for two years was there engaged in farming. In 1870 he became a miner, and for twelve years continued in this vocation. He next was employed in railroading for eighteen months, and in 1879 was appointed clerk of the Mutual Mining Company at Cannelburg, Ind., and shortly afterward was appointed manager of the same company, and next, through the state geologist, was appointed assistant mine inspector. He performed the functions of this office to the entire satisfaction of all concerned, and was then placed in full charge of the Mutual Mining Company as manager, and this position he still holds, being assisted by his son, Lawrence P. , and by Joseph A. Harris. Beside its coal operations, the company conducts a store and carries a large stock of general merchandise, and in the latter department does a business amounting to about $30,000.00 per annum. The marriage of Mr. Cahill took place in November of 1875, to Miss Ellen Grimes, a native of Providence, R. I., the ceremony being performed in Washington, Daviess County, Ind., by Rev. Father Peythieu. This union has been blessed with two sons and five daughters, of whom the following five still survive: Lawrence P., who was confirmed at the age of fifteen years by Bishop Chatard, was educated under the Sisters of Providence at Loogootee, and at Washington, and is now an assistant to his father; Annie who received a parochial school education and was confirmed at the same time as her brother, Lawrence; Julia A., also confirmed by Bishop Chatard, and Ellen and Margaret. Mrs. Cahill was confirmed at Cannelton, Perry County, Ind., at the age of ten years. In politics Mr. Cahill is a staunch democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Samuel J. Tilden, but has never himself sought public office, his business affairs being too absorbing to permit him to trifle his time away in office seeking. In religion he and family are devout Catholics and do all in their power to advance the interests of St. Peter's Church, at Montgomery, are attendants at the Mission of Ease at Cannelburg, and socially they stand with the best families of the township and county.

Submitted by: John D. McMullen
History of the Catholic Church in Indiana. (Logansport, Ind.: A.W. Bowen, 1898) Vol. 2, pp 213-214


ALEXANDER CHOMEL, editor of the Washington Advertiser, was born in France in 1826, and is a son of Dennis and Lucy (COLLASON) Chomel. He was reared in a city and had good educational advantages. At the age of twenty-three he came to America and located in New Albany, Ind., where he followed merchandising three years. He went to Loogootee, Ind., in 1860, and engaged in the same business. He edited the Loogootee Times for some time and then moved to Shoals and edited the Martin County Herald. In September, 1884, he came to Washington and has since edited the Advertiser and Enterprise. In December, 1850, he took for his companion through life Sabina CARRICO, a native of Kentucky, to whom were born nine children, eight now living: Lucy, Thomas, Catharine, Julius, Alexander, William, Mary and Anselm.

As an editor he wields much influence in the political affairs of the county, and with all the zeal and energy of which he is capable furthers the interests of the Democratic party. He is a member of the Catholic Church.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 756


JESSE W. BURTON, attorney at law, Washington, Ind., was born in Garrard County, Ky., October 2, 1828, and is a son of Robert A. and Sarah (WILLIAMS) Burton, both natives of Kentucky, living and dying in their native State. Jesse W. Burton was brought up on a farm by his parents in Kentucky until he was fourteen years old, when he entered Bradley Institute in Garrard County, remaining there several years, after which he entered Cumberland Academy at Monticello, Ky., of which his brother, William M. Burton, was the principal. By this time he was eighteen years of age and had obtained a good literary education. He then taught country school some years. At the age of twenty he began reading law at the capital of his native county, and received a license to practice August 14, 1850. He read law with his brother, Allan A. Burton, afterward appointed by President Lincoln Minister to the United States of Colombia, South America.

He then spent a year traveling and prospecting for a location in northwestern Missouri. He then came to Washington, but soon located at Petersburg, Pike County, where he practiced law less than a year, returning then to and locating in Washington, opening his office May 16, 1853. With the exception of the years 1875 and 1876, when he resided in Lawrenceburg, Ind., he has continually resided in Washington since that time, and has earned for himself a high place in the legal fraternity of Daviess County. Judge Burton, before the war of the Rebellion, was an old time Whig, casting his first presidential vote for Gen. Winfield Scott. At the formation of the Republican party he became a Republican, and at the breaking out of the war was one of the first to espouse the cause of the Union, making the first Union speech made in the county. He assisted to raise the first company sent from Daviess County, under Capt. Charles CHILDS, and during the entire continuance of that terrible conflict was active in giving financial and moral support to the Union. During 1856 and 1857 he was prosecuting attorney for the district composed of Knox, Daviess, Pike and Martin Counties. He was a candidate for judge of common pleas, and also for judge of the circuit court, but defeated in each instance owing to the hopeless minority of the Republican party. On the 23d of November, 1869, he was admitted to practice in the United States Courts.

