M.D. LEMOND, a prominent farmer and stock dealer of Dubois County was born in the county, January 28, 1842, being the oldest of eleven children born to the marriage of John B. Lemond and Abselah Miller, natives of North Carolina and Dubois County, Ind., respectively. The father, when a youth, came to the county with his parents and located on the farm where our subject now lives. After his marriage he lived on the home farm for one year, and then moved on a tract of land which he entered about three-fourths of a mile east. He lived there several years, but finally returned to the home farm, where he died September 1, 1862. The mother died in April, 1878. They were among the earliest pioneers of the county, and to such as they is due the credit of the development of the county. M.D. Lemond was reared at home receiving a common school education. He worked on the home farm until the death of his father, when he assumed control, and has since continued to own and work it. He is now the owner of 700 acres of good land, and is probably the largest farmer in the county. He makes a specialty of stock raising, chiefly cattle. October 10, 1883, he was united in marriage with Sallie J. Harris, a native of Spencer County, and to them has been born one child, Charles B., born July 3, 1884. Mr. Lemond resided at Duff Station on the Lake Erie & St. Louis Railway five miles west of Huntingburgh.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



JACOB H. LEMMON, representative of one of the pioneer families of the county, was born February 8, 1840, son of John and Elizabeth (Cimmerl) Lemmon. The father, a native of Kentucky, came to Dubois County, Ind., with his father in 1802, and located on a tract of land near where Portersville now stands. John was raised amid the wilderness, undergoing all the hardships of pioneer life. After marriage he followed farming, sending his products by boats down the White, Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. His death, which occurred in 1872, was a severe loss to his many friends. He was a Republican and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject received a very limited education and passed his boyhood on the farm. July 6, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He remained in the field until January, 1865, then returned home and in November, 1866, he married Martha Jane McMahan, who has borne him two children: McMahan and Louise. He is a stanch Republican in politics, and a member of the G.A.R. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. After marriage, Mr. Lemmon lived on the old homestead until 1872, and then purchased the McMahan farm near Duff Station, where he resided until 1883, when he removed to Huntingburgh where he has since resided. He still controls his farms and is engaged in stock raising.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



WILLIAM R. McMAHAN, M.D., of Huntingburgh, is a representative of one of the oldest and most respected families of Dubois County. He was born September 8, 1843, being the eldest and only son in a family of five children, all living, born to the marriage of Joseph A. McMahan and Nancy Armstrong. The father was born in Kentucky in 1812, as son of William R. McMahan, and was of Scotch descent. In 1818 the family moved to Indiana and settled on a farm two miles west of where Jasper now is, in Dubois County. There the grandfather of our subject passed the remainder of his days, and as a Whig in politics was among the first to represent Dubois County in the State Legislature, and also served as one of the associate judges of the county for a number of years. He died about the year 1835, a member of long standing in the Baptist Church, of which he was a minister. Joseph A. McMahan was raised on a farm in this county, and when a youth learned the tannerís trade, at which he worked until 1832, when he embarked in mercantile pursuits at Jasper. Twelve years later he resided and engaged in agricultural pursuits the remainder of his days. He was an unassuming, honest and industrious citizen, and a man whose character was without a blemish. A Republican in politics, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, he died respected by all who knew him, July 21, 1872. The mother of our subject was of Irish extraction. Born in Kentucky, she came to this State at an early day, and bravely assisted her husband in his lifeís labors. She died June 12, 1872, aged sixty-two years. Dr. W.R. McMahan received but a limited literary education in youth, but being a close observer and great reader, that omission has been supplied in later years. When eighteen years old, the war of the Rebellion began, and espousing the Union cause he enlisted a private and non-commissioned officer, and after Stone River battle was promoted second lieutenant, then first lieutenant. He commanded a company on the memorable march to the sea with Sherman, and also had command of the foragers for his regiment. Returning North at the close of the war he read medicine with an uncle at Mankato, Minn., two years. In 1868 he graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago and since that time has practiced his profession at Huntingburgh, Ind., where he has won success and distinction as a physician and surgeon, and esteem as a private citizen. Since first beginning the study of medicine Dr. McMahan has ever since been a student, and besides being a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the faculty of the Evansville Medical College during the years 1882-83-84, having occupied the chair of Surgical Pathology. He is the present president of the town school board, is one of the directors of the Huntingburgh Bank, is chief surgeon for the Lake Erie and St. Louis Railway, and is a member of the board of examining surgeons at Huntingburgh for pensions. March 23, 1868, Dr. McMahan wedded Louisa Helfrich, who died October 13, 1875, after bearing him four children, three of whom now live. March 8, 1877 Elizabeth Lukermeyer became his wife, and of three children born them two are now living. Dr. McMahan is a Republican, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



