Omer Doniker, one of Posey township's well-known and substantial farmers and the proprietor of a fine farm where he now lives, two miles south of Bentonville, besides other land in the county, was born in Posey township and has lived there all his life. He was born on October 4, 1869, son of Martin and Levona (Shipley) Doniker, both of whom spent their last days in Posey township.

Martin Doniker was born in Germany on January 9, 1815, and lived there until he was about twenty-three years of age, when, following the expiration of his term of military service, he came to this country and located at Cincinnati, where he found work at his trade as a tailor, later coming up into Indiana and locating at Connersville. There he worked as a tailor until his marriage, after which he moved onto the Templeton Beeson farm, two and one-half miles west of Bentonville, where he farmed until after the death of his wife about 1873, he being left with three small children, whom he was compelled to place in the hands of kind neighbors for rearing. After the death of his wife Mr. Doniker remained on the Beeson farm, in the employ of Mr. Beeson, and was thus engaged until after his children had grown up and established homes for themselves, when he began making his home alternately with the children and thus spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring at the home of his son, Omer, the subject of this sketch, on January 16, 1902. His wife, who was born Levona Shipley, daughter of Adam Shipley. was born on a farm in the northwestern part of Posey township, this county, and was twice married, by her first husband, S. W. Hendricks. having had two children, namely: Mrs. Phoebe Vare, widow of Ora Vare, who is now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Bright, at Indianapolis, and Sanford Hendricks, who lives in Berrien county, Michigan. By her marriage to Mr. Doniker she was the mother of three children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Jennie, who married Benjamin Copeland and now lives on a farm four miles north of Connersville, and Anna, who married Alonzo Wallace and after his death married his cousin, Linville Wallace, and lives at Milton, over the line in Wayne county.

Omer Doniker was but four years of age when his mother died and he was taken in charge by Mrs. Hester Florea, who lived in the southwestern part of Posey township and who died when he was seven or eight years of age. Two of her sons, Thomas and Albert Florea, remained on the farm and Omer Doniker remained with them and continued making his home on that farm, later working for Dr. J. M. Patterson, whose wife, a niece of Mr. Florea, became the owner of the place and thus continued until he was nineteen years of age, when he began "working out" for others. After his marriage in 1892. Mr. Doniker began farming for himself on the old Leven Ferguson farm in the southeastern part of Posey township, now the Frank Florea farm. A year later he moved to the Carver farm that had belonged to his wife's father and lived there until 1907, when he moved to the farm on which he is now residing, two miles south of Bentonville, and there has made his home ever since. In addition to the well-improved farm of ninety acres on which he makes his home, Mr. Doniker also is the owner of one hundred and forty acres of the old Carver farm and is doing very well in his farming operations. In his political faith he is a Republican and takes a proper interest in the general civic affairs of the community, but has not been a seeker after public office.

Mr. Doniker has been twice married. On February 24, 1892 he was united in marriage to Myrtle E. Caldwell, who was born on a farm in section 30 of Posey township, a daughter of Enoch and Sarah Jane (Scott) Caldwell, the former of whom was born on a pioneer farm in the northwestern part of Harrison township, a son of Joseph and Salena (Ferguson) Caldwell, pioneers of that community and further and fitting reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Enoch Caldwell grew up on the old Caldwell farm where Scott Caldwell now lives, and after his marriage bought the farm now owned by Cleve Caldwell in the northwestern part of Harrison township. From that place he moved to what is now known as the Carver farm on the southern edge of Posey township, a place of one hundred and forty-six acres, where his daughters, Myrtle and Sylvia were born. From that place he moved to the Train Caldwell farm, two miles south of Bentonville, this giving him the ownership of three farms. In 1880 he moved back to his first farm and he and his brothers, Horace and Alexander, and their father there conducted a dairy farm. Enoch Caldwell there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in March, 1885. His widow survived him just ten years, her death also occurring on that farm. In his earlier manhood Enoch Caldwell was one of the best-known school teachers in Fayette county. He later served as a justice of the peace in and for his home township and as assessor of the same and in many ways ,did well his part in behalf of the community in which he spent all his life. He and his wife were the parents of five children and the family were earnest members of the Christian church. These children were Cora, Sylvia, Myrtle, Alice and Scott. Cora Caldwell, now deceased, was the wife of L. K. Tingley. Alice Caldwell is the wife of Fred M. Hackleman. Scott Caldwell lives on the old home farm. Myrtle Caldwell, first wife of Omer Doniker, died on December 18, 1905, and on September 17, 1907, her widowed sister, Sylvia, married Mr. Doniker. By his first marriage Mr. Doniker is the father of three children, Russell Harold, Lester E. and Ruth Levona, all of whom are at home. Mr. Doniker and his family belong to the Christian church. and he is a member of Lodge No. 84 of the Independent Order o f Odd Fellows.

Mrs. Sylvia Doniker was first married on September 16, 1896, to Wellington Beeson, who was born near Beesons' Station over the line in Wayne county, a son of Mark and Ellen (Harvey) Beeson, both of whom were born in that same neighborhood. The Beeson family, one of the oldest in this part of the state, finds further and fitting mention elsewhere in this volume, the family having been prominently represented in this community since pioneer days. Wellington Beeson grew up on the old Beeson home place and lived there until his marriage to Sylvia Caldwell, after which he moved to a farm one mile south of the present home of the Donikers, and there he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring ,there on November 5, 1899. He left a widow and two daughters, Eva and Fern. His widow and daughters continued living on that farm until her marriage to Mr. Doniker. She still owns the farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres. The Donikers' have a very pleasant home and take an interested part in the general social activities of their home community, helpful in all good causes.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Gabriel Ginn Powell, one of the best-known and most substantial farmers of Fayette county and the proprietor of a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres, the old Powell homestead in the northeast corner of Fairview township, rural mail route No.15 out of Bentonville, was born on that farm and has lived there all his life. He was born on August 14, 1848,a son of Isaac and Mary Viola (Ginn) Powell, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of this county, whose last days were spent on the farm on which their son, the subject of this sketch, is now living.

Isaac Powell was born in Nicholas county, Kentucky, and was about fifteen years of age when his parents Zenas and Charity (Baker) Powell came up into Indiana with their family in 1825 and settled in this county, where their last days were spent. Zenas Powell, was a well-to-do farmer of the Carlisle neighborhood in Kentucky, but when the settlement up here in this part of Indiana began to expand so promisingly in the twenties he determined to put in his lot with that of the settlers here and in 1825 he and his wife and all of their children, save their eldest son, Nathan, came here seeking a permanent location. Zenas Powell entered the southeast quarter of section 34 in Harrison township, a little more than a mile northeast of Harrisburg, and there established his home in the then wilderness. . Not long afterward his wife, Charity, died and he married again and for a time thereafter lived at Milton, but moved to a farm two miles west of his old home and there he spent his last days, his death occurring on April 27, 1857. His son, Zenas Powell, Jr., bought the interests of the others heirs in the place and there he farmed the rest of his life. Zenas Powell, Jr., was born near Carlisle, Kentucky, October 12, 1805, and was twenty years of age when he came, to this county with his parents. Here he married Lydia Caldwell, who was born on the farm .now owned by Scott Caldwell, northwest of Harrisburg, the southwest quarter of section 34, adjoining the old Powell home, a daughter of Joseph and Miriam (Chadwick) Caldwell, the former of whom, a native of Maryland, was one of the earliest settlers in this county, having been one of the occupants of the old blockhouse back in the days when the Indians were troublesome. Miriam Chadwick was born in North Carolina and also was among the early arrivals in Fayette county, her parents having come here in pioneer days. Zenas Powell, Jr., died on September 17, 1883, and his widow survived him until January 23, 1899. They were the parents of nine children, namely: Lewis F., long since deceased; Mary Jane, who married Horace H. Elwell and is now deceased; Emmaline, who married I. Zeller and is now deceased; Charity, also deceased, who was the second wife of I. Zeller; Eliza, who died when two years of age; Malinda, who died unmarried; James, who died in childhood; Margaret, who is still living on the old home farm, and Sarah Catherine, wife of L. L. Broadus, of Connersville.

