JOHN STOUT, junior member of the firm of John Gramelspacher & Co., was born in Harrison County, Ind., April 11, 1851, son of Jacob and Louisa (Helman) Stout. At the age of seventeen he left his home and went to Louisville, Ky., to learn the carpentering trade. He remained there two years, having mastered the trade in that time. He started South and located first in Nashville, Tenn., where he remained nine months, and then returned to Louisville for one year, going thence to his native county, and afterward lived three years in Indianapolis, Ind., thence to Louisville, thence to Cloverport, and finally settled in Jasper where he has since lived. In 1881 he entered into partnership with Mr. Gramelspacher, and since that time has continued in the lumber trade. June 23, 1885, he married Elizabeth Sang. They are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat, but votes for the best man irrespective of party.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



ANDREW M. SWEENEY, superintendent of schools of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 26, 1853, being one of a family of nine children born to Michael and Harriet (Reade) Sweeney, natives of Ireland. In 1850 the father came to the United States and located in Cincinnati where he was employed as railroad contractor, and where he still resides. He has been engaged in the same business in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Ohio, ever since coming to America. Andrew M. was raised in Cincinnati, and when ten years old began working for his father on the railroad, continuing with him until fifteen years old when he began attending school in Teutopolis, Ill., then attended St. Meinradís College in Spencer County, Ind. When about nineteen years old he began teaching the ďyoung ideaĒ in Dubois County, and the following year accepted a position as principal of the Jasper schools, working in this capacity for about eight years. August 5, 1878, he married Helen Kuebler a native of Jasper, the result of this union being four children, two now living: Robert K. and Clarence C. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church. Since April 4, 1883, Mr. Sweeney has been president of the Southern Indiana Teachers Association.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



WILLIAM A. TRAYLOR, attorney at law, of Jasper, Ind., was born February 5, 1843, son of Jesse Traylor and Jan McDonald, natives of Pike and Dubois Counties. The father who was of English descent, came to this county about 1844, and settled near Portersville, on a farm, where he has since resided. William A. was raised on a farm in this county, and received a fair education in his boyhood. He prepared himself for a teacher under a private tutor, and followed this profession for six years. He studied law meanwhile under Adams & Buettner, and Maj. Carr, of Jasper, for a number of years, and then attended the law school of the State University, at Bloomington, from 1867 to 1868, graduating from there the latter year. March, 1867, he opened a law office in Jasper, where he practiced, and then entered into partnership with W.S. Hunter. They are among the leading practitioners of the county. From 1878 to 1882 he was a member of the State Senate, and was elected without an opposing candidate. He is a Democrat, and a member of the I.O.O.F. May 7, 1873 he married Flora E. Hobbs, native of Indiana, the result of this union being six children - two sons and four daughters.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



TOLIVER WERTZ, M.D., of Jasper, Ind., was born in Pennsylvania, April 14, 1838, being the youngest of seven children born to Henry Wertz and Ann Abrahams, natives of Pennsylvania and England, respectively. They made their home in Pennsylvania, where they passed their lives. Our subject was raised on a farm in his native State, receiving a good literary education, completing an academic course. He followed the occupation of farming until he was twenty-five years old, and taught school one year, when he began the study of medicine, attending Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, in 1864-65. He then came to Warrick County, Ind., where he practiced at Boonville, until 1871, and then came to Jasper, where he has been engaged in attending to a reasonably large and remunerative practice. In 1878 he returned to the above named medical college, and received a diploma from there in 1879. He is a Mason, and, although not a member of any church, was raised in the Protestant faith.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



JACOB WILHOIT, a prominent citizen of Bainbridge Township, Dubois County, Ind., was born in Woodford County, Ky., May 29, 1834, and is the fourth in a family of six children born to Abram and Frances (Mosby) Wilhoit, who were born in Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. They came to this State and county in 1838, and settled on the farm where our subject now lives. At that time the country was a complete wilderness of woods. Jacobís father preceded them here, and made arrangements for their removal. He then returned to Kentucky for them, but sickened and died there a short time afterward. Jacob always lived at home with his mother, assisting her all he could. He received a very limited education, owing to the poor facilities of that day. His mother died September 10, 1883. April 29, 1863, he married Amelia A. Thomas, and they became the parents of one child, John L., who died September 11, 1872. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat. He has succeeded well as a farmer, and now owns 176 acres of excellent land.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



