Harry Emery Weaver, cashier of the Farmers Bank of Bentonville and a well-to-do landowner of Posey township, this county, was born on a farm in that township, one and one-half miles west of Bentonville, and has lived in that neighborhood all his life. He was born on September 28, 1883, son and only child of George H. and Rachael E. (Thornburg) Weaver, the former of whom was born in that same township and the latter in the neighboring county of Wayne, who are now living in Bentonville.

George H. Weaver was born on a pioneer farm on Williams creek, in Posey township, this county, December 26, 1851, son of William and Lovisa (Messersmith) Weaver, the former of whom was born on that same farm during the early twenties of the past century, a son of George and Catherine (Hanley) Weaver, natives of Pennsylvania, who came from that state to Indiana in the early days of the settlement of this part of the state and after a sometime residence in Wayne county came to Fayette county, where George Weaver entered from the government the northeast quarter of section 30, southeast of Bentonville, and there established his home, he and his wife spending their remaining days on that pioneer farm. William Weaver grew up on that farm, thoroughly inured to the hardships inseparably connected with the lives of the pioneers, and in that neighborhood married Lovisa Messersmith, daughter of Hiram Messersmith and wife, pioneers of that section of the county, who moved from there about the year 1863 to Missouri, where they spent the rest of their lives. After his marriage William Weaver for two years made his home on what is now known as the old Rodney Shipley farm northeast of Yankeetown and then he moved to Madison county, where he bought a farm and where he made his home for twelve years, at the end of which time he returned to the farm on which he was born, southeast of Bentonville, and after four years there moved to a farm just on the eastern edge of Bentonville and thence, after awhile, to a farm two and one-half miles southwest of Bentonville and from there back to his farm in Madison county, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring about 1882. His wife had died about 1863, by which time two of his children were grown and married, and for some time afterward he kept the younger children together, his son, George H., remaining with him until he was sixteen years of age, when he began working for his uncle, John Weaver, on the latter's farm northwest of Bentonville, where he remained for six years, at the end of which time he returned to the old home place and after his marriage a year later established his home there.

For six years after his marriage George H. Weaver remained on his old home farm and then bought a farm of one hundred and twenty-six acres a mile and a half west of Bentonville, where he made his home for ten years, at the end of which time he moved to the farm three-quarters of a mile south of Bentonville, where Frank Weaver is now living, renting the latter place, it being a larger farm than his own, and after six years of residence there rented a two-hundred-acre farm a couple of miles southwest of Bentonville. A year later he returned to his own farm and there continued to make his home for fifteen years, or until in February, 1916, when he retired from the farm and moved to Bentonville and has since made his home in that village, he and his wife being very comfortably situated there. In the fall of 1916 Mr. Weaver was compelled to undergo the amputation of his left leg as the result of complications ensuing from an abrasion of the foot caused by a nail in his shoe. He is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife are members of the Christian church, in the affairs of which they ever have taken an active interest.

On November 21, 1874, George H. Weaver was united in marriage to Rachael Thornburg, who was born on a farm about five miles north of Hagerstown, in Wayne county, this state, a daughter of William and Frances (Spradlin) Thornburg, both of whom were born in that same county, the former a son of Dempsey and Jane Thornburg, who came to this state from Tennessee and established their home in the Hagerstown neighborhood. William Thornburg grew up in that community and married Frances Spradlin, daughter of Wright and Frances Spradlin, who came to this state from North Carolina. After his marriage William Thornburg established his home on a farm in the neighborhood of his boyhood home and there he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in August, 1914.

Harry E. Weaver, only son of George H. and Rachael E. (Thornburg) Weaver, grew up on a farm in Posey township and supplemented the schooling he received in the local schools by a course in a business college at Marion, from which he was graduated, and later took a post-graduate course in bookkeeping, finishing there in 1903. Upon leaving school Mr. Weaver returned to the farm and after his marriage in the fall of 1905 established his home on the farm and there continued farming until he met with an accident while operating a corn-shredder on November 17, 1915, which permanently disabled him from the manual labor of the farm, compelling his retirement from the farm. Upon relinquishing his place on the farm Mr. Weaver moved to Bentonville and aided in the organization of the Farmers Bank of Bentonville, of which institution he was made cashier and is now occupying that important position. He owns the building in which the bank is located and has done much during the short time the bank has been doing business to insure the permanency of the institution. The Farmers Bank of Bentonville was organized and opened for business on July 8, 1916, with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, all paid up, and with the following officers: President, J. K. Smith; vice-president, R. S. Hicks; cashier, Harry E. Weaver, and directors, besides the above-named officers, as follow: J. A. Boyd, A. Boyd, Bent Wilson, George Kelsey, Oliver Thornburg, T. B. Millikin, J. C. Dodson and Warren Munger. The bank has a large, burglar-proof vault, with safety-deposit boxes and is well equipped for the business.

