Dr. J. H. Johnson, homeopath, one of the best-known physicians in Connersville, is a native son of Indiana, born at Dale, in Spencer county, April 6, 1871, a son of Dr. Samuel F. Johnson, an honored veteran of the Civil War, a former legislator and for many years one of the best-known and most influential men in that part of the state.

Dr. Samuel F. Johnson also was a native of this state, born near Boonville, in Warrick county, and received his medical education in the college at Keokuk, Iowa, from which he was graduated in the late fifties. He began practice at Rockport and was thus engaged there when the Civil War broke out. He went to the front as captain of a company in the Sixty-fifth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and presently was promoted to the position of major surgeon of the regiment, serving in that capacity with that command until the close of the war. Upon the completion of his military service Doctor Johnson returned to Rockport and continued the practice of his profession the rest of his life. Dr. Samuel F. Johnson was one of the leading Republicans in Spencer county and served that county as county treasurer and was later elected to the state Senate and was afterward returned to the Legislature as a member of the House of Representatives, serving in both branches of the General Assembly with distinction.

Reared at Dale, Dr. J. H. Johnson received his elementary schooling in the schools of that place and supplemented the same by a course in the high school at Rockport, being graduated from the same in 1890. He then attended the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute for four years, at the end of which time he entered the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville and after an attendance of two years there went to Chicago, where he entered the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, and was graduated from that institution in 1895. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor Johnson returned to Rockport and there opened an office for the practice of his profession, remaining there until his removal, in 1905 to Connersville, where he ever since has been successfullly engaged in the practice of his profession, having built up an extensive practice in that city and surrounding county. In 1907 Doctor Johnson took a post-graduate course at the Louisville Medical College and has ever kept abreast of the modern advances in his profession. He is a member of the Indiana State Homeopathic Society and for some time has been serving as supreme medical director of the Puritan Life and Annuity Insurance Company.

In 1905 Dr. J. H. Johnson was united in marriage to Ella Lake, daughter of Wallace D. Lake, a member of the well-known Lake family in this county, further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and to this union two children have been born a son.,Earl, and a daughter, Margaret.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Simon Doenges, postmaster of Connersville and former manager of the Connersville Ice Company, was born at Lawrenceburg, this state, July 14, 1870, and has lived in Indiana all his life. His parents, Simon and Amelia (Kring) Doenges, the latter of whom is still living, were born in Germany, but became residents of this country in the days of their youth, their respective parents having come to the United States and settled at Lawrenceburg, this state.

The elder Simon Doenges was a young man when he came to the United States in 1832. The vessel on which he sailed was wrecked in a storm and the passengers were compelled to take to the boats in mid-ocean. They presently were picked up by another vessel, but were one hundred and fifty-two days in making the passage, on account of storms and contrary winds. The food gave out and starvation was staring them in the face before they finally reached port. Simon Doenges had been trained as a stationary engineer in his native country and long followed that line after coming to Indiana. Not long after locating at Lawrenceburg he took a contract for furnishing cord-wood to the railway company for use in the locomotives, that being in the days of the old wood-burners, and carried out the contract with considerable profit. For years he worked as a stationary engineer at Lawrenceburg and then moved to Connersville, where he spent his last days, his death occurring in 1900, he then being seventy years of age. His father died in Germany and his mother came to America with her children and spent her last days at Lawrenceburg. Among these children, besides Simon, were Christian Doenges and Mrs. Goebler, of Indianapolis. Simon Doenges's widow is still living in Connersville; being now past eighty-two years of age. Her parents, who came to this country from Germany, also spent their last days in Lawrenceburg. Among their children, besides Mrs. Doenges, was Mrs. Charlotte Lyendecker, of Indianapolis.

The junior Simon Doenges was reared at Lawrenceburg, the city of his birth, and attended school there until he was fourteen years of age, when he began to learn the cabinet-maker's trade and presently became an expert cabinet maker, following that vocation for about eighteen years. Years ago he began working in the cabinet department of the plant of the Indiana Furniture Company at Connersville and was not long thereafter made foreman of the same, from which position he was presently promoted to the position of superintendent of the plant, and while serving in this capacity was elected councilman from the first ward of the city of Connersville, being the first Democrat elected to that office in twenty-five years, but one Democrat having served twenty-five years prior to that time. In 1906 Mr. Doenges, in company with others, purchased the plant and equipment of the Connersville Ice Company and in the subsequent reorganization of that company he was elected secretary-treasurer and general manager and was thus actively engaged until his appointment to the office of postmaster of Connersville by President Wilson in 1914. Upon the arrival of his commission as postmaster Mr. Doenges entered upon the duties of that office and is now serving the public in that important capacity. He still retains his interest in the Connersville Ice Company, however, and is a member of the board of directors of the same. Mr. Doenges is a Democrat and has for years taken an active interest not only in local political affairs, but in the political affairs of the district and state. He is a member of the Indiana Democratic Club and has a wide acquaintance among the leaders of his party throughout the state.

On July 11, 1889, Simon Doenges was united in marriage to Sophia Dentlinger, who was born at Batesville, Indiana, daughter of Louis and Margaret Dentlinger, natives of Germany, the former of whom died at his home in Connersville in 1913 and the latter of whom is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Doenges are members of the Presbyterian church and take a warm interest in church affairs, as well as in the general social activities of their home city. Mr. Doenges is a Mason, affiliated with Warren Lodge No. 15 at Connersville, and is likewise a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Knights of Pythias, of the Modern Woodmen of America and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and is connected with the Travelers Protective Association, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes an active interest. Mrs. Doenges is one of the ten children born to her parents and five of whom are still living, those besides herself being Pauline, Louisa, William and Otto Dentlinger.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Dr. A. T. Sweetland (Chiropractic), who has been following his profession at Connersville with much success since 1912, was born in the city of Chicago on February 24, 1883, but has been a resident of this state since the days of his childhood. He is a son of LeRoy B. and Anna A. Sweetland, the former of whom was born in Dryden, New York, and the latter at Toronto, Canada.

LeRoy B. Sweetland was reared at Dryden, New York, and there received his schooling. His mother was a school teacher and he early turned his attention to teaching, in time becoming the principal of the schools in his home town, remaining there until he moved to Chicago, where he took employment with the Chicago &- Erie Railroad Company and was thus employed there until he was transferred to Huntington, Indiana, where he remained in the employ of the same road the rest of his life, a period of thirty-five years, his death occurring in a railway accident in 1912. His widow is now making her home in Los Angeles, California.

