HENRY SCHROER, merchant, Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of Dubois County, was born April 7, 1844. He is a son of William and Catherine (Christopher) Schroer, natives of Prussia, who married in the old country and came to the United States in 1836 or 1837, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, where they remained about four years, and then moved to Dubois County. They chose for their home a tract of land a few miles west of Huntingburgh. Here they passed the remainder of their lives, the fatherís death occurring October 14, 1872, and the motherís March 7, 1869. William was quite successful from a financial standpoint. He cleared and improved his land and was forced to undergo many of the hardships incident to pioneer life. His son Henry, received as good an education as could be obtained in the schools of his day and at the age of twenty-two he left home and worked at manual labor in Boonville, Ind. He soon returned home and feeling the necessity of a better education, began selling scientific and religious books in order to obtain money for schooling. He attended the Rockport Indiana College for some time where he fitted himself for teaching. He continued at this work until he was twenty-seven or twenty-eight years of age, when he returned home and took control of his fatherís farm, which he subsequently bought and where he lived until 1880, when he moved to Huntingburgh and engaged in general merchandising. His business increased so rapidly since 1884 that he took Henry Katterjohn as partner. They have had excellent success and are doing a thriving business. April 15, 1869, he married Dinah Feldwisch. To this union were born five children: Emma M., Louis William, Sarah, John and Wesley. Mr. Schroer is a stanch Republican and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is recognized throughout the county as an enterprising and upright church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HENRY SCHNECK, proprietor of a wagon, blacksmith and repair shop, began business September 1, 1871, in the building he now occupies. He has an extensive trade and is doing a thriving business. He was born November 16, 1843, in Wurtemburg, Germany, and is one of eight children born to Henrich P. and Christina (Green) Schenck, natives of the same place, in which country they lived and died. The father who was mayor of Ossweil, died in 1869, and the mother in 1861. Henry received a good education in the schools of his native country, and at the age of fifteen years began to learn the machinistís trade, serving six years as an apprentice. In 1864 he came to the United States and worked five years in Jeffersonville, Ind., meanwhile learning the blacksmithís trade. Until 1871 he worked in Louisville, Ky., and then came to Huntingburgh where he has since resided. October 29, 1872, he married Katharine Limp. To this union four children were born: Charles, Lizzie, Otto and Hugo. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church and he is a Democrat.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



HERMANN H. SCHMETT, native of Hanover, Germany, was born August 21, 1838, being the second son is a family of four children Adam and Kate (Bellar) Schmett, who came to the United States in 1852. On reaching Troy, Ind., the father took sick and died. The family came on to Dubois County, Ind. Herman worked on farms for wages until the breaking out of the war when he enlisted in Company G, Sixtieth Indiana Volunteers, serving until March 21, 1865. He participated in the pursuit of Morgan, siege of Vicksburg and the Texas campaign, and numerous lesser engagements. Soon after returning home he bought the farm where he now lives. He has now a farm of 120 acres and has erected good buildings on it, and is giving considerable attention to stock-raising. November 30, 1865, he married Katie Bergmann, a native of the county. They have six children: Frederick, Adam, Bernhard, Frank, Louis and Edward. Both parents are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is very liberal, usually voting for the man rather than the party. He favors Democratic principles.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



DR. CHARLES W. SCHWARTZ, druggist and practicing physician of Huntingburgh, Ind. was born near the city of Strasburg, Germany, December 23, 1850, and is the eldest of three children born to Phillip and Kathrina (Miller) Schwartz, natives of the same place. The father was a carpenter by trade and came to the United States in 1852, followed by his family a year later. He located in Posey County, Ind., where he followed his trade and engaged in mercantile pursuits until his death in 1882. The mother died in 1873. Our subject received a fair education in German and English,, attending Evansville Business College for some time, at the age of seventeen he began clerking in a store at Evansville where he remained six months. He then returned home and began the study of medicine and attended the University of Louisville, Ky., in 1872, 1873 and 1874, and graduated from that school in the latter year. He came to Perry County and practiced for some months in Leopold during his vacation in 1873. He settled permanently in Huntingburgh and soon established a good practice. In 1880 he began keeping a drug store, which has proved very successful to the Doctor. He carries an excellent stock of goods and has a large share of the trade in town and county. August 26, 1874, he married Emma Fromm. To them were born two children: Esther S. and Charles H. The Doctor is a Republican in politics and was pension examiner for three years. He is a member of the County Medical Society and was president of that body one year. He is a Mason and was raised in the Lutheran Reformed Church of which his wife is a member. Dr. Schwartz is one of the energetic and prosperous business men of Dubois County, and is recognized as a well read and efficient physician and an excellent citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



