JOHN BUCHANAN, news-dealer and confectioner, Aurora (place of business is in the post office building, where all the delicacies of the season can be found, was born in Ohio County, March 4, 1827, and received a common school education. His father was born in North Carolina, June 7, 1780. The mother, Anna (STURMAN) BUCHANAN was born in Virginia, July 16, 1784. They were married February 12, 1801. In early life the father was a miller, but awhile before his death, which occurred April 24, 1828, he was engaged in farming. Mr. John BUCHANAN was a farmer until 1878, when he followed gardening for three years. In 1881 he moved to Aurora and opened up a general agency, which he conducted up to March, 1884, at which time he added his present business and has prospered even better than he hoped for. He was married, November 4, 1856, to Miss Isabella GREGORY, a native of Rising Sun. To them have been born Mar, April 16, 1858, died February 29, 1860; Jennie, September 23, 1860, died December 21, 1875; Frank July 29, 1863. Our subject was appointed county superintendent by the county commissioners of Ohio County, after which he was elected, and served in that capacity for five years.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


JOSEPH BUCHERT, proprietor hotel and farmer, Jackson TOwnship, a native of Dearborn County, born in 1832, is a son of Peter and Mary (EGBY) BUCHERT, he a native of Germany and she of France. They were married in France, and in 1826, with a family of five children, immigrated to America, landing at New York; thence by team came to Cincinnati where they remained one year, and in the fall of 1827 came to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased forty-six acres of land on the southeast quarter of Section 30 in Jackson Township, upon which he resided through life. When he located upon this land there was but little cleared, upon which a log-cabin into which they moved and commenced their pioneer work. Their first milling was done on the Whitewater, corn bread and meat being their principal articles of food. Subsequently he purchased more land, erected a good log-house, and before his death he had a good farm and comfortable home. After Mr. BUCHERT had purchased his land and moved on to it with his family he had $4.75 left. all the money he had in the world, and no way to get any more but to make from the land, then all in the woods- a condition which would discourage most men of the present day. But the result of his life proved him equal to the undertaking. The first plow he had bought on his way back from Cincinnati; also the first grindstone he brought in the same way. He died in February 1854, aged seventy-five years. His wife survived him and died September 24, 1874, aged eighty -three years. They were parents of eleven children. All grew to maturity, married and had families, six now living: Frances, now widow MILLER; Joseph; Catharine, wife of Frank SINDERBERGER, residing in Cincinnati; Elizabeth, wife of M. HOFFRIDER, residing at Los Angeles, Cal; Caroline, wife of Charles SCHOTT, living in Shelby County, Ind. and Morton, also in Shelby County. The latter married and resided in Jackson Township until the spring of 1883, when he removed to Shelby County. In 1880 he was elected township trustee and had served three years. After he moved away his brother Joseph, was appointed to serve the balance of the unexpired term. Those deceased were Peter, Mary, who married Joseph BRANDT; Anna, who married Lawrence SIEFORT, John and Terris, the latter married John Idoux. Peter, the eldest son, while young followed steam boating from Cincinnati to New Orleans for several years. Subsequently, he settled in Iowa, married and had two sons and one daughter. In 1853, in attempting to swim across Turkey River, when about the middle of the stream was seen to sink and was drowned, it was believed from cramps, as he was known to be an excellent swimmer. John, the other son deceased married and had one child, Anna, who survived and is now the wife of Simon ZINSER; John was a stove molder by trade. He was elected county commissioner in the fall of 1882, and was serving in that office at the time of his death. He died march 2, 1884, aged sixty-two years. Joseph, our subject, was the seventh child of his father, and was born in the log cabin on his father's place and grew to manhood familiar with pioneer life. He remembers well when a child of running after the wild deer and turkeys, trying to catch them, and of the extensive forests that then covered almost the entire country. He was married, September 6, 1859, to Caroline HUBER, born January 20, 1839, a daughter of Damas and Catharine HUBER, he a native of Germany and she of France. They came to America in 1833. They had seven children, six now living: Caroline; Joseph; Catharine, wife of F. HOUSEMAN; Lewis; Louisa, wife of Christian SCHOOK, and Anna, wife of F. KNOEPFLER. The one deceased, Mary, married M. BRISBO. By this union Mr. BUCHERT has had nine children, seven now living: Emma M.; Louisa E., wife of George H. KOENIG; Frank J., Pauline A., Richard, Martha A. and Edmond S. In the spring of 1859 Mr. BUCHERT purchased one acre of land upon which was a large building, part log and part frame. Here in partnership with John Medosch he opened out a hotel and grocery. Soon after Mr. BUCHERT bought the interest of his partner and continued the business till 1876, when he closed out his grocery stock, erected his present large and commodious brick house in which he has continued the hotel business to the present day. In 1856 Mr. BUCHERT made a trip to California and returned in 1859, prior to the purchase above mentioned. Mr. BUCHERT started in life with very little capital. Now he owns 111 acres of land and has one of the best and largest brick houses in Jackson Township, with other good improvements, the result of industry and carefully conducted business.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