JOACHIM MIESSNER, proprietor of the Huntingburgh Woolen-mills, was born in Hanover, Germany, September 8, 1829, being one of four children born to Adolph and Catharine (Lohman) Miessner, natives of the same place as our subject, where they lived and died. Joachim passed his boyhood laboring on the farm. He received a good common school education and at the age of twenty years he left his native land and immigrated to America, locating in Huntingburgh, Ind., which was at that period a very small settlement. He worked at manual labor two years, and secured enough money to make a partial payment on a small farm he had purchased south of town. He cleared and improved the land and has lived there ever since. In 1865 he started a woolen-mill in Huntingburgh with Ernst Zeller as partner. Zeller sold out to Gerhard Koch, and in 1878, Miessner purchased the whole property and has carried on the business with fair success. He uses about ten tons of wool annually, manufacturing a superior quality of jeans, linsey and stocking yarn, and employs about ten hands. In 1850 he married Anna Catherine Harms, a native of Hanover, Germany. They have six children: John Henry, William, Anna, Charles, Maria and August. He is a Republican, and he and family are members of the Evangelical Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



BERNARD MILLER, manager and one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Star Mills, was born in Prussia, March 18, 1848, being one of a large family of children born to Edward and Fredica (Kuhn) Miller, natives of East Prussia and living the greater part of their lives in West Prussia, where they died, the father in May, 1885, and the mother in March, 1868. Bernard was raised in his native country, receiving a good German education. At the age of sixteen years, he began learning the mercantile business and working as a clerk in the stores of Germany until 1877, when he came to the United States, locating first in Pike County, Ind., where he worked in a saw-mill two years, and then came to Dubois County and farmed two years, and later worked as section hand and foreman on the railroad until the latter part of 1884. In March, 1885, he bought a one-sixth interest in his present business, and is meeting with good success, that firm doing the leading business in their county, having a large steam buhr-mill. In 1878 Mr. Miller married Mary Herrudorf. They are the parents of four children: Olga, Dina, Agnes and Arthur. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. His wife is a Catholic.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



CHARLES MOENKHAUS, proprietor of the St. George Hotel, Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Louisville, Ky., March 18, 1860, and is one of seven children born to the marriage of William Moenkhaus and Fredica Ramsbrok, who are natives of Germany. Charles came to Dubois County with his parents when a child, and was raised by them in Huntingburgh, receiving a fair German and English education. He was engaged in the hotel business with his father until February, 1883, when he assumed control of the business, and has conducted it successfully ever since. The St. George is the best hotel in the town or county, and commands the leading local and transient trade, and is well and comfortably furnished throughout. February 4, 1883, he married Louisa Bretz, a native of Dubois County. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and he is a Democrat, and a successful and enterprising young business man.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GEORGE B. MONTGOMERY, M.D., of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born August 12, 1827. He is one of ten children born to John R. and Kate (Brownlee) Montgomery, and is the only living representative of his people. His parents were natives of Kentucky, and the father came to Indiana when about ten years old, and located with his parents in Gibson County, where he spent the remainder of his life. He held the office of recorder of that county for twenty-seven years, and was well and favorably known. Our subjectís grandfather was also quite a noted personage. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, being in the battle of Tippecanoe, and was associate judge of the probate court a number of years. Was a member of the State Legislature from Gibson County, serving a number of terms in that capacity. The immediate subject of our sketch received a fair education in the public schools, and at the age of seventeen began the study of medicine under Drs. Graff and Lewis, and also under Dr. Fullerton, continuing his study two or three years. He began practicing medicine in Jefferson County, Ill., continuing one year. He then came to Jasper, Ind., and shortly after removed to Winslow, Pike Co., Ind., and made that his home for over thirty years. In the meantime he graduated from the Medical College of Evansville in 1868. In 1883 he came to Huntingburgh, where he is at present engaged in the practice of his profession, meeting with good success wherever he goes. He was appointed assistant surgeon of the Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and was afterward promoted to surgeon of the regiment. January 4, 1851, he married Kate Whitman, a native of Warrick County, Ind. They have three children living: Clarence, Viola and Helen. He is a stanch Republican, and has held the office of examining surgeon for pensions for ten or twelve years, but was removed under Clevelandís administration. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the G.A.R. He is the last of his generation, having no living relatives.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