Dr. A. T. Sweetland received an excellent scholastic foundation for the practice of the exacting profession he is following. He was but a child when his parents moved from Chicago to Huntington and he grew to manhood in the latter city, completing the course in the high school there he entered the Palmer School of Chiropractic at Davenport, Iowa, and upon completing the course in that institution received his degree in 1911. Thus admirably equipped for the practice of his profession, Doctor Sweetland located at Ft. Wayne, this state; but after a short time there moved to Connersville, where he opened offices in the McFarlan block and where he ever since has been located, having built up an excellent practice.

Doctor Sweetland is one of the most enthusiastic chiropractors (ki-ro-praktor - from the Latin meaning to work by the hands) in the country, having been led to take up this form of the healing art by reason of a most remarkable experience. For twenty years the Doctor was totally blind in his right eye. He received treatment by some of the most noted eye specialists in the country, expending for such service no less than five thousand dollars, without securing a particle of relief, and finally accepted the declaration of the specialists that his was a hopeless case. The blindness presently extended to the other eye and for eight months he was totally blind. His attention then being called to the remarkable instances of cure being effected by chiropractic, he began taking a course of adjustments under the direction of a skilled chiropractor and before two years the sight of his eyes was restored, nor has he had a recurrence of the trouble that so long blighted his life and his prospects. The Doctor's studies in chiropractic were directed by Dr. D. D. Palmer, the founder of chiropractic, at the latter's school in Davenport, and in view of the amazing effects of the treatment in his own personal case, he naturally is an ardent and devoted advocate of this school of drugless healing and has become recognized as one of the most skilled practitioners in that line of practice in the middle West. His practice is constantly extending as people come more and more to realize the efficacy of the form of treatment provided under chiropractic and his offices are well equipped for the practice of the profession to which he so ardently has devoted his life.

Doctor Sweetland married Lottie England, a daughter of J. O. England, and has one child, a son, Leroy W. Sweetland.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Prof. Claude L. Trusler, superintendent of schools of Fayette county and one of the most popular officials in the court house, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Jackson township on November 21, 1878, son of Samuel Frederick and Orpha Jane (Sims) Trusler, both of whom also were born in this county and who are stil lliving here, influential residents of the Everton neighborhood.

Samuel Frederick Trusler is a son of Milton and Isabella (Thompson) Trusler, natives of Indiana and pioneer farmers in Jackson township, this county. Milton Trusler was a son of James Trusler, of Virginia, who was a soldier in the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, and he had two brothers, Nelson and Gilbert Trusler, who were officers in the Union army during the Civil War. Milton Trusler and his wife spent their last days in this county, honored pioneer residents of the same. They were the parents of eight children, those besides Superintendent Trusler's father, the second in order of birth, having been Anna, Laura, Henry, Sidney, Ira, Juanita and Nina. The mother of these children was of English descent, the founder of her branch of the Thompson family in this county having been Joseph D. Thompson, who settled in Jackson township, this county, about the year 1830. He was descended from Maurice Thompson, of Hampshire, England, who at one time was governor of the East India Company. Samuel F. Trusler grew to manhood in Fayette county and married Orpha Jane Sims, who was born in Columbia township, this county, daughter of John and Nancy (Collins) Sims, also natives of this state, representatives of pioneer families, and who spent their last days in this county, where they reared a large family John Sims was a farmer and blacksmith and owned a farm in Columbia township. Samuel F. Trusler has always been a farmer and is the owner of a well-kept farm of about ninety acres in Jackson township, where he and his wife are very pleasantly situated. Two children were born to them, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Maude, who married John Kennedy, of Dunrieth, in the neighboring county of Henry.

Reared on the paternal farm in Jackson township, Claude L. Trusler received his elementary schooling in the district schools in the neighborhood of his home and remained at home until he was eighteen years of age. Upon completing the course in the Jackson township high school he entered the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana, and was graduated from that institution, after which he entered upon his teaching career and was engaged as a teacher in the high school at Everton and later as a teacher in the high school at Alquina, and was thus engaged until his election in June, 1907, to the office of superintendent of schools of Fayette county, a position which he has held ever since and in the exercise of the functions of which office he has done much to advance the cause of education hereabout. Professor Trusler has a wide acquaintance among educators throughout the state and his close personal interest in the schools under his charge has done very much to increase the efficiency of the schools of Fayette county.

In 1899 Claude L. Trusler was united in marriage to Estella Jerman, who also was born in Jackson township, this county, a daughter of W. C. and Cora (Gwaltney) Jerman, substantial farmers of that township, now living at Everton. W. C. Jerman and wife have five children, of whom Mrs. Trusler was the third in order of birth, the others being Ray, Bessie, Curtis and Robert. To Professor and Mrs. Trusler four children have been born, Jean, Noel Milton, Helen and Yale Nelson. Mrs. Trusler is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and the Professor is a member of the Universalist church. In his political views the Professor is a Republican and, fraternally, is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, affiliated with the lodge of that order at Everton. The Truslers have a very pleasant home at Connersville and take a warm interest in the general social activities of their home city.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John B. McFarlan, Jr., president of the People's Service Company of Connersville, secretary of the McFarlan Realty Company of that city and in other ways identified with the commercial and industrial affairs of his home town, was born in Connersville and has lived there all his life. He was born on November 7, 1866, son of John B. and Lydia C. (Jackson) McFarlan, the former of whom was born in the city of London, England, and the latter in Cincinnati, Ohio, both now deceased, who for many years were regarded as among the leaders in the social, religious and industrial life of Connersville and further and fitting reference to whom is made in a biographical sketch relating to Charles E. J. McFarlan, elder brother of the subject of this sketch, presented elsewhere in this volume.

Upon completing the course in the Connersville public schools the junior John B. 1TcFarlan entered Oxford University, at Oxford, Ohio, and after a course of two years there became engaged with his father in the business of manufacturing buggies at Connersville; was presently made a partner with his father in that business and remained thus connected until the time of his father's death. The elder John B. McFarlan was for many years recognized as one of Connersville's most far-seeing citizens and was one of the most active factors in the industrial development of that city. One of the most notable evidences of his foresight was the encouragement he gave to young men to build homes of their own, paying for the same in easy installments, being content to accept second mortgages in the case of worthy applicants for homes. That company, under the present direction of the McFarlan brothers and their sister, Maria J. McFarlan, is still continuing in business at Connersville and the junior John B. McFarlan is secretary of the same. The McFarlans also are heavily interested in the People's Service Company of Connersville, successor to the old Connersville Natural Gas Company, and the junior John B. McFarlan is president of the same. He also is the owner of a fine farm in the neighboring county of Rush and in recent years has given much and careful attention to the management of the same, having developed there one of the best farm plants in that part of the state. Mr. McFarlan is a lifelong Republican, but has never been a seeker after public office.