C.C. SCHREEDER, manager of the Huntingburgh Argus, was born January 19, 1847, in Berlin, Germany, being the only son of Charles Frederick and Mary (Arensmann) Schreeder. His father dying, his mother, with the subject of this sketch, then a mere lad, sailed for the United States soon after, and arrived at Huntingburgh, Ind., in the autumn of 1852, where they took up their residence. About a year afterward his mother married the Rev. Frederick Wiethaup, a minister of the German Evangelical Association, and the family moved to Evansville, Ind., where Rev. Wiethaup was in charge of a congregation. From Evansville the family moved to the northeastern part of Indiana, where several years were spent in different localities. On account of the then meager school facilities of that part of the State, the opportunities of young Charles for acquiring an education were limited. In the fall of 1861 his step-father was appointed to the pastorship of a church in Dayton, Ohio, and during the familyís stay in that city he attended the public schools. In the early part of the year 1863, when but sixteen years of age, he enlisted in the Rebellion, joining Company D, Second Ohio Infantry, which company was at once ordered to active duty. He served in the above company as sergeant until the following winter, when he was discharged on account of physical disabilities. During the same winter he went to Evansville, Ind., where he set in to learn the saddlerís trade, but was prevented from so doing by a continuance of bad health. In the meantime his step-father had been stationed at Huntingburgh, and his health continued to fail, he joined his parents at that place. In January, 1865, he again enlisted in the war, this time joining Company E, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, going from Huntingburgh. While in the service he at different time performed various officerís duties, and at Tullahoma, Tenn., he was detached from his company, and upon the special selection of Gen. Dudley, placed on his body-guard in the capacity of orderly, a position which he occupied until the regiment reached Clarksville, Tenn., where the company was mounted, and engaged in scouting and ridding that section of guerillas. While thus engaged on the 17th of August he was severely wounded, disabling him for life. He remained with his regiment, however, and did train guard duty between Clarksville and Bowling Green. The company was discharged on the 26th of October, 1865, when he returned to Huntingburgh, and spent the following winter in recuperating his broken health. He was married, April 12, 1868, to Miss Louisa C. Behrens, daughter of Herman Behrens, the first merchant of Huntingburgh. Two children - a daughter and a son - were born to them. He was then living in Evansville, where, in the year of 1868, a battalion of veterans was organized, of which he was elected lieutenant-colonel, which was quite an honor, he being only twenty-one years of age. In April, 1870, he received the Republican nomination for city assessor of Evansville, and was elected by a large majority. In October of the same year he was elected assessor of Pigeon Township, Vanderburgh County, and held that office until 1872, when he was nominated and elected city clerk of Evansville, and was the youngest man ever elected to that responsible position, being only twenty-five years of age. On account of his aged parents he returned to Huntingburgh in the fall of 1876. He is an ardent Republican, and takes a prominent part in the politics of the county and State, exerting much influence. In 1878 he was elected chairman of the Republican County Committee, re-elected to the same position in 1880, and again in 1884. For the past fifteen years he has attended every Republican district and State convention, and in 1884 was appointed an alternate delegate from the Second Congressional District to the Republican National Convention, at Chicago. In May, 1877, he was commissioned postmaster at Huntingburgh, in which capacity he served eight years, making one of the most efficient officers in the State, the office being conducted in the most thorough business-like manner. Upon retiring from the postoffice he assumed entire control of the Argus, the only Republican newspaper in Dubois County, making that paper the organ of the Republicans, and also one of the best country papers in the State. He is an enthusiastic member of the G.A.R. He joined the order at Evansville, but soon organized a post at Huntingburgh, of which he was elected its first commander, and was re-elected to that position again. He now occupies the position of aid-de-camp on the staff of the department commander, with the rank of colonel.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