On November 8, 1905 Harry E. Weaver was united in marriage to Bessie S. Mason, who was born on a farm just east of Bentonville, a daughter of John S. and Alice (Norris) Mason, substantial residents of that community. Though permanently retired from the active labors of the farm Mr. Weaver continues to give general supervision to the farm he owns in Posey township as well as to a farm owned by his wife in that same township. Mr. and Mrs. Weaver are members of the Christian church, with the local congregation of which Mr. Weaver has been connected since he was sixteen years of age, and take an active interest in church work, as well as in the general socials activities of the community in which they live, helpful in promoting all good causes thereabout.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


George Washington Lake, one of Fayette county's best-known retired farmers and the proprietor of a fine farm in Jennings township, where he made his home for thirty-five years, but who is now living in the pleasant village of Everton, was born in that village on November 22, 1851. He is a son of Phenas and Rebecca (Lambert) Lake, members of old families in this county and the parents of eleven children, further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, together with a somewhat extended history of the Lake family, going back for centuries in England and detailing the history of the life of William Lake, father of Phenas Lake. William Lake came to Indiana from New Jersey in 1815, settling in Dearborn county, whence, in 1835, he came up the river to Fayette county and settled in the Everton neighborhood; in Jackson township, where he spent the rest of his life and where his son, Phenas Lake, also spent the rest of his life, a farmer and saw-mill owner, justice of the peace and for years one of the most substantial and influential residents of that part of the county.

It was on the home farm at Everton, in the house now occupied by his brother, Ellis R. Lake, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, that George W. Lake grew to manhood. He received his schooling in the Everton schools and from boyhood was a valued aid to his father in the labors of developing and improving the home farm. After his marriage, he then being twenty-six years of age, he established his home on his farm in the southern part of Jennings township, and there resided for thirty-five years or until his retirement from the farm in 1911 and removal to Everton, where he is now living and where he and his family are very comfortably situated. Mr. Lake is the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and ninety acres in Jennings township, which, since his retirement from the active labors of the farm, has been operated by his son, Frederick E. Lake, who is living on the farm.

On November 5, 1876, George W. Lake was united in marriage to Mary Caroline Kerr, who was born on a pioneer farm south of Everton on July 10, 1850, daughter of James and Margaret (Grist) Kerr, well-known and influential residents of that community. James Kerr, who was one of the first school teachers in the Fairfield neighborhood, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, October 23, 1791, and was but eight years of age when his parents left Ireland and came to this country. His father, a political refugee on account of his participation in the Irish rebellion of 1798, left his native land with his wife and two small sons, James and Henry, December 12, 1799, and arrived at the port of Charleston, South Carolina, April 20, 1800. He established his home in the Abbeville district of South Carolina and there James Kerr grew to manhood. There, on March 7, 1815, James Kerr married Nancy McIlwain and in the spring of 1832 he and his wife came West, arriving in Indiana on May 21 of that year, settling in the Fairfield neighborhood, in Franklin county. On July 27 of that same year Nancy Kerr died and on December 23, 1824, James Kerr married Margaret Grist, who was born in the Pendleton district of South Carolina, January 9. 1809, and who came to Indiana with her parents, Simon and Sarah Grist, in 1813, the family settling in Fayette county. During the period of his residence in the Fairfield neighborhood James Kerr taught school and he also taught for some time after moving to the farm south of Everton in this county, where he spent the rest of his life. On January 28, 1828, he and his family moved to that farm in Jackson township and it was not long until James Kerr came to be recognized as one of the strong and influential characters in that part of the county. He took an active interest in the general civic affairs of the community and for some time served as trustee of the township, in that capacity rendering admirable service in behalf of the pioneer community. His last vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln. He and his wife were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith. There were thirteen of these children, all of whom grew to maturity save one son, Hugh, who died when two years of age. James Kerr died on September 16, 1873, at the age of eighty-one years, and his widow survived until January 26, 1884, she being seventy-five years of age at the time of her death.