When twenty years of age, about five years after his arrival in this county, Isaac Powell married Elizabeth Dale, who was born on a pioneer farm one mile west and one mile north of Harrisburg, a daughter of Alexander Dale and wife, pioneers of Fayette county, who later moved to Wabash county, and to that union seven children were born, namely: Squire, who went to Philadelphia and married there, but came home with consumption and here died; Harriet, who married Hugh A. Dickey and now lives in Grant county, this state; Enos, who moved to Wabash county and died in the city of Wabash; Nancy, who married James Ross, of Wabash county, and died there; Alfred, who died in childhood; William Joseph, and another who died in infancy. The mother of these children died in 1846 and in 1847 Isaac Powell married Mary Viola Ginn, who was born in 1821 on a pioneer farm in the Nulltown neighborhood in Columbia township, this county, a daughter of Gabriel and Hannah (Wood) Ginn, early settlers in that community, who had come up here from Kentucky. Hannah Wood was born near Havre de Grace, Maryland, and was but four years of age when her parents moved to Kentucky, where she grew to womanhood and where she married Gabriel Ginn, later coming up into Indiana and settling in this county. About 1836 Gabriel Ginn moved from the Nulltown settlement to Connersville and established his home at the point now occupied by the Big Four freight depot and was living there during canal days. His wife taught school for some time in their home there. Gabriel Ginn took an active part in public affairs in those days and for seven years served as clerk of the court.

To Isaac and Mary Viola (Ginn) Powell were born five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being Thomas Jefferson, Mary Elizabeth, Samuel K. and Sarah Desdemona, all of whom are living save the two last named. Thomas Jefferson Powell is a well-known farmer of this county, who lives on the Dan Lewis farm, a mile east of Fairview. Mary Elizabeth Powell married George Looney and is now living at Rushville. Sarah D. Powell married John Matthews, of Arlington, and died about two years ago. In 1880 Samuel K. Powell married Ida Murphy and began farming in the north edge of Fairview township. He was killed in an accident on Christmas night in 1891, and left a widow and three children, Mary Estella, Donald G. and Homer. Mary Estella Powell married Oliver Manlove, a farmer in Posey township, and has two children, Elsie Louise and Robert G. Donald G. Powell lives on the farm just west of the old Powell homestead in the north edge of Fairview township. He married Meta Chance and has two children, Lowell C. and Helen Lorene. Homer Powell, who married Ruby Dickey, is farming the old Powell farm and lives in a separate house on that farm. For eight years or more during the days of his young manhood, Samuel K. Powell was a school teacher, teaching in the schools at Fairview and at Falmouth and the Baker school at "Yankeetown." He was an active Republican, was interested in the Patriotic Order of the Soils of America and in the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and was a member of the Christian church, as is his widow, who is now living on the old Isaac Powell farm, keeping house for her brother-in-law, the subject of this sketch. She was born at Hamilton, Ohio, in 1860, daughter of Cornelius and Katherine (Mason) Murphy, both of whom also were born in that city, and who came to this county when their daughter, Ida, was about four years of age and settled in the Bentonville neighborhood. There Cornelius Murphy died in 1879. His widow is now living, in Cincinnati.

Isaac Powell became one of the most substantial farmers in the western part of the county and had a wide acquaintance throughout the county, this acquaintance being enlarged by his years of activity as an auctioneer and particularly as a crier at live-stock sales, he thus coming to know nearly everybody in the county. For some time he served as county assessor and in other ways contributed to the public service. After his marriage in 1830 he and his wife started keeping house in a cabin on his fatherís farm, but shortly afterward bought the farm in the northeastern corner of Fairview township, where he spent the remainder of his life and where his son, the subject of this sketch is now living. Very little, if any, of that land was cleared at the time he bought it and he had a difficult task in clearing the place and bringing it under cultivation. One field near the house he cleared while the timber was still green and the fertility of that particular .field was permanently impaired thereby.

Gabriel G. Powell has always lived on the farm where he was born and is a lifelong farmer. For years he has given close attention to the raising of high-grade horses and hogs, and has a fine lot of draft horses and purebred Duroc-Jersey hogs. He is the owner of two hundred and forty acres of excellent land and is accounted one of the most substantial farmers in that part of the county. Like his father, Mr. Powell is genial and hospitable in his demeanor and is widely known throughout the county. Though he has never married he is not wanting in natural affection, for he remained with his parents in their old age and ever since the death of his brother, Samuel K. Powell, has been like a father to the latter's children.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Burl Eddy, a former well-known business man of Connersville, now living on a wel1-improved farm that he owns on the western edge of Columbia township, this county, was born in that township on April 14, 1867, and has lived in this county all his life. He is a son of George Willis and Louisa (Cox) Eddy, both now deceased, the former of whom also was a native of Fayette county, and the latter of the neighboring county of Franklin.

George Willis Eddy, former trustee of Columbia township, was born on a pioneer farm in that township in 1828, a son of Jonathan and Jane (Hall) Eddy, early settlers in that community. Jonathan Eddy was born in Massachusetts about the year 1798 and in the days of his young manhood came to Indiana with the Perrin family and others, and bought land in Columbia township this county, where he spent the most of the remainder of his life. He was a quite well-to-do farmer for that period and in addition to his home farm in this county was the owner of farm in Marion county occupying the present site of Irvington, the eastern annex to the city of Indianapolis. He and his wife were the parents of three children, James, Mrs. Nancy Jane Allen and George Willis.

Reared on the homestead farm in Columbia township, George W. Eddy grew up familiar with the trials and hardships of pioneer living and in turn became a farmer on his own account, spending his entire life as a farmer in his home township. He was an excellent farmer, and an active, representative citizen of the community in which he lived, for some years serving most acceptably as trustee of his home township. He died on April 10, 1904, and his widow survived him for more than twelve years, her death occurring on July 23, 1916. She was born, Louisa Cox, on a farm in the neighborhood of Andersonville, in Franklin county, this state, a daughter of Joseph and Anna (Paisley) Cox, natives of Virginia who had lived in both Kentucky and Ohio before coming to this state id who moved from here to Illinois, where their last days were spent. George W. Eddy and his wife were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: Ellsworth, who lives on a farm near Columbia; William, who died on September 1, 1873, at the age of nineteen years; Anna, who married Timothy Carroll, after whose death she married George McCombs, of Connersville, and died at her home in that city on May 5, 1911, and Viola, who married James Carroll and died in 1886.

Burl Eddy was reared on the home farm in Columbia township, receiving his schooling in the local schools, and early learned the tinner's trade at Connersville, where he presently established a tin shop of his own and for years did a general business in tinning, roofing and in installing furnaces, following his trade in that city for about twenty-five years, at the end of which time, in June, 1913, he retired from business in the city and moved back to the old Eddy homestead in Columbia township. Two years later he bought his present farm of one hundred and fourteen acres on the west edge of that same township and has since made his home there, engaged in general farming, in which he has been quite successful.