CHARLES SHURIG, dealer and manufacturer of tinware, stoves, cane and cider-mills, was born in Saxony, Germany, September 25, 1833, being one of a family of seven children, born to August and Wilhelmina (Kulka) Shurig, natives of Germany, where they lived and died. The subject of our sketch remained in his native country until he was seventeen years old, when he came to the United States in 1851, and searched for his sister, who had come here about a year previously, and found her in Newark, N.J. He remained there about five years and then traveled all over the Western States as far as Kansas, working at his trade, and finally bought a farm in Kentucky, where he remained two years. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted as a home guard, and volunteered as a two monthsí man to guard Cumberland Gap; finally on account of his Union sentiments he was compelled by the Southern guerrillas to leave Kentucky, so accordingly, in 1863, he came to Dubois County, Ind., and started a stove and tin-ware store, remaining in that business ever since, where he has had the best of success. In 1860 he married Mary Johnson, a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of one of the early and prominent families of that State. They have eight children living: Franklin, Charles, William E., Emma E., James Louis, Philip, Henrietta W. and Chester August. In politics Mr. Shurig is a stanch Republican, and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GUSTAV SPITZER (deceased), formerly one of the old and prominent farmers of the county, was born in Solingen, Germany, September 17, 1818, son of John A. Spitzer and Anna Maria Schlagter, who came to the United States in 1832, and located in Louisville, Ky., where they remained about two years, and then came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought forty acres of land. The father died in 1852, and the mother three years later. Gustav received a common school education in his native country. After coming to America he remained with his parents except a short time before the Mexican war, when he worked at the cutlerís trade. He was married to Julia Risch, October 6, 1853. To them were born eight children, four of whom are living: Matilda, Hermine, Conrad Gustav and Emily. Mr. Spitzer was quite successful, financially, and at the time of his death, January 13, 1876, he owned 280 acres of land. He was a member of the Lutheran Church and a good and useful citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



FREDERICK L. STORK, engineer and one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Star Mills, was born December 20, 1851, and is a son of William A. and Mary (Waldmann) Stork, natives of Germany. The father, who was a farmer, immigrated with his wife and three children to America in 1847, and settled in Dubois County, Ind., where he bought a farm and remained until his death in 1880. The mother still resides with a son in Holland, Ind. Our subject received an ordinary English and German education, and at the age of twenty-two years learned the carpenterís trade, and followed it in this county with good success until 1885, when he bought a one-sixth interest in his present business and has given his entire attention to it since. In November, 1880, he married Sophia Louisa Hilsmire, to whom two children were born: Walter Clarence and Stella Hattie. Mr. Stork is a warm Republican, and he and wife are members of the German Methodist Episcopal Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



ADAM STRATMANN was born in Germany, December 8, 1849, and is a son of John and Theresa (Muetterich) Stratman, who came to America in 1856, locating first in Covington, Ky., where he remained three years. He then came to Dubois County, Ind., farming in Jefferson Township until his death in August, 1883. The mother still resides on the farm. Adam lived with his parents in the city and on the farm until he was fifteen years old, and secured a common German and English education. He left home and began learning the blacksmith trade in Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked at this business until he was twenty-one years of age. He then came to Dubois County, and farmed and blacksmithed at home until after the war, when he engaged in the saw and grist-mill business in Schnellville until 1871, and then farmed until 1884. He then came to Huntingburgh and engaged in selling all kinds of building material in which he has been quite successful. In 1873, he married Caroline Schnell, daughter of Henry Schnell, of Jefferson Township. Mr. Stratmann is a Democrat, and a member of the town council and he and wife are Catholics.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