To George W. and Mary Caroline (Kerr) Lake three children hare been born, namely: Mamie G., who married Lafayette Moore, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and has one child, a son, Daniel George; Frederick Ellis, who is at home with his parents at Everton, and Walter Arden Lake, now farming in the Bentley neighborhood, who married Eva Pierce and has one child, a son, Arden Pierce, born on October 1 7, 1916. Mr. Lake is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and of the Improved Order of Red Men and Mrs. Lake is a member of the Pythian Sisters and of the Daughters of Rebekah, both taking a warm interest in the affairs of these several organizations. Mrs. Lake is a member of the Methodist church and she and her husband have ever given their earnest attention to local good works, helpful in promoting all measures having to do with the advancement of the common welfare of the community in which they have lived all their lives.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Lafayette Moore, trustee of Jackson township and one of the best known and most substantial farmers of that township, was born in that same township and has lived there all his life. He was born on the old Moore farm, now occupied by his elder brother, Joseph A. Moore, in section 23 of Jackson township, October 2, 1875, son of Daniel W. and Caroline (Beckett) Moore, both natives of this section, members of pioneer families, and both of whom are now deceased, the latter dying about eighteen years ago and the former surviving until May 1, 1916. Daniel W. Moore was one of the most substantial farmers in the southern part of the county and for some time served as trustee of Jackson township. He and his wife were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second son and the fourth child in order of birth. In a biographical sketch relating to Joseph A. Moore, the elder son, presented elsewhere in this volume, there is set out a comprehensive history of the Moore family in this county, and to that the attention of the reader is respectfully invited for additional information in connection with the present sketch.

Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, Lafayette Moore received his elementary schooling in the local schools and supplemented the same by a course in the Central Normal School at Danville, this state, and at the university at Valparaiso, and for three winters taught school at Everton. After his marriage in 1894 Mr. Moore located on the farm on which he is now living, about one mile east of Everton, and has ever since made that place his home, having been quite successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising. Like his father and his grandfather before him, he has long been a buyer and shipper of live stock and has also done well in that line. Mr. Moore is a Democrat and has ever given his close attention to local civic affairs. In the fall of 1914 he was elected trustee of Jackson township and is now serving in that important capacity, giving his most thoughtful and intelligent attention to the public service.

On May 15, 1894, Lafayette Moore was united in marriage to Mamie G. Lake, who was born in Jennings township, this county, a daughter of George W. and Caroline (Kerr) Lake, both members of prominent pioneer families in the Everton neighborhood and further and extended mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Mrs. Moore completed her schooling in the high school at Everton and she and her husband have ever given their earnest attention to the general social and cultural affairs of the community in which they live. Mr. Moore is a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Improved Order of Red Men and in the affairs of these organizations takes a warm interest. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have a very pleasant home and have one child, a son, Daniel George Moore, born on March 20, 1895. Mrs. Moore has been county president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union for the past three years and was chosen as delegate to the national convention at Seattle, Washington, which she attended.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Hon. James K. Mason, joint representative in the Indiana state Legislature from the district comprising the counties of Fayette and Franklin, former chairman of the Fayette County Farmers Institute, one of the best known farmers and stockmen in Fayette county, the proprietor of a fine farm in Posey township and for years actively identified with all movements having to do with the improvement of rural conditions throughout this part of the state, is a native son of Fayette county, born in Posey township, and has always lived in that township. He was born on a farm about three fourths of a mile southeast of Bentonville on April 11, 1879, son of James Henry and Emma F. (Kemmer) Mason, the former a native of the state of Ohio and the latter of this county, for years well-known residents of the Bentonville neighborhood, who later moved to Cambridge City, where James :Henry Mason spent his last days and where his widow is now living, very comfortably situated.

James Henry Mason was born on a farm about eight miles east of the city of Hamilton, in Butler county, Ohio, August 18, 1848, son of James Mason and wife, who moved from New Jersey to Ohio, driving through with a spring-wagon which contained all their belongings and settled in Butler county. There James Mason made a success of his farming operations and was regarded as a quite well-to-do farmer when, shortly after the close of the Civil War, he disposed of his holdings in Butler county and came to Indiana and bought a farm about four miles north of Connersville, on the west side of the Milton pike, just south of the county line, where he established his home remaining there for some years, at the end of which time he bought the Othniel Claypool farm of about four hundred and eighty acres, one and one-half miles east of Bentonville, where his grandson, the subject of this sketch, now lives, the place known as the old James McCullum farm. The handsome old brick house, of Colonial architecture, which still stands on that place, now remodeled and modernized, with a furnace heating plant and the like, was erected by James McCullum in 1848 and is back thirty-four rods from the road, being approached through an avenue of pine trees. On that place James Mason spent the rest of his life, becoming one of the wealthiest men in the northern part of the county. He was a man of large public spirit and took an active part in political affairs, for years being regarded as one of the leaders in the Republican party in this county. He was stricken with apoplexy while addressing a Republican meeting during a campaign and died shortly afterward, sincerely mourned throughout the entire county. James Mason left four children, James H., John S., Mrs. Hannah Thompson and Mrs. Kate Murphy.

