The late Thomas M. Little, an honored veteran of the Civil War, for years one of the best-known and most able of the members of the Fayette county bar, former clerk of Fayette county, former treasurer of the city of Connersville and for years a justice of the peace in and for his home township, was a native son of this county and lived here all his life, doing much during his active and useful career to advance the best interests of the community in which his heart was wrapped up. He was born on a farm in Orange township on September 24, 1840, son of Samuel and Frances (Russell) Little, the former a native of the state of South Carolina and the latter of this county, a member of one of the pioneer families of Orange township, and whose last days were spent in Pawnee, Nebraska.

Samuel Little was born in Chester, South Carolina, and in the days of his young manhood moved from there to Ohio, locating in Greene county, whence he came to Indiana and settled in Orange township, this county, where he lived until late in life. Samuel Little had taught school in his early manhood and was a man of intelligence and excellent judgment. He was an active Republican and for some time, many years ago, represented this district in the state Legislature. He also served for some time as a doorkeeper in the national capitol at Washington. About thirty years ago he moved to Pawnee, Nebraska, where he spent his last days, his death occurring about ten years later. His wife, Frances Russell, was reared in this county, a daughter of William Russell and wife, who came to this county from Adams county, Ohio, and were among the pioneers of Orange township.

Thomas M. Little was reared on the farm on which he was born, in Orange township. and was living there when the Civil War broke out. On July 25, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company F, Third Indiana Cavalry, and served with that command until he was honorably discharged as a corporal in Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D. C., November 15, 1862, he having been sent to the hospital on account of a serious wound in the shoulder received in a skirmish before the battle of South Mountain a wound from the effects of which he suffered all the rest of his life. At the time he was wounded Mr. Little was captured by the enemy, but was paroled and later exchanged. His family still has his parole, signed by order of Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton. Upon partially recovering from his wound and after his exchange, Mr. Little enlisted for the hundred-day service and served during that period as a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Little returned to Fayette county. He previously had studied law in the office of James C. McIntosh at Connersville and in 1865 was admitted to the bar. After his marriage in 1866 he established his home in Connersville and there spent the remainder of his life, one of the most useful and influential citizens of that city and a lawyer of wide repute throughout this part of the state. Mr. Little took an active part in local politics and for years was accounted one of the leading Republicans of Fayette county, his activities being extended also to district and state political affairs. On June 30, 1881, he was appointed clerk of the Fayette circuit court to fill an unexpired term and after two years of such service was elected to the office of county clerk and was re-elected, serving in that capacity, in all, about ten years. Upon the expiration of his term as county clerk, he was appointed to the office of city treasurer to fill an unexpired term and was re-elected at successive elections, occupying that responsible position for about seventeen years. He later was elected justice of the peace and was occupying that magisterial position at the time of his death. Mr. Little was an able advocate in court and held a high position in the estimation of his colleagues at the bar. He was a brilliant orator and both before the court and jury and on the hustings commanded the close attention of his hearers. As a patriot he thought deeply of his country and of its rights and its needs and as a public servant he was faithful to his trust, even to the smallest fraction. Though Mr. Little possessed a keen sense of humor, tenderness ever was his dominant characteristic. He had a marvelous memory and this faculty he had cultivated until he came to be regarded as well nigh a walking gazetteer of local events and his recollection of affairs in this county usually was accepted as final and conclusive. Thomas M. Little died at his home in Connersville on February 5, 1916, and at his passing left a good memory, for he had done well his part in life. His widow is still making her home in Connersville, where she is very comfortably situated. She is a member of the First Methodist church, as was her husband, and has ever taken an active part in church work. Mr. Little was reared in the Presbyterian church and for many years and up to the time of his death taught a class in the Sunday schools of both of these churches.

