LIEUT. SAMUEL J. SHIPLEY. In the memoral annals of Fayette county there is no name held in better remembrance than that of the late Lieut. Samuel J. Shipley, United States navy, retired, who died at his home in Harrison township in 1897. Lieut. Samuel J. Shipley was born in Wilmington, Delaware, December 24, 1813, son of Joseph E. and Mary H. (Test) Shipley, the former born near the Brandywine, Delaware, November 13, 1780, and the latter, near Salem, New Jersey. They were married on April 16, 1804. Samuel Shipley, the grandfather of Samuel J., and for whom the latter was named, was born on December 5, 1755. His wife, Jane (Bennett) Shipley, was a sister of Caleb Bennett, who commanded a company at the battle of the Brandywine and at one time was governor of Delaware. The brother and sisters of Samuel J. were named and born as follows: Mary A., born on February 29, 1805; Charles, August 17, 1807, and Eliza J., October 15, 1811. Their ancestors came from England soon after William Penn colonized Pennsylvania, and were of Penn's religious faith.

Our subject, when a school boy near the Delaware Bay watching the ships go down to the ocean, early evidenced a desire to go to sea, and in 1833 he made application for an appointment as midshipman, the application being indorsed by his friends, Daniel Rench, Samuel W. Parker and others, and in the following year his appointment was received through Gen. Jonathan McCarty, then member of Congress from the Connersville district. The young naval aspirant was soon ordered to the brigantine "Enterprise," at Norfolk, Virginia, and from thence sailed for the Brazilian station, South America; soon after reaching which he was transferred to the flagship "Erie" and remained on that station nearly three years, returning to the United States in the fall of 1837, when he was granted a leave of absence. He returned home and soon after purchased a farm in Harrison township, which he ever after made his home when not engaged in the naval service. After the expiration of his furlough he was ordered to the receiving ship "Hudson," at New York, and not long thereafter was transferred to the line-of-battle ship "North Carolina" that was used as a school for apprentices. The class of 1834, to which he belonged, was the first to pass an examination at the Naval Academy established at Philadelphia in 1839 (subsequently changed to Annapolis, Maryland).

In June, 1840, soon after passing his examination, young Shipley was ordered to the \Vest India station and joined the United States ship "Warren" at Pensacola, Florida. He made a cruise with that vessel to the Spanish main and the Gulf of Mexico; thence to New York, where he was granted a leave of absence, and on his return home was united in marriage, November 14, 1841, to Martha Holton, daughter of Rev. Jesse and Jane Holton. On the expiration of his leave of absence he joined the United States ship "Falmouth" as sailing master, and made a cruise of over two years to the Gulf of Mexico and the West Indies, returning home in 1844, when he was permitted to remain with his family for more than a year. In 1846 his wife died at the age of twenty-four years, leaving a daughter, Jennie, who was a great source of comfort and a stay to her father during his declining years.

Soon after the death of his wife Master Shipley received orders to join the United States ship "United States," as sailing master, bearing the broad pennant of Commodore Read, ordered to the coast of Africa. (At that time our government was b bound by treaty with Great Britain to keep up a force of eighty guns for the suppression of slave traffic). After taking on board a new battery of fifty-two guns and stores they started for the Cape Verde Islands, via the Azores, going from Pico south, passing the Canary Islands, sighting the Peak of Teneriffe in the distance. On their arrival at Porto Praya, Cape Verde Islands, their place of rendezvous, they took on board some stores and provisions and proceeded down the coast, visiting Sierra Leone, Cape Mount (a noted slave mart), stopping some time at Monrovia, at which place Commodore Read, Master Shipley and other officers dined with President Roberts, whose hospitality they had been invited to share. While here they visited Mission House school and other public buildings. From Cape Mesurado they sailed for the Gulf of Guinea, anchoring off Cape Palmas, thence down the Ivory and Gold Coast, passing Cape Three Points, and anchoring at Cape Coast Castle, an English station strongly fortified, and which in times past they had hard work holding against the warlike Ashantees. At this station, within the enclosure of the fort, is the tomb of the wife of Governor Maclean, a Scotch gentleman then in charge of the station. She was an English poetess, who had written over the initials L. E. L. Also here it was that Elisha K. Kane, the assistant surgeon and an enthusiastic friend of our subject, took his first lesson in navigation, and a few degrees to the east, in the kingdom of Dahomey, near the mouth of the river Quorra Niger, came near losing his life from exposure in exploring that benighted and Gob-forsaken land. They cruised in the Bight of Benin to the mouth of the river Gaboon. From thence they sailed to Prince's Island, anchoring at West Bay (an island belonging to Portugal), a resort for whale ships, and while there the crews of the United States vessels witnessed the capture of a whale with her calf. They next sailed for their place of rendezvous, St. Jago, Cape Verde Islands, and en route there, while in the Gulf of Guinea, upon observation it was found that they were at a point where there was neither latitude nor longitude, in other words, they were on the meridian of Greenwich at the equator.

On arriving at Port Praya, Master Shipley was appointed to take charge temporarily of the depot of supplies, at which post of duty he remained several months, Doctor Kane, who was quite sick, remaining for a time with him. About June 1, 1847, Mr. Shipley returned to duty oil board the ship, which soon afterward sailed, and they made their third and last cruise down the coast, stopping several days at the mouth of the river Congo, keeping near the coast line, so that they could see the impenetrable jungles and forests, with occasional openings and villages. At this time the United States had four vessels - the flagship "United States" and the sloops of war "Marion," "Dolphin" and "Boxen" cruising along the coast, the English having about the same number, so that it was almost impossible for the slave-runners to evade their vigilance. From the river Congo they sailed down the coast, stopping at St. Paul de Loanda, from thence to Benguela, in latitude 13 degrees south of the equator; thence to within a short distance of the island of St. Helena (noted as the place of exile of Napoleon Bonaparte), and then steered for the Cape Verde Islands, and on arriving at Port Praya fell in with the brig "Dolphin," which had on board, with other documents from the navy department, the commission of Master Shipley as lieutenant in the United States navy. He was then transferred to the United States brig "Dolphin."