WILLIAM THIES, manufacturer and dealer in furniture at Huntingburgh, Ind., is a native of Hanover, Germany, born February 5, 1841, being an only child of John Thies and Angelina Wiethaup, natives of the same place, where the father died when William was about three years old. Our subject came to the United States with his mother in 1852, and located in Huntingburgh, where the mother died in 1877. He received a limited education, which he has improved in later years by his own efforts, and by contact with business life. At the age of twelve years, he began learning the cabinet-makerís trade, which he followed for about twelve years. In 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company K, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, serving until the close of the war, when he returned home and worked at his trade until the fall of 1865, and then started a planing-mill in company with Henry Winkenhofer, continuing at this about six years. He then sold his interest, and two years later engaged in the tobacco business with Henry Dufendach, at which he continued two years. Until 1884, he was one of the proprietors of the Union Grist-mill. He then sold out, and soon after engaged in his present business, in which he is meeting with good success. Mr. Thies is a successful business man, starting with no capital, he has by good management and industry, acquired a comfortable competency. In 1865 he married Anna Wesseler, to whom eight children were born, six now living: Ellen M., Leah, Samuel, Franklin, Walter N. and Lillie. His political views are Republican, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



VITAL WALZ, proprietor of the pottery and stone pump factory at Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Baden, Germany, April 28, 1829, son of Valentine and Agnes (Fritsch) Walz, who lived and died in Germany; the mother in 1831, and the father, in 1863. Vital was raised in Germany, and learned the pottery trade. He came to the United States in 1854, and soon after located in Evansville, Ind., where he followed his trade nearly four years, then engaged in the business for himself, meeting with good success. In 1880 he came to Huntingburgh and bought out Hermann & Vence, and built his present building in which he is engaged in the manufacture of all kinds of potteryware and tiling. In 1856 Mr. Walz married Fredrica Yager, a native of Baden, Germany. They are the parents of one child, Joseph V. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



DANIEL WESSELER, farmer, of Dubois County, was born in the place where he now resides, December 9, 1849, son of John F. and Margaret (Hartmann) Wesseler, natives of Hanover, Germany. When about twenty-five years old the father came to this country, locating for a short time in Louisville, Ky., and then came to Indiana and bought the farm of eighty acres on which he now resides. He and wife are still living, aged, respectively, seventy-five and seventy-four years. They were among the early settlers of the county, and have seen they country change from a wilderness to its present flourishing condition. Daniel was the only son, and has remained with his parents, taking care of them in their old age. For the past ten years he has had complete control of the farm, which the father increased from eighty to 160 acres. January 1, 1878, he was married to Katharine Miller, native of Germany. To them were born two children: John and Benjamin Franklin. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Church, and he is a Republican, and well and favorably known throughout the county.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