MICHAEL WILSON, a prominent and well-known citizen of Jasper, Ind., is a native of Northumberland, England, born October 3, 1834, and is the elder of two children born to Anthony and Ann (Pratt) Wilson. Our subject lived in England until he was sixteen years old, and received a limited education. His mother died when he was three years old, and in 1850, he came with his father and family to the United States, landing at New York, and soon after went to Hawesville, Ky., where they remained six years. During this time he made a prospecting trip with his uncle to the Cumberland Mountains, and afterward moved across the Ohio River, to Cannelton, Ind., where he lived until 1866, when he came to this county, where he has ever since lived. He immediately opened a coal mine, the first in the county, and has been engaged in that business ever since. November 1, 1862, he married Elizabeth Chilton, by whom he is the father of four children: George R., William A., Margaret A., and Thomas B. Success has attended his efforts in the development of the coal industries of the county. He recently disposed of his mine, and is now drilling for another. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Episcopal Church, and he is a Democrat, and was elected to the office of county surveyor.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Bainbridge Township



FREDERICK ARENSMANN, one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Planing-mill, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1818, and came to the United States in 1842, and located in Huntingburgh, Ind., where he worked for Col. Jacob Geiger, on the farm and in the mill, three or four years. He then purchased a farm near Huntingburgh, where he lived about fifteen years. At the breaking out of the war he bought a grist-mill, which he operated nearly three years, then engaged in general merchandise, and also ran the Huntingburgh woolen-mills a year or two. He then retired from active work until about 1870, when he bought an interest in his present business, in which he has remained ever since. He has been very successful in business affairs, and now has a comfortable competency. Just before leaving his native country, he married Mary Engel. They are the parents of seven children: Mary, Anna, Henry, Elizabeth, Caroline, Matilda, and Daniel. Mr. Arensmann is a Republican in politics, and he and family are members of the Evangelical Association.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



VALENTINE BAMBERGER, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes at Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Dubois County, January 22, 1850, son of Peter and Catherine (Frick) Bamberger, natives of Germany. The father came to the United States about 1850, and located on a farm in Dubois County, where he lived until 1881, when he retired from business, and now resides in Huntingburgh. The mother died in 1863. Our subject received a good German and English education, and lived on the farm until he was fifteen years old, when he began learning the shoe-makerís trade of Frederick Hildebrand, staying with him about four years. He then worked at his trade in various places, and in 1872 engaged in his present business for himself. He carries a fine line of goods, and has met with the best of success. In 1872 he married Wilhelmina Hildebrand. They have five children living: John Louis, Anna Johanna, Clara Kathrina, Philip Leo, and Emma Amelia. Mr. Bamberger is a Democrat, and a member of the town council. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



PHILIP BAMBERGER, dealer in stoves and tinware at Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of the county, was born March 4, 1855, and is a son of Peter and Catherine (Frick) Bamberger. (See sketch of Val. Bamberger.) His boyhood was passed on the farm, and while there he received but a limited education, but by contact with business life he has overcome this deficiency. At the age of fifteen years he began learning the tinnerís trade at Rockport, Ind., remaining there nearly three years. He returned home in 1874 and worked at his trade in Huntingburgh until 1881, and then worked in Boonville one year, and in 1882 returned to Huntingburgh, where he has remained ever since, and doing well financially. August 13, 1876, he married Joanna Hildebrand, daughter of Fred Hildebrand, whose sketch appears in this work. They have three children: Edward T., Emma W. and Charles P. He is a Democrat in politics and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



LOUIS BEHRENS, son of Herman and Phillipina Lieber, both natives of Germany, was born February 24, 1853, in Huntingburgh, Ind. The father came here when a young man, about 1828 or 1830. He was engaged for some time in the merchandise business, together with pork-packing, cattle trading and farming. He was noted for his generosity throughout the county. He died in 1862. Louis worked on his fatherís farm until he was eighteen, when he learned the wagon-makerís trade, and in 1874 began manufacturing wagons and buggies in Huntingburgh, in connection with his brother Jacob. In 1877 Jacob died, and between 1876 and 1881 his brothers Frank and Frederick were with him as partners. In 1882 they commenced selling agricultural implements and are now meeting with the best of success. Louis married Eliza Miller in 1877. They have had four children: Nora P., Sophia Kate, John H. (deceased) and Walter John. Mr. Behrens is a faithful Democrat and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GARRETT B. BLACKWELL, M.D., of Huntingburgh, Ind., born August 23, 1855, is a son of Joshua D. and Samantha Jane (Helton) Blackwell, natives of Indiana. The family have resided in Monroe County, Ind., for over thirty years. Our subject received an ordinary literary education in his boyhood days, and at the age of seventeen years was apprenticed to a carpenter in the neighborhood, but discontinued the work after one year and began the study of medicine at home, which he continued till twenty-one years old and then began studying under a preceptor, continuing about two years. He then removed Arkansas, and in a short time after to Illinois, where he practiced six months. In 1880 he returned to Indiana and located in Gibson County, where he practiced two years, attending lectures at the Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1881. In 1882 he came to Huntingburgh, where he has since resided. In 1884 he returned to the Medical Institute at Cincinnati, from which he received a diploma June 2, 1885. January 25, 1881, he was united in marriage to Flora B. Martin, and by her has two children: Edith Beatrice and Garrett Eugene. In politics the Doctor is a Democrat, and a member of the Indiana Eclectic Medical Association, and an able and successful physician.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