On October 12, 1910, John B. McFarlan was united in marriage to Nellie Brown, who was born and reared in Connersville, daughter and only child of George M. and Ada (White) Brown, both of whom were born in this county and have for years been well-known residents of Connersville. George M. Brown is a son of George W. and Hannah (Yingling) Brown, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Germany, who became early residents of Fayette county and here reared a considerable family, their children having been George, Charles, William, Andrew, Fred, Alfred E., Maggie and Jennie. Mrs. Brown is a daughter of Hamilton White and wife, also early residents of Fayette county, who were the parents of five children, those besides Mrs. Brown being Elizabeth, India, Fred and Robert White. Mrs. McFarlan is a member of the Methodist church and both she and her husband give their earnest attention to the general social activities of their home town.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


One of the well-known and successful retired farmers and stockmen of Connersville is John Lockhart, who was born on Williams creek, in this county, on February 19, 1828, the son of Moses and Elizabeth (Reed) Lockhart, natives of the states of Ohio and Pennsylvania, respectively.

Moses Lockhart was born in Adams county, Ohio, where he received his education in the common schools, grew to manhood and was married. After their marriage, he and his wife established their home in the Buckeye state, where they resided for a time and in 1811 came to Indiana and located in Fayette county, on Williams creek. Mr. Lockhart entered land of the government in Connersville township and he and his wife at once started to make a home for themselves and those dependent upon them. This section of the country at that time was, for the most part, a wilderness, covered with the heaviest of timber. The task of clearing the farm and preparing the land for the future crops was no easy one, and it was only with a firm determination and a firm will that this early pioneer was successful in his task. A rude log cabin, common to the district and the times, was erected and in this the little family resided for some years. A small tract was cleared and the first crop planted and later harvested, and thus the family were able to live for another year, or until another crop could be raised. Much game was obtained in the forests and fish from the rivers and streams and thus the settler of those days lived and worked. For a number of years, chopping, logging and burning was the order of the day. In time the farm became developed and improved, and where once grew the big trees of the forest, grew the golden grain, and the rude cabin was replaced by a more commodious and substantial structure. Here Mr. Lockhart engaged in general farming until the time of his death in 1832. His wife survived him and lived to the age of eighty.

Moses and Elizabeth Lockhart were the parents of the following children: Thomas, Robert, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Elisha, Nancy, Allison, Rolston, Mary Jane, John, Moses and one who died in infancy. Thomas is now deceased and Robert died in Louisiana; Elizabeth was the wife of Moses Burnett; the other children, with the exception of John, are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Lockhart originally were members of the Baptist church, but later united with the Christian church, and were always active and prominent in church work, substantial supporters of the local society. Mr. Lockhart was identified with the Democrat party and had much to do with the early civic life of the county. He was a man of much -force of character and his advice and counsel was of much value at the time of the organization of the township and the county, after the state was admitted into the Union.

John Lockhart received his education in the early schools of his township and grew to manhood on the home farm, where he remained until his marriage. The life on the farm in those days was not such as the boy of today enjoys. Much of the territory was yet undeveloped and there was always much work that a lad could do. Yet, with all the hardships and privations, the youth of those days were trained in a way that well fitted them for the lives that they were to lead. For the most part they were manly, upright and industrious. They were taught the spirit of independence and morality. A social circle was developed that brought much good to the people of the community. All were, for the most part, on an equity, and there was little discussion as to who were the social leaders; other than the fact that they were honest and fearless men and women.

It was on February 18, 1859, that John Lockhart was united in marriage to May Susan Dora, who was born in the state of Kentucky, and who came to Fayette county in 1855, and here she made her home until the time of her death on December 13, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Lockhart were the parents of five children, three of whom are now living: William, Elizabeth and Rebecca. William M. Lockhart is a well-known and successful grocer in Connersville; Elizabeth is the wife of T. E. Murphy, a substantial farmer of Fairview township, this county, and Rebecca is the wife of Albert Chrisman, a well-known and prominent attorney at Connersville. These living children of the family are all prominent in their respective localities, have splendid homes of their own, and they and their families are all held in the highest regard and esteem by the people who know them. After his marriage John Lockhart and his wife lived on the old home place for one winter, and then purchased a farm of their own, one mile west of Poplar Grove, where he and his wife lived for forty-five years. The farm they developed and improved, and there met with much success as general farmers and stockraisers. In 1903 he and his wife retired from the more active duties of life and moved to Connersville, where Mrs. Lockhart died and where Mr. Lockhart still resides. He has sold a part of his large farm, but still owns one hundred and twenty-seven acres in Connersville township. He was an excellent farmer and took much pride in the upkeep of his fine farm and in the care and attention that he gave the splendid stock that he always kept on the place.

Mr. Lockhart has long been identified with the Republican party, and has always taken a keen interest in local affairs. He was ever interested in the development of the schools of the county, and for a number of years served as a school director, always looking to the best interest of the school and the children. His wife was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Lockhart was always a liberal supporter of the local society. During his life as a young man he taught public school and singing school. Much of his education he gained through his own efforts, for he was always a great reader and student, and today is well posted on all current events. For one of his years he is unusually active, and has many interesting tales to tell of his early life in the county. His general disposition and his ability to tell of many of the interesting events of former days has made for him many friends throughout the county. His life has been an active one and he has seen many changes in the district during his life in this section. He recalls that when he was a lad, the greater part of the country about Connersville was a wilderness. Heavy timber was everywhere, and the woods were alive with game and the streams abounded with fish. All this has changed, and in the change he has had his part in the great transformation. The beautiful farms, well-established and modern homes, splendid roads, up-to-date towns and cities and schools that are the pride of the state, are all of recent date, and were perhaps undreamed of in the boyhood days of our subject. His life has been a worthy one, and today he is held in high esteem by his neighbors and friends.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


The late Hiram Elmer Rees, a well-known and well-to-do retired farmer of Fayette county, who died at his home in Connersville on July 1, 1912, was a native son of Fayette county and spent all his life here. He was born on a pioneer farm in Fairview township on December 11, 1848, a son of Justus and Phoebe Ann (Long) Rees, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Indiana, who were well-known and influential residents of Fairview township in their generation, and who spent their last days there.