On March 30, 1898, Burl Eddy was united in marriage to Margaret Leona Stevens, who also was born in Columbia township, this county, a daughter of William J. and Ellen (Stephen) Stevens, the latter of whom died more than sixteen years ago, and the former of whom is now making his home with his daughter, Mrs. Eddy. William J. Stevens was born at Laurel, in the neighboring county of Franklin, August 6, 1853, a son of Abner and Elizabeth (Hires) Stevens, the former of whom was born in this county, and the latter in the state of Pennsylvania. Abner Stevens was born and reared in Harrison township, this county, a son of Charles and Letitia (Thorp) Stevens, early settlers in that part of Fayette county. Charles Stevens was born in. Virginia and when a child moved with his parents to Kentucky, where he was reared. As a young man he came up into Indiana, locating in Harrison township, this county, about two miles north of Connersville, in 1820. While living there he married Letitia Thorp, a member of one of the first families to settle in Fayette county, and after his marriage took up a tract of "Congress land" in the southwestern part of Columbia township, where he lived until his retirement, in old age, his last days being spent with his daughter, Mrs. Cotton. Abner Stevens was but a child when his parents moved from Harrison township to Columbia township and on the home farm in the latter township he grew to manhood. After his marriage he located at Laurel, in the neighboring county of Franklin and there made his home until after three of his children were born, when he returned to this county and located on his old home farm in Columbia township, where his wife died in 1900. She was born, Elizabeth Hires, in Pennsylvania, and was but a child when her parents, John and Sarah Hires, came to Indiana and located at Laurel, where her father was for years engaged in the grocery business. After the death of his wife Abner Stevens retired from the farm and thereafter made his home with his children, his death occurring at Connersville in 1908. He and his wife were members of the United Brethren church and their children were reared in that faith. There were six of these children, five sons and one daughter. Mary Ellen, the only daughter, died at the age of seven years. The five sons, Charles, William J., Alonzo, Curtis and all lived to maturity.

William J. Stevens remained on the home farm until his marriage in 1875 to Ellen Stephen, daughter of Levi and Elizabeth (Walker) Stephen, and then began farming on his own account and has remained a life-long farmer. His wife died on November 30, 1900, and since then he has been making his home with Mr. and Mrs. Eddy. To him and his wife four children were born, those besides Mrs. Eddy, the first-born, being Clara, wife of Harry Smith, superintendent of the county infirmary; Clifford G., a farmer in the southwestern part of Columbia township, who married Nora Revalee and has four children, Ethel, Marie, Evan and Frances, and Benjamin, a furnace setter, living at Indianapolis, who married Sarah Spears and has one child, a daughter, Fern. Mr. and Mrs. Eddy have two children, sons both, George William and Theodore Chime. Mr. Eddy is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias and takes an active interest in the affairs of both of these organizations.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Henry P. Doenges, of Connersville, one of the most highly skilled patternmakers in this part of the country, was born at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, August 11, 1860, son of Simon and Amelia (Kring) Doenges, and is a brother of Simon Doenges, postmaster of Connersville, whose biographical sketch presented elsewhere in this volume gives a full account of the Doenges family in this part of the country.

Until he was sixteen years of age Henry P. Doenges continued to live at Lawrenceburg, where he received his schooling and where he learned the rudiments of the cabinet-maker's trade. He then for some time lived with his mother's folks in various places in the West and also for a time at Indianapolis, most of the time while thus moving about continuing his employment as a cabinet-maker. In 1882, he then being past twenty-one years of age, he located at Connersville and went to work for the Connersville Furniture Company and was thus engaged for the greater part of the time during the next five or six years. He then for a time was engaged at his trade in wheeling and Parkersburg, West Virginia, and about 1888 returned to Connersville, where he went to work in the blower factory of the P. H. & F. M. Roots Company as a pattern-maker, a branch of craftsmanship which he had acquired in addition to his knowledge of cabinet-making and general wood-working. Ever since then Mr. Doenges has been engaged as a patternmaker and has done very well. He is an artist in his line of craftsmanship and his services are in constant demand, now making patterns for both the automobile factories at Connersville, as well as for some of the other local factories. He takes a just pride in his labors and gives his most studious attention to the plans entrusted to him.

In 1884, two years after locating at Connersville, Henry P. Doenges was united in marriage to Barbara Gauck, who was born near the village of Morris, in Ripley county, this state. a daughter of Fred and Lena (Hildebrand) Gauck, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Indiana. Fred Gawk was but a child when he accompanied his parents from New Jersey to this state, the family settling in Ripley county. His father and mother spent their last days at Oldenburg, in Franklin county. Fred Gauck married Lena Hildebrand, who was born in Ripley county, this state, daughter of John and Barbara (Schontz) Hildebrand, natives of Germany. John Hildebrand upon coming to this country first settled in Cincinnati, but later came on up into Indiana and settled in Ripley county, where he bought a farm and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. Fred Gawk died in Ripley county and his widow is still living there.

Mr. and Mrs. Doenges have three children, Flora, Martha and Ahlma. Mrs. Doenges is a member of the Catholic church and takes an earnest interest in parish affairs. Mr. Doenges is a member of the local tribe of the Improved Order of Red Men and takes an active interest in the affairs of the same.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


George D. Messersmith, one of Columbia township's well-known and substantial farmers and proprietor of a well-improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres a short distance northwest of Nulltown, where he and his family are very comfortably situated, was born in that township and has lived there all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in that township, September 11, 1857, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Ward) Messersmith, well-known residents of that community, both now deceased.

Peter Messersmith also was born in Columbia township and lived there all his life. He was born in 1834, a son of Peter and Mary (Grosslow) Messersmith, who were born and married in Germany and who had one child born to them in the old country, later coming to the United States and proceeding on out to Indiana, locating in this county and becoming early settlers in Columbia township, where they spent the remainder of their lives, industrious farming people. The junior Peter Messersmith was born after his parents came to this county and farmed all his life on the old homestead in Columbia township, where he was born and where he died in 1867. His wife, Elizabeth Ward, was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1831, and was but a girl when her parents, William and Mary (Smith) Ward came over into Indiana and located on a farm just northwest of Nulltown, in this county, where they remained the rest of their lives. William Ward and his wife were born in Rockingham county, Virginia, and were there married, later moving to Ohio and after a sometime residence in Preble county moved to Cleves, in that same state, whence, in the spring of 1837, they came on up the valley of the White Water and settled on a farm near Nulltown, in Columbia township, this county, where William Ward died in the following October, leaving his wife and four small children. The Widow Ward kept her children together and by the exercise of courage and industry maintained her little family until the children were of a self-supporting age, among her labors having been the keeping of a hotel for boarding the laborers on the canal when the canal was being dug through that part of the country. She lived to a good old age, her death occurring in 1894. Elizabeth Ward early evinced an unusual interest in her studies at school and upon completing her schooling in the local schools became a school teacher and was thus engaged for some years before her marriage to Peter Messersmith. To that union five children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: Ida May, who died when four years of age; Franklin, who has been dead a number of years; Marietta Geneva, who is living on the old home farm, and George, who is also living on the old home place and farming the same.

George D. Messersmith was ten years of age when his father died and he grew up on the home farm near Nulltown, from boyhood an able assistant to his widowed mother in the labors of maintaining the home place. After his marriage he and his wife established their home on the old Ward homestead in Columbia township and have ever since made that a place of residence. Mr. Messersmith is farming one hundred and eighty acres and is doing very well, in addition to his general farming, giving considerable attention to the raising of high-grade-live stock, with particular reference to Poland China hogs, raising registered stock. He is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and of the improved order of Red Men a n d in the affairs of these organizations takes a warm interest.