GEORGE P. BUELL, of Lawrenceburgh, was born in Scipio, Cayuga County, N.Y., in 1801. He moved to Indiana in 1820 with his father, Judge Salmon BUELL, who had come West to invest the remnant of a fortune. Judge BUELL'S large family scattered through the Western States of Ohio and Indiana; Barnum and Salmon D. BUELL in Marietta , and George P. and Almira DUNN at Lawrenceburgh. Our subject, in 1820, in connection with his brother-in-law, Luther GEER, who had been a wealthy merchant of Utica, N.Y., brought a large stock of goods to the village of Lawrenceburgh and embarked in business. At this time very little attention had been paid to the raising of hogs, although the country about the place of his adoption was particularly adapted for that feature of agriculture, and hogs were exceedingly low, owing to the difficulty in getting them to market. While pork here was only bringing from$1 to $1.50 per barrel, it commanded the high price in New York City of from $10 to $11 per barrel. Mr. BUELL at once, on his arrival, began purchasing all the hogs in the surrounding country, had them slaughtered and packed into barrels, and taken by impromptu boats to New Orleans and thence conveyed by ships to New York City. This is said to have been the first experiment in the West, that later opened up the way and led to that very important trade and commercial enterprise which for many years made Cincinnati famous, and gave her the soubriquet of "Porkopolis". This first enterprise of the kind in the West made by Mr. BUELL proved so successful that he continued the business at Lawrenceburgh, and thereby furnished a home market for this character of agricultural product, which induced the farmers in th e Miami Valley to engage extensively in the raising of hogs. For a number of years Lawrenceburgh was the center and monopoly of trade in pork packing and shipping to distant markets, exceeding and preceding this branch of business at Cincinnati. In this business Mr. BUELL continued for many years, having at different times associated with him as partners Robert Buchanan and James M. Armstrong, president of the Commercial Bank of Cincinnati. To Mr. BUELL, James H. and Geo. W. Lane each were indebted for their start in life, as he gave them their first start in business, the latter of whom, it may be said, in due appreciation of the many kindnesses received at Mr. BUELL'S hands, and from the admiration he had for the man, and respect for his memory, here preserves the facts connected with the beginning of the Western pork trade, giving credit to him to whom it justly belongs. Mr. BUELL was twice married. His first wife was Ann LANE, who died in 1844, after they had lived happily together for twenty years. He, being left with seven little children, in 1845 married Mary ST.CLAIR, who with all the love of aunt and mother, made him happy by her solicitude for his children. Her death occurred in 1859. After the death of his first wife Mr. BUELL embraced religion, and ever after led the life of a Christian. Next to his family Mr. BUELL was devoted to his country, which he loved as only a patriot could love. As part of that country he had loved Indiana. From the time of its adoption until his death he devoted himself to her interests. With her was spent his manhood and his riper years, and with this people were his feelings and his "home," to him truly "the dearest spot on earth." He had watched his adopted State from her infancy to her maturity, and it was the interest he felt in her welfare that induced him to take the part in politics which he often did, with influence; for he was far-seeing and energetic. Though he filled a seat in the State Senate for several years, to the credit of his constituents, yet he was not a partisan from love or desire of office. Through bitter experience in early life, and great industry in later years, Mr. BUELL amassed a handsome competency. His death occurred at Lawrenceburgh Dec. 31, 1862. Says a writer: "The year 1862 will long be remembered for the sad record it made in the memory of many of the citizens of this county, and rapidly as calamity has followed calamity, and numberless as have been the hearts that have been made to bleed during this terrible year, how peculiarly is this the case with a family to which the writer will call attention; and with what sadness of heart will its members call to mind 1862. At the close of the year, and on the last day of the same, the only remaining son of the once large and influential family of Judge Salmon BUELL of Utica Lake, N.Y., expired, and during the year, commencing with its first week, seven of the family traveled the same road.. Lieut. Julius Octavus BUELL, youngest son of George P. BUELL, Esq., of Lawrenceburgh, Ind. died Jan. 6, 1862, at Denver Col., aged twenty years; George P. BUELL, Esq., oldest son of P. Barnum BUELL of Lowell, Ohio, who fell from a boat in the Ohio River opposite Cincinnati and was drowned, January 1862, aged thirty-five years; Cadet James P. DRAKE, Jr., only son of Gen. Drake and Priscilla H. Drake, who was Priscilla H. BUELL, youngest daughter and only remaining member of a family of twelve, of Judge Salmon BUELL; young Drake died in Tennessee, after a lingering illness, in February, 1862, aged twenty-two years; Don Carlos CURTIS, son of William F. CURTIS and Amelia A. CURTIS, formerly Amelia A. BUELL, granddaughter of Judge BUELL, who died at Marietta, Ohio, June 7, 1862, aged fourteen years; Captain Frank BUELL who closed his bright career in August, 1862, on the field of battle, while protecting the retreat of Pope's army, aged twenty-six years; P. Barnum BUELL died December 5, 1862, at Lowell, Ohio, aged twenty-six years; George P. BUELL died December 31, 1862, at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., aged sixty-one years."