It was on February 20, 1866, in Orange township, this county, that Thomas M. Little was united in marriage to Martha Huston, who was born on a farm in that township, June 21, 1835, daughter of William and Jane (Ramsey) Huston, early settlers in that township, whose last days were spent there. William Huston was born in Ireland about 1807 and was left an orphan at an early age. When he was about twelve years of age he came to the United States with his aunts, the family settling in Ohio. In Preble county, that state, he grew to manhood and there married Jane Ramsey, who was born in that county, and shortly after their marriage they moved over into Indiana and settled in the southeastern part of Connersville township, this county, near the Village Creek church, moving thence, after a residence there of about three years, to Orange township, where they spent the remainder of their lives and where Martha Huston was living at the time of her marriage to Mr. Little. To that union five children were born, namely: Samuel Calvin Little, now a resident of the city of Indianapolis, who married Martha A. Miller and afterward married Ida Turner, to which union nine children have been born; George Little, who married Rebecca Blaine and lived at St. Paul, Kentucky, until his death on December 30, 1915; Ethel who lives at Eaton. Ohio, widow of Thomas M. Buck, and has two children, Thomas M. and Charles H.; Mary, who is unmarried and makes her home with her widowed mother at Connersville, and William, also of Connersville, who married Florence W. Achey and has four children, William A., Mary Josephine, Frances Ellen and Thomas Allen. Miss Mary Little is a graduate of Cedarville College at Cedarville, Ohio, and taught school one year at Muncie and four years in Connersville. During the time of her father's incumbency as city treasurer she acted as his deputy and attended to of the detail work of that office.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John Melvin White, a well-known retired farmer and stockman of Jackson township, former county assessor and a former member of the board of county commissioners of Fayette county, now living at Everton, is a native son of Fayette county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm about two miles southwest of Everton, in Jackson township, March 22, 1866, son of William Madison and Sarah (Kerr) White, both of whom also were born in Jackson township and who spent all their lives there, honored and respected by all in that part of the county during the past generation.

William Madison White was born on the same farm as was his son, the subject of this sketch, and spent his whole life in that neighborhood. He was born on March 23. 1838, a son of Alexander and Deborah (Lake) White, pioneers of this county, further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Alexander White was born in Kent county, Delaware, January 22, 1808, and was early orphaned, his father dying when he was two years of age and his mother a few years later. He was thus early put on his own resources and at the age of twelve years began to make his own living. In 1827, when eighteen or nineteen years of age, he located at Harrison, Ohio, and there began working in a tavern, also being emploved to carry the mails on the stage line out of that place, and while there drove the canal boat for two or three years on the old White Water canal. For seven years he resided at Harrison and while there, December 10, 1831, married Deborah Lake, a member of the Lake family well known in this county and further reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and in 1834 he and his wife moved to Indiana, settling near Blooming Grove, in Franklin county. A year or two later they came up into Fayette county and settled in the Everton neighborhood in Jackson township. Upon coming to this county Alexander White entered from the government a tract of land in Jackson township and there established his home, continuing to reside there for many years. He did well in his farming operations and became the owner of about five hundred acres of land. He and his wife were members of the Methodist church and were active in church work. They lived together for nearly fifty years, her death occurring in 1883, she then being about sixty-eight years of age, and he survived until May 26, 1888, being then seventy-four years of age. Mrs. Deborah White was born in Connecticut and was about five years of age when her parents, the Lakes, came to this part of the country and located at Harrison, Ohio, down in the White Water valley, just over the Indiana line.

William M. White was reared on the home farm in Jackson township and there grew to manhood, a valued aid to his father in the labors of developing and improving the same. Before he was twenty-two years of age he married and established a home of his own on the place his father had entered from the government and became a prosperous farmer, owning at the time of his death about five hundred acres of land, the greater part of which was under profitable cultivation. He and his wife were earnest members of Mt. Zion Methodist Episcopal church and ever took an active part in church work and in the advancement of all other good works in the community in which they lived. Both he and his wife had been born and reared in that community and watched its development from the days of their youth and did what was in their power to aid in such development, so that at their deaths they were sincerely mourned throughout that entire countryside.