ERNST JACOB BLEMKER, Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Prussia, July 4, 1829, and is an only child of Jacob W. Blemker, a native of Germany. The mother died in 1830 and the father immigrated to the United States in 1836, locating in Lexington, Ky., and in 1848 came to Dubois County, Ind., where he resided a number of years. He now resides near Huntingburgh, having married Mary Ann (Geiger) Dunn. After his motherís death, our subject was raised by an uncle and received a fair education in German. At the age of fifteen he came to the United States and lived on a farm near Lexington, Ky., until he was eighteen years old when he came to Dubois County and learned grist milling at which he worked four years. He then learned the tannerís trade of Andrew Kaiser and has followed that business ever since. He owns a good farm of 200 acres near town and is doing well financially. In 1853 he married Sophia Bremer. They have four children living: Henry J., Ernst W., Daniel G. and Lydia K. Mr. Blemker is a stanch Republican and has served three terms as township trustee. He has been a member of the town council five or six years. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



ISAAC BEELER, M.D. (deceased), one of the early physicians of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born near Dayton, Ohio, October 14, 1828, and was raised on a farm in his native State, receiving a good education. Early in life he began the study of medicine, and later graduated from the medical institution of Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1851 he came to Huntingburgh, and soon acquired the leading practice in the county, and was well and favorably known as a competent physician and excellent citizen. He was a member of the Christian Church and a Republican in politics and an active worker for his party. December 3, 1846, he married a Miss Hughes, who died leaving one child, a daughter; January 4, 1863, he married Mary Robertson, a native of Spencer County, who still survives him. They were the parents of five children: Elmer E., who is a young man preparing for the medical profession, Alvin, George, Sarah E. and Nancy.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



JOHN HERMAN HENRY BORMANN, farmer of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, April 10, 1822, a son of Henry and Margaret A. (Rathje) Bormann, who remained in their native country until our subject was thirteen years old, when they immigrated to the United States and located in Pittsburgh where the father worked for a few years. They then came to Dubois County, Ind., and located on a farm where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father died October 24, 1847, and the mother August 20, 1847. Henry remained at home until twenty-four years of age, when he worked at teaming and gardening for about two years. In 1848 he bought the farm of eighty acres where he now lives, and which he has since increased to 120 acres. November 22, 1849, he married Katharine Beamer, native of Hanover, Germany, born 1832. They have two children: William and Mary. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church and he is a Democrat in politics.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



LEONARD BRETZ, a prominent early settler of Dubois County, was born February 28, 1829, in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, and is one of six children born to Jacob and Barbara (Bausman) Bretz. The father, a farmer in the old country, immigrated to the United States with his family in 1837 and engaged in like pursuits five miles east of the present town of Huntingburgh, Ind. He remained there until his death in 1878 followed by his widow two years later, both having been members of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. Leonard passed his youth and early manhood at the old home farm, securing only such education as the limited facilities of that day afforded. When seventeen years old he went to Louisville, Ky., where he clerked four years in a hardware store. In 1851 he embarked in general merchandising in Huntingburgh, and has since continued here with more than ordinary success, has justly won what is far better - an honored name and a record untarnished by dishonesty or otherwise. The same year of his embarking in business in Huntingburgh, Barbara Gerhard, a native of Bavaria, became his wife, and they are the parents of eight living children: Anna B., Wilhelmina F., Emeline, William L., Gustav C., Walter F., Matilda S. and John Henry. Mr. Bretz is a Democrat, and although by no means an office seeker he takes an active interest in public affairs, and is jury commissioner for Dubois County. He and family belong to the Lutheran Reformed Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