In 1861 Lieutenant Shipley tendered his services to the United States government and went to Fortress Monroe as executive officer of the "Brandywine", returning home on account of sickness in 1863. After retiring from the navy our subject lived a somewhat retired life on his farm in Harrison township, esteemed and respected by the community at large. Lieutenant Shipley died on July 11, 1897.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


James Mount, deceased, and for many years one of the prominent and successful residents of Fayette county, was born in the state of New Jersey in the year 1805 and died at his home in Connersville in 1882. He was the son of Daniel and Rhoda (Hunt) Mount, who settled in the state of New York and were the first of the family to come to Indiana, where they engaged in farming for many years. David Mount was later elected a judge at Brookville, which position he filled with dignity and ability. He was identified with the Republican party and always took great interest in local affairs, long having been recognized as a leader and adviser in his home community. He and his wife were devoted and active members of the Presbyterian church and were prominent in the social and the religious life of the community in which they lived and where they were held in the highest regard and esteem by all who knew them. They continued to reside at Brookville until the time of their death, after having reared a family of several children.

James Mount received his primary education in the local schools and later attended Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio. He was a great student and finished his course in the university with honor. After completing his schooling he located at Connersville, where he engaged in the mercantile business. He also interested himself in the banking business of the town, and was an extensive landowner, taking much pleasure in his life as a farmer and stockraiser. He was a Republican and though he never aspired to office he devoted much of his time and his ability to the interests of his home city as well as to the interests of the county. He was a firm believer in the selection of the best men to administer the affairs of the public. He believed in the best of public improvements, the maintenance of good schools and the building of good roads. To him, much of the future greatness of the district depended upon these important factors. He well knew the advantage of a good education, for he had spent years of his early life in the pursuit of an educational training.

Mr. Mount was known throughout a wide territory for his generous and kindly disposition and for his business acumen. He believed in the highest standards of life and felt that a man did not owe his whole time and ability to himself. One of his greatest pleasures was in the assistance that he could give to his neighbors and those less fortunate than he had been and many a struggling young man could testify to his generosity. He did not believe that charity should be extended simply for the sake of giving, but that the recipient might be directed to higher aims. Few worthy unfortunates were ever turned away without receiving some help. Not alone, was he generous with his money, but his kindly disposition compelled him to seek the presence of those who needed his advice and counsel. In sickness and in trouble, in adversities and disasters, his presence was ever welcome to those who were the sufferers. His wife was a member of the Presbyterian church, and he was a liberal supporter of the same.

James Mount married Mary Dickson, daughter of Arthur and Sarah (Wilson) Dickson of Williamsburg, Virginia. Her parents moved from their home in Virginia and located at Brookville, Indiana, in an early day, and there the father established himself as a merchant. There he remained for a number of years and met with much success. He later moved to Connersville, where he engaged in business on Fifth street. The mother died in Connersville and the father later returned to Brookville, where he spent his last days. They were the parents of two children, Mary and William, the latter of whom spent much of his life at Topeka, Kansas. The family were prominent in the activities of their home district and were among the excellent people of the county. James and Mary (Dickson) Mount were the parents of six children, Arthur, David, Charles, William, Catherine M. and Quincy. Arthur Mont died in his youth. David Mount, on reaching manhood engaged in general farming and stockraising and was thus engaged with success until the time of his death some years ago. Charles Mount engaged in banking at Connersville. He married Sarah Ella Huston and after her death he was united in marriage to Esther Roots. William Mount died when but a young man and Quincy Mount, who engaged successfully in banking at Connersville, died in 1916. Catherine M. Mount is now living in the city of Connersville, where she has always lived and where she is regarded as one of the prominent and highly esteemed women of the city. Educated and refined, she has ever taken an earnest interest in the general social activities of her home city and her good work has been a source of inspiration to many. She has long been interested in the moral and the educational development of the community and has had much to do with movements having as their design the elevation of the standards of living hereabout. It is hardly too much to say that few families have exerted a wider influence for good in Connersville than have the Mounts.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Edgar M. Michener, secretary and treasurer of the Connersville Buggy Company, vice-president of the Central State Bank of Connersville and for years recognized as one of the leading business men of that city, is a native son of Fayette County and has lived here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Columbia township on October 29, 1857, son of William and Mary A. (Blake) Michener, the former a native of the state of Ohio and the latter, of Virginia, who had come to Indiana with their respective parents in the days of their childhood, the families of both settling in Fayette county, and here spent the remainder of their lives.

William Michener was a son of Mordecai and Catherine (Eyestone) Michener, the former of whom was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, and the latter in eastern Kentucky, her father having been a soldier of the Revolutionary War who emigrated to Kentucky short1y after the genera1 opening of settlement in that state. Though a Quaker by birthright and inclination, Mordecai Michener served as a soldier of his country during the War of 1812. He was a cabinet-maker of much skill and a carpenter and builder. He used to make hall clocks of the typical "grandfather-clock" variety, and not a few of these ancient clocks are said to be still in use and keeping excellent time. In 1828 Mordecai Michener and his family came over into Indiana and settled in this county, where he died a few years later. His widow survived him until 1865. They were the parents of six children, William, Rebecca, George, John, Jonathan and Thomas.

William Michener was but eight years of age when his parents settled in Fayette county and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Jackson township. He married Mary A. Blake, who had come to this county with her father from the Old Dominion, her mother having died in Virginia, the family settling here in 1835. Lewis Blake, her father, who became one of Fayette county's substantial pioneer citizens, was a soldier in the War of 1812 and was the father of six children, Maria, Mary A., Rosa J., Roberta, Polly I., and Elizabeth. Following his marriage William Michener moved from Jackson township to a farm in Columbia township, a place of one hundred and ninety-two acres, which he set about developing and improving and where he lived for years, later moving to Connersville, where he spent his last days, his death occurring there in 1906, he then being eighty-six years of age. His widow survived him until 1914 and she was eighty-nine years and ten months of age at the time of her death. They were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith. There were six of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being as follows: Louis T., of Washington, D. C.; Helen M., who died unmarried; Perry G., of Washington, D. C.; William M., deceased, and Scott Michener, of Connersville.