He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and is P. N. G. of the local lodge; he is also a Master Mason. He was married November 22, 1860, to Sarah M. JOHNSON, a native of Elizabethtown, Hamilton Co., Ohio, by whom he has five children: Ada J. (wife of Frank A. COLLIER), Emma S. (wife of Clinton K. THARP), Mary H., Robert W. and Nellie.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 755


ROBERT A. BROWN was born on the farm where he now lives September 10, 1850. He was the fifth of eight children born to Benjamin F. and Jane (WALLACE) Brown. The father was born on the same farm. He was a farmer all his life, and was quite prosperous. The mother was probably a native of Tennessee.

Our subject was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. He made his home with his parents until twenty-one years of age. In 1871 he, with his four other brothers, began making brick, and in 1875 added a tile factory to their brickyard and now do perhaps the most extensive and paying business of the kind in the county. Our subject also farmed quite extensively, and the brothers now own 150 acres of very fine land.

December 25, 1879, he was united in marriage to Emma LYNCH, a native of the county, born and reared on an adjoining farm. One child, Pearl, has blessed their union. Robert is a Republican politically, and is one of the prominent business men of the county. John F. Brown, brother of Robert A. Brown, was born February 8, 1846. He received much the same rearing as his brother and remained with his parents until their respective deaths. When our subject was but fourteen years old his father died, and the mother lived until 1873. He is a joint owner of the farm of 150 acres, and also has an interest in the tile and brick manufactory with his four brothers. They have devised a patent on the Eureka Tile Kiln which is proving very favorable and promises a success financially. They have the most extensive factory in the county and are doing a big business. March 21,1873, he was married to Belle F. DUDLEY, a native of eastern Ohio. They have three children: William T., Benjamin F. and Libbie M. Mr. Brown is a stanch Republican in politics.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 754


HON. MATTHEW L. BRETT, born January 5, 1823, in South Carolina, is the eldest of seven children born to Patrick M. and Mary Brett, who were born in the "Emerald Isle," and came to this country immediately after marriage, about 1820, and lived in South Carolina about ten years and then came to Daviess County, Ind. The father was a lawyer and teacher, and a very prominent man of the county, having held several very important offices. His death occurred in 1844 and the mother's in 1868. Matthew Brett was reared on the farm where he now lives.

His early education was very limited, as his help was much needed at home. After his father's death he remained on the home farm and has assisted his mother ever since. At the age of twenty-one he succeeded his father in the auditor's office in 1844, and held the position fifteen years successively. He also carried on farming, milling and merchandising to some extent. In 1860 he was elected to the State Legislature, and served the regular and special sessions. He served two years on a committee appointed by the Legislature to audit the expenses incurred by the State on account of the war. In 1862 he was elected treasurer of State and held the position two years. In 1872 he was elected from Daviess County to the Legislature and served two sessions. Shortly afterward he unfortunately became a cripple, and has ever since given his time and attention to his farm and has been very prosperous. He owns 250 acres of land, part near Washington and part in Warren County.

He was married, June 1,1858, to Miss Alice HAYES, of Vincennes. To them were born two children, both of whom are now deceased: Anna (who lived to be the wife of Austin F. CABEL, and the mother of one child, named Brett Cabel, the only descendant of our subject) and William (who died when young). The family are members of the Catholic Church, and our subject has always been a Democrat, politically. The different positions of honor and trust he has filled so efficiently and satisfactorily indicate the high regard in which he is held by all.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 753


SAMUEL B. BOYD, superintendent of the schools of Daviess County, was born at Yorkville, Dearborn Co., Ind., March 14, 1858, being a son of John and Elizabeth (MILLER) Boyd (both deceased), who were natives of Ireland and Ohio, respectively. He was reared on a farm in his native county by his parents, receiving a good literary education. He completed his schooling with a course at the Central Norman College at Danville, Ind., and at the age of nineteen began his career as a public teacher. In 1871 he removed with his parents to this county, teaching four years in the county schools, and since acting as principal of the Odon schools and as an instructor in the city schools of Washington. June 1, 1883, he was elected county superintendent, a position he has since filled with satisfaction. He is an Odd Fellow, a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 754