James H. Mason was a young man when the family came to this county from Ohio and he at once took an active part in the work of improving and developing the home farm in Posey township. At the age of twenty-eight he married Emma F. Kemmer, who was born in that township, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Campbell) Kemmer, members of prominent pioneer families of that neighborhood, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Elizabeth Campbell was a kinswoman of Alexander Campbell, the founder of the Christian, or Disciples church. After his marriage James H. Mason continued farming in Posey township until about 1905, when he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Bentonville, presently moving thence to Cambridge City, where he died on August 31, 1911, and where his widow is still living. He and his wife were the parents of four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Clarence A., Mrs. Maggie M. Beeson, who is living across the line in Wayne county, about a mile and a half east of the old Mason home, and Dorothea E., now Mrs. Grover Castner, living in Cambridge with her mother.

James K. Mason was four years of age when his parents moved from the old home farm to the farm northwest of Bentonville and was eighteen years of age when they moved back to the old home place, where he is now living. He received his schooling in the high school at Bentonville and has ever sedulously supplemented the same by exhaustive home study and wide reading until he has come to be one of the best-informed men in the county. After his marriage in the fall of Igor he rented the old home farm where he was born and there established his home. Two years later he bought at administer's sale an adjoining "eighty" that had been a part of his Grandfather Mason's original homestead, and in the fall of 1910 he bought from his father, paying one hundred dollars an acre for the same, sixty acres of the home place, including the house. Upon the death of his father he inherited ninety acres additional and now is the owner of two hundred and thirty-two acres of the old home place, besides a one-fourth interest in a section of land in Briscoe county, Texas, owned jointly by himself and his brother and sisters. In addition to his general farming Mr. Mason has for years taken much interest in the raising of cattle and hogs for the market and has given much attention to the work of promoting the raising of hogs in this county, promoting the "pig-feeding" contests in all proper ways. In 1915 his little daughter, Elsie, won second prize in this contest at the county fair and in 1916 Mr. Mason had charge of the annual contest and with the preparations for the same, speaking on every possible public occasion in behalf of the movement and urging the boys of Fayette county to enter into the movement. Thirty days before the date of the decision of the contest he and others toured the county with a pair of scales, weighing the pigs that had been entered in the contest and during the final exhibit at the county fair weighed them again, one hundred dollars in prizes being divided among the four winners. Mr. Mason also was continued in charge of that work in 1917 and has done wonders in the way of stimulating interest in hog raising among the youngsters of this county. During the years 1912-13 he was county chairman of the Farmers Institutes and his indefatigable labors in that connection did much toward reviving the interest in such meetings and in re-establishing the work of the farmers institutes throughout the county. When Mr. Mason accepted that chairmanship he found but two such institutes in the county. When he retired from the office there were eleven in the county and all doing good work. From the days of his boyhood Mr . Mason has been an unwavering Republican and has for years taken an active part in local political affairs. In 1912 he was nominated by his party as the candidate for joint representative from the legislative district comprised in the counties of Fayette and Wayne, but was unsuccessful in his campaign, the Democratic landslide in that year nullifying the effects of his canvass of the district. In 1914 he was again nominated from that same district and was elected, serving in the session of 1915. During that session the joint-legislative district was changed, Fayette county being linked with Franklin instead of with Wayne, and in the spring of 1916 when Mr. Mason was re-nominated to succeed himself in the Legislature the district was generally conceded to the Democrats; but the nominee entered the campaign with all the vigor of which he was capable and won out by a majority of two hundred and seventy-four, running ahead of the state ticket in every precinct in the two counties. During the memorable legislative session of 1917 Mr. Mason took much interest in the question of better roads for Indiana and worked vigorously in that behalf, his chief contention being that there should be a cash fund in each county to provide for the construction of all public roads and thus to do away with the present costly system of bond issues for highway purposes, according to his convincing demonstration forty percent of the present cost of building highways in this state being chargeable to interest accruing on the bonds issued for that purpose. In addition to his labors in behalf of a highway commission, Representative Mason stood firmly for the act prohibiting the traffic in liquor in this state, favored woman suffrage and was a supporter of the bill for the creation of a new constitional convention.