In 1901 George D. Messersmith was united in marriage to Stella Holmes, who was born in Fairview township, this county, a daughter of John P. and Ellen (Reese) Holmes, both natives of Indiana, the former born in Franklin county and the latter in this county. John P. Holmes was born on a farm near the village of Andersonville in 1843, a son of William and Elizabeth (Hope) Holmes, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Virginia parentage, who had lived in the Andersonville neighborhood for some years before their son, John P. was born. When the latter was a boy in his teens they moved to Illinois, where both died about two years later. John P. Holmes then returned to Indiana and located in the neighborhood of Glenwood, where, in 1867, he married Ellen Reese, who was born in this county, in the of Glenwood, daughter of Lorenzo and Rachel Ann (Moffett) Reese, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. Lorenzo Reese was born in 1818 and was but a child when his parents, John and Nancy (Barrett) Reese, came over into Indiana from Ohio and settled in the neighborhood of Longwood, in this county. There Lorenzo Reese grew to manhood and there he married Rachel Ann Moffett, who was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and who was but two years of age when her parents, Thomas and Salome Moffett, came to Indiana and settled in the neighborhood of Longwood, in this county. After his marriage Lorenzo Reese located on a farm near Glenwood, where he died in 1846. His widow married Lorenzo Springer and lived in that same neighborhood to old age. After his marriage John P. Holmes established his home on a farm in the Glenwood neighborhood and farmed there until in November, 1888, when he retired from the farm and moved to Connersville, where he spent his last days, his death occurring in 1891. Since his death his widow has spent much of her time in the homes of her children. Stella Holmes was about seventeen years of age when her parents left the farm and moved to Connersville and she was living there at the time of her marriage to Mr. Messersmith.

To that union one child has been born, a son, Forrest, born in 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Messersrnith are members of the Methodist church and take a proper interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general good works and social activities of the community in which they live, helpful in advancing all movements designed to advance the common welfare.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Joseph A. Moore, one of Jackson township's well-known and substantial farmers and who also for years was engaged as a carpenter and builder at Everton, now living on the farm on which he was born in Jackson township, was born on September 24, 1869, son of Daniel W. and Caroline (Beckett) Moore, both of whom were born in the Everton neighborhood in this county and there spent all their lives, influential residents of the community in which they lived.

Daniel W. Moore was born in Jackson township, this county, January 23, 1840, a son of Anderson and Isabel (Gordon) Moore, both of whom were born in this state, the former in Fayette county and the latter in the neighboring county of Franklin, and who spent all their lives hereabout. Anderson Moore was born on November 20, 1816, a member of one of the first families that settled in Fayette county, and he grew up in this county. He married Isabel Gordon. who was born in Franklin county on March 9, 1820, and who died on November 9, 1859, and their family was reared in this county. On March 14, 1863, Daniel W. Moore was united in marriage to Caroline Ross, who was born in 1839 and who died in 1865. On September 20, 1866, he married, secondly, Caroline Beckett, who was born on December 7, 1844, on a farm two miles east of Everton, a daughter of Azariah T. and Emily (Ross) Beckett, further mention of whom is made in a biographical sketch of their son, Azariah T. Beckett, Jr., presented elsewhere in this volume. Daniel W. Moore established his home on a farm in section 22 of Jackson township, the place now occupied by his eldest son, the subject of this sketch, and there spent the rest of his life, becoming the owner of a fine farm of three hundred and thirty-two acres. He took an active part in local civic affairs and was twice elected trustee of Jackson township, the first time in 1878. He also held other offices of public trust and gave his earnest attention to the public service. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and a member of the Fayette County Protection Society, and he and his wife were members of the Methodist church. His wife died about eighteen years ago and he survived until May 1, 1916. They were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow: Nora B., who married W. H. Snider and is now deceased; Emma, wife of Dr. A. P. Helvie, of Connersville; Lafayette, a farmer of Jackson township and present trustee of that township, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and Alice, who married Roy Jerman and lives on a farm near Billingsville, in the neighboring county of Union.

Joseph A. Moore was reared on the farm on which he was born and where he is now living and there he lived until his marriage at the age of twenty-four years, when he began farming on his own account on another farm in Jackson township, where he remained nine years, at the end of which time he moved to Hamilton, Ohio, where for some time he was engaged working at the carpenter trade. He then returned to this county and located at Everton, where he engaged in business as a carpenter and builder and was thus engaged, making Everton his home, until August 19, 1916, when he returned to the old home farm where he was born and where he is now living, he and his family being very comfortably situated. Though giving his chief attention to his general farming operations. Mr. Moore, who is one of the best-known carpenters and builders in that part of the county, continues his operations as a builder and accepts contracts for building generally throughout that section.

On February 1, 1894, Joseph A. Moore was united in marriage to Catherine Hornung, who was born at Everton, a daughter of Andrew and Caroline (Raber) Hornung, both of whom were natives of Germany, born at Hanau, Prussia, and who came to America with their respective parents about 1851, the two families locating at Cincinnati. Caroline Raber was born in 1836 and was about fifteen years of age when she came with her father to this country, her mother having died in the old county. At Cincinnati, on February 25, 1859, she married Andrew Hornung, who came up into Indiana the next year and located at Everton, in this county, where he made his home for some years and then moved to Connersville, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring there on January 3, 1889. His widow survived him for more than eighteen years, her death occurring on July 10, 1907. Although reared a Catholic, she was a faithful member of the Methodist church and ever saw that her children attended the services of the church. There were eight of these children, two of whom died in infancy and all of the others of whom are still living save Peter, the eldest son, who died in 1913, Mrs. Moore, who is the youngest of the family, having three brothers, George, Andrew and Frank William, and a sister, Mrs. Margaret Veach, living.

To Joseph A. and Anna Catherine (Hornung) Moore eight children have been born. one son and seven daughters. The only son, Edwin L., died when three years of age. The daughters are all living, as follow: Caroline, who married Paul Kidd and lives near Everton; Lura May, who is living at Connersville; Ethel, who is teaching a school, and Mary Catherine, Nora Isabel, Freda Marine and Neva Lavonne, who are at home with their parents. The Moores have a very pleasant home and take a proper part in the genera1 social activities of the community in which they live. Mr. Moore is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Richard A. S. McMullen, one of Fayette county's best-known and most substantial retired farmers and landowners, proprietor of a fine farm in Waterloo township, now living in the nearby city of Richmond, is a native son of Fayette county and has lived here, actively engaged in farming, until his recent retirement and removal to Richmond, where he built a modern house on south Nineteenth street, where he now resides. He was born on May 10, 1845, in an old stone house which is still standing, on the farm which he now owns and on which he made his home until his recent retirement and removal to Richmond, a son of Henry Kendall and Ann (Cave) McMullen, early settlers in that part of this county, who spent their last days in Richmond, this state.

Henry Kendall McMullen was born near Stannardville, Virginia, October 10, 1808, a son of James and Edy (Kendall) McMullen, the former of whom was born in October, 1771, and the latter, February 25, 1775. He grew up in Virginia and there married Elizabeth Taylor, by whom were born four children, two of whom died in Virginia and two of whom came to Indiana, grew up in this county and here reared families. It was about the year 1836 that Henry K. McMullen came to Indiana with his family from Virginia, settling in Wayne county, where his wife died. On April 19, 1838, he married Mrs. Ann (Cave) McMullen, widow of his deceased brother, William McMullen. She was born in Orange county, Virginia, March 19, 1807, daughter of Abner and Ann Cave. In 1839 Henry K. McMullen moved over into Fayette county and settled on a farm in the northeastern part of Waterloo township, the place where the subject of this sketch was born, and there he remained, an active and prosperous farmer, until 1887, when he moved to Richmond, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring about two years later, in August, 1889. His widow survived him for more than twelve years, her death occurring in February, 1902.

Henry K. McMullen over took an active part in local public affairs and held various local positions of trust, in the performance of the duties of which he ever had the best interest of the public at heart. He was progressive in his principles voted for Fremont because of his detestation of the institution of slavery and in his later years warmly espoused the cause of the Prohibition party. He and his wife were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church and he for years was a leader in the local church of that denomination.