Edgar M. Michener was reared on the paternal farm in Columbia township, this county, and his first schooling was received in the primitive subscription schools of that neighborhood. He finished the course in the public schools that later were established and supplemented the instruction there received by a course in the University of Indiana, from which he was graduated in 1881, after which he was engaged in teaching school supplemental to his labors on the farm, for about eleven years, at the end of which time he became connected with the Connersville Buggy Company in the capacity of bookkeeper. That was in 1892 and Mr. Michener has ever been connected with that concern. After awhile he was promoted from bookkeeper to the position of assistant secretary and treasurer of the company and since 1912 has been secretary and treasurer. The Connersville Buggy Company was organized in 1883 by L. T. Bower. J. S. Huston and John D. Larned and was incorporated in that same year with a capital stock of twenty thousand dollars, which capital has since been increased to one hundred thousand dollars. The company employs from fifty to one hundred men and its buggies are sold in all parts of the United States. The present officers of the company are as follows: President, Scott Michener; secretary and treasurer, Edgar M. Michener, and superintendent, C. C. Bower. Mr. Michener has other business interests in Connersville, including an interest in the Central State Bank of that city, of which he was one of the original stockholders and of which he is the present vice-president. The Central State Bank of Connersville was organized in 1907 with a capital stock of sixty thousand dollars. Mr. Michener is a stanch Republican and has ever given his close attention to local political affairs, but has not been an office seeker.

On December 23, 1885, Edgar M. Michener was united in marriage to Emma Baxter, who was born at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, October 11, 1860, daughter of Reuben and Margaret (Sutton) Baxter, the former of whom was an honored veteran of the Civil War, and the latter of whom died in 1907. Reuben Baxter and wife were the parents of two children, Mrs. Michener having had a sister who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Michener are earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the various beneficences of which they take a warm interest, Mr. Michener being a member of the board of trustees of the local congregation. They have ever taken a proper interest in the advancement of all movements having to do with the betterment of local conditions and have been helpful in promoting the same.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


James A. Clifton, prosecuting attorney of Fayette county, is a native Hoosier and has been a resident of this state all his life. He was born on a farm in the vicinity of Wheeling, Carroll county, October 20, 1885, and after completing the course in the Wheeling high school entered the normal college at Marion, this state, which he attended for three years, varying his attendance there by teaching school in the schools of his home county. During all this time he was directing his studies with a view to the law and upon completing his work at college was admitted to the bar and located at Connersville, where he ever since has been engaged in the practice of his profession, now having offices in the First national Bank building.

It was on January 3, 1908, that Mr. Clifton opened his office at Connersville and he at once began to give his close attention to local affairs. In January, 1914, he was elected by the city council to the office of city attorney and served in that capacity until he resigned to enter upon the duties of the office of prosecuting attorney of Fayette county on January 1, 1916, having been elected to that office as the nominee of the Democratic party, in the election of November, 1914. Mr. Clifton is an ardent Democrat and for some time served as chairman of the Fayette county Democratic central committee, in which capacity he rendered admirable service in behalf of his party.

On October 2, 1913, James A. Clifton was united in marriage to Iona Ochiltree. Mr. and Mrs. Clifton are members of the Presbyterian church at Connersville and Mr. Clifton is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, of the Modern Woodmen of America and of the Loyal Order of Moose, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


JOHN MILTON HIGGS.
Inseparably linked with the history and fortunes of Connersville and of Fayette county since the days before the Civil War period, the name and the fame of the late John Milton Higgs, founder and for many years editor and proprietor of the Connersville Examiner, are as secure as those of any institution in the county; for, through his many years of devoted and unretiring service in behalf of this local commonwealth, "John Milton," as he was familiarly and lovingly known in the community, came to be regarded, even as the paper he reared here, as one of the institutions of the social order hereabout. Establishing his Examiner as a straight-out, uncompromising and fearless champion of the principles of the Democratic party at a time in the history of Fayette county when to be an outspoken Democrat was to encounter a form of opposition and even opprobrium altogether incomprehensible to the present generation, John Milton Higgs pursued the not always even tenor of his way, fighting his own fight, using such weapons as came to his hand - and he was as resourceful in defense as he was skilful in attack - and won out in the face of as determined opposition as any Indiana newspaper man ever met. Just how many opposition newspapers were laid away in "John Milton's" newspaper grave-yard, falling by the wayside in ineffectual attempts to put his paper out of business, is difficult to compute at this date, but they were numerous, the opposition being long in arriving at the conclusion that "John Milton" and his Examiner were at least fixtures, if not institutions, in this community. In the end, John Milton Higgs outfought and outfaced the opposition and without further serious molestation pursued the course he had marked out from the beginning of his career, calmly and serenely, and his last days were filled with content, for he had fought a good fight - and the world ever honors a good fighter. Always an ardent champion of the best interests of Connersville and of Fayette county, John Milton Higgs lived to be a witness to the development of this community such as his early contemporaries hardly could have dreamed, and he was content, for much of this same development undoubtedly was due to his unceasing advocacy of progress and the things for which progress stands. He lived to near the traditional three-score years-and-ten stage of man's life and at his passing in 1909 left a good memory, for he had earned the honor and respect not only of the community in which he had so long and unselfishly labored; but of the state in which he had lived all his life.

John Milton Higgs, an honored veteran of the Civil War, founder of the Connersville Examiner and former postmaster of Connersville, was a native Hoosier and was ever proud of that fact. He was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Franklin, April 1, 1842, son of George and Melinda (Irwin) Higgs, also natives of that county, members of pioneer families there. George Higgs was a son of William Higgs, who came over from North Carolina to Indiana in the early days of the settlement of this state and established his home in the then "wilds" of Franklin county. There George Higgs grew to manhood, married, reared his family and continued farming until old age, when, in 1890, he retired from the farm and moved to Connersville, where he spent his last days, his death occurring there on July 29, 1895.