On October 9, 1901, James K. Mason was united in marriage to Nellie Manlove, who also was born in Posey township, on the farm where her father still lives, two and a half miles southeast of Bentonville, daughter of John L. and Mary E. (Scott) Manlove, and to this union five children have been born, three of whom are living, Elsie Viola, Mary Florence and Bertha Olive, and two of whom, Carl Scott and James Lester, are dead. Mr. and Mrs. Mason have a very pleasant home and have long been regarded as among the leaders in the general social activities of the community in which they live, helpful in promoting all proper agencies for the advancement of the common welfare not only throughout this county, but throughout the state.

John L. Manlove, father of Mrs. Mason, was born on the farm on which he still lives, October 23, 1846, son of William and Margaret (Munger) Manlove, prominent residents of that part of the comfy and further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume, both having been members of pioneer families in the northern part of the county. Mr. Manlove has always been a farmer on the place where he now lives. In 1876 he married Mary E. Scott, who also was born in Posey township, daughter of John and Margaret (Weaver) Scott, also members of pioneer families. She died in 1910. To that union seven children were born, those besides Mrs. Mason, the second in order of birth, being as follow: Omer S., now living in Cambridge City, who married Nellie Jones and has two children, Martha Ellen and Irving; Lola, wife of Rich Miles, a farmer living near Raleigh, in the neighboring county of Rush; William G., who is with his father on the home farm, where he operates a saw-mill; Eunice, who is now living at Bentonville, widow of Emery Curtis; Arthur T., living on part of his father's farm, who married Ina Hussey and has one child, a son, Russell, and Park M., now living at Milton, over the line in Wayne county, who married Gertrude Baker and has two children, Horace and Mary Olive.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Charles W. Mason, member of the board of commissioners of Fayette county and a well-known merchant of Bentonville, is a native son of Fayette county, born on a farm just southeast of Bentonville, and has lived in that neighborhood all his life. He was born on May 21, 1882, son of John S. and Alice (Morris) Mason, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Iowa, and the former of whom is still living on his fine farm three-fourths of a mile southeast of Bentonville, where he has lived since the days of his young manhood, his father having settled there in the latter seventies.

John S. Mason was born in Butler county, Ohio, July 16, 1851, son of James and Ann (Sheppard) Mason, natives of New Jersey, who were married in that state and then moved to Ohio, locating in Butler county, where they remained until 1865 in which year they came up into Indiana and settled in this county, James Mason buying the northwest quarter of section 36 in Harrison township, four miles north of Connersville on the west side of the Connersville and Milton pike. There the mother died, after which, in the latter seventies, James Mason sold that place and bought five hundred and sixty-three acres, a half-mile strip running east from Bentonville, in Posey township, along the south side of the road, and there James Mason spent the remainder of his life, building up a very fine farm property, two hundred and fifty-one acres of which his son, John S. Mason, now owns, having made his home there for many years. James Mason and wife were the parents of four children, of whom John S. was the last-born, the other being as follow: Hannah, who married Miles Thompson and is now deceased; Catherine, wife of Cornelius Murphy, of Cincinnati, and Henry, who died about five years ago. Since coming into possession of his portion of the home farm John S. Mason has built a new house, remodeled the barn and has done a lot of fencing, draining and clearing, having now one of the best-improved farms in that part of the county. He was about twenty years of age when he moved to that place with his father and upon his marriage, established his home there. His wife died on July 2, 1896. She was born in Iowa, a daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (Harvey) Morris, the former a native of Delaware and the latter of Ohio, who left Butler county, in the latter state, not long before the birth of their daughter, Alice, and for several years made their home in Iowa, returning thence to Ohio, where they remained until about 1875, when they came to Indiana and located at Dublin, where they were living when their daughter Alice married Mr. Mason. Later Mr. and Mrs. Morris came to this county and for a time made their home at Bentonville, later moving to Hartford City, where the former died. Mrs. Morris spent her last days at Kalamazoo, Michigan. To John S. Mason and wife two children were born, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Bessie, wife of Harry Weaver, a banker at Bentonville.

Charles W. Mason was reared on the home farm, receiving his schooling in the schools at Bentonville, and continued farming until in the spring of 1912, when he and Frank D. Hackleman formed a partnership and engaged in the mercantile business at Bentonville, dealers in general hardware and farm implements. That enterprise has proved a pronounced success, the firm having built up an excellent trade throughout that part of the county, their store being stocked with a completeness of detail that would do credit to a town much larger than Bentonville. Mr. Mason has also been interested in the First National Bank of Dublin for the past four years and is a member of the board of directors of the same. He is a Republican and has ever given his close and interested attention to local civic affairs. On November 7, 1916, he was elected member of the board of county commissioners from his district and entered upon the duties of that important office on January 1, 1917.