DR. N.H. WILSON, a native of Jefferson County, Ind., was born November 12 1844. He is the third child in a family of five sons and two daughters born to the marriage of John C. Wilson and A.J. Reynolds, both natives of Jefferson County, Ind., and of Scotch-Irish and Irish-English descent, respectively. The father, who was born February 20, 1815, has led a very active business life. He has managed a farm, and has been extensively engaged in stock dealing. He has also been twice in the general merchandise business, in 1851-52 and 1864-65. In 1860-61 he represented his county in the State Legislature. He has been quite successful in business, and, though he began life a poor man, he has accumulated considerable property. He is one of the oldest native residents of Jefferson County, and was nursed by the noted Indian chief, White Eyes. He has been three times married. By the second marriage he is the father of five children, three still living; and by his third wife six, all but one of whom is living. Dr. Wilson was reared at home, receiving his early education in the common schools, and later attended the Lancaster College. From 1862 to 1864 he was a member of the Ninth Indiana Legion, and participated in the pursuit of Gen. Morgan. February 13, 1865, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served until mustered out at Macon, Ga., January 21, 1866. He was promoted to the position of hospital steward, and was in the brigade that received the surrender of Gen. Wolford, and which was later divided into departments in charge of the Freedmanís Bureau of southwestern Georgia. While with Stoneman on his raid he visited Andersonville prison, and now has in his possession a piece of the dead line procured near the Providential Spring. After his return from the war he continued the study of medicine and dentistry, which he had previously begun. He attended the Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, for one year, after which he began the practice of dentistry at Paris, Ind., and the year following removed to Loogootee. He practiced his profession at that place traveling in Pike, Dubois, Martin and Spencer Counties, until 1872, when he came to Huntingburgh. He now probably does more dental work than any other dentist in southern Indiana. In addition to his professional duties he has also, at different times, dealt in stock and been engaged in general merchandising. He is a member of the F. & A.M., Royal Arch degree, and the I.O.O.F., Scarlet degree. Politically he is a Republican, and takes an active interest in all political matters.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GERSHOM P. WILLIAMS, M.D., of Huntingburgh, Ind., born October 24, 1843, is an only son of James L. and Elizabeth (Lynn) Williams, natives of Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. The father was a school teacher, which occupation he followed till his death, in 1844. The mother afterward married John Davis, of Warrick County. She died in 1861. At the age of ten years Gershom P. was bound out to his brother-in-law, Benjamin Fuller, and was raised by him on a farm, receiving a fair literary education in his boyhood days. At the age of twenty he began the study of medicine under Dr. Barker, of Bloomville, Ind., and in 1866 he attended the medical college of Cincinnati, Ohio, completing his course the following year. He then came to Huntingburgh and began to practice his profession. He has remained here ever since, and has met with good success. In 1871 he married Alice G. McDonald. To them were born five children, four now living: Maud Alice, Jennie Gertrude, Ross and Frank. He is a Democrat, and, although he has never aspired to office, has held various offices of trust in the town and county. He is secretary of the town board of health, and member of the American Medical Society. He is a Mason, and was Master of the local lodge three years. During the war he enlisted in Company I, Fifty-third Indiana Volunteers. He was promoted to sergeant of his company. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church, and are worthy and respected citizens.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



PLACIDUS ZARN, O.S.B., rector of the Church of Visitation, of Huntingburgh, Ind., is a native of Canton Graubuendten, Switzerland, born March 2, 1846, and is one of seven children born to Blasius and Rose C. (Willi) Zarn, natives of Switzerland. The father came to the United States in 1856 and located in Tell City, Perry Co., Ind., in 1858, and later removed to Spencer County, where he now resides. Father Zarn began his studies preparatory for the priesthood in 1858, at St. Meinradís College, receiving ordination from that institution in 1868. July 16, 1881, he was appointed to his present charge.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Patoka Township



GEORGE W. ABEL is the son of John and Sarah Abel. The father, a native of Virginia, was born in 1807, and the mother in Pennsylvania in 1825. John served as general of the Home Guards in Ohio, and subsequently engaged in surveying in Ohio and Indiana. After he had located in Dubois County he was elected assessor for many terms, and between the years 1854 and 1860 he represented Martin and Dubois Counties in the Indiana State Legislature. His death occurred September 2, 1875. The subject of our sketch was born November 14 1854. December 29, 1881, he married Margaret Walts of Haysville, Ind. He received a common school education, and in 1882 he was elected justice of the peace, which office he has held ever since. He is a successful farmer, an unprejudiced office holder, and an honest citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Harbison Township



GEORGE ANGERER was born in Germany June 2, 1823. He came to the United States, after landing in Quebec, and finally went to Louisville, Ky., where he worked as a day laborer. Some time afterward he settled on a farm in Dubois County, Ind., where he has since remained. Barbara Laulner became his wife November 8, 1847. She was of the same nativity as himself, and became the mother of eleven children, seven now living, named as follows: Margaretha (wife of Christian Meyer), John, George, Kathrina, Barbara, and Eva and Lena (twins). December 26, 1873, Mrs. Angerer was called from among the living, after having lived a good and useful life. Mr. Angerer and family belong to the Evangelical Lutheran Church. In politics he is a warm Democrat, and a successful farmer and prominent citizen.

"HISTORY OF PIKE AND DUBOIS COUNTIES, INDIANA" CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1885.
Harbison Township



Deb Murray