On February 21, 1860, William M. White was united in marriage to Sarah J. Kerr, who was born on a pioneer farm a short distance south of Everton, in Jackson township, this county, daughter of James and Margaret (Grist) Kerr, well known among the early settlers of that neighborhood and to whom further and more particular reference is made elsewhere in this volume. James Kerr, who was the first school teacher in the Everton settlement, teaching first at Fairfield and later near the present village of Everton, was a native of Ireland, but had been a resident of this country since he was eight years of age. Sarah J. Kerr was a twin. At the age of fourteen she joined the Methodist Episcopal church at Everton and ever remained a faithful and consistent member of the same. She died at her home in Jackson township on May 26, 1901, aged sixty years, and her husband, William M. White, survived her less than two years, his death occurring on August 9, 1902, he then being sixty-four years of age. To their union eight children were born, all of whom save one, William Earl, are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Mrs. Catherine Elliott, Mrs. Mary Olive Worster, Mrs. Ida Belle Funderburg, Mrs. May Funderburg, Mrs. Bessie Goble and Mrs. Daisy Bohnenkemper.

John Melvin White, who, from the days of his boyhood, has been known familiarly among his friends as "Mel" White, grew up on the home farm in Jackson township and was early put to work at what is now regarded as man's work. At the age of eleven he rode horseback to Cincinnati, helping his father drive stock to market, and at thirteen drove the teams, hauling all the material used in the erection of a house his father built in 1879 on the home place southwest of Everton, and at sixteen was driving four and six-horse teams, even at thirteen having driven six-horse teams, getting timber out of the woods. He early became an expert stockman and for years dealt extensively in live stock, long being regarded as one of the best judges of mules, particularly, in this part of the state, his services being much in demand as a judge at county fairs and stock shows. Mr. White is an ardent Republican and from the days of his boyhood has taken an interested part in local politics. In 1894 he was elected assessor of Jackson township, his term to run four years, but by reason of legislative changes made during his incumbency he was kept in office for five years. In 1902 Mr. White was elected as a member of the board of county commissioners from his district and was unanimously renominated for that office and re-elected, thus serving two terms in that important office, or six years, during which time much bridge and road work was carried out in this county. During the past five years Mr. White was made his home in Everton, where he and his family are very comfortably situated. He is a member of local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and was a trustee of the lodge when the lodge building was erected at Everton in 1892. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose and in the affairs of both of these organizations takes a warm interest.

On January 17, 1589, John Melvin White was united in marriage to Viola Perduie, who was born at Everton and who, like her husband, has spent all her life in Jackson township. She is a daughter of Harrison and Lizzie (Hubbell) Perduie, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Connecticut, who were for years well-known residents of Everton. Harrison Perduie was born on November 9, 1835, at Harrison, Ohio, son of Rufus and Polly Perduie, and his wife was a daughter of Joel Hubbell, who settled at Mt. Carmel, in Franklin county, this state, in 1839. Harrison Perduie was a painter and followed that trade at Everton until his death on July 17, 1894. He was a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and of the Red Men. His widow, who was born on June 17, 1838, survived him until August 27, 1911, she then being seventy-three years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. White four children have been born, all of whom are living save their only son, Dolph, who died when two years of age, the daughters being Ethel, who married Burleigh Durbin, of Connersville, and has one child, a son, Burleigh Melvin; Mary Catherine, who married Harry Griffith and now resides at Los Angeles, California, and Mildred, who is still in school.