On February 22, 1905, Charles W. Mason was united in marriage to Claudie Fern Miller, who was born on a farm two miles west and a mile south of Bentonville, in Posey township, a daughter of George and Martha (Cregar) Miller, the former of whom farmed in that neighborhood all his life. In a sketch relating to Frank D. Hackleman, Mr. Mason's partner, presented elsewhere in this volume, there are additional details relating to the Miller family in this county, Mr. Hackleman's wife's mother having been a sister of Mrs. Mason's father, George Miller. In December, 1881, George Miller married Martha Cregar, who was born near Cedar Grove, in the neighboring county of Franklin, a daughter of Samuel and Malinda (Brackeney) Cregar, both of whom were born in that same county. Samuel Cregar farmed all his life near Cedar Grove and both he and his wife died in 1902. George Miller died in 1903 and after his death his widow and children moved to Bentonville, where Mrs. Miller now makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Mason. George Miller and wife were the parents of three daughters, Bessie (deceased), Mrs. Mason, and Grace E., wife of Thomas McKee. Mr. and Mrs. Mason are members of the Christian church at Bentonville and Mrs. Miller has been a member of that church for more than thirty years. The Masons have a pleasant home and take a proper interest in the general social activities of their home town, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Clarence G. Carr, the well-known public auctioneer at Glenwood and proprietor of the livery barn there, was born on a farm in Rush county, about two and one-half miles northwest of Glenwood, October 18, 1880, son of Guy B. and Jessie F. (Bussell) Carr, the former of whom was born in Ohio and the latter in Indiana, who are now living at Glenwood.

Guy B. Carr was born in Butler county, Ohio, November 10, 1855, a son of Guy A. and Elizabeth (Blue) Carr, the former a native of the state of New York and the latter of Virginia, born in that portion of the Old Dominion now comprised in West Virginia. When fifteen years of age Guy B. Carr came to Indiana with an elder brother and located with him in Rush county. There he worked at farm labor until his marriage in 1878, he then being twenty-two of age, after which he began farming for himself on rented land in Rush county. Six or eight years later he came over into Fayette county and bought a forty-acre farm northwest of Glenwood, in Fairview township, and there lived for about eighteen years, meanwhile increasing his holdings by the purchase of an adjoining tract of thirty acres. In 1892 he bought a place of one hundred and forty-eight acres on Williams creek, in the eastern part of Fairview township, and in 1903 he sold his original farm and moved to this latter farm, where he made his home until his retirement from the active labors of the farm in 1913 and removal to Glenwood, where he and his wife are now living. Mr. Carr has long given his close attention to public affairs and served for five years during the nineties as assessor of Fairview township.

On January 17, 1878, Guy B. Carr was united in marriage to Jessie F. Bussell, who was born on a farm about five miles northwest of Glenwood, in Rush county, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Jane (McMillan) Bussell, old settlers and well-known residents of that part of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Carr are earnest members of the Christian church and their children also are members of the church and, as well as their parents, are active workers in the same. There are four of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: Otis, a draughtsman in the office of the Atlas Engine Works at Indianapolis, who married Maude Simpson and has two children, Virgil and Edith; Ethel, who married Edwin McGraw, of Milton, and has three children, Minnie, Robert and Ernest, and Minnie, wife of Scott Powell, a farmer, of Harrison township.

Clarence G. Carr grew to manhood on the farm, receiving his schooling in the graded school at Fairview and lived at home until his marriage when twenty years of age, after which he began farming on his own account, farming the place on Williams creek owned by his father, and two years later moved to the old Bussell farm in Rush county, where he made his home for two years, at the end of which time he moved to the Kirkpatrick farm near Ging's Station, where he lived for about two years. He then spent another year on the Bussell place and then for five years made his home on the Stout farm near Ging's Station, and a year on the Kinder farm farther east. He then, in October, 1913, moved to Glenwood, where he ever since has made his home. It was in the spring of 1913 that Mr. Carr began his career as an auctioneer by taking a course in the Jones School of Auctioneering at Chicago, and he since then has been quite successful as an auctioneer and crier of public sales, his services being in demand both in this county and in the neighboring county of Rush. In the fall of 1913, upon taking up his residence in Glenwood, Mr. Carr built a commodious livery barn there and in the following December started in business in the general livery line. The following summer he added automobile livery to his establishment and has since done a general garage business in connection with his horse-livery business. Since November 13, 1916, he has held the contract as rural mail carrier on route No. 28 out of Glenwood. In the fall of 1914 Mr. Carr built a handsome house just south of the interurban track, on the eastern side of the county line, in Glenwood, and is therefore still counted a resident of Fayette county. During his residence in Rush county he served for two years as assessor of Union township and he also has served as a member of the town board in Glenwood, but takes no particularly active part in politics. He and his wife are members of the Christian church and also take an interested part in the general social activities of their home town.