Reared on a farm in the neighborhood of Brooklyn, John Milton Higgs completed his schooling in the Brooklyn high school and at the age of fifteen years began his newspaper career as the "devil" in the office of the Brooksville Democrat. He early and readily mastered the details of the "art preservative of all arts," evincing from the very beginning an apparent natural aptitude for the newspaper business, and after working in the office of the Brooksville Democrat for some years came up into Fayette county and started a newspaper at Connersville, the Connersville Telegraph, and was still conducting that newspaper when, two or three years later, the Civil War broke out. Abandoning his paper and his other interests, Mr. Higgs enlisted his services in behalf of the Union and on September 18, 1861 was mustered in as a member of Company L, Forty-first Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, afterward the Second Indiana Cavalry and with that command served for three years and nine days, being mustered out as quartermaster of his company. During this term of service Mr. Higgs served mainly with the Army of the Cumberland and was present at such important battles as that of Shiloh, Perryville, Chickamauga, Stone's River and many skirmishes and engagements of lesser import.

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Higgs returned to Indiana and located at Indianapolis, where for a time he was employed in the offices of the Sentinel and the Gazette. The Democrats of Fayette county then demanding a newspaper to represent their party in this county Mr. Higgs returned to Connersville and on December 24, 1867, issued the first number of the Connersville Examiner, which paper ever since has ably represented the interests of Connersville and of Fayette county and as ably espoused the principles of the Democratic party in this community and throughout the state. When the Examiner was founded the Democratic party, undeniably, was not in the best repute in certain quarters in Fayette county and Mr. Higg's ardent and uncompromising advocacy of the principles of that party through the columns of his newspaper created antagonism that more than once threatened his very life, but he persisted in the face of all opposition and it was not long until the Examiner came to be recognized as one of the leading Democratic newspapers in the Middle States, a position it ever has maintained. From the first the Examiner was a friend to Connersville and in every way promoted the industrial and general development of that city and of the county at large and Mr. Higgs soon came to be known as a persistent, consistent and effective "booster," his paper ever standing for progress and development, and it is undoubted that the Examiner exerted a very large influence in the way of directing the course of industrialism and of civic progress hereabout. As time passed the old party rancors gradually subsided and the valiant editor found himself firmly fixed in the hearts and the affections of the people whose interests he ever sought to serve, only the most inveterate withholding from him his due meed of honor. During the Cleveland administration Mr. Higgs was a commissioned postmaster of Connersville and served for two terms in that important public position. He served three terms as a member of the county council and two terms as a member of the local school board. In 1872 he was nominated for the office of county treasurer and despite the then overwhelming Republican majority in this county was defeated by but ninety-nine votes. Mr. Higgs was a member of the Connersville post of the Grand Army of the Republic and ever took an active part in the affairs of that patriotic organization.

On October 31, 1861, shortly after enlisting as a soldier of the Union, John Milton Higgs was united in marriage to Catherine Davis, daughter of A. M. and Mary (Crawford) Davis, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio, early and prominent residents of Connersville. A. M. Davis, locally and familiarly known as "Colonel" Davis, was born near Farrington, in Hanover county, Virginia, and as a young man moved to New Paris, Ohio, whence, after some years, he came to Indiana and located at Connersville. Colonel Davis was a merchant tailor and at Connersville he engaged in that business in partnership with William Collins and later with W. H. Beck, and was thus engaged when the Civil War broke out. In 1862 he and Gilbert Trusler recruited a company attached to the Thirty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he was elected first lieutenant of the company. At the battle of Shiloh his company was stationed at the rear to guard the wagons, which form of service so disgusted the Colonel, who was chafing to be in action, that he resigned his commission and was later given command of a Richmond (Indiana) company, at the head of which he later was killed in battle. Colonel Davis had served as deputy sheriff of Fayette county. He was a master Mason and took an active interest in Masonic affairs. At Middleton. Ohio, before coming to Indiana, Colonel Davis was married to Mary Crawford, who survived him many years. Mrs. Davis was a member of the Presbyterian church, as was her husband and their children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, those besides Mrs. Higgs, the first-born, being as follow: George M., who married Eliza Winters and is now deceased; John R., who married Stella Lowery and is now deceased; Permilla, who married Perry McElvain and is now deceased; Viola, wife of John Caldwell, of Cambridge City, this state, and Ida L. and Maude, deceased. John Milton Higgs died at his home in Connersville on November 17, 1909, and his widow is still making her home in that city.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


G. Edwin Johnston, one of Connersville's best-known lawyers, attorney for the board of commissioners of Fayette county and attorney for the Connersville city council, was born in a suburb of the city of Pittsburgh, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, November 30, 1878, son of John C. and Amy E. (Anderson) Johnston, both natives of that same state and the former of whom is still living, now a resident of Tarentum, a suburb of Pittsburgh.

John C. Johnston was born and reared in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and has been engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery there for many years. He is a son of George and Margaret (Mehaffy) Johnston, the former of whom was born in Ireland and the latter in the state of Pennsylvania, of Irish parentage. George Johnston was about nine years of age when he came to the United States with his parents, the family settling on a farm in Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood. He continued a farmer and he and his wife spent the rest of their lives in Pennsylvania. They were the parents of two sons, Mr. Johnston having a sister, Belle. John C. Johnston married Amy E. Anderson, who was born in Pennsylvania, daughter of Elias and Elizabeth (Hazelett) Anderson, both born in that same state, of New England stock. Elias Anderson was a farmer. His wife died when past middle age and he survived her for some years, he being seventy-eight years of age at the time of his death. They were the parents of four children, Mrs. Johnston having had two brothers, Samuel and John, and a sister, Eleanor. Mrs. Johnston died on September 5, 1914, she then being sixty-eight years of age. She was an earnest member of the United Presbyterian church, as is Mr. Johnston, and their children were reared in that faith. There were six of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follows: Dr. Robert C. Johnston, of Springdale, Pennsylvania; Franklin H., of that same place; Nellie, who died in girlhood; Edna M., wife of Charles E. Stottler, of Steubenville, Ohio; and Frances G., who is at home with her father at Tarenturn, Pennsylvania.