Richard S. McMullen grew to manhood on the farm in the southwestern part of Waterloo township, where he was born, and after his marriage in the fall of 1587, his father retiring from the farm about that time, established his home there and remained there until early in 1917, when he moved to Richmond, where he had built a comfortable home and where he now resides. Mr. McMullen is an able farmer and during his many years of residence on the farm came to be recognized as one of the most substantial citizens of that part of the county. He is the owner of about five hundred and seventy acres of excellent land and in his farming operations has done very well. His land is well improved and unencumbered and his farm plant is fully up to the standards of modern methods of agriculture.

On November 6, 1887, Richard A. S. McMullen was united in marriage to Sarah Gertrude Wood, who was born in the neighboring county of Union, a daughter of Alexander and Melinda (Lower) Wood, well-known residents of that county, and to that union five children were born, namely: Henry A. Fiske, who died in February, 1889, at the age of five months; Harriet Ann, who married Walter G. Knollenberg, of Richmond, and has one child, a daughter, Gertrude Agnes; Frances Melinda, twin sister of Harriet, who married Hollis Ward Hanson, of Connersville; Dorothy Alexandria, who is at home with her father, and Mary Alice, who is at school at Glendale. The mother of these children died on June 23, 1915. She was a lifelong member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the faith of which church Mr. McMullen also was born and reared, and was for years one of the leaders in the work of the congregation to which she was attached, so that in her death she was greatly missed in the community in which she had so long been an active influence for good.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Dr. A. P. Helvie, well-known veterinary surgeon at Connersville, was born at Muncie, this state, February 1, 1873, a son of S. H. and Jennie Helvie, who later settled in Fayette county. S. H. Helvie was born in Delaware county and after his marriage made his home in Muncie until 1881, when he came to this county and located on a farm in Jennings township, remaining a farmer here until his death.

Having been but about nine years of age when he came with his parents to this county, A. P. Helvie completed his common school education in the schools of Connersville. He then attended the Central Normal School at Danville for a couple of terms, at the end of which time he returned to the home farm in this county and remained there until his marriage in 1892 to Emelia Moore, after which he engaged in farming on his own account and farmed for five years. He long had been a close student of live stock and the ailments of the same and finally concluded to turn his attention to veterinary surgery as a profession, and with that end in view then entered the Indiana Veterinary College at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1900, with the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Surgery. Thus qualified for the practice of his profession, Doctor Helvie opened an office at Connersville and has since been engaged in practice there. Doctor Helvie keeps closely abreast of the advances being made in his humane profession and is a member of the Indiana State Veterinary Association and of the Fayette County Veterinary Association, in the deliberations of which bodies he takes an active interest.

Doctor Helvie is a Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after office. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and with the Knights of Pythias and in the affairs of these popular organizations takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Dr. B. W. Cooper, one of Connersville's well-known physicians, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in Hendricks county, this state, September 1, 1874, a son of the Rev. Shelby Cooper, for many years one of the best-known ministers of the Methodist Episcopal church in Indiana, having had charges in various parts of the state during his long and successful ministry.

Completing his common schooling in the high school at Cartersburg, E. W. Cooper entered the Central Normal School at Danville and after a comprehensive course there entered the Medical College of the University of Kentucky at Louisville, from which institution he was graduated, four years later, in 1907, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor Cooper opened an office for the practice of his profession at Muncie, this state, and after a short time thus engaged there located at Straughn, where he practiced for about seven years, at the end of which time he moved to Connersville, where he opened an office and where he ever since has been engaged in practice. Doctor Cooper keeps fully abreast of the advances being made in modern medicine and is a member of the Indiana State Medical Association and of the American Medical Association, in the deliberations of which bodies he takes a warm interest. The Doctor is a Mason and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and of the Knights of Pythias and in the affairs of these several organizations takes an active interest. In his political views he affiliates with the Republican party.

In 1904 Dr. B. W. Cooper was united in marriage to Jennie Pearson and to that union two children .have been born, Helen and Hugh.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


The Tate family is one of the oldest in Fayette county, having been represented here since the year 1812, four years before the admission of Indiana to statehood, and for many years the late James Hankins Tate, referred to here as the first, because his son, of that same name, is still living in this county, was one of the best-known and most influential farmers of Connersville township. He was born in this county and had been a witness to the development of the same since pioneer days, taking his part in that development, and had served the public in various capacities in a most acceptable manner.

The family of the Tates really had representation out here in the valley of the Whitewater previous to 1812, for in that year, when William A. H. Tate, then a boy of sixteen, came out here from Virginia, making the trip alone on horseback, he had an uncle here, a Mr. Reagan, who had settled some time before at a point about two miles south of where the important city of Connersville now is located, the Reagan place having been just west of where the canal later was put through. When young William A. H. Tate arrived here he liked the looks of things so well that he straightway returned to his Virginia home and induced his father, Major John Tate, to dispose of his interests in Virginia and with the other members of the family move out to the new country in the Indiana territory, and thus the family was established here in Fayette county.

Major John Tate, the pioneer, had his title by right of his service in the Virginia militia and was a fairly well-to-do person in his native state. He married a Poston, member of a family that had its origin in England, the first representative of that family in this country having settled in Maryland, the family later becoming established in Virginia and representatives of the same becoming later pioneers in Indiana, notable among these latter having been "Sandy" Poston, a unique and well-known figure in the pioneer life of this part of the state. "Sandy" Poston was a brother of Major Tate's wife and he came out here early and settled among the Indians, becoming presently widely known as a horse trader and a man of huge capacity for the joyful things of life. Major Tate drove over from Virginia to the new Indiana country with his wife and their younger children, bringing their belongings in a wagon, and bought land in the southern part of Connersville township. Not long afterward he sold that tract and moved to the little hamlet that had grown up around John Conner's saw-mill, now the city of Connersville, and presently became one of the first postmasters of Connersville, if not the very first. He later was elected county recorder and still later county treasurer, his service in behalf of the public covering quite a stretch of years. His son, Joseph Tate, also served for years as recorder of Fayette county. William A. H. Tate, who was born in Virginia on March 30, 1796, and who rode out here, "spying out the land," when he was sixteen years of age, spent the rest of his life in Fayette county and for many years was justice of the peace in and for Connersville township, being widely known over the county as Squire Tate. He married Louisa Cunningham, who was born a short distance east of Connersville, daughter of the Reverend Cunningham, a pioneer minister of the Baptist church, who had come out here from the Carolinas. In a log cabin about four miles southwest of Connersville, William A. H. Tate and wife began housekeeping and in that log cabin, July 20, 1830, James Hankins Tate, the subject of this memorial sketch was born.

James Hankins Tate grew to manhood on the home farm in Connersville township, fully acquainted with the methods and manners of pioneer living. When but nine years of age he was entrusted with the responsible task of carrying the mail from Connersville on a route including Laurel, Dublin and Bentonville, and for twenty years or more continued carrying the mail on that and an extended route, braving the storms of winter and the blazing heat of the summer. For about sixteen years he also served as assessor of Connersville township and in other ways gave of his time and his energies to the public service. He became prosperous in his farming operations and gradually enlarged his land holdings until he became the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of choice land in his home township and was long accounted one of the most substantial farmers in that neighborhood. He and his wife were members of the Christian church and were long accounted among the leaders in good works in their neighborhood. For the last five or six years of his life James H. Tate was an invalid, requiring his faithful wife's almost constant care. He died on October 6, 1916, and his widow survives, continuing to make her home on the old home farm in Connersville township.