CHRISTIAN MORGANTHALER, native of Germany and son of John and Margaret Morganthaler, natives of the same place, was born June 20, 1826, and was raised and received his education in his native land. At the breaking out of the war in 1848, he came to the United States, and located in New York City, where he worked for about seven years in a store. He then came to Evansville and worked at manual labor about sixteen years. In 1872, he came to Dubois County and settled on the farm where he now lives. His farm of 170 acres is well improved with good buildings. May 2, 1856, he married Barbara Decker, a native of Germany. They have five children: Fred, Matilda, Louisa, Anna and Mary. Fred and Louisa are school teachers and are doing well for themselves. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Morganthaler is a Republican, casting his first vote for Lincoln. He is an upright, honest citizen and highly respected.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HON. WILLIAM E. NIBLACK, of Vincennes, judge of the supreme court, was born in Dubois County, Ind., May 22, 1822. The father who was of Scotch descent was born in Kentucky, and the mother, a native of Virginia, was of English descent. The former came to Indiana, in 1817, and the latter in 1820. They were married near Petersburg, Pike Co., in 1821. Our subject, spent his early life on a farm, and when sixteen years old entered the State University, but pecuniary circumstances did not permit him to finish his course and graduate. He followed surveying three years, and in the meantime studied law. In 1845 he began practicing law at Old Mount Pleasant, and in 1849 was elected to the Legislature. At various times he held the office of senator, circuit judge of the judicial district, holding the positions about eight years. He soon after moved to Vincennes and was elected to Congress in 1856, serving by re-election in the thirty-fifth and thirty-sixth Congress until 1861. He served in the State Legislature during the session of 1863, and in 1864 was again elected to Congress serving continuously until March 4, 1875. In 1864 he was delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Chicago, and the same at New York, 1868. In 1876 he was elected a judge of the Supreme Court of Indiana and served one term of six years, and was re-elected in 1882. Although he descends from the Whig and Federal party, he has always been a stanch Democrat. He is considered a just and upright judge, a true man and earnest citizen, and wears his honors in a manner that shows him to be worthy the many exalted positions he has filled.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GERHARD N. NIEHAUS, one of the oldest pioneers of the county, was born in Hanover, Germany, April 11, 1808, son of Frederick Niehaus and Margaret Knostmann, natives of the same place. Gerhard remained in Germany until he was about twenty-four years old. Having learned the printerís trade, he came to the United States and located first in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then in Louisville, Ky., where he remained until 1838. He then came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought the farm on which he has since resided. It was then a wilderness, but now is a fine farm of 320 acres. He was married in 1837, to Katharine M. Aransmann, by whom he is the father of four children, one now living, Bernhard. His wife died July 28, 1877. He is a member of the Evangelical Church, and a worthy and useful citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



BARNARD NIEHAUS, son of the above, was born November 28, 1838. He received a good education, and has worked on the farm all his life, having had, for the past three years, complete control of it. March 17, 1863, he was united in marriage to Eliza Wesseler, native of the county, born January 10, 1844. To them were born seven children: Katie, Benjamin, Sarah, Reuben, Levi, Flora and Lawrence. Both he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church, and in politics he is a Democrat, and is one of the best and most influential farmers in the county.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