G. Edwin Johnston was reared in the suburbs of Pittsburgh and upon completing the course in the common schools took a further course in the Pittsburgh Academy and afterward taught school for three terms, meanwhile continuing his schooling in vacations, and later entered the university at Valparaiso, Indiana, from the elocution department of which he presently was graduated. He later took the scientific course there and a year in the law school, after which he entered the Indianapolis Law School, from which he received his Bachelor degree in 1904 and his Master degree in 1905. In that same year Mr. Johnston was admitted to the bar of the Marion circuit court, of the Indiana state supreme court and of the United States circuit court at Indianapolis, and thus equipped for the practice of his profession opened an office at Columbus, this state, and was there engaged in practice for eighteen months, at the end of which time, in the fall of 1907, he moved to Connersville, opened an office there and has ever since been engaged in the practice of his profession in that city. In 1915 Mr. Johnston was appointed attorney for the board of county commissioners and was reappointed by that board in 1916. In this latter year he was elected by the city council as attorney for the city of Connersville and is now filling both the office of county attorney and city attorney.

On June 15, 1905, G. Edwin Johnston was united in marriage to Zella R. Ralston, who was born near New Salem in Rush county, Indiana, September 10, 1883, daughter of Elias V. and Mary (McCorkle) Ralston, both natives of this state and the latter of whom is still living. Elias V. Ralston and wife were the parents of five children. Mrs. Johnston having three sisters, May, Esther and Hattie, and a brother, Carl Ralston. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston are members of the Presbyterian church and take a proper interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general social activities of their home town. Mr. Johnston is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Knights of Pythias, of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and of the Modern Woodmen of America, in the affairs of which several organizations he takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


David Wilson McKee, veteran lawyer of Connersville, dean of the Fayette county bar and senior member of the law firm of McKee, Wiles & Elliott, of Connersville, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Noble township, in the neighboring county of Rush, December 14, 1845 son of David and Martha L. (Woods) McKee, natives of Kentucky, whose last days were spent in Rush county, honored and influential pioneer residents of that county.

David McKee was a son of John and Ann (Platt) McKee, natives of Pennsylvania, who came into Indiana by way of Kentucky and became pioneers in Rush county, where they lived to ripe old age and where they reared a family of seven children, those besides David having been Mrs. Mary Ann Stewart, Henry, Platt, John, Robert, Samuel and James. David McKee studied with a view to the law in his young manhood, but later became a farmer and followed that vocation the rest of his life, occupying his winters for many years during the earlier part of his manhood by teaching in the schools of Rush county. He married Martha L. Woods, who was born in Kentucky, daughter of Richard Woods and wife, who became pioneers in Indiana and who were the parents of a good-sized family, Mrs. McKee having had four brothers, John, Samuel, James and Richard Woods, and two sisters, Nancy and Rebecca. David McKee died at his home in Rush countv in 1884, he then being seventy-four years of age. His wife had preceded him to the grave about two years, her death having occurred in 1882, she then being seventy-three years of age. They were earnest members of the Presbyterian church and their children were reared in that faith. The were seven of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being as follows: John. H., deceased; Richard Woods, deceased; Martha Ann, wife of Samuel Logan, of Rush county, this state; James, who died in infancy; Ezra, deceased, and Mary Jane, wife of Samuel H. Trabue, of Rushville, this state.

David W. McKee was reared on the paternal farm in Rush county and his first schooling was received in the little old log church building, which also served as a school house, in the neighborhood of his home in Noble township. He also received careful instruction at home from his father and his studies early were directed with a view to the law, a subject to which his father had given close study years before and in which he ever maintained an earnest interest. While continuing to help in the labors of the home farm, David W. McKee taught school during the winters for five years, meantime prosecuting his law studies, and was admitted to the bar in 1871. In 1873 he married and located at Brookville, this state, where he engaged in the practice of his profession for a little more than thirteen years, or until in December, 1886, when he located at Connersville, where he ever since has been engaged in practice, now dean of the Fayette county bar. Mr. McKee is a Democrat and has for years been looked upon as one of the leaders of his party in this part of the state. During his residence in Brookville he was for some time the president of the town council there and after moving to Connersville served for some years as city attorney of that city. In 1900 Mr. McKee was the nominee of his party to represent the sixth Indiana district in Congress, but that was a Republican year and he was defeated by his Republican opponent, James E. Watson.

Mr. McKee has been twice married. It was on June 19, 1873, that he was united in marriage to Martha Eleanor McKee, of Woodford county, Kentucky, daughter of Henry Platt and Ann (Hutchison) McKee, and to that union were born four children, namely: Josie E., who married Elmer C. Green, of Newcastle, this state, and has two children, Margaret Eleanor and Woodford McKee; Ethel L., now living at Santa Fe, New Mexico, who married David Blaine Thomas, who died leaving one child, a son, Robert McKee Thomas, after which she married Joseph W. O'Byrne and by this second marriage has a daughter, Joy Elizabeth; Grace L., society editor of the Connersville Examiner, who is also an expert violinist, and Louise V., who married Edward E. Miller, of St. Bernard, near Cincinnati. The mother of these daughters died on February 22, 1914, and on December 23, 1915, Mr. McKee married Mrs. Ada R. Harrison, widow of William H. Harrison and sister of his deceased wife. Mr. and Mrs. McKee are members of the Presbyterian church, in the various beneficences of which they take a warm interest, Mr. McKee having been an elder in that church almost continuously since 1875. He also has served as president of the Fayette county branch of the American Bible Society and has ever given his most intelligent and thoughtful attention to local good works, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare hereabout.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Dr. A. J. Fletcher, one of Connersville's well-known physicians, was born at Fostoria, Ohio, September 2, 1878, and was reared in that city, receiving his elementary education in the schools of his home town. Upon completing the course in the high school at Fostoria he spent a year at Ohio Wesleyan College and then entered Barnes University at St. Louis, taking there the literary and medical course. After two years spent at that institution he entered Southwestern University at Chicago and two years later, in 1909, received from that institution the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