"Mel" White is a member of one of the oldest families in Fayette county and his grandparents on both sides, as noted above, took an active part in early affairs in the southeastern part of the county, his mother's parents James Kerr and wife, being particularly well remembered throughout that section by reason of Mr. Kerr's early connection with the schools of the Everton neighborhood. For several years he taught a school conducted on the farm on which his daughter, Sarah, Mr. White's mother, was born and where she spent all her life. James Kerr married Margaret, or "Peggy" Grist, who came from North Carolina to Indiana when a child with her parents, George Grist and wife, who built a home in the woods in the southeastern part of this county: their first habitation there being a mere pole and brush lean-to, which they equipped with a bedstead made of poles stuck into holes bored into the supporting posts of the cabin. Even after James Kerr and "Peggy" Grist were married things were still in an unsettled state hereabout and wild animals occasionally invaded the settlements. One day when Mrs. Kerr was going to the nearby spring for a pail of water she came upon a bear lumbering up the path. It is doubtful which was more astonished, Mrs. Kerr or the bear, but the bear, at least, was sufficiently startled out of his bearings to seek safety in the branches of a birch tree standing near the spring. Mrs. Kerr called her husband and the latter appeared on the scene with a rifle, with which he speedily dispatched bruin, and the Kerrs and their pioneer neighhors were thus provided with some very fine bear steak. James Kerr died in 1877.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Charlie Newland, one of Fairview township's best-known and most progressive farmers, is a native son of Fayette county and has lived here all his life, actively engaged in farmitlg with the exception of a couple of years engaged in business in Connersville. He was born on a farm one mile south of Alquina, in Jennings township, March 24, 1858, son of John and Maria (Edwards) Newland, both also natives of this county, the former born on that same farm, where he spent all his life, with the exception of one year.

John Newland was born on March 12, 1819, son of James and Hannah (Huff) Newland, who were among the early settlers of that part of the county and influential factors in the development of the same. James Newland was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, December 29, 1782, and was early left an orphan. When he was twelve years of age his place of residence was changed to Bracken county, Kentucky, and later he moved to Lexington, in that same state, where he learned the trade of a cabinetmaker, a trade he followed all his life. He was living in Lexington when the second war of American independence broke out and he served during the War of 1812 as a member of Captain Smiths troop of the First Kentucky Regiment, which performed valiant service along the Indiana frontier under the command of General Harrison. On January 18, 1814, he married, in Bracken county, Kentucky, Hannah Huff, of that county, whose parents, John and Martha Huff, natives of the state of Pennsylvania, later came to Indiana and settled in Union county, where they spent their last days. In 1814, shortly after his marriage, James Newland, in company with the two Piggmans, Jesse and ,Adam, and John Huff, came up into Indiana Territory looking for land and were so well pleased with the lay of the land up here in the valley of the White Water that James Newland entered a tract of three hundred and twenty acres, in what afterward came to be organized as Jennings township, this county, and the others entered one hundred and sixty-six acres each. Upon securing the title to his land James Newland returned to Kentucky and in 1818 came back up here with his family and established his home on his half section in Jennings township. He was a man of large views, sagacious and intelligent and he prospered in his undertakings, soon coming to be regarded as one of the leaders in that community, as he also was one of its most substantial citizens. He was one of the trustees of the old county library board and in other ways did his part in developing the social and cultural life of the new community. He was an ardent Mason, having joined that order in the early claps of the institution of Freemasonry at Cincinnati, and all his life took an active interest in Masonic affairs. James Newland died on his old home place in Jennings township in January, 1849, and his widow survived him but six months, her death occurring in July of that same year.

John Newland was reared on the home farm in Jennings township and there spent practically all his life. As a boy he was attentive to his studies, the schooling he received in the primitive schools of that day being supplemented by valuable instructions received from his parents, and he taught the first school opened at Alquina. On April 20, 1843, he married Maria Edwards, daughter of William and Rachel Edwards, pioneers of that part of the county, and after his marriage established his home on the old home place, which, after the death of his parents five years later, he continued to operate the rest of his life. "Uncle" John Newland, as he was known throughout that whole countryside, was a good farmer and became the owner of four hundred and twenty-five acres of land, one of the best-improved farms in that part of the county. He was an ardent Mason and an equally ardent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a member of both the subordinate lodge and the encampment of the latter order, to which latter he was admitted on June 4, 1863. He was raised to the degree of master Mason in Warren Lodge No. 1.5, Free and Accepted Masons, December 11, 1869, and in the affairs of both of these fraternal organizations ever took an earnest interest. "Uncle" John Newland died at his home in Jennings township on November 15, 1893, he then being seventy-four years, eight months and three days of age, survived by his widow and six of their seven children and seven grandchildren.