On December 23, 1558, James H. Tate was united in marriage to Louisa Halstead, who was born in Columbia township, this county, on a farm about a mile north of Columbia, December 3, 1840, daughter of Hickson and Eliza (Jones) Halstead, the latter of whom was born in this county, member of a pioneer family. Hickson Halstead was born on a farm that is now covered by a section of the great city of New York, a son of Thomas Halstead, and when a young man came to Indiana, locating at Metamora, in Franklin county, and later coming over into Fayette county, where he married Delilah Martin, who lived in the northwest part of Connersville township, but was not related to the Martins now living there. After his marriage Hickson Halstead located on a farm in the south part of Connersville township, where his first wife died. He then married Eliza Jones, who was born on a pioneer farm in section 6 of Connersville township, daughter of William Jones, who had come out here from Virginia in the days when the Indians still held possession here and had later bought from the government a tract of land on which he established his home and reared his family. After his second marriage Hickson Halstead made his home on the Jones farm and there he spent the rest of his life and it was there that his daughter, Louisa, married James H. Tate, although much of her youth had been spent in the home of an aunt in Orange township.

To James H. and Louisa (Halstead) Tate eleven children were born, two of whom died in infancy and one of whom, Eugene Preston, died when eleven years of age. The surviving members of this family are as follow: John E., a farmer, living on the northwest quarter of section 5 of Connersville township; Emery Edinburgh, who lives in Orange township; Minnie, wife of Levi Ballard, of Indianapolis; William H., who lives on Grandfather Halstead's old home farm in Columbia township; Curtis L., who lives on a farm on the Rushville pike, four miles west of Connersville; James Hankins (second), who lives on a farm southwest of Connersville, in the east part of section 32; Orlia Francis, who lives in Montana, and Grover C., who lives in Connersville. The Tate family are a hospitable people and are held in high respect in the severa1 communities in which they live, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John L. Doenges, secretary-treasurer and general manager of the Connersville Ice Company at Connersville and long regarded as one of the substantial and public-spirited business men of that city, was born at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, but has been a resident of Connersville since the year 1882. He was born on February 21, 1863, son of Simon and Amelia (Kring) Doenges, natives of Germany, who settled at Lawrenceburg, this state, upon coming to this country and there reared their family, Simon Doenges being engaged there as a stationary engineer. Simon Doenges and wife were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being as follow: Simon Doenges, postmaster of Connersville, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume; Minnie, wife of Charles Richter, of Indianapolis; Henry, of Cincinnati; Louisea, wife of Henry Cramsey, of Indianapolis; Fred, of Connersville and Anna, wife of Fred Sholtz, of Indianapolis.

After completing his boyhood schooling at Lawrenceburg, John L. Doenges began working as a farm hand and was thus engaged for some time, presently taking up the trade of stationary engineer, later taking up the trade of cabinet-making, which he followed for about twenty-five years. It was in 1882 that he moved to Connersville and there found employment in the plant of the Connersville Furniture Company and was engaged with that concern for many years, presently becoming a stockholder in the concern. He also became interested as a stockholder in the Connersville Ice Company, of which his brother, Simon Doenges, now postmaster of Connersville, was the president and general manager, and was made secretary and treasurer of the same. When his brother left the active management of the company to enter upon his duties as postmaster, Mr. Doenges assumed the general management of the affairs of the Connersville Ice Company and is now occupying that position. Mr. Doenges is a Democrat and has ever taken an active part in local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public office.

On April 21, 1883, John L. Doenges was united in marriage to Mary Reifel, who was born in Ripley county, this state, daughter of Philip Reifel and wife, natives of Germany, and both now deceased, who were the parents of eight children, those besides Mrs. Doenges being George, Martin, Philip, Minnie, Kate, Lou and Ahma. To Mr . and Mrs. Doenges two sons have been born, Ernest and Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Doenges are members of the German Presbyterian church at Connersville and for about twenty years Mr. Doenges was a member of the board of trustees of the same. He is a member of Warren Lodge No. 15, Free and Accepted Masons and of Guttenberg Lodge No. 319, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the affairs of these organizations takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


James Monroe Hamilton, proprietor of an excellent farm in Waterloo township, this county, where he makes his home, was born in that township and. has lived there practically all his life, save for a short period during which he lived just over the line in Union county. He was born in 1859 on a pioneer farm in Waterloo township. in the same house in which his father was born, a son of Charles Henry and Rachel (Strong) Hamilton, both natives of that same township, members of pioneer families and for years prominent and influential residents of that community.

Charles Henry Hamilton was born on a pioneer farm in Waterloo township in 1834, in the same house, as noted above, in which his eldest son, the subject of this sketch, was born, a son of Capt. James Scott and Eliza (Courtney) Hamilton, who were among the early settlers in that part of Fayette county. Capt. James Scott Hamilton came out to Indiana from Virginia, where he had served during the War of 1812 as captain of a company stationed at Norfolk. He was born on the ocean while his parents were en route from Ireland to this country and was reared in Maryland, in which state his father died. His mother, Mrs. Jane (Scott) Hamilton, later, in 1833, came to Indiana and settled in section 3 of Waterloo township, this county, where she spent her last days. Capt. James S. Hamilton previously, in Virginia, had married Eliza Courtney, who was born in Ireland and who was but ten years of age when her parents came to this country, locating in the Old Dominion, and he and his family also came to Fayette county, settling in Waterloo township, where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, honored and useful pioneers of that community. Captain Hamilton was a man of ability and was a successful farmer, gradually accumulating quite a bit of property in his new home out here in the "wilds" of Indiana. He and his wife were earnest members of the Methodist church and took an active part in the general social life of the settlement during the formative period of this now well-established and prosperous farming community. She died in 1872 and he survived her for six years, his death occurring in 1878. They were the parents of eleven children and a numerous progeny, in the present generation, trace to that sterling pioneer pair.

Reared on the pioneer farm on which he was born and where his parents settled in 1833, Charles H. Hamilton grew up to the life of the farm and upon reaching manhood began farming there on his own account. In 1859 he married Rachel Strong, who was horn on a farm in the southeastern part of that same township, the place where William Maze now lives, a daughter of Richard and Susanna (Gaby) Strong, both members of pioneer families in this county and further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Richard Strong was born in Virginia on June 9, 1802, and was but ten or twelve years of age when his parents came out to Indiana and settled in this county in 1813 or 1814. Here he grew to manhood and married Susanna Gaby, who was born in Pennsylvania. of Pennsylvania-Dutch stock, on June 9, 1802, and who was but a girl when she came to this county with her parents in pioneer times. After his marriage Richard Strong settled on the farm where William Maze now lives, in the southeastern part of Waterloo township, and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, the latter living to be past eighty years of age, her death occurring on November 9, 1883. They were the parents of thirteen children. Charles H. Hamilton remained a farmer all his life and was the owner of a well-improved and profitably operated farm. For some years he served as assessor of his home township and in other has contributed his share of time and energy to the public service. He died on April 4, 1901, and his wife died on December 21, 1885. They were the parents of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being as follow: Anna Belle, who died on January 28. 1878; Mrs. Laura Helen Bullard, of Indianapolis; Charles Henson Hamilton, who died on December 11, 1915; John William Hamilton, who died on November 7, 1896; Mrs. Maude Riggs, of Connersville; Oliver Lafayette Hamilton, who died on October 4, 1870; Mrs. Rebecca Jane Garrett, of Wayne county, this state; Mrs. Catherine Funk, of Waterloo township, and Robert Washington Hamilton, who died on June 16, 1876.

James M. Hamilton was reared on the paternal farm in Waterloo township, receiving his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and has lived in that township all his life with the exception of short periods, a part of the time living over the line in Union county. He married in 1880 and in 1859 bought the farm on which he is now living, in Waterloo township, and has ever since made his home there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. He has a farm of one hundred and forty acres and his place is well kept and well improved, his farm plant being up-to-date and operated in accordance with modern methods of agriculture.