Upon receiving his diploma, Doctor Fletcher was appointed an interne at St. Elizabeth Hospital at Danville, Illinois, and after a year of valuable practice in that institution opened an office for the practice of his profession at Homer, Illinois, where he remained successfully engaged in practice for five years, at the end of which time he was appointed to the staff of the Wesley Memorial Hospital at Chicago. After serving there for a year Doctor Fletcher resumed his regular practice, in 1913 locating at Connersville, where he ever since has been engaged in practice and where he has done very well, having built up an extensive practice in the city and surrounding country. Doctor Fletcher keeps fully abreast of modern advances in his profession and is a member of the Fayette County Medical Society and of the Indiana State Medical Association, in the deliberations of both of which bodies he takes a warm interest. During his college days Doctor Fletcher was an active member of the fraternities - Alpha Tau Omega, Omega Upsilon Phi and Tau Alpha Phi and continues to take an earnest interest in the affairs of those organizations.

In June, 1910, Dr. A. J. Fletcher was united in marriage to Rosa Crawford and to this union three children have been born, Arthur J., Philip Voris and Julia Rose.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


EDWARD W. ANSTED.
In the wonderful industrial development that has marked the city of Connersville during the past quarter of a century and more there has been no more potent or influential factor than Edward W. Ansted, for many years one of the leading manufacturers and bankers of that city. So widely recognized is this simple statement of fact that in the late Elbert Hubbard's "Little Journey to Connersville," published just shortly before that gentle philosopher started on his ill-fated journey to Europe on the "Lusitania," which was torpedoed and sunk en route, Mr. Ansted was referred to as "the man who keyed Connersville" and Connersville is referred to as "the lengthened shadow" of E. W. Ansted.

Edward W. Ansted was born at Clayton, in Jefferson county, New York. His father was the village blacksmith and the boy was brought up to keep busy. The father's folks were "Mohawk Dutch," with all the virtues that Holland supplies industry, economy, intelligence and thrift, with a love of the handicrafts. His mother was of Irish descent, thus he is a combination of the solid substance of the Dutch and the humorous wisdom of the Hibernian, as the Hubhard "little journey" so aptly put it. When eighteen years of age, E. W. Ansted began helping to manufacture wagon springs in Gananoque, Canada. Thence he presently moved to Kalamazoo, Michigan, and from there, about 1882, to Racine, Wisconsin, where he became foreman in the plant of the Racine Springs Works, continuing that connection until that firm failed, when he and Michael Higgins, in 1884, bought the machinery and started a small factory at Racine, which they operated until 1889, when they were induced to open a new factory at Indianapolis to supply springs for the Parry Manufacturing Company, the largest concern of its kind in the United States at that time. Three years later Mr. Ansted moved his springmaking plant to Connersville and has ever since made that city his place of residence. In this new location Mr. Ansted's business interests gradually became extended until he was the controlling factor in several of the leading industries in that city, including the Lexington-Howard Company, manufacturers of automobiles; the Ansted Spring and Axle Company, the Central Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of automobile bodies; the Indiana Lamp Company, manufacturers of automobile lamps; the Connersville Wheel Companv, the Rex Buggy Company and the Hoosier Castings Company. He also owns a half interest in the Ansted & Burk Milling Company, of Springfield, Ohio, and is president of the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of Connersville, a member of the board of directors of the Fayette National Bank and president of the Glenwood State Bank at Glenwood. As Elbert Hubbard commented after enumerating the various concerns with which Mr. Ansted is connected: "When you want things done, call on a busy man - the other kind has no time."

Edward Mr. Ansted's parents, Ames and Ellen Ansted, spent their last days in Connersville. As above noted, Ames Ansted was a blacksmith and general mechanic, wheelwright and village manufacturer. In their later years he and his wife came to Indiana and after a sometime residence in Indianapolis moved to Connersville, where they spent the remainder of their lives. They were members of the Catholic church and their children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, Edward W., Amos A., Mary, William B., Emma, Margaret and Charles. It was during the time of his residence in Kalamazoo, Michigan, that Edward W. Ansted was united in marriage to Catherine Burk, who was born in the province of Ontario, of Irish parentage, and to this union five children have been born, George W., Arthur A., Frank B., Nellie, who married Emory Huston, of Connersville, and Edward W., Jr.. deceased.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


The Rev. Theodore S. Mesker, pastor of St. Gabriel's Catholic church at Connersville, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at Evansville, this state, March 20, 1862, and his early schooling n-as obtained in the parochial school of St. Mary's parish in that city, under the pastorate of the Rev. Ferdinand Viefhaus. In April, 1874, he then being twelve years of age, he entered St. Meinrad's Seminary, conducted by the Benedictine Fathers at St. Meinrad, this state, and there spent two years pursuing the commercial course. He then took up the study of the classics and completed that course in the seminary of St. Francis Salesianum at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, after which he re-entered St. Meinrad's and there completed the full course in philosophy and theology, being admitted to minor orders on May 19, 1883; ordained as sub-deacon on June 3, 1884; as deacon on June 7, 1884, and as priest on May 30, 1885, the ordination vows being administered by Bishop Chatard at St. Meinrad's.

Father Mesker celebrated his first mass at his old home church, St. Mary's at Evansville, June 7, 1885, and his first ministerial charge was as assistant pastor of St. Mary's parish at Indianapolis. He presently was transferred from there to the pastorate of St. Bernard's parish at Rockport, this state, but while journeying to missions connected with that parish contracted a severe illness, which necessitated a sojourn of some months in the South. Restored to his wonted state of health by this change of climate, Father Mesker returned North and almost immediately after his arrival in Indiana was appointed to take charge of the parish of the Guardian angel at Cedar Grove in Franklin county and he entered upon his parochial duties there on August 15, 1888. He found the parish somewhat in debt, but by assiduous toil and the exercise of his energies as a financier he not only succeeded in paying off this debt in a few years, but in erecting there one of the most beautiful houses of worship in the diocese of Indianapolis.