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


JOHN BUFFINGTON, (1 of 2)of Dearborn County, was one of the early settlers of this section of the country, and for more than forty years maintained his place among her most prominent and influential citizens. His history, as it is connected with the most thrilling incidents of Western life and involves all the varied interests of a protracted and useful life, merits a more extended notice than can here be given it. His birth occurred in Virginia March 7, 1784, and he removed to the West in 1797. He spent several years with the settlers of North Bend and on the Miami, after which he moved to Dearborn County and entered land on North Hogan Creek, where he opened a farm and upon which, with the exception of a few years, he resided until his death, which occurred March 10, 1852. Mr BUFFINGTON planted himself in the wilds of Indiana, endured all the perils, privations and toils of a pioneer life, cleared up a beautiful farm, raised and educated a large and respectable family, and lived long to enjoy the fruits of industry and the labor of his hands, and to repose in the happy consciousness of a virtuous and honorable career.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


JOHN BUFFINGTON (2 of 2), retired, Hogan Township, resides in Wilmington. Through life he was a farmer, blacksmith and flat-boat pilot. He was born in Washington Township November 17, 1818. His father , Jonathan, was born in Pennsylvania and immigrated to this county in 1807, where he followed farming in summer and piloted on the river in winter. The mother, Jane (MOORE) BUFFINGTON, was born in Kentucky August 22, 1800, and came to this county in 1805 with her parents. They raised a family of six children, the father dying in 1827, the mother in 1882. Mr. John BUFFINGTON was married July 1, 1852 to Miss Eliza Jane Carabaugh, who was born in Hogan Township April 4, 1826. By this union three children were born: William H., Oscar D. and John. The first and third died in infancy. Mr BUFFFINGTON began as a river pilot in the spring of 1844 and continued as such until 1879, being compelled to abandon his chosen occupation on account of cataract, which destroyed the vision of one eye and materially damaged the other. Otherwise he is well preserved and enjoys good health. He joined Dearborn Lodge No. 536, I.O.O.F., in 1855, and Wilmington Lodge No. 158, F.&A.M., in 1860. His amiable wife is a member of the Methodist of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


JOSEPH H. BURKAM, capitalist and lumber dealer, Lawrenceburgh, was born in Dearborn County in 1838. He is a son of Elzie G. BURKAM, who came to Dearborn County about 1820. Elzie G. was a prominent man of Dearborn County for many years. He removed from the country to the city in 1846, and was made president of the Lawrenceburgh branch of the State Bank, and served as such until 1865. He had also a banking house in Cincinnati, Ohio, for fifteen years, and was interested in the banking firm of BURKAM & Sons, of Chicago. In 1865 he removed to the city of New York, where he has since resided, a wealthy banker of that city. Our subject, Joseph H. BURKAM, is one of the prominent and most active business men of the city of Lawrenceburg. His early life was passed in Dearborn County. He was chiefly educated in Lawrenceburgh, and before of age he began the banking business with the firm of E.G. BURKAM & Co., of which he was a member. In 1861 Mr. BURKAM came to the city and accepted the vice-presidency of the branch of the Bank of State located here, in which bank he remained until 1865. When the Lawrenceburgh National Bank was organized that year (1865), he established the present extensive lumber yards of the BURKAM Lumber Company, since which time he has been engaged in this business in connection with real estate transactions, and has also carried on farming extensively. Col. BURK(H)AM was a member of the first board of directors of Lawrenceburgh National Bank, and, in 1872, was one of the principals in the Lawrenceburgh Banking Company, controlled and managed by Elzie G. and J.H. BURKHAM. He has also taken a deep interest in the establishment of the woolen-mills of the city, and invested a large amount of capital in the enterprise; he also took an active part in having the Miami Stove Works located at Lawrenceburgh. During the war he was a strong Unionist, and as colonel of a regiment of the Indiana Legion, in command of several companies did good service in repelling Morgan's forces in their invasion of southeastern Indiana. Col. BURKAM was married in 1860 to Miss Kate COLLINS, whose death occurred in 1881, leaving four sons and a daughter, namely; William F., Frank M., Joseph H., Ezie and Kate C.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