Justus Rees was but a child when his parents, John and Nancy (Jarrett) Rees, moved from Pennsylvania to what then was regarded as the "wilds" of Indiana and settled on a farm in Fairview township, this county, where they established their home and where they spent the remainder of their lives. There Justus Rees grew to manhood. He married Phoebe Ann Long, who was born on a pioneer farm near Dodridge's Chapel in the neighboring county of Wayne, a daughter of John and Mary (Hudson) Long, early settlers of that neighborhood, and in turn established a home of his own in Fairview township and there spent the remainder of his life, a lifelong farmer.

Hiram E. Rees was reared to the life of the farm and in turn became a farmer on his own account, after his marriage in 1871 continuing to live in the vicinity of his old home until 1886, when he bought a quarter of a section of land on Elephant hill, northwest of Connersville. There he lived for twelve years, at the end of which time he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to Connersville, selling his farm in 1898 and thereafter making his home in Connersville, where he was engaged in various occupations, in order not to be idle, for he had ever been accustomed to a life of industry and could not be content to sit down to a life of idle ease, and there he remained until his death in the summer of 1912.

Hiram E. Rees was twice married. It was on September 6, 1871, that he was united in marriage to Nancy Jane Moffit, a sister of Miles K. Moffit, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and who died on February 5, 1874, leaving two children, Merritt Elmer Rees, born in 1872, who married Mary Dusterberg, of Vincennes, and now lives at Indianapolis, where he is engaged as an air-brake inspector for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and Nancy Florence, born on January 3, 1874, and who was but five days old when her mother died, who married Joseph Storm, of Indianapolis, and has one child, a daughter, Elizabeth. In 1876 Hiram E. Rees married, secondly, Elizabeth Ann Baker, who was born near Falmouth, in Fairview township, this county, a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Groves) Baker, the former of whom was a native of Kentucky and the latter of this state. Daniel Baker was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, in 1814, and was but a boy when his parents, Abraham and Elizabeth Baker, came up into Indiana, about 1822, and settled near Falmouth, on what is now known as the Fitzgerald farm. At that time the country thereabout was a dense forest and upon locating there Abraham Baker had to cut down trees in order to clear a space for the erection of a log cabin. He built the kitchen, adjoining the cabin, around the stump of a tree, leaving the stump to serve as a table, and amid these primitive conditions began the laborous task of caving a tillable farm out of the forest. Abraham Baker, who lived to the great age of nearly one hundred years, was the father of seven children, David, John, Harrison, Nancy, Helen and Eliza (twins) and Daniel. Daniel Baker grew to manhood on that pioneer farm and there spent the remainder of his life, a substantial member of that prosperous farming community, his death occurring on August 19, 1889, he then being seventy-five years of age. His wife had preceded him to the grave a little more than a year, her death having occurred on July 29, 1888. She was born in the neighboring county of Rush on September 12, 1824, a sister of Hiram Shipley's mother, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume. To Daniel Baker and wife eleven children were born, those besides Mrs. Rees having been: John G., George, Sarah, Ruloff, Garrett W., Harriet, Adaline, Alpha, Albert Jefferson and Lucy E. Of these, John was killed by a reaper falling on him on July 8, 1884. He left a widow and three children. Sarah and Ruloff died about the same time of diptheria. George died on August 18, 1891, Alpha, who married Van Bates, died without issue. Garrett W. Baker lives in Elkhart, this state. Albert J. Baker is the proprietor of a barber shop just north of the terminal station in Indianapolis. Adaline married James Dickey and lives in Fairview township. Harriet married F. M. Martin and lives west of Connersville, and Lucy married George Kenyon and lives at Indianapolis.

To Hiram and Elizabeth Ann (Baker) Rees two children were born, Oda, born on December 8, 1877, who died on July 22, 1879, at the age of twenty months, and Clyde O., born on May 30, 1882. Clyde O. Rees, who is now engaged as a machinist in the shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Indianapolis, married Lavina Hurst, of Buffalo, New York, and has one child, a daughter, Mary Jane. Since her husband's death Mrs. Rees has continued to make her home in Connersville. In 1916 she built a beautiful modern residence at 1023 Grand avenue and is now living there, very comfortably situated, enjoying conditions of living that hardly could have been dreamed of in her girlhood days on the pioneer farm in the woods. Her parents grew up among the pioneers of this section and from her mother she learned to spin, the spinning being done at home when she was a girl. She also learned to weave and in her girlhood days often was engaged in weaving at a neighbor's loom.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Charles E. J. McFarlan, secretary and treasurer of the People's Service Company of Connersville, vice-president of the McFarlan Realty Company of that city and for years one of the most active and influential business men of Connersville, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at Cambridge City, in the neighboring county of Wayne, December 1, 1853, son of John B. and Lydia C. (Jackson) McFarlan, the former a native of England and the latter of the state of Ohio, whose last days were spent in Connersville, where for years they occupied a high position in the social and business life of that city.

John B. McFarlan was born in the city of London on November 7, 1822, and was about eight years of age when his parents, James and Ann (Beecraft) McFarlan, came to this country with their family and settled in Hamilton county, Ohio, in the immediate vicinity of the then rapidly developing city of Cincinnati. James McFarlan was a native of Scotland and was a silk manufacturer in London, but upon coming to this country bought a farm in the vicinity of Cincinnati, land now included in the corporate limits of that city, and there spent his last days, his death occurring when he was fifty-eight years of age. His widow survived him for many years and lived to be nearly ninety years of age. They had a large family, those of their children who grew to maturity, besides John B., being James, Thomas, Robert, Edward, Ann, Martha, Elizabeth and Mary.

Though but a boy when he came with his parents to this country, John B. McFarlan was from the beginning of his residence here a helpful assistant in the labors of developing the home farm in the Cincinnati neighborhood. He completed his schooling there and when about seventeen years of age entered the factory of the old firm of George C. Miller & Sons at Cincinnati., to learn the trade of carriage blacksmithing. Some little time after completing his apprenticeship he opened a small chop of his own in the village of Cheviot, afterward and now known as Westwood, a suburb of Cincinnati, and while there married. Not long afterward, about 1850, he moved to Cambridge City, this state, conveying his goods and chattels by canal boat, and there established a carriage-manufacturing plant. In 1856, requiring a wider outlet for his expanding business, he moved to Connersville and bought out the firm of Ware & Veatch, carriage manufacturers, and continued that business quite successfully until his death on August 15, 1909, he then lacking but a few weeks of being eighty-seven years of age. From the very beginning of his residence in Connersville John B. McFarlan took a particularly active part in the general business and industrial life of the growing city and it is undoubted that his influence and the exercise of his boundless energies had very much to do with the development of the industrial interests of the city during the period of his activities there. When natural gas was discovered in this state Mr. McFarlan became one of the chief organizers of the Connersville Natural Gas Company and was elected president of the same. He also was one of the organizers and a member of the board of directors of the Indiana Furniture Company (now the Krell Piano Company), was president of the McFarlan Building Company, which erected the McFarlan block in Connersville, and in his manufacturing industries employed large forces of men. Upon the organization of the Connersville Blower Company he was elected president of the same and served in that capacity until his death. For several years he also was president of the Fayette Banking Company, organized in 1892, and since then merged into the Fayette National Bank of Connersville, and in other ways gave of his time and energies to the development of his home town.