On August 1, 1906, Father Mesker was transferred from Cedar Grove to Connersville to take charge of the parish of St. Gabriel in the latter place, and he ever since has been in charge there. St. Gabriel's had a fine church, erected in 1853, and a substantial school building and the Sisters' house was being erected when Father Mesker arrived in charge. He completed the work and has since brought about numerous other substantial improvements in the parish property. The church and other buildings are surrounded by beautiful grounds that are kept with much care and which provide a handsome park fronting the priest's residence, a very comfortable and substantial house. During his pastorate of more than ten years at Connersville, Father Mesker has done a good work in behalf of his parish, which has now grown to include about three hundred and fifty families, with about two hundred children in the parochial school, and all departments of the parish work are reported to be in flourishing condition.

In this connection a brief history of St. Gabriel's parish at Connersville will be fitting. The first priest to visit Connersville is said to have been the Rev. John Ryan, who was in charge of the Catholic parish at Richmond, in the neighboring county of Wayne, from August, 1846, to June, 1848, but no record of the exact date of his visit to the few Catholics who then were settled in and about Connersville has been kept. The Rev. William Doyle, in charge at Richmond from May, 1849, to August, 1853, next had charge of the little mission at Connersville. Father Doyle boarded with the family of A. Apert and celebrated mass in their home. In 1851 he bought the ground and built a small church and the same was dedicated to the worship of God as the St. Gabriel's Catholic church of Connersville, and there the parish worshiped for more than thirty years. The first resident pastor of St. Gabriel's was the Rev. Henry Peters, who arrived in 1853. He completed and somewhat improved the church and built a comfortable priest's house, the latter of brick. He fitted up the basement of the church as a school room and there the children of the parish received instructions until a proper school house could be provided. Father Peters was in charge at Connersville for more than twenty years and in addition to his service as pastor of St. Gabriel's performed service as a missionary over a wide territory in this part of the state, his missions including parishes at Liberty, in Union county; at Laurel, in Franklin county; at Rushville, in Rush county; at Cambridge City, in Wayne county; at Newcastle, in Henry county, and at several other points. On account of the proximity of the railroads to the original site of St. Gabriel's church, Father Peters bought a couple of lots in another section of the city in 1871 and on that site erected a school house of brick, in which the Sisters of Providence are still conducting the parish school. The labors of Father Peters in the northeastern portion of the diocese of Vincennes would afford a most interesting narrative; but the facts and the dates have been buried with him. He died at Connersville on January 31, 1873, and his remains were transferred, in charge of the Rev. M. Fleischmann, to North Madison, where he now rests, awaiting the general resurrection.

Father Peters was succeeded at St. Gabriel's by the Rev. Peter Bischof, who remained until 1876, succeeding admirably in restoring order and in reducing the indebtedness on the school house. He was appointed to Madison in 1881 and was succeeded at St. Gabriel's by the Rev. F. J. Rudolf, who paid the balance of the parish debt during the first year of his pastorate and at once made preparations for the erection of a new church. He bought five additional lots and the corner stone for the new house of worship was laid by Bishop Chatard on June 11, 1882. The church was completed in 1883 and is a beautiful Gothic edifice, one hundred and fifty-four by fifty-four feet in general dimensions, with a transept seventy-four by twenty-eight feet. The church was dedicated on June 15, 1884, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop F. S. Chatard and the occasion was made one of much rejoicing on the part of the parish. Excursion trains were run from Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Harrison and Newcastle, and there were societies present from Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Brookville, Oldenburg and Rushville, and a company of Knights of St. John from Cincinnati, with Peter Meyer as captain. It was a beautiful summer day and the day and the occasion will never be forgotten by the participants in the dedicatory ceremonies.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


George Washington Goble, a well-known young lawyer of Connersville and a member of the law firm of Himelick, Frost & Goble, of that city, is a native of the Sunflower state, born of Hoosier parents, but has been a resident of Indiana since his early childhood. He was born on a farm on the plains of Elk county, Kansas, December 21, 1887, eldest son of Samuel Harper and Nannie (Fisher) Goble, natives of Indiana, who are now living on a farm in Preble county, Ohio.

Samuel Harper Goble was born on a pioneer farm in Union county, this state, June 26, 1856, son of Henry Washington and Susanna (Harper) Goble, pioneers of that part of the state, the former of whom was born in that county on November 18, 1823, and died at his home, in a house erected about fifty yards from the spot where he was born, November 12, 1910, he then lacking six days of being eighty-seven years of age. He always lived on that farm. Henry Washington Goble was twice married. His first wife, Susanna Harper, was the mother of three children, Samuel H., Mrs. Lydia Ann Hand and one who died in infancy. The second wife, Susan Gray, was the mother of seven children, Henry D., Mrs. Mary Whiteman, Mrs. Mattie Clark, Mrs. Kate Whiteman, Lida, Lawrence and Mrs. Florence Burris. Henry Washington Goble's father, Abner Goble, the founder of the family in Indiana, was a native of New Jersey, born on October 3, 1783. There he married Lydia Johnson, who was born in the year 1788, and he and his bride drove through to the then wilds of Indiana, coming in a covered wagon by way of the Cumberland Pass in company with Benoni Goble, a brother of Abner, the brothers having married sisters, and both families established homes in Union county. Abner Goble and his wife pre-empted a tract of land in that county and there spent the rest of their lives, rearing a family of six children, Mrs. Nancy Staten, Mrs. Leathe White, Mrs. Sarah Krom, Mrs. Mary White, Amy Ann and Henry Washington. Abner Goble was killed by a falling tree while working in the timber, he then being well advanced in years. His wife lived to the ripe old age of ninety-two. Another of Abner Goble's brothers settled near Knightstown, Indiana, and lies buried under the court house at Hamilton, Ohio.