Charlie Newland farmed on the home farm south of Alquina from the days of his youth until recent years. As a boy of fifteen years he started to do things on his own behalf, his father at that time turning over to him a couple of acres of ground on which to try his hand both as a wheat farmer and as a corn farmer. The desire to do the best he knew how prompted him to give his best efforts to the cultivation of this tract and he had an acre of wheat and an acre of corn that was the pride of the neighborhood. This initial effort encouraged him to take an interest in the work of the farm and his father gave him every opportunity to acquire a careful knowledge of farming and farm management. In addition to his general farming he early began to give his attention to the raising of live stock, with particular attention to the breeding of pure-bred Berkshire hogs, and he made quite a success in that line. After his marriage in 1881 he continued to make his home on the old home farm until in March, 1907, when he moved to Connersville and was there engaged in the feed business for about two years, at the end of which time he bought the farm of one hundred and fifteen acres in the southeastern part of Fairview township, where he since has made his home and where he and his wife are very pleasantly situated. The day on which Mr. Newland took possession of that farm the barn burned with all its contents, entailing upon him a loss of about three thousand dollars, but he immediately rebuilt the barn and now has a better one than before. An unusual series of misfortunes in his life which Mr. Newland sometimes refers to, is the fact that within a period of thirteen years he broke his right leg four times, the accident in each instance being due to an apparently trivial cause. The house in which Mr. and Mrs. Newland live was built about sixty years ago and was constructed of timber grown on the place, poplar, walnut and gray, so substantially that the house still has a look of being almost new. There is a well constructed basement underneath the whole house and in one of the rooms of this basement is a great old-fashioned fireplace with a crane in it. Mr. Newland has made further improvements to the place since he took it in charge and has a very well-kept farm plant.

As noted above, Charlie Newland was married in 1881. His wife, Margaret Belle Thomas, was born in Columbia township, this county, daughter of Gilbert V. and Sarah (Allen) Thomas, the former a native of New York state and the latter of Indiana, whose last days were spent on a farm in Columbia township. Gilbert V. Thomas, who was born in 1808, came to Indiana from New York and became an early settler in Columbia township, this county, where he spent the remainder of his life. His wife, Sarah Allen, was born and reared on a farm in the Duck Creek neighborhood, in Franklin county, three and one-half miles south of Everton. Mr. and Mrs. Newland take a proper interest in the general social affairs of their home neighborhood and are helpful in all good works thereabout. Mr. Newland is a member of the Knights of Pythias, with which order he has been affiliated for thirty-three years, and a member of the Improved Order of Red Men, with which organization he has been affiliated for twenty-seven years.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Dr. William R. Phillips, a well-known practicing physician at Orange and thoroughly identified with the best interests of that community, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at Chelsea, in Jefferson county, this state, October 26, 1878, son of Dr. Andrew H. and Elvira G. (McKeand) Phillips, both of whom were born in that same county and whose last days were spent there.