ERNST PICKHARDT, editor and proprietor of the Huntingburgh Signal, the only German paper in Dubois County, was born in Hueckesnagen, Rhine Province, Prussia, August 29, 1832, being second of a family of nine children born to William and Wilhelmina (Leyer) Pickhardt, both natives of the same country. The father, who was a cabinet-maker by trade, came to the United States in June, 1850, locating at Evansville, Ind., where he followed his trade until about 1867, when he came to Huntingburgh, and continued at his trade here until his death. The father was a quiet, unassuming citizen, and was fairly successful in life, from a financial standpoint, having accumulated considerable property. Himself and wife were members of the Evangelical Church. The subject of this sketch was raised in his native country, receiving a fair education in his native language. He learned the cabinet-makerís trade of his father at the age of twelve years. He came to the United States with his parents, and worked at his trade until 1854, then clerked a year in a store in Evansville. In 1856, he came to Huntingburgh, and engaged in a general merchandise business, continuing until 1878. In 1867 he, in company with a cousin, Mr. Emil Reininghaus, started the Huntingburgh Signal. In 1878 he assumed complete control of the paper, and has managed it ever since, meeting with extraordinary good success. September 24, 1854, he married Elizabeth Weisheimer, a native of Hesse Darmstadt. They have seven children living: Edmund, Ernst W., Louisa, John, Amalia, Anna and Clara. He is a Democrat in politics, but conducts his paper on the independent principle. He is a Mason. Himself and family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. He has held various local offices of trust in the town and county, such as township trustee, and member of town and school board, and is recognized throughout the county as an enterprising and successful newspaper man, and an upright Christian citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



WILLIAM T. POWELL was born April 29, 1845, and is the elder of two children of James and Sarah (Oxley) Powell, natives of Virginia and Indiana, respectively. The father was married in this county, and has since been living on a farm. The mother died in 1878 or 1879, and about two years later the father took for a second wife, Mrs. Sarah Hendrickson. William remained at home until about twenty years old, when he married and began farming for himself in Ferdinand Township, where he lived until 1868, and then exchanged it for his present farm of eighty acres. He also owns eighty acres of land in Warrick County. February 23, 1865, he was married to Missouri Fisher, by whom he is the father of seven children, five now living: James T., John L., Ella A., Mary and Morman M. In politics, Mr. Powell is a Democrat, and is a well known man of the county.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



H. WILLIAM PRIOR, a well known farmer of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, August 28, 1826. He came with his parents, John H. and Mary (Engel) Prior, to America in 1842, and located in Huntingburgh, then consisting of two or three houses. They lived on leased land about six years, when the father died, October 16, 1848, and very soon after, William entered the farm where he now resides. He now owns 120 acres, and has shown great industry in clearing it and getting it in the fine state of cultivation it now is. August 31, 1848, he was married to Mary A. Beamer, born in September, 1831. Twelve children have been born to them, ten of whom are living: Henry, Anna, William, John, Louisa, Frederick, Caroline, Louis, Rosa and Johanna. The two children who died were August, aged eighteen years and Mary, an infant. The family are members of the Lutheran Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



AUGUST RAMSBROK, one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Union Mills, was born in Prussia, January 8, 1841, is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Lohofener) Ramsbrok, natives of the same province, where they lived and died. August received a fair German education, and came to the United States in 1855, locating first in Louisville, Ky., where he commenced the cigarmakerís and bakerís trades, working until 1861. He then enlisted as musician in the Fifth Regiment Kentucky Infantry, serving in this capacity, and also part of the time as baker until 1865, when he came to Huntingburgh and engaged in the leaf tobacco business until 1878, when he bought a one-third interest in his present business, in which he has met with good success. The firm has a large and well furnished steam buhr-mill and commands a good trade. In 1865, Mr. Ramsbrok married Fredrica Winkenhofer. To them were born four children: William H.K., Christian R.F., Henry B. (deceased) and Louisa M. He is a Democrat, and has been a member of the town council over fifteen years. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



JACOB RAUSCHER, was born in Germany, January 5, 1820, son of Daniel and Mary Rauscher, who came to this country when Jacob was a lad about ten years of age. The mother died on the voyage to this country. The father located in Stark County, Ohio, where he remained five or six years, after which he came to Dubois County and entered a tract of land near Huntingburgh, where he remained until his death. He was twice married, Jacob received little or no education. When he was about fifteen years old his father died, and he remained with his step-mother about a year, and then worked out by the month, remaining with one man three successive years, and receiving $8 per month. In payment he took eighty acres of land where he yet resides; by industry and good management he now owns between 500 and 600 acres. In 1865, he sold his farm and moved to Huntingburgh and engaged in the milling business, but at the end of five years, he purchased his old farm. He also owned an interest in the Star Mills of Huntingburgh, but has lately given all his attention to stock-raising. He chose for his wife, Anna M. Schavley. To them were born ten children, five now living: Isaac, William, Mary, Emma and Eva. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