WILLIAM H. BOONE, farmer, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, December 2, 1847; son of Isaac and Mary (HOLDERMAN) Boone, and is of German descent. His father was born in Rockingham County, Va., in 1815, and his mother in Montgomery County, Ohio. In 1825 the Boone family removed from Virginia to Montgomery County, Ohio, and there the grandfather of our subject died. In 1858 the father of subject removed from Montgomery County to Miami County, Ohio, and there still resides.

Our subject was raised on the farm and attended the public schools of his neighborhood. He began for himself at eighteen years of age, and came to Daviess County in 1883 and settled where he now lives, on what was known as the BRUNER farm. He has 10 acres of well-improved land one mile from Washington. He was married, in 1839, to Miss Frances V. MALCOM, a native of Shelby County, Ohio, born in 1849, daughter of Nathan and Deborah Malcom. They have four children, viz.: Maggie M., Mary B., Blanche D. and Hazel E. He is a Republican and a most enterprising gentleman.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 752


BONHAM & GILL, undertakers, and manufacturers of and dealers in furniture, Washington, Ind., is a firm composed of M. L. Bonham and Joseph H. Gill. Martin Luther Bonham was born in Dearborn County, Ind., March 4, 1827, and is a son of Zedekiah and Amelia (CULLOM) Bonham, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Ohio.

The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm by his parents and received a limited common school education. At the age of seventeen he learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Hamilton County, Ohio. He continued working at his trade and at the furniture business in that county until 1862, when he removed to Washington and entered the employ of John MATTINGLY, who had established the present business some years previously. Six months later he entered into partnership with his employer, and the firm enjoyed a prosperous business until Mr. Mattingly's death in 1872. Mr. Bonham then conducted the business alone until 1874, when he accepted as a partner Joseph H. Gill. This firm has continued ever since and enjoys a large share of the trade in this line. They are the leading undertakers in the city, and carry a full stock of furniture. Mr. Bonham is a Republican and a Royal Arch Mason. He was married, in 1847, to Selana LINCOLN, who died, leaving four children: George H., Mary (the wife of John CRETZ, of Harrison, Ohio), Zedekiah A. and Clifford L. In 1864 he was married to his present wife, Mrs. Sarah A. SOWERS.

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"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 752


JESSE BILLINGS was born in Lawrence County, Ind., August 19, 1831, of English and Welsh descent, and son of William and Mary (DAVIS) Billings, natives of Tennessee and Wales, respectively. They were married in Tennessee in 1820, and two years later moved to Lawrence County, Ind., where they purchased 200 acres of land near Mitchell. When Jesse was about eight years old his mother died, and he remained with his father, assisting him on the farm until nineteen years of age. February 7, 1850, he was married to Sarah MILLER, born November 22, 1833, daughter of John and Susannah (TYRE) Miller, and moved to Illinois, where he purchased land and lived for about four years. He then came to Daviess County, Ind., and bought 135 acres of land, which he has since increased to 560 acres, 460 acres being under cultivation. His land is all underlaid with a good quality of coal. At a depth of 190 feet they found a six-foot vein, and at fifty feet an eithteen-inch vein, and at ninety feet a four-foot vein, all of which was analyzed and found to be first-class. He and wife are the parents of these children: John W., Abram R., Mary S., George W., Annie A., Airnetta B., Morton E., Charles S., Lillie M., Louis S. and Jesse F. Mr. Billings is a Republican and cast his first vote for Fillmore. He has been a member of the Masonic lodge twenty-seven years, and a member of the Christian Church twenty years. Mr. Billings was not in the late war, but his sympathies were with the Union soldiers. He had three brothers who served, and all were wounded, but returned home in safety.

Data Entry Volunteer: Diana Flynn
"A HISTORY OF KNOX AND DAVIESS COUNTIES, INDIANA" 1886 GOODSPEED PUBLISHING COMPANY, CHICAGO
DAVIESS COUNTY, IN. WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP PAGE 750