H. C. VINCENT, M.D., Guilford, a physician of thirty-five years practice, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1826.  The paternal ancestors of his family were of English descent and may be traced back to the time of the invasion of Britain by the Romans.  The modern lineage is traced from three brothers, Daniel, Samuel and a third whose name is unrecalled.  Daniel and Samuel immigrated to this country in the early part of the seventeenth century and settled on Martha's Vinyard Island and from that point the descendants radiated, most of them moving westward.  Dr. Vincent seems to have descended from the line founded by Daniel Vincent, a branch of whose posterity settled in the vicinity of Cincinnati about the time that city adopted its present name.  His paternal ancestors in Massachusetts were all sailors, and after the death of his grandfather in that State his grandmother removed with her family to Ohio to prevent her sons from adopting a seafaring life.  The family consisted of the following children: Jane, Thomas, Jeremiah, Bartlet, Elizabeth, Louise, Elias and Daniel; the latter and Louise are now the only ones living and reside on the old homestead near Cincinnati, each now being near ninety years of age. Among the list of descendants are some men of national reputation.  Henry Vincent, the celebrated English lecturer and Dr. Vincent of Chatauqua fame, being examples.  Jeremiah Vincent was sixteen years of age when he arrived at Cincinnati with his mother with whom he resided on a farm till he reached his majority.  He then went to work with his brother-in-law, William CROSSMAN, a carpenter and contractor, with whom he was engaged till about 1825, when he married Elizabeth GOLDEN and soon after began his career as pilot on a river steamboat plying between Cincinnati and New Orleans.  About 1835-36 he abandoned the river and took up agricultural pursuits near Cincinnati, on land inherited by his wife, and here he closed his buy life in 1859.  His wife was of Irish and Hollandese parentage, her mother's name being VON VANCE.   Her people were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania and her mother came to Cincinnati as early as 1796, and died there in 1878, at the advanced age of ninety-nine years and eleven months.  Mrs. Jeremiah VINCENT was born in Cincinnati, in 1806, and died in October 1884.  Dr. H. C. VINCENT, whose name introduces this sketch, passed his first nine years in Cincinnati.  He then went to the farm four miles from the city with his parents and was in this locality educated in the Carey Academy, beginning his studies in 1844.  Two years later he began the study of medicine with Dr. Jacin Brevort, under whose direction he continued his reading two years.  In 1848 he entered Starling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio, and in the following year began the practice of  his profession at Dover, this county, where he resided till 1856, except two years, 1851-52, which were spent in California.  In 1856 he located at Yorkville where he continued his practice till 1861, when he removed to Guilford which has since been his place of abode.  Soon after locating at Guilford Dr. Vincent was commissioned assistant surgeon of the Eighty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and entered the service.  In February, 1863, he was sent home wounded, but returned in the following June and was present at the capture of Vicksburg and Jackson but was unable to join in the Atlanta campaign.  In the winter of 1864 he resigned his commission, returned home and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession in Dearborn County.  IN 1850 he married Mary L. WARD of this county, daughter of William S. WARD and by this union there were born five children: Blanche, Charles, Edwin, Sherman and Edith.  Charles is deceased, Blanche is now the wife of E. CHaplin, a most excellent gentleman and resides at Guilford where her husband is engaged in merchandising.  Dr. VINCENT ranks among the leading physicians of the county and has an extensive practice.  He is a member of the F. & A.M. and is an active worker in the interest of the Republican party.

"HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885"

SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp


JAMES C. VINSON, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Dearborn County, Ind.,  September 16th, 1838.  His parents, Simeon and Rebecca A. (BRUCE) VINSON, were natives of Dearborn County. The former born October 4, 1811; the latter, May 12, 1817.  They were married in Dearborn County, August 20, 1837, and first settled in Washington  Township, where they resided until 1844, at which time they moved to their present residence.  They had born to them nine children: Abigail, William, C., Caroline, Mary, Alanson, B.C. , and three which died in infancy.  James C. began work for himself when about seventeen years of age, always engaging in farming.  He was married in Hogan Township, September 14, 1862to America CARBAUGH who was born March 8, 1838, and by whom  he has had born to him five children, viz: Della C., William B., Herman D. (deceased), Simeon J. and Minnie E.  After his marriage he settled on this father's farm, where he remained about four years; then he purchased and moved on a farm in Sparta Township, and resided until 1871, when he purchased his present farm there.

 "HISTORY OF DEARBORN AND OHIO COUNTIES, INDIANA-1885"

SUBMITTED BY: Jackie DeCamp

Surname: Van Osdol, Crowley, Mulford, Sedam, Richmond

Nathan Allen VAN OSDOL, farmer, Cass Township [Ohio County, IN], born in Fayette County, Penn., May 25, 1813, is a son of Benjamin and Rebecca VAN OSDOL, natives of Pennsylvania, who removed to Indiana in 1816, coming down the river in a flat-boat to Rising Sun, where they landed in the summer of that year and located about three miles west of Rising Sun. Mr. VAN OSDOL was a carpenter and mill-wright by trade, which occupation he followed the greater portion of his life. He was a true type of the pioneer an honest, hard working man. They brought four children with them from Pennsylvania, of whom Nathan Allen was the youngest, and is the only one now living [1885]. Mr. VAN OSDOL [Benjamin] died September 12, 1848, aged seventy-one years. His widow died March 5, 1844, aged sixty-five years. Nathan Allen, who was a child of three years of age when brought to this then wilderness, grew to manhood, fully acquainted with pioneer life, and has remained a citizen of Ohio County through his entire life. For several years, in his early life, he followed boating on the river, then settled upon a farm, and has since made farming his principal business. He started out in life, when sixteen years of age, with a capital consisting of one calf, which he sold for $1. He worked by the month, for which he was paid $3.50, and the highest wages he ever obtained was $8.00 per month. In the harvest field he could sometimes get 50 cents for reaping hard all day. Through all these experiences Mr. VAN OSDOL has passed, and by industry and economy has accumulated a competency, now owning a farm of 155 acres, with good improvements. He was married June 30, 1836; to Elizabeth CROWLEY, a daughter of James and Elizabeth CROWLEY, natives of Virginia. Mr. CROWLEY drowned in the river, in his native State, in 1817. Subsequently Mrs. CROWLEY married David MULFORD, and in 1820 removed to Indiana and settled near Dillsborough, and there and in Ohio County spent the balance of her life. She died February 6, 1868, aged seventy-seven years. By her first husband she had one son and three daughters; two now survive, Van S. and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. VAN OSDOL are parents of twelve children, seven now survive: Melissa, wife of Peter RICHMOND; Boston W., John, William Wesley, Charles L., Mary Elizabeth, wife of Andrew SEDAM, and Benjamin Franklin. Of these John and Charles L. are practicing physicians in Allensville, Switzerland Co., Ind. Of those deceased, three died young, two grew to womanhood: Margaret Ann and Nancy Jane; the former died, aged twenty-seven years, the latter at nineteen years of age. Mr. VAN OSDOL and wife have been active members of the New Hope Methodist Epicopal Church for forty-five years, in which he has been a pillar, doing much for the best interests of the society.
Originally submitted by: John Krall, resubmitted by Judy Ryden
History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, F. E. Weakley & Co., Publishers, Chicago, 1885, pages 956-7.