Dr. Andrew H. Phillips, who was born in 1844, was a son of George C. and Abigail (Harland) Phillips, the former of whom was a grandson of George C. Phillips, who came from England in 1832 and settled in Jefferson county, this state. Abigail Harland was a member of the widely represented Harland family in this country, the family descending from two brothers, George and Michael Harland, who came to America in Colonial times and whose descendants recently held a reunion in Chicago, at which covers were laid for fifteen hundred persons, including among the number some of the foremost men of this country. When the Civil War broke out Andrew H. Phillips was but seventeen years of age. He tried to enter the service of the Union army, but his enlistment was rejected on physical grounds. He later was accepted, however, and served in the hospital service for about a year. At the close of the war he found his sympathies so closely in touch with the medical practice that he decided to become a physician and with that object in view came to this county and began the study of medicine in the office of his brother-in-law, Doctor Sipe, at Fayetteville, now Orange, and after a course of study under that preceptorship returned to his home in Jefferson county and began the practice of medicine at Chelsea. He later entered the Indiana Medical College and was graduated from that institution in 1875. Ten years later he entered upon a post-graduate course in the medical college at Cincinnati and was graduated from that institution in 1886, after which he resumed his practice at Chelsea, where he died on September 8, 1888. His wife had preceded him to the grave about three years, her death having occurred in 1885. She also was born in Jefferson county, daughter of James and Sarah (Wood) McKeand, the former of whom, a cooper and shoemaker, was of Scottish descent. Dr. Andrew H. Phillips and wife were members of the Methodist church. The Doctor was a Mason, having affiliated with that ancient order while living at old Fayetteville, in this county. He took an active part in political affairs and for some years served as trustee of his home township in Jefferson county.

Dr. William R. Phillips received admirable training for the exacting profession upon which early in life he decided to enter. Though but ten years of age when his father died he had even then determined to follow his father's profession and early began reading to that end. Following his graduation from the high school at Lexington, this state, he entered the Marion Normal College and continued his studies there until within about ten weeks of the time he should have graduated. He then began teaching school and for about three years was thus engaged, in the meantime pursuing privately his medical studies, and in due time entered the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville, from which institution he was graduated on July 12, 1905. Thus equippd for the practice of his profession, Doctor Phillips came to Fayette county and opened an office at Orange, where his uncle, Doctor Sipe, years before had been in practice and where his father gained his early medical education. There Doctor Phillips has ever since been engaged in practice and has been quite successful. He has an excellent practice and is in numerous useful ways identified with the growing interests of the community of which he has become an influential factor. Doctor Phillips is a Republican and during the memorable campaign of 1912 put in his lot with the Progressive wing of that party and was nominated for the office of coroner of Fayette county and for joint representative of Fayette and Franklin counties, but withdrew from the race in order to support James K. Mason, Republican nominee.

Doctor Phillips is a Mason, as was his father, and has twice been master of Orange Lodge No. 234, Free and Accepted Masons, in which lodge he has filled all the offices save those of secretary and treasurer. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men, has filled all the offices in that lodge with the exception of that of keeper of wampum, and is now district deputy great sachem of the order of this tribe.

On December 25, 1901, Dr. William R. Phillips was united in marriage to Mary Wilson, of Forest, Ohio, who was born in Hardin county, that state, daughter of Randall A. and Lydia J. (Coleman) Wilson, and who was attending the normal school at Marion at the time she met Doctor Phillips. She taught school for one term before her marriage. To Doctor and Mrs. Phillips four children have been born, one of whom, William R., died when seven weeks old. The other children are David Coleman, Nilah Grace and Richard Austin. The Doctor. his wife and family, are members of the Christian church at Orange and take a proper interest in church work, as well as in the general good works of the community in which they live, helpful in promoting all worthy causes thereabout.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


John C. Naylor, one of Fairview township's best-known and most substantial farers, was born in a log house on a pioneer farm in Blooming Grove township, in the neighboring county of Franklin, and has lived in this section of Indiana all his life. He was born on December 6, 1856, son of Joel and Sarah (Glidewell) Naylor, both of whom were born and reared in Franklin county, members of pioneer families there, and both of whom have been dead for many years, the subject of this sketch having been orphaned when but a child.