As noted above, it was during the time of his residence at Cheviot that John B. McFarlan was united in marriage to Lydia C. Jackson, who was born at Cincinnati on December 4, 1822, and who died at her home in Connersville in December, 1906, she then being eighty-four years of age. She was a daughter of Thomas S. and Maria (Collins) Jackson, the former of whom was burn in the city of Baltimore and the latter in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Thomas S. Jackson was one of the early bankers of Cincinnati, connected with the old Franklin Bank in that city, and there he and his wife spent their last days, he being about seventy-five years of age at the time of his death and she, eighty-five. They were the parents of eight children, of whom four grew to maturity, those besides Mrs. McFarlan having been Charles J., George E. and Lucy. John B. McFarlan and wife were earnest members of the Presbyterian church and their children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being as fol1ow: Clara, who died when about twelve years of age; Maria J., who is unmarried; James E. and William W., of St. Petersb urg, Florida; Lucy, who died when two years of age, and John B., Jr., of Connersville.

Charles E. J. McFarlan was about three years of age when his parents moved from Cambridge City to Connersville and he has lived in the latter city ever since. As a boy he learned the trade of carriage painter, meanwhile pursuing his studies in the local public schools, and upon completing the course there took a course in the old Chiekering Institute at Cincinnati. Upon his return from that institution he engaged in the boot-and-shoe business at Connersville, in association with D. H. Sellers, but about three years later disposed of his interest in that business and entered his father's carriage factory, presently becoming a partner with his father in that business and was actively connected with the same until 1913. Meanwhile he was taking active participation in the affairs of other local business and industrial concerns and early in its organization became secretary and treasurer of the Connersville Natural Gas Company, continuing that position with the Peoples Service Company at the time of its organization and taking over the affairs of the old gas company, which latter position he still occupies. When the McFarlan brothers and their sister, Maria J. McFarlan, formed the McFarlan Realty Company at Connersville, Charles E. J. McFarlan was elected vice-president of the same and still occupies that position. Mr. McFarlan is a Republican and has ever given his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs. For twelve years he was a member of the Connersville school hoard and occupied that important position during the time of the erection of the new high school building in that city. He has ever taken a warm interest in the cause of education and was for sixteen years a member of the board of trustees of DePauw University.

On November 10, 1880, at Connersville, Charles E. J. McFarlan was united in marriage to Ella S. Hughes, who was born and reared in that city, daughter of Dr. S. W. and Ann (Hall) Hughes, natives of Virginia and prominent residents of Connersville, where Doctor Hughes was engaged in the practice of medicine until his death in 1865, he then being forty-six years of age. He had an extensive practice, covering a wide scope of territory hereabout, and literally gave his life for others, the exactions of his practice wearing him out at a time when he ought to have been in the very prime of his life. His widow survived him for years and was sixty-seven years of age at the time of her death. They were the parents of two daughters, Mrs. McFarlan having a sister, Emma. Mrs. McFarlan's maternal grandfather also was a physician, Dr. Daniel D. Hall, a prominent practitioner in Connersville at an earlier day. To Mr. and Mrs. McFarlan one child has been born, a son, Alfred Harry McFarlan, who married Jessie M. Manlove and is living at Connersville, where he is actively identified with the industrial life of the city, president of the McFarlan Motor Company. The McFarlans are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take a proper interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general social activities of their home town, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advancement of the common welfare hereabout.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Frank P. Ansted, manufacturer, former president of the Connersville Commercial Club, vice-president and manager of the Lexington-Howard Company, manufacturers of automobiles; president of the Inland Motor Sales Company, vice-president of the Indiana Lamp Company and holder of important interests in various other concerns at Connersville, is a native of Wisconsin, but has been a resident of Connersville since the days of his early youth and has therefore been a witness to and a participant in the wonderful industrial development that has marked that city during the past quarter of a century. He was born at Racine, Wisconsin, December 22, 1884, son of Edward W. and Catherine (Burk) Ansted, the former of whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in the Dominion of Canada, who are now living in Connersville, where they have for years been recognized as among the leaders of the general life of that city and further and fitting mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume.

When his parents located in Connersville Frank B. Ansted was about six years of age and he received his elementary schooling in the public and parochial schools of that city. Following his graduation from the high school in 1904 he entered the law department of the University of Michigan and was graduated from the same in 1907. In that same year Mr. Ansted was admitted to the bar and engaged in the practice of his profession at Connersville, where he ever since has been located. Mr. Ansted has given considerable attention to commercial and industrial affairs in the city of Connersville and for some years, until 1911, was vice-president of and attorney for the Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of that city. Since then he has given the greater part of his attention to his extensive manufacturing interests. Some years ago he took hold of the Indiana Lamp Company, as vice-president and manager of the same, and still occupies that position. In August, 1915, Mr. Ansted became vice-president and manager of the Lexington-Howard Company at Connersville, manufacturers of motor cars, which concern was established in 1908 and now employs about two hundred and fifty persons and is turning out about five thousand motor cars a year. The Indiana Lamp Company also has developed an extensive business in the manufacture of automobile lamps. Mr. Ansted also is interested in the Hoosier Castings Company and is president of the Inland Motor Sales Company. He is past-president of the Connersville Commercial Club and in other ways has for years contributed of his time and his energies to the advancement and promotion of the higher interests of the city.