DANIEL REUTEPOHLER, cashier of the Huntingburgh Bank, was born December 17, 1850, and is one of seven children born to Herman and Catherine (Solman) Reutepohler, natives of Prussia. The father a cooper by trade, came to America in 1836, locating first in Kentucky, and finally came to Dubois County, Ind., where he has since lived, coopering and farming being his occupations. He has been very successful from a financial standpoint, and has lived in this county thirty-four years. He married our subjectís mother in Ohio, in 1842 or 1843, and her death occurred in August 1855. Later, he married Margaret Mann, his present wife. Our subject passed his boyhood on the farm with his parents. He secured a fair English education, and by his own efforts is a good German scholar. At the age of twenty, he hired out as teamster to Henry Kunz, of Holland, this county, with whom he remained one year. He then worked at the same business in different parts of the county. He attended college at Berea, Ohio, one year, then returned home and sold books in the county in order to secure money to finish his education, and soon after, attended the Evansville Business College, from which he graduated in 1874. He married Margaret Kunz, and worked with his father-in-law in the store until 1881, when he began selling drugs on his own responsibility. In 1883, he came to Huntingburgh and assumed his present position, which he has filled faithfully and well ever since. In 1876, his wife died, leaving one child, Ella Nora. He married Carrie Huenefeld in 1882. They have one child, Cora Ella. Mr. Reutepohler is a Republican, and a man who takes an interest in all private and public enterprises. He is secretary of the Huntingburgh Building and Loan Association. He and wife are members of the German Methodist Church, and he is a prominent and successful business man of Dubois County.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HERMAN ROTHERT, a prominent citizen of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, October 28, 1828, and is an only son of four children born to Gerhard and Margaretta (Kuhran) Rothert, natives of the same country. The father, who was a house carpenter by trade, came to the United States in 1840, and soon after, located in Huntingburgh, where he worked at his trade, bought lots and built a house in order to prepare a home for his family, whom he had left in the old country. In 1840, he returned home, but came back the same year, bringing his oldest daughter with him. In 1844, he sent for the remainder of his family, and continued working at his trade in Huntingburgh until his death, which occurred in 1855. His widow is still living, at the age of eighty-five, and resides in Huntingburgh. The subject of this sketch was raised in Germany, and received only a common education in his native language. At the age of sixteen, he began learning the carpenter trade of his father, working at it off and on, until he was twenty-eight years old, working also at any manual labor by which he could obtain money. He soon evinced a disposition for trade, and began in the merchandise business, also trading in fur and tobacco, and engaged in the pork-packing business. Later, he began keeping hotel, conducting it successfully for a number of years, also continuing the other enterprises with the exception of store-keeping. Mr. Rothert proved very successful in the tobacco business, and enlarged his warerooms from time to time, so that now he has two large buildings, one three and a half stories high, and covering an area of 150x152 feet. He give employment to sixty or sixty-five hands ten months during the year, and handles about 1,000,000 pounds of leaf tobacco annually. He is in every sense of the word a self-made man, having started in life with but little money, and little or no English education, but by untiring energy and perseverance, he has arisen step by step, until he now possesses a competency second to none in southern Indiana. He owns 2,500 acres of good land, mostly in Dubois, Pike and Warrick Counties. September 19, 1854, he married Franziska Weber, a native of Bruchsal City, Baden, Germany. To them were born five children: Frank J. (deceased), Sophia, John H., Hugo C. and Otto A. Mr. Rothert has always been a reliable Democrat, and was a public official here a number of years, and also postmaster for some time. He has never aspired to any office of note. He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. His wife who is an intelligent, accomplished lady, is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Rothert who is president of the Huntingburgh Bank, is an enterprising and successful business man, owns property in Greene County, Ark., and has the reputation of being a thoroughly upright and honest citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township

Deb Murray