Susanna (Harper) Goble, the mother of Samuel H. Goble, was born in Union county, this state, January 24, 1835, and died at the youthful age of twenty-seven years. Her father was Thomas Harper, an Irishman, born in 1803. Her mother was Eliza McCammon, a Virginian, born on August 14, 1814. Susanna Goble had one brother, Samuel Harper, a man of most unusual depth of intellect, and two half-brothers and a half-sister, John Capper, Dan Capper and Elizabeth (Capper) Elliot. It was on that pioneer farm of his father's that Samuel Harper Goble grew to manhood. When twenty-one years of age he decided to go to Kansas, which then seemed to be offering special inducements to settlers. He settled on the plains of Lane county, built a dug-out and for three years lived in that humble abode, his chief occupation during that period being the gathering of buffalo bones which strewed the plains - one of the chief "natural products" of Kansas during pioneer days - and hauling them to market, seventy-five miles distant by ox-team. During the winters he varied this occupation by teaching school in Cass county, Missouri. While living there he married Nannie Fisher, who was born in Shelby county, Indiana, May 4, 1868, daughter of George Washington and Mary Ann (McLean) Fisher, the former of whom was born in Shelby county, Indiana, June 6, 1826, and the latter in the state of Tennessee, June 10, 1828. George W. Fisher and wife reared their family in Indiana and then moved to Kansas, settling in Elk county, where the former spent his last days, passing to the Great Beyond, February 6, 1887. His widow returned to Indiana and spent her last days at the home of her son, Tilman Fisher, in Tipton county, dying at the age of seventy-one. George Washington Fisher's father was Michael Fisher, a German, born on October 9, 1800. His mother was Mahala Miebb. He had six brothers and sisters, Martin, Calvin, William, Mrs. Nancy Fisher, Mrs. Pink Bass and Thomas. Mary Ann (McLean) Fisher's father was Daniel McLean and her mother Nancy Farnsworth. She had ten brothers and sisters, Mrs. Lizz Thomas, Mrs. Ellen Fisher, Mrs. Sallie Webb-Runkle, Mrs. Rachel Runkel, Mrs. Nancy Law, Jess, Howard, Henry, John and Jane. George W. Fisher and wife were the parents of eight children, those besides Mrs. Goble having been Tilman, Thomas, Mrs. Adelaide Rose, Mrs. Icy Small, Mrs. Rebecca Mayn, Mrs. Malinda Snyder and Mrs. Mahala Magee.

-After his marriage Samuel H. Goble settled on a farm in Elk county, Kansas, and there made his home for seven years. In 1893 he returned to Indiana with his family and settled in Franklin county, where he lived for two years, during which time he was engaged in carrying the mail from Brookville to Oxford, Ohio. He then moved to Connersville and was there engaged in the livery business for ten years, at the end of which time he moved to a farm four miles south of College Corner, in Union county, where he made his home four years. He then bought a quarter of a section of land in Wayne countv, this state, where he resided for nine years and on March 1, 1917, he located on his present farm of two hundred and forty-five acres near New Paris, Ohio. While living in Kansas, Samuel H. Goble took an active part in the organization of the Populist party, which for years was so strong in that state, and made many effective speeches in behalf of the principles of that party. He and his wife are ake parents of four sons, the subject of this sketch having three brothers, Harry T., Edward E. and Loren E., who are on the home farm in Preble county, Ohio.

George W. Goble was five or six years of age when his parents returned to Indiana from Kansas and he grew to manhood in this state. He was graduated from the high school at College Corner, Ohio, in 1908 and shortly afterward entered Indiana University and after a course of two years there began teaching school and was engaged as principal of the high school at Alton, Crawford county, this state, for two years. He then resumed his studies at the university and was graduated from the literary department of the same in 1913. He then married and for a year thereafter was engaged as principal of the high schoo1 at Cleveland, Oklahoma, in the meantime keeping in view his ambition to become a lawyer and pursuing his studies to that end. He then entered the law department of Yale University, a pupil of W. H. Taft, former President of the United States, a professor in that department, and was graduated from the same in 1915. Mr. Goble was a member of the Indiana-DePauw debating team in 1913, and at Yale, he won the first Munson debating prize in a field of twelve contestants. On August 1, 1915, he located at Connersville and has since then been engaged in the practice of his profession in that city. Upon locating at Connersville Mr. Goble formed a partnership with E. R. Himelick and the firm has since been enlarged by the acquisition of H. L. Frost, the firm now doing business under the style of Himelick, Frost & Goble. Mr. Goble is a Democrat and gives his thoughtful attention to political affairs.

It was on August 20, 1913, that George W. Goble was united in marriage to Roberta Lee Sonner, who was born in Harrison county, this state, December 11, 1894, daughter of Walter and Catherine (Fleischmann) Sonner, natives of that same county, the former of whom is still living, and who were the parents of three children, Thomas, Maude and Roberta. Mrs. Goble's mother died when she was three years of age and she was reared in the family of Abraham N. Peckinpaugh, at Alton, this state, and was graduated from the high school there. Both the Sonners' and the Fleischmanns are old families in Indiana, Mrs. Goble's grandparents on both sides having been born in this state. Walter Sonner's father was Amos Sonner, his grandfather, Joseph Sonner, and his great-grandfather Philip P. Sonner, who came to Harrison county from Strasburg, Virginia, in 1817, and who died in 1845. Walter Sonner's mother was Eliza Deene, who was the daughter of Lincoln Deene, a reputed relative of Abraham Lincoln, and Evaline M. (Simpson) Deene, who was a descendant of Sir Thomas Wyatt, an early colonial governor of Virginia. Walter Sonner's brothers and sister are Thomas Bayard, at present secretary-treasurer of the German American Trust Compaily of New Albany, Indiana, Joseph, Edwin and Zetta. Catherine (Fleischmann) Sonner was the daughter of John Philip Fleischmann and Annie Hardsaw. To Mr. and Mrs. Goble two children have been born, both daughters, Elizabeth Fisher, born on December 8, 1914, and June Harper, December 3, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Goble are members of the Methodist church and Mr. Goble is a member of the Masonic lodge at Connersville.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Deb Murray