On October 7, 1908, Frank B. Ansted was united in marriage to Isabel Roberts Heron, who was born in Connersville, daughter of James M. and Nancy D. (Dolph) Heron, the former a native of the state of Indiana and the latter, of Kentucky, who are still residents of Connersville and who are the parents of two children, Mrs. Ansted having a sister, Norah. James M. Heron is the eldest of the three children born to his parents, James M. and Caroline (McCarty) Heron, natives of Indiana, he having two sisters, Catherine and Nora. The elder James M. Heron was a well-known manufacturer and capitalist. Mrs. Ansted's maternal grandfather was the Reverend Dolph. a clergyman of the Methodist church, who was the father of five children, those besides Mrs. Heron having been William, Edward, May and Kate. Mrs. Ansted is a member of the Episcopal church and Mr. Ansted is a member of the Catholic church. He is a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. He and his wife have one of the finest homes in Connersville and take an earnest interest in the general social activities of the city, helpful in advancing all worthy causes.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Henry T. Silvey, one of Connersville's best-known and most progressive merchants and a partner with William H. Luking in the clothing business there, a continuation of the old-established tailoring establishment of William H. Beck, founded in Connersville in 1848, was born at Everton, this county, July 29, 1877, son of Thomas Hillary and Hannah (Jerman) Silvey, the latter of whom is still living in that village.

Thomas Hillary Silvey also was a native son of Fayette county, born just east of Nulltown, in Jackson township, October 14, 1835, a son of Dr. Presley S. and Frances S. (Sterrett) Silvey, pioneers of that section of the county. In addition to being a physician, Dr. Presley S. Silvey was a "local" preacher of the Methodist faith and in his day was one of the best-known men in this part of the state. He was born in Virginia in 1802 and was about fifteen years of age when his parents, Thomas and Anna Silvey, settled in Fayette county. It was on May 20, 1817, that Thomas Silvey bought a tract of ten acres in Jackson township, this county, paying for the same seventy dollars; land that today is valued at probably one hundred and twenty-five dollars an acre. Thomas Silvey, who was born on August 17, 1774, died on July 30, 1835. On that pioneer farm in Jackson township Presley S. Silvey grew to manhood and early turned his attention to the practice of medicine and to preaching. The demands for his medical services came from a wide stretch of territory and he traveled horseback for miles in all directions, calling on his patients. One night while answering a call west of Everton a bear crossed his path. He went on to the house of his patient. The next morning the bear was killed in a neighbor's barn lot. Doctor Silvey married, November 20, 1822, Frances S. Sterrett, who died in 1855, leaving eight children, Elizabeth Ranch, James Morgan, Asbury, Rebecca, Ann, Thomas Hillary, Jerusha and Jane. The Doctor died on March 21, 1872, at his home at Everton, where he had been engaged in practice for many years.

Thomas H. Silvey was a blacksmith and with the exception of one year spent at Alquina spent all his life in Jackson township. He had his blacksmith shop at Everton and was for years one of the best-known men in that part of the county. On September 8, 1858, he married Hannah Jerman, who was born at Fairfield, in the neighboring county of Franklin, October 26, 1839, a daughter of Reuben and Elizabeth (Osborne) Jerman, the former of whom was for years engaged in the live-stock business at Everton, driving stock through to Cincinnati. He also drove turkeys through to Cincinnati. In his later life Reuben Jerman moved to near Columbia, this state, and there spent his last days. His widow returned to Everton, where her last days were spent. Thomas H. Silvey died at his home in Everton in March, 1889, and his widow is still living there. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom are still living, Katherine having died at the age of nine years and William P., in 1897, at the age of twenty-seven years. Those besides the subject of this sketch who are still living are Reuben J., of Kansas City; Mrs. Anna Murphy, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Fannie Elizabeth Sims, of Indianapolis, and Jasper L., of Everton.

Henry T. Silvey grew up at Everton. In the days of his youth he followed farm work and later became engaged as a clerk in a grocery store at Everton. This experience gave him a taste for merchandising and after about two years spent in the store at Everton he went to Connersville, where he became engaged in a grocery store. In 1902 he went to work in the establishment of W. H. Beck's Sons, tailors and clothiers, and was thus engaged until in February, 1910, when he and William H. Luking bought the store from Charles D. Beck, who had been sole proprietor since the death of his brother. This store, at the northwest corner of Central avenue and Court street, is one of the oldest mercantile establishments in the city of Connersville. It was founded by William H. Beck, a son of David Beck, a pioneer tailor. William H. Beck early learned the trade of a tailor and when a youth determined to get into business on his own account. Equipped with a pair of shears, a package of needles and one dollar in cash he went to Falmouth, where he laid his case before a woman who consented to board him, he to pay as he could. He gave her his dollar on account and announced that he was ready to do neighborhood tailoring. He was successful from the start, farmers from all around that part of the country bringing him cloth from the mills to be made up into clothing, and after he had saved a few hundred dollars he went to Cincinnati, laid his case before a jobbing house there and was given credit to the amount of four hundred dollars. Thus outfitted, Mr. Beck started a tailor shop in Connersville in 1848, starting business at the corner now occupied by the Silvey-Luking store, and was there engaged in business the rest of his life. He built up an extensive business and after his death the business was carried on by his sons, Samuel W. and Charles D. Beck, under the firm name of W. H. Beck's Sons, and was so conducted until Mr. Silvey and Mr. Luking bought the store, which they have since been very successfully conducting under the firm name of the Silvey-Luking Company.

In December, 1897 , Henry T. Silvey was united in marriage to Lulu Z. Trusler, who was born on a farm between Blooming Grove and Fairfield, in the neighboring county of Franklin, a daughter of William H. and Catherine (Loper) Trusler, the former of whom was born and reared on that same farm, the old Trusler homestead, and who now lives at Richmond, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Silvey have a pleasant home in Connersville and take an interested part in the city's general social activities. Mrs. Silvey is a member of the local chapter of the Daughters of the-American Revolution through descent from her father's grandfather, who participated in the War of Independence. Mr. Silvey is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John W. Reichle, the genial manager of the Palace Hotel, of Connersville, was born in North Vernon, Indiana, January 1, 1887. He is the son of John and Anna (Wrape) Reichle, both of whom were born in Jennings county, Indiana, where they have always made their home. Mr. and Mrs. Reichle are the parents of seven children: four sons Henry, Walter, Frank and John W., and three daughters Minnie, Mary and Florence (deceased). John Reichle has been identified wjth the business interests of North Vernon for the past twenty-five years.

John W. Reichle was educated in the common and high school of his home town. After graduating from the high school he went west and for seven years (1907-14) was in charge of a stave mill in Arkansas. Although he was only twenty years of age when he began his connection with the firm owning the stave mill, yet he displayed such ability to manage men that he was successful from the start. His seven years of service with the firm employing him is amp1e evidence of his ability to perform satisfactory service.

While in Arkansas he met the girl who later became his wife, Rose Hodge, a native of Greenup, Illinois. She is a daughter of C. C. and Martha (McNeese) Hodges and was born in 1891. She was educated at Sedalia, Missouri, and Ravenden, Arkansas. In addition to her regular common and high-school education she received a thorough course in music and is an accomplished pianist.