On March 6, 1901, Clarence G. Carr was united in marriage to Lulu McClure, who was born in the village of Fairview, this county, a daughter of George and Leuticia (Caldwell) McClure, both of whom also were born in this county, the former at Fairview and the latter in Harrison township. George A. McClure was born at Fairview on September 3, 1838, a son of John and Amanda McClure, and there lived until his marriage on October 9, 1861, to Leuticia Caldwell, who was born on the old Caldwell homestead in the northeastern part of Harrison township, the place now owned and occupied by her brother, Daniel Caldwell, a sketch of whom, presented elsewhere in this volume, gives details of the history of the Caldwell family in this county.

After his marriage Mr. McClure lived for a time on the Caldwell farm and then moved to Rush county, where he followed farming for years, later returning to Fairview and for ten or twelve years thereafter making his home in the old Fairview Academy building, which he bought and reconstructed for a home, and in 1905 moved to Connersville, where he spent his last days, his death occurring there on May 21, 1909, since which time his widow has been making her home with her children. To George McClure and wife were born seven children, namely: Mary Amanda, wife of George Desborough, of Connersville; Julia Belle, wife of O. Morton Moffitt, of Indianapolis; Alice, who married Garrett Gray, of Connersville, and died in the fall of 1895; Samuel J., of Falmouth, Rush county; Florence A., wife of William Elwood, of Connersville; William, also of Connersville, and Lulu, wife of Mr. Carr. George McClure was an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and was an earnest member of the Christian church, as is his widow. To Mr. and Mrs. Carr four children have been born, namely: Russell Guy, born on February 21, 1903; Roscoe Von, October 28, 1904; Hazel Florence and Harold Floyd (twins), September 19, 1911, the last-named of whom died on December 15, 1911.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Frank Cummins, one of the best-known farmers and horsemen of Fayette county and the proprietor of a well-improved farm of eighty acres just west of the village of Bentonville, on which place he makes his home, is a native son of Fayette county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Posey township on September 2, 1859, son of John D. and Catherine (Williams) Cummins, prominent residents of that community and further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume.

Until his marriage in the fall of 1880 Frank Cummins made his home on the farm on which he was born and after his marriage he began farming a place of forty acres two miles west of Bentonville, where he lived until 1901, when he moved to his present farm of eighty acres one-half mile west of Bentonville, where he has since made his home and where he is very comfortably situated, he and his wife having a very pleasant home there. For about twenty years and up to about four years ago Mr. Cummins had given much attention to the raising of fast horses and training them for the track. Some of these horses he raced personally and for years was one of the best-known horsemen in this circuit. Nine of the horse raised by Mr . Cummins he himself raced. Among these was "Angie W.", with a mark of 2 :11-1/4, pacing, and 2:16-1/4 trotting. Another of these horses was "Redbird," with a mark of 2:18-1/4. Both of these animals, however, actually worked faster for Mr. Cummins than the official mark given them, "Angie W." having done a mile in 2:06-1/4 and "Redbird" in 2:10-1/4. "Prince Patchen," another of Mr. Cumminsís horses and a colt from "Redbird," had a record of 2:18-1/4 and actually worked a mile in 2:11-1/4. "Angie W." also was a "Redbird" colt. For some years past Mr. Cummins has been living practically retired from the more active labors of the farm and is now taking things somewhat easier than during his earlier years of practical farming and horse raising.

Mr. Cummins has been twice married. On September 30, 1880, he was united in marriage to Flora Ayers, who was born on a farm about a half mile east of the old Cummins homestead in Posey township, a daughter of Levi and Susan (Jennings) Ayers, and who died in 1893, leaving one child, a daughter, Hazel, who married George Bridgeman, now living near Lewisville, in the neighboring county of Henry, and has one child, a daughter, Wilma. Some years later while racing "Redbird" in Ohio Mr. Cummins met there Dora Focht, who was born in Union township, Auglaize county, that state, and on March 23, 1898, the two were united in marriage. Mrs. Cummins is a daughter of Daniel and Maria (Justice) Focht, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio, whose last days were spent on the farm in Auglaize county, Ohio, on which Mrs. Focht had lived for sixty years. Daniel Focht was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, and was reared to farming, a vocation he followed all his life, when a young man he moved over into Ohio and there married Maria Justice, who was born in Union township, Auglaize county, and in that county he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, the former dying in 1896 and the latter, in August, 1913.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


David Baker, one of Fayette county's best-known retired farmers and a substantial old citizen of Fairview township is a native son of that township, born on the farm on which he is now living, two miles east of Falmouth, and has lived there all his life. He was born on February 14, 1815, son of John and Mary (Hanna) Baker, both of whom were born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, who became pioneers of Fayette county and here spent their last days, substantial and influential pioneers of the Falmouth neighborhood.