As noted above, it was in 1880 that James M. Hamilton was united in marriage to Sarah Elizabeth White, who was born on the old White homestead in the southwestern part of Waterloo township, this county, a daughter of John and Catherine (Miller) White, the former of whom also was born on that farm, a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Boyd) White, the former of whom also was born on that farm, a son of Joseph White and wife, who were among the very earliest settlers in that part of Fayette county, the Whites, in their respective generations being successful farmers and substantial citizens. John White, who died in September, 1904, was twice married. His first wife, who was Jane Dugan, died, leaving two children, Emma L. and Daniel O., and in 1862 he married Catherine Miller, who was born in Pennsylvania and who came to this county about 1853, she then being about sixteen years of age, with her parents, Isaac and Sarah (Myers) Miller, the family settling in Waterloo township. To that second union three children were born, Mrs. Hamilton having two brothers, Emmet Theodore and Isaac Omar White. Mrs. Catherine White died in 1911.

To James M. and Sarah Elizabeth (White) Hamilton six children have been born, namely: Rozzie Belle, who married David Funk, now living on the old White farm where her maternal ancestors were born, and has four children, Edna Isabel, J. D. Willard, Eugene Wendell and Henry Ellis; Claude Austin, now living in Wayne county, who married Edith Schroy and has three children, Irvin L., Herbert J. and Ruth; Otto Arlington, who married Ruth Baker and is now living at Springersville; Ethel W., who married Albert Crawford and is now living in Union county; Alta L., who is at home with her parents and Florence, also at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton are members of the Christian church and their children were reared in that faith.

The Hamiltons have a very pleasant home and have ever taken a proper part in the general social activities of the community in which they live, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare thereabout. Mr. Hamilton is a member of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization. Politically, he is a Democrat and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local political affairs.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


The traditions of the Williams ancestry cross the ocean to Cromwellian times in Wales, whence, after the restoration of the Stuarts to the English throne in 1668, four brothers of the Williams name sought religious freedom in America. Three of these brothers, who were persecuted in Massachusetts colony, accepted the scant toleration of a forest obscurity back from Long Island Sound.

One of these three, Matthew Williams, a Welsh Baptist preacher, had Thomas who was the father of Timothy, who was the father of Jonas, the Hoosier pioneer of the Williams family. Matthew lived to be one hundred and three, Thomas one hundred and two, and Timothy nearly one hundred years old. Like their ancestor, Thomas, Timothy and Jonas were Baptist ministers.

Jonas was born December 26, 1751, and in boyhood was captured by the Indians, who bound his ankles so tightly with thongs that his feet froze while his captors slept. Because of lameness he became a currier in New York City; and then a miller, and to fill in the waiting hours when grinding a shoemaker. He married Eleanor Ward of New York City. He removed to the Wyoming Valley and there operated one of the largest mills in the valley. In 1778 their property was destroyed and they escaped from the Indians in the terrible massacre. After their ruin at Wyoming, the family went to Orange county, New York, and later to Cayuga county, where he built and ran a mill, where is now the town of Genoa.

About 1812 Jonas Williams came to Indiana, where he was the first settler on, and gave his name to, the principal branch of the White Water river. His son, Charles, was born in Cayuga county, New York, November 23, 1793, and became the first pioneer farmer in what is now Fairview township, developing a fine farm about eight miles northwest of Connersville. He was also an excellent carpenter, the first contracting carpenter in his neighborhood and in that capacity erected most of the houses and barns built in that part of the county in an early day. He was an energetic and enterprising citizen and prospered in his affairs. He served in the War of 1812 and had some thrilling experiences at that time. He was twice married. His first wife, who was a Smith, was the mother of five children. His second wife, Lydia Jobe, who was born in Pennsylvania on April 16, 1800, survived him many years, her death occurring on January 30, 1899, she then being nearly ninety-nine years of age. She was an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist church and was the mother of seven children, four sons and three daughters. Charles Williams died at his home in Fairview township in 1868, honored and respected by all.

Charles R. Williams was the eldest of the four sons of Charles and Lydia (Jobe) Williams. He was reared on the home farm in Fairview township, receiving his elementary education in the schools of that neighborhood and supplementing the same by a course in old Asbury (now DePauw) University. At the age of eighteen he began teaching school, teaching during the winters and farming during the summers, and was thus engaged in Fayette and Madison counties for eighteen years, beginning his teaching service at a wage of eighteen dollars a month and closing the same at a wage of seventy-five dollars a month, this latter being during the Civil War period. He concluded .his long teaching service in 1869. In 1864 he was three times drafted for service in the Union army. Following the first two drafts, he furnished substitutes, but on the third draft went to the front as a member of Company C, One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and with that command served for five months, being mustered out in August, 1865. For eight years Charles R. Williams farmed in Harrison township, this county, and in Madison county. In 1868 he was elected surveyor of Fayette county, a position which he held very acceptably for a period of twenty years. In October, 1874, he was elected auditor of Fayette county and was re-elected in 1878. Upon the completion of his service as auditor he for some time served as deputy auditor and was thus for many years one of the most familiar figures about the court house and one of the best known men in the county. In 1875, upon assuming the duties of county auditor, he moved to Connersville, which ever thereafter was his home.

On August 3, 1851, Charles R. Williams was united in marriage to Caroline Ellis, who was born in Harrison township, this county, November 11, 1833. She was the daughter of Lewis and Samantha (Thomas) Ellis, earnest and influential pioneers of that community. Richard Ellis, the early pioneer, was an officer in the commissary department of the Colonial service in New England and New York and was among the first settlers in Massachusetts. His son, Reuben Ellis, was an ensign in the Colonial service in 1754-1757 and his son, Benjamin, was a Revolutionary soldier of distinction. To Benjamin was born Moses Ellis, who lived in Cayuga county, New York, until 1818, when he moved to the vicinity of North Bend, Ohio, where for eight years he lived on the farm of Gen. William Henry Harrison. From North Bend, in 1826, they came on up the White Water valley and settled in Harrison township, this county. He was the first postmaster established at Plum Orchard in 1827, the year after his location in that neighborhood, and he in numerous ways contributed of his energy to the public welfare thereabout. He and his wife were earnest members of the Christian church and were tireless in church work. Betsy Judd Ellis died in 1841 and Moses Ellis in 1848.

Lewis Ellis was about fifteen years of age when he came with his parents to Fayette county. He grew to manhood on the pioneer farm in Harrison township. On December 30, 1832, he married Samantha P. Thomas, daughter of Elder Minor Thomas, of this county, a pioneer preacher throughout this part of the state, a power for good hereabout in pioneer days and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this work. Lewis Ellis became a substantial farmer in Harrison township and a man of much influence there. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church and were long among the leaders in good works in the northern part of the County. Caroline Ellis Williams, their daughter, was the eldest of sixteen children. It was said of her at her death that she had mothered forty-five children, including eleven children of her own, eight grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren and six of practical adoption into their family. Her life was truly a life of service to others. In their later years both Charles R. Williams and his wife were cheerful, helpful Christian workers. They were both members of the First Baptist church of Connersville and prominent in official capacities.

In politics, "Uncle Charlie." as he was known throughout the county, was a Republican, a progressive Republican. In 1884 he engaged in general contracting with special reference to bridge work and street and sidewalk paving, later associating his sons with him in that business and was thus engaged until his retirement from business in 1906, after which time the contracting business was continued by his sons, Charles, Roy L. and Frank T., who have carried out large engagements in that line, not only in this state, but in Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Tennessee, Missouri and Louisiana.