After their marriage on May 12, 1914, Mr. Reichle and his bride at once left for Indiana. They returned to Mr. Reichle's former home in North Vernon and he at once became connected with the Metropole Hotel in that place. He continued there until June 24, 1916, when he became manager of the Palace Hotel at Connersville, where he is now located. Under his efficient direction the business of the hotel has been greatly improved and it now enjoys a liberal share of the patronage of the local and transient business of the city.

Mr. and Mrs. Reichle have a charming little daughter, Laverne, who was born on March 19, 1915. This little maid has the unique distinction of having two great-grandmothers, Mrs. Mary Wrape, of North Vernon, and Mrs. Anna Weyl, of Bridgeport, Illinois.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


E. Ralph Himelick, one of Connersville's well-known young attorneys-at-law, prosecuting attorney-elect for the thirty-seventh judicial circuit, and senior member of the law firm of Himelick, Frost & Goble, is a native son of Indiana, born in the neighboring county of Union, and has been a resident of Connersville since the year of his admission to the bar in 1914. He was born on a farm in the neighborhood of College Corner on May 5, 1887, son of John W. and Rachel (DuBois) Himelick, both natives of Indiana, who are now living in Franklin county, where they are very comfortably situated.

John W. Himelick was born on a pioneer farm in Bath township, Franklin county, son of John and Mary (Davis) Himelick, the former of whom was born in Ohio, and who were the parents of six children, Mary, Marian, Laura, Flora, John W. and Grant. The elder John Himelick was a well-to-do farmer and breeder of thoroughbred horses and both he and his wife lived to ripe old age. John W. Hirnelick has always been a farmer. For eighteen years he lived in Union county and during his residence there served for six years as a member of the board of county commissioners.

He married Rachel DuBois, who was born in Union county, a daughter of John K. and Elizabeth (Wilson) DuBois, also natives of Indiana, who spent most of their lives in Union county, although John K. DuBois was born in the neighboring county of Franklin. He died at the age of sixty-six years and his widow survived him some years, she being seventy-eight years of age at the time of her death. They were the parents of six children, Angeline, Sarah, Harriet, Rachel, Edgar and Arthur. John W. Himelick was reared in the faith of the Methodist church and his wife is a member of the Colters Corner Methodist Episcopal church. They have two sons, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Dwight Himelick, of Franklin county.

E. Ralph Himelick was reared on the paternal farm and during his boyhood and young manhood was a valuable aid to his father in the labors of developing and improving the same. Following his graduation from the township high school he entered Indiana University and in 1911 was graduated from the College of Liberal Arts of that institution, immediately thereafter entering the Indiana University Law School, from which he was graduated in 1914 and at once was admitted to the bar. Thus admirably qualified for the practice of his profession Mr. Himelick engaged in practice at Connersville and for the first year was associated in practice with the late Reuben Conner. After the death of that gentleman he practiced alone until in August, 1915, when he formed a partnership with G. W. Goble. In February, 1916, H. L. Frost became a member of the firm, which has since been engaged in general practice of the law at Connersville, under the firm style of Himelick, Frost & Goble. Mr. Himelick is a Republican and gives his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs. In the election of 1916 he was elected prosecuting attorney for the thirty-seventh judicial circuit and will enter upon the duties of that office on January I, 1918.

On September 5, 1912, E. Ralph Himelick was united in marriage to Faye Hamilton, who was born at Mt. Carmel, in the neighboring county of Franklin, July 24, 1891, daughter of Harvey and Caroline (Sleet) Hamilton, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Ohio, who were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Himelick was the last born, the others being Harry, Clarence, Mabel and Guy. Harvey Hamilton is one of the ten children born to his parents, who came over from Ohio during the early days of the settlement of this part of Indiana and became well known among the pioneers of Franklin county. The Sleets also are a pioneer family in Franklin county. Mr. and Mrs. Himelick have one child, a son, John Haney. Mrs. Himelick is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Himelick is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of Warren Lodge No. 15, Free and Accepted Masons, at Connersville, and of the chapter at that place, and takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John Stoll, one of Connersville's well-known merchants and the proprietor of a well-stocked grocery store at 216 West Sixth street in that city, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident of Connersville since the days of his boyhood. He was born in Wurtemburg on September 29, 1863, son of Jacob F. and Katerina (Schweickle) Stoll, natives of Germany, the former of whom died in his native land when his son, John, was about fourteen years of age.

In 1880 the Widow Stoll and her two children, John and Frederica, the latter of whom is now Mrs. Fred Seal, came to the United States, their destination being Connersville, where Mrs. Stoll had a brother and a sister living. They arrived at that place on September 29, 1880, the seventeenth birthday of John Stoll, and within two weeks the boy had a job as a baker, a trade he had learned in his native country. He worked at that trade until the first of the succeeding year, when he took employment in the factory of the McFarlan Buggy Company and there worked three years, learning the wood-working trade. He then went over to the Monk & Roberts furniture factory and after working there six months took employment with the Connersville Furniture Company and was engaged in the factory of that company for eleven years, learning all departments of the cabinet-making trade. From that place he returned to the McFarlan factory, but four months later, in Apri1, 1896, he started a little grocery store on the top of West hill. In the meantime he had married and his wife was, from the very beginning of his mercantile venture, a great aid in pushing the business. Much of the time during the early years of his mercantile career Mr. Stoll was compelled to be out with the wagon and Mrs. Stoll became an excellent manager and buyer. Mrs. Stoll continues to do the buying for the store and has done much to contribute to the success of the enterprise. Mr. Stoll and his wife had no experience before starting in business, but by careful thought, diligence and constant attention to details have gained experience and have done very well. About four years after John Stoll started in business on West hill his brother, Jacob F. Stoll, bought into the concern and the brothers started another store at 216 West Sixth street, the latter being conducted by Jacob F. Stoll, John Stoll continuing in business on the hill. Five years later John Stoll bought his brother's interest in the business, sold his store on the hill and has since operated the store on Sixth street, where he and his wife have built up an excellent business.

It was in 1886 that John Stoll was united in marriage to Anna M. Disque, who was born in Rheinpfalz, Germany, daughter of John and Katherine (Green) Disque, natives of that same county. At the age of nineteen years Anna Disque came to this county in company with a number of other girls from the vicinity of her home, with a view to finding better conditions here than they could hope to find at home, and upon her arrival in this country went to Cincinnati, where she lived until her marriage to Mr. Stoll. To that union have been born three children, one son, Carl, and two daughters, Emma and Elsie. The entire family are members of the German Presbyterian church and take an earnest interest in church work. Mr. Stoll is a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose, while Mrs. Stoll is a member of the Daughters of Rebekah and of the German Aid Society.