JACOB G. CATO, one of the oldest native pioneers of the county, was born March 2, 1838; his parents were Green Cato and Rhoda Alley, natives of the ďOld DominionĒ and Tennessee, respectively. The father grew to manhood in his native State, and removed to Tennessee, where he was married and where his wife died; he was married again in that State and moved to Indiana, and located on a farm near Huntingburgh; he lived in various places in the county until 1860, when he removed to Pike County, where he died November 31, 1877. The mother died on the same day, three years later. Jacob received his education from the primitive log schoolhouse of early times; he remained at home until attaining his majority, with the exception of three years, when he lived with Dr. Hughes. July 4, 1859, he married Lauretha Shively; after marriage he moved to Spencer County, where he lived four years. In 1864 he returned to this county and located on the farm where he has since resided; he has 125 acres of good land. They have seven children: Anna, Mary E., Jacob B., Emma J., William W., Benjamin F. and Lulu B. Mr. Cato and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Democrat, having held the office of assessor five years.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HERMAN DIECKMANN, undertaker and carpenter, of Huntingburgh, Ind., began working at the undertaking business about 1873; he has a fine line of goods and everything necessary for carrying on a successful business; his native country is Germany, where he was born December, 1834; he is a son of Henry Dieckmann (see sketch of Gerhard Dieckmann); he remained in the old country until seventeen years old, and then removed with his parents to the United States, when he learned the carpenterís trade and worked in Louisville, Ky., until 1854, when he came to Huntingburgh; he has since worked at his trade with the exception of the time spent in the army. September 26, 1864, he was drafted for service and was enrolled in Company K, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteers; he was with Sherman on his famous march to the sea, and through the Carolinas. November 13, 1856, he was married to Josepha Neumann, who died in 1874, having borne him eight children, six now living: Matilda, Amelia, John, Earnest, Elnora and Amelia. In 1877 he married Hannah Anthony, by whom he is the father of four children: Rosa, Wilhelmina, Frank and Theodore; he is a Democrat and member of the Lutheran Church. His wife is a Catholic.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GERHARDT DIECKMANN, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, Huntingburgh, Ind., began business in July, 1855, in a frame building on First Street, where he remained about one year; he then built a brick building on Third Street, where he conducted his business until about 1864, when he bought a two-story brick building adjacent to his present location. This was the first brick building erected in the town. In 1876 he tore it down and erected the large two-story building where he is now doing business; he carries a good stock of ready-made goods in addition to those manufactured by himself. Mr. Dieckmann was born in Oldenburg, Germany, in May, 1830, being the eldest of a family of two sons and two daughters, born to the marriage of Henry Dieckmann and Kate Stumberg, also natives of Germany. The father, who was a carpenter, followed his trade in his native country until 1851, when he came to the United States with his family and located in Louisville, where he remained only a short time; he then came to Huntingburgh, where he has since resided; he is now in his eighty-second year. Gerhardt was reared at home receiving a good education in his native country. At the age of fifteen he began to learn the shoe-makerís trade, serving an apprenticeship of six years; he then came to the United States with his parents, and engaged in business as before stated. In March, 1855, he was united in marriage with Alvina Spitzer, who died in December of the next year. He was again married, in June, 1857, to Margaret Bormann, by whom he is the father of ten children, of whom Charles, Henry, John, William, Rena Wilhelmina, Amelia and Sophia are living.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HENRY DUFENDACH, a prominent merchant of Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of Dubois County, born October 22, 1841, is one of eight children born to Christopher and Mary Elizabeth (Wessler) Dufendach, natives of Germany. They married in the old country, and came to the United States, settling in Dubois County, Ind., where the father followed the life of a farmer. At the breaking out of the war, he bought the Union Grist-mill, in company with another man, and operated it successfully for two or three years, and then sold his interest. The mother died in May, 1872. Henry, our subject, was raised on a farm, receiving little or no education in his boyhood, but has since acquired a good, practical education by his attendance at Sunday-school, and by his own untiring efforts. At the age of fifteen he began learning the cabinet-makerís trade in Huntingburgh, but after working at it nearly three years, abandoned that business and clerked for some time in a store, and afterward worked in his fatherís mill about three years. He then engaged in the general merchandise business with Ernst Pickhardt, and continued in this about three years, when he sold out to his partner and engaged in the same occupation for himself on a small scale. His business increased so rapidly that he built a large brick warehouse, and the following year built his present dwelling house. In 1883 he erected his commodious brick block and has since carried on his business with marked success. In 1873 he bought a warehouse and began buying and selling leaf tobacco, and now handles nearly 500,000 pounds annually. His tobacco house is a two-story frame building, 35x85 feet in dimensions, with a large shed addition. Since 1870, he has engaged quite extensively in pork-packing, handling from 500 to 1,200 hogs per year. February 23, 1862, he married Johanna Boehmer, who died June 26, 1872, leaving three children, two now living: Ernst C. and Franklin H. April 20, 1873, he married Mary Schroder, a native of Ohio. To them were born four children, three now living: Norman C.W., Cora V., and Cornelia A. Mr. Dufendach and family are members of the Evangelical Association, and he is recognized as a successful and enterprising business man and a worthy citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



Deb Murray