It was this firm that in 1887 tore down the old bridge at East Connersville, pictured elsewhere in this work and built the foundations for the present bridge, the elder Williams and his sons, Roy and Charles, being shown in that picture.

Charles K., like his ancestors,, was a soldier and belonged to the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He died on November 5, 1908, and his widow survived him but little more than two months, her death occurring on January 9, 1909.

The children born to Charles R. Williams and Caroline (Ellis) Williams were Frank T., Rose Ellen, Alice, Olive and Minor, who died of diphtheria in childhood and are buried in the same grave; Laura, who died in her young womanhood; Lida, Harriet, Roy L., Bert and Charles, Jr. Frank T., the eldest son, was born in 1852. He was reared a farmer, but in May, 1876, he bought a store in Harrison township and was there engaged in the mercantile business until he became connected with his brother, Roy L., in the paving contracting in 1884, and has ever since been thus engaged. On June 3, 1878, he married Florence M. Williams, (of another family), who was born in Connersville on May 31, 1857, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Benton) Williams, who came here from Kentucky, and to this union was born one child, a son, Carl, who died in infancy.

Rose Ellen Williams, the eldest daughter, was twice married. Her first husband, Donovan Shipley, was thrown from a horse and killed three weeks after their marriage. She later married Bert Caldwell. She died leaving two small children, Fern and Volney, who were raised and cared for by their grandparents until they married and had homes of their own. Fern Caldwell married Will M. Stoops, who lives on the Stoops farm south of Connersville. To them have been born three sons, Edward, Wayne and Robert. Volney Caldwell has for a number of years been connected with the postal service-first on the railway mail service and at present in the local post office. He married Neva Watson, of this city. They have one daughter, Virginia.

Alice Williams married Leander W. Jordan. To them were born three children, Olive, a merchant tailor, married Maud Fowler. They have two daughters, Helen and Margaret, having lost their only son, Paul. Ola Jordan, the widow of John Jordan, is a capable stenographer who has been with the Lexington Automobile Company since they were installed at Lexington, Kentucky. She has a son, Elmo, and a daughter, Evelyn. Elsie Jordan married Laud Ludlow, of Harrison township. They reside on their farm.

Lida Williams married Charles Swain, of Muncie, Indiana. He is now a paving contractor in New York. She died in 1907 leaving two daughters, Laura and Zella. Laura is the wife of Lemuel Masterson, of Maysville, Kentucky. They now reside in Cleveland, Ohio, where he has a profitable position with the Sherwin-Williams Company. They have a son, William Ellis, and a daughter, Carolyn Zella married Emmett O'Brien, for her first husband, and they had one son, Charles. She is now the wife of Marvel Sutton, a farmer of Lyonsville, Indiana.

Harriet E. Williams, the youngest daughter, has been a teacher in the Fayette county schools since her graduation from the Connersville schools. As the valedictorian of her class, she received a scholarship to the State University at Bloomington. In 1916 Miss Williams wrote and directed the pageant given in Connersville in behalf of Fayette county in connection with Indiana's Centennial celebration. She is an active member of the First Baptist church of Connersville. Roy L. Williams married Effie Prosser, the daughter of Willis and Jane De Moss Prosser. She was born in Huron, Lawrence county, Indiana. Roy has been in the contracting business since a young man. He calls Connersville his home, hut at present they reside on their farm in southeastern Missouri, known as the "Woodsdale Farm," from which place he directs his various paving jobs and oversees his fifteen-hundred-acre farm. Mrs. Williams is a member of the Baptist church in Connersville. Mr. Williams is a member of the Elks lodge.

Bert Williams, who died after reaching maturity, was one of the first librarians of Connersville. He was a musician, especially fine on the flute. He loved his work in the Blue Ribbon Orchestra. He was a member of the Methodist church.

Charles Williams, Jr., was the youngest son. He was a graduate of the Connersville high school and finished a correspondence course in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He has left a valuable plat of Connersville, which is in constant use at the present time. He was a soldier in Company D, United States Volunteer Engineer Corps during the Spanish-American War. He was also a paving contractor and held various offices in Fayette county.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


James Hankins Tate, the second, so referred to here because there is presented elsewhere in this volume a memorial sketch relating to his late father, James Hankins Tate, first, is a native son of this county, as was his father before him, and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm about five miles southwest of Connersville, in section 3 of Connersville township, the same being in the immediate vicinity of his present home, May 10, 1874, son of James H. and Louisa (Halstead) Tate, both of whom were born in Fayette county, members of pioneer and well-known and substantial families, further and more detailed reference to whom, together with a narrative having to do with the beginnings of the Tate and Halstead families in this county, is made elsewhere in this volume of biography.

Reared on the home farm in Connersville township, James H. Tate (second) received his schooling in the local schools and has spent most of his life farming, though for a couple of years he was successfully engaged in the feed business at Connersville, giving up that business in order to return to the farm, where he might give his assistance to his aging father, whose death occurred in the fall of 1916. It was in 1903, following his marriage, that the second James H. Tate began farming for himself on a rented farm north of Connersville, and there he made his home for seven years, at the end of which time he moved to his present farm, the same being located just south of the place on which he was born, and there he has continued to reside, he and his family how being very pleasantly and very comfortably situated. Mr. Tate is a Democrat, as was his father before him, and for two years he served as deputy sheriff of Fayette county. He has been quite successful in his farming operations and besides owning a share in the old home farm, has bought other lands until now he is the owner of one hundred seventy-four and one-fourth acres has a well-improved and profitably cultivated farm.

On October 6, 1903, James H. Tate was united in marriage to Hallie Gertrude Bradburn, who was born in Brookville in the neighboring county of Franklin, daughter of Albert E. and Mary E. (Stewart) Bradburn, the former of whom, a lifelong farmer, spent the latter years of his life in Fayette county, dying here on August 4, 1909, and the latter of whom is now making her home with Mr. and Mrs. Tate. Mr. and Mrs. Tate have three children, Mildred Marguerite, James H., the third, now called "Junior," and Alma Gladys. Mr. Tate joined the Methodist church on his twentieth birthday and he and his wife are both members of that church, taking an active interest in the various beneficences of the same. Mr. Tate is a member of the Modern Woodmen and in the affairs of that organization takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Curtis L. Tate, one of Fayette county's best-known and most substantial farmers and the proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred acres and a comfortable home on the Rushville pike. about four miles west of Connersville, in Connersville township, was born in that same vicinity and has lived there all his life. He was born on January 17, 1872, son of James H. and Louisa (Halsted) Tate, well-known residents of that neighborhood and further and more detailed reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume.

Reared on the home farm in Connersville township, Curtis L. Tate received his schooling in the district schools of that neighborhood and remained at home, a valuable assistant in the labors of developing and improving the home place, until his marriage in 1902, when he began farming on his own account. For two years he rented land arid then he bought his present farm of one hundred acres on the Rushville pike, four miles west of Connersville, where he has since resided and where he and his family are very comfortably and very pleasantly situated.

In 1902 Curtis L. Tate was united in marriage to Mary C. Brown, who was born in Madison county, this state, in 1883, daughter of Elijah and Melissa Ellen (White) Brown, the former of whom was born in Perry county, Ohio, and the latter in the state of Iowa, who came to Fayette county in 1887 and located on a farm about four miles south of where the Tates now live. About 1897 Elijah Brown sold that farm and returned to Madison county, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1913, and where his widow is still living.

Mr. and Mrs. Tate have four children, Ruby Thelma, Garnet Zelma, Catherine Curtis and Orlia Arthur. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take an earnest interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in the general social activities of the community in which they live, helpful in furthering all causes having to do with the advancement of the common welfare.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Deb Murray