About ten years ago Mr. and Mrs. Stoll bought their present home, a substantial brick residence that was erected in Connersville before the days of the Civil War by Mr. Stoll's great-uncle, John Farner. After Mr. Farner's death the administrator of his estate sold the house to Mr. Schoenholtz, the baker for whom John Stoll worked upon arriving in Connersville, and Mr. Stoll bought the place from Mr. Schoenholtz's daughter. Before Mr. Stoll remodeled the old house it was of a rather odd design, one of the "landmarks" in Connersville, but since it has been remodeled in someehat more up-to-date fashion it is a good-looking and substantial residence and there Mr. Stoll and his family are very pleasantly situated.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


The late James Huston, for years a resident of Connersville and one of Fayette county's best-known retired farmers and landowners, was a native son of this county and lived here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm near Bentonville in 1836, a son of John and Mary Miller Huston, the former a native of Pennsylvania, who was among the earliest settlers in Posey township, this county, settling on a tract of "Congress land" in the vicinity of Bentonville in the early thirties of the last century. They resided there during the remainder of their lives.

On that pioneer farm in Posey township James Huston grew to manhood. He received his education in the primitive schools of that neighborhood. From the days of his boyhood he was a valued aid to his father in the labor of developing and improving the farms. Upon reaching man's estate he became a fanner on his own account and prospered in his operations, eventually accumulating some six hundred acres of valuable land. During the last thirty years of his life he made his home in Connersville, the county seat of Fayette county, directing the management of his farms from there. Mr. Huston was an ardent Republican and always gave attention to local civic affairs. He was active in local politics, although never a seeker after or holder of public office. He was an active worker in church matters, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and endeavored to encourage all movements designed to advance the common welfare. James Huston died at his home in Connersville on December 15, 1914, in the seventy-ninth year of his age, an honored and respected pioneer citizen of the community and country, in which his whole life had been spent.

James Huston had been twice married. In 1863 he married Ruth Amelia Murray, who was born at Genesee, New York, a daughter of James and Anna (Miller) Murray. Mrs. Huston died at Bentonville in 1875, at the age of thirty-eight years, leaving two children, a son and daughter, Francis Murray and Mary Helen, the former now a resident of Chicago and the latter a resident of Connersville.

Francis Murray Huston upon completing his education at Earlham College and at DePauw University, was admitted to the bar of the Fayette circuit court, at the age of twenty-one years. Later he turned his attention to newspaper work and presently came to be recognized as an authority as a financial writer. His early newspaper work was with the Cincinnati Enquirer and later with the Rocky Mountain News at Denver. He then was connected with the Chicago Inter Ocean for a time and later joined the Chicago Evening Post staff as a political writer and later became financial editor. He spent twenty years with the Post and then joined the staff of the Chicago Herald. For ten years he has been also editor of the Rand- McNally Bankers Monthly Magazine. Mr. Huston also has been a contributor to the London Times and numerous other papers and for years has been the Chicago correspondent of the Journal of Commerce of New York City. He was married to Linnabelle Janes, of Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1900.

Mary Helen Huston, who has a very pleasant home at Connersville, received her elementary education in the schools of her home town and supplemented the same by a course in Western College at Oxford, Ohio. In the social and cultural activities of her home town she has ever taken a warm interest and is an active supporter of movements having as their aim the advancement of the common good.

James Huston married, secondly, Marian Koogler, daughter of Dr. Adam Koogler, of Connersville, and a niece of Gen. George Crook, of the United States army. Mrs. Huston died at Connersville on October 2, 1907.

Among James Huston's ancestors ranked William Huston, a native of Ireland, who was his grandfather, and who assisted in establishing American independence, while acting in the capacity of captain.

Mr. Huston was one of a family of seven children, of whom two survive, Thomas Huston, of Kokomo, Indiana, and Mrs. S. S. Merrifield, of Connersville; William Nelson Huston, Mrs. Elihu Schrader, Mary Ann Huston, John Miller Huston, Mrs. Charles Mount and Robert Marshall Huston having preceded their brother to the great beyond. Charles A. Murray, a prominent attorney of Denver, is a brother-in-law.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Lincoln Kerr Tingley, cashier of the First National Bank of Connersville and formerly and for years train dispatcher in the office of the old Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad Company at Connersville, former councilman from his ward in the Connersville city council and for years an active factor in the development of his home city, is a native son of Fayette county and has lived here all his life. He was born in the village of Harrisburg, this county, September 15, 1866, a son of Dr. Uriah B. and Elizabeth (Kerr) Tingley, for years recognized as among the leading residents of that village.

Dr. Uriah B. Tingley was one of the pioneer physicians of Fayette county and his memory, particularly in the northern part of the county, is held dear to many in that section. He was born in Clermont county, Ohio, September 30, 1816, and early turned his attention to the study of medicine. He was graduated from the old Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati and in 1838 came to Indiana, proceeding by way of the canal to Hamilton and thence by stage coach to Oxford and then on by foot up the valley of the Whitewater to Connersville, where he opened an office for the practice of his profession. A year later he moved on up to Harrisburg and there remained in practice the rest of his life, a faithful physician and a friend to all.

Reared at Harrisburg, Lincoln K. Tingley received his first schooling there in what then was known as the "Frog Pond" school house. Upon leaving school he worked for a time on farms and then turned his attention to telegraphing and presently was appointed an operator in the Connersville office of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad Company, now known as the Cincinnati, Indianapolis & Western, performing his duties in that connection so well that he presently was advanced to the position of train dispatcher and was thus engaged until his election to the position of cashier of the First National Bank of Connersville on January 1, 1905, since which time he has given his undivided attention to the affairs of the bank, long having been recognized as one of the leading bankers in this part of the state. Mr. Tingley is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. For ten years he represented his ward as a member of the city council and in many ways did well his part in promoting the general advancement of the affairs of his home city.

Mr. Tingley has been twice married. It was on September 24, 1889, that he was united in marriage to Cora C. Caldwell, who died leaving one child, a daughter, Mildred, who married Leslie Richman and has one child, a son, Robert. After the death of his first wife Mr. Tingley married Ella M. Crago and to this union one child has been born, a son, Malcolm. Mr. and Mrs. Tingley are members of the Christian church and Mr. Tingley for some years served the local congregation of that church as a deacon.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Deb Murray