John Baker was born on a farm in the near vicinity of Paris, in Bourbon county, Kentucky, February 1803, son of Abraham and Elizabeth Baker, the former of whorn was born on July 7, 1764, and who were married on March 18, 1800, making their home in Bourbon county, Kentucky, where eight children were born to them, of whom John was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: David, born on August 11, 1801; Harrison, April 3, 1805; Mahala, March 3, 1807; Nancy, February 1, 1809; Ellen and Eliza (twins), July 2, 1811, and Daniel, June 22, 1814. In the fall of 1824 Abraham Baker, seeking land for his sons, came up into Indiana and settled in Fayette county, giving each of his sons a farm in the northeastern part of Fairview township. He bought three eighty-acre tracts, the place where David Baker now lives, and across the road from that place, where now the Fitzgerald farm is, he bought a quarter section. On this latter tract he established his home, and there his younger son, Daniel, remained with him until his death, the other sons, John and David, occupying the nearby "eighties," Harrison selling out and moved to Wabash county, where he died. The above three sons spent the rest of their lives on the farms which they opened and cleared back in the twenties. Elizabeth Baker, wife of Abraham, died on October 5, 1826, about two years after settling here in the then wilderness and Abraham Baker survived until January 17, 1832.

In the fall of 1826 John Baker, second son of Abraham, went back to his old home in Kentucky and there on December 12, 1826, was united in marriage to Mary Hanna, who was born in that same community in Bourbon county on October 30, 1801. The following spring he returned to Indiana with his bride and settled on the farm two miles east of Falmouth, which he had begun to clear in 1824 and where he had put up a log cabin for the reception of his bride, and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, earnest and industrious pioneers of that community. As he prospered he increased his original holdings there to one hundred and twenty acres and later bought an adjoining tract of one hundred and forty acres on the north. On that pioneer farm Mary (better known as "Polly") Baker died on December 2, 1858, and john Baker, her husband, survived her many years, his death occurring in April, 1892, he then being in the eighty-ninth year of his age. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the last-born, the others being as follow: Elizabeth, now deceased, who was twice married, her first husband having been William Dickey and the second, Dave Weimer; Harrison and Eliza Jane (twins), the latter of whom died when eight years of age and the former of whom died in April, 1892; James, who lives in Milton; Sallie Ann, who married Guy Jackson and is now deceased; Harriet, who married John Stuckey and lives in Grant county, and Mary Jane, of Falmouth, widow of Tillman Van Buskirk. David Baker still has the spinning wheel used by his mother, "Polly" Baker, and the saddle bags which his grandfather and his father brought with them from Kentucky. He also has the old family Bible, a venerable volume bound in sheepskin and printed in New York in 1814, in which is carefully set out the record of births and deaths and marriages in the family of Abraham and Elizabeth Baker and of John and "Polly" Baker. John Baker and his wife were earnest members of the Methodist church, as were the former's parents, and took an active interest in church affairs in the early days of the community in which they settled, religious services frequently being held in their home in the days before the settlement had an established house of worship, and their children were reared in that faith.

David Baker has always lived on the farm where he was born and has always followed farming, becoming the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and fifty-eight acres with a nice country home on it. That farm he sold two years ago, but he continues to make his home there, living with his brother-in-law, who bought the place, and is quite content to spend the rest of his life on the place on which he was born and which he has helped to develop from pioneer times.

On May 8, 1901, David Baker was united in marriage to Dora Iva Pierce, whp was born in the neighboring county of Franklin, a daughter of Cornelius and Isabel (Chance) Pierce, who years ago moved from Franklin county to New York City, where the father became a member of the metropolitan police force and where he died. After his death his widow and children returned to Franklin county and presently moved thence to the neighborhood of Morristown, in Shelby county. There the widow Pierce married again and presently moved back to New York. Her daughter, Dora Iva, remained in Shelby county until her marriage to Mr. Baker. She died at her home in Fairview township in the fall of 1908. She was a member of the Christian church.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Deb Murray