John P. Naylor, father of Joel Naylor, was one of the earliest settlers in the Blooming Grove settlement in Franklin county. He was born in Pennsylvania about 1792 and when twenty years of age came to Indiana Territory on a prospecting trip, crossing the site of what is now the prosperous city of Connersville when there was but one log cabin there. He went on farther to the west and entered 3 tract of one hundred and sixty acres near the junction of White river and Fall creek, where the city of Indianapolis later came to he laid out by the state survey party sent out by the Legislature to locate a capital for the state. He cleared quite a bit of that track, land now a part of the city of Indianapolis, but the constant prevalence of fever and ague in the swampy country so discouraged him that he abandoned the farm and moved to Franklin county. His widowed mother and two sisters were with him, having moved out from Pennsylvania to join him in his Indiana home, and they established their home in Blooming Grove township upon moving to Franklin county and there became established as among the early settlers of that part of the county. John P. Naylor became a contractor during the time of the construction of the old White Water canal and built a number of the aqueducts along the coarse of that historic waterway. He was a man of robust and vigorous physique and lived to be a b u t eighty-five years of age.

Joel Naylor grew up in Franklin county and became a carpenter and stone mason, as well as a farmer, and some two-story houses he built in his home neighborhood are still standing. He was killed by the kick of a horse in 1860, his son, the subject of this sketch being then but three years of age. His widow, who was born in Franklin county, a daughter of Nash Glidewell and wife, Virginians, who had settled in Franklin county in pioneer days, survived him about eight years, her death occurring when her son, John C., was eleven years of age.

Following the death of his mother, John C. Naylor made his home with his uncle, William Naylor, for three years, at the end of which time he went to Connersville, where he found employment in a machine shop and woodworking establishment and presently became an expert machinist and cabinetmaker, trades that he followed in that city for twenty-three years. In 1898 he traded his home in Connersville for a farm in Fairview township and on February 20, 1899, moved onto that farm, where he ever since has made his home and where he has done very well as a farmer. Mr. Naylor has a well-kept farm of one hundred and sixty-one acres and has improved the same in excellent shape, conducting his farming operations in accordance with the approved methods of modern agriculture.

On October 3, 1883, John C. Naylor was united in marriage to Isabel Waggoner, who was born in Wabash county, this state, daughter of Michael and Sarah (Clanford) Waggoner, the former of whom was born near Flat Rock, in Rush county, this state, and the latter in Pen Yan county, New York. Michael Waggoner lived at Henryville a short time after his marriage and then moved to Wabash county, where he farmed for a few years, at the end of which time he returned to this part of the state and settled on a farm on the north edge of Franklin county, in Blooming Grove township, where he spent most of the remainder of his life, his last days being spent in the village of Blooming Grove, where his daughter, Isabel, was living at the time of her marriage to Mr. Naylor. To that union one child has been born, a daughter, Marie. Mr. and Mrs. Naylor are members of the Methodist church and take a proper part in church work, as well as in the general social activities of the community in which they live.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


When Dr. Richard Wasson Sipe died at his home in Orange in the summer of 1916, there was sincere mourning throughout that part of the county and throughout the neighboring sections of the counties of Franklin and Rush, for in his passing there had departed from that community a strong, personal influence that had been exerted in all good ways thereabout for more than half a century. Settling at Orange, then old Fayetteville, as a young man just out of college and full of enthusiasm for his profession, Doctor Sipe from the very beginning of his residence there, devoted his best energies to the alleviation of the ills of that neighborhood and to the promotion in all ways of the interests of the community. Alwvays ready to relieve distress, he would go any place at any time on call of the ailing and many times in seasons of epidemic or more than usual illness would ride until exhausted. The friend of all, he was retained as the family physician in most of the families of that community through two generations, the grandchildren of his original patients coming, in their generation, to rely upon the wisdom and skill of the old physician. Counsellor and adviser, as well as physician, Doctor Sipe was a veritable mentor in that community for many years and his influence ever was exerted for the good. Even when enfeebled by advancing years the calls upon his services continued and toward the end he often responded to these calls at times when his physical strength was probably far less than that of the patients who relied upon him, and he maintained his active practice up to within two months of his death. Lenient in matters involving fees for his services, the Doctor oftentimes neglected the mere material side of his affairs to his own financial detriment, ever declining to press a bill for services rendered in behalf of those he suspected might find it inconvenient to pay, but he had his reward in the sense of duty well performed, realizing in the gratitude of those whom he thus served