FRANCIS BUSALD, merchant, Jackson Township. This gentleman and prominent business man of Jackson Township was born in Germany, September 24, 1824 is a son of Martin and Catharine BUSALD, natives of Germany, but who, in the spring of 1840,immigrated to America, landing at New York, from whence they came to Cincinnati, thence to Lawrenceburgh, arriving at the latter place about the 1st of September of the same year. Mr. BUSALD then settled on a piece of rented land in Jackson Township. He died in 1858, aged fifty-six years. His wife who survived him, subsequently purchased sixty acres of land in Ripley County, Ind., but finally sold her farm and removed to St. Peter's, in Franklin County, Ind., where she died aged sixty-eight years. They were the parents of eight children, five now living: Francis; Barbara, wife of William HEIM, residing in Cincinnati; Margaret, wife of Arnold REIGGER, residing in Bloomington, Ill.; John A. and George; the two last now reside in Franklin County, Ind. Mr. Frances BUSALD, the eldest son of his father, has remained a resident of Jackson Township ever since the arrival of their family in 1840, a period of forty-five years. While young he learned the carpentering trade, which business he followed several years, by which he earned his first money and purchased a house lot in Lawrenceville for $300, and soon after sold it for $400. He then purchased a farm of eighty acres for $1,000. In 1856 he traded this farm for the store property and stock of goods, where he still continues conducting a general mercantile trade. He has now been in business here twenty-nine years; he has had a large and extensive trade, having won the confidence of the community by the honest and upright manner of his transactions, and by his industry and close application to business he has accumulated a good and ample competency. He owns a good farm, of 170 acres, adjoining the village of Lawrenceville, upon which he has erected a fne and commodious brick residence, and is now comfortably situated to enjoy the balance of his life in peace and plenty. On January 23, 1849, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaret MEISTER, a native of Germany, by whom he has had thirteen children, nine now living, viz: Frank; Margaret, wife of Adam SAHM; Catharine, wife of Simon WHIPPLE; Barbara, wife of John RIEPBERGER; Mary, wife of Peter SCHNEIT; John; Josephine; Caroline, wife of Frank DUELL, and George.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


HENRY C. BUSSE, farmer, Hogan Township, was born in Prussia, September 23, 1834, and received a good English and German education. His parents, Rev. Christian and Dorothea (POOS) BUSSE, were born in Prussia, his father, November 11, 1806, mother March 10 1806. They were married December 27, 1826, and were parents of four children: Dorothea, born in 1827, died in 1831; Christena, born February 24, 1832, died June 24, 1850; Johanna, now Mrs. Henry ENGELKINGE, and Henry C. Father BUSSE was a farmer in early life. He immigrated to America in October, 1844, and came to this county; located in Manchester Township. In 1846 he was ordained as a Lutheran Evangelical minister. His first pastorate was St. Stephen's Church, in Manchester Township, where he preached for twenty-eight years. In addition to his ministerial duties, he taught school from 1846-1869. Success crowned his every effort as a minister, and he received many into the church during his labors. Since 1874 he has led a retired life. His wife died January 3, 1877. He now makes his home with his son, Henry C. who cheerfully gratifies his every desire. Mr. Henry C. was married, April 27, 1854, to Miss Anjelica GESSELL, a native of Germany, who was born March 22, 1833. By this union nine children were born: Henry P., born June 27, 1856; Caroline, born December 4, 1858; William, born January 31, 1861; John, born March 27, 1863; Louisa, born December 12, 1865; George, born March 15, 1868; Anna, born May 16, 1870; Abalona, born June 20,1872; Matilda, born January 4, 1875. The entire family belong to the Lutheran Church. Mr. BUSSE has been one of the trustees in the church for the past sixteen years. He is a quiet industrious citizen, and everything about the farm gives evidence of taste and thrift.

HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885
SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


The Biography of Dr. Abraham Brouwer, aka Brower, by Lillian K. Martin, 2005.

Abraham Brouwer (Brower) was born Oct 26, 1771 at New York City, NY. His father was Jeury Brouwer, Jr, aka Jeremiah Brower , Jr. who was a shipping merchant in NYC. In 1776 Jeury Brouwer, Jr lost all his properties, ships and cargo in NYC, due to the American Revolution and he fled to New Barbadoes, Bergen Co NJ as a War Refugee and died there shortly after arriving, in 1776. His wife Elizabeth Vandewater died not long after, and her young children were raised by Jane Brouwer, Mrs. Peter Kip of NYC. Jane Brouwer Kip was the d/o Jeury Brouwer, Jr and his first wife, Jane Elsworth, d/o Theophilus.

Abraham Brouwer was educated at Queens College, New Brunswick, NJ. This college later became Rutgers University. He graduated with a Medical Doctorís degree on Sept 24, 1793. He married Elizabeth Stoutenborgh on Oct 23, 1794 NYC. Dr. Brower had a practice in NYC, later they moved to New Brunswick, NJ and were members of the First Reformed Church there, the membership was recorded as May 14, 1813. Shortly after that date, according to a story written by their daughter Maria, the family headed west with a wagon train of settlers, first over the mountains of PA, then onto rafts on the Ohio River, they got off the river at Cincinnatti, OH and stayed several years there in the Montgomery district. About 1818 the family crossed the river and settled permanently at Lawrenceburg, Dearborn Co IN.

The children of Abraham Brower were: Isaac; Jeremiah Henry; Eliza; Mary Ann; Matilda; Johanna; Matilda Caroline; Henrietta; Charles Howard; Maria; Alexander Hamilton.

Jeremiah Henry Brower followed his fatherís footsteps and also became a medical doctor. He served in the Civil War in Indiana, and was the President of the Indiana Medical Association. He and his wife and family are buried at Lawrenceburg, IN in the Greendale Public Cemetery.

Eliza Brower, d/o Abraham Brower, married Dr. Henry Haines of Lawrenceburg, IN.

The death notice of Dr. Abraham Brower appeared in the Democratic Register, Jan 6, 1865. Mrs. Elizabeth Brower had opened the first girls school in Lawrenceburg, IN. In the book which was written by A. J. Cotton, about the persons he knew in Dearborn Co, IN, he mentions Dr. Brower in glowing terms. He also mention that one of his prize pupil was Lawyer Abraham Brower. This young man who was studying under the care of Mr. Cotton in 1826, was born 1805 in NYC, the son of Jacob Brower and Abigail Manning. Jacob Brower b. 1772 NYC was the younger brother of Dr. Abraham Brower.

Dr. A. Brower was instrumental in inspiring his nephew Jeremiah Brower b. 1801 NYC, s/o Jacob Brower b. 1772, to also become a doctor. Dr. A. Brower cared for the sons of his brother Jacob Brower, namely: John Abraham Brower b. 1791 NYC, Jeremiah Brower b. 1801 NYC, Lawyer A. Brower b. 1805 NYC and Chancellor Livingston Brower b. 1808 NYC. These 4 brothers all left Indiana about 1830 to settle in Missouri.

Dr. Abraham Brower b. 1771 And his brother Jacob Brower b. 1772, were the sons of Jeury Brouwer, Jr, s/o Jeury Brouwer, Sr of Brooklyn, Kings Co, NY, s/o Abraham Brouwer, of Brooklyn, NY, s/o the immigrant Adam Brouwer born, Cologne, Germany and arrived in Manhattan, New Amsterdam in 1642, and there married Magdalena Verdon, d/o Jacob. Adam Brouwer built a Flour Mill at Gowanus Creek, Kings Co. NY.

Submitted by Lilly Martin, the 11th generation down from Adam Brouwer of Brooklyn, through Dr. Jeremiah Brower b. 1801 NYC d. 1875 Wayne Co Iowa, through his daughter Emma Brower, Mrs. John Oscar Mills , died 1895 at La Grande, Union Co OR.
P.O. Box 2013, Lattakia, Syria email: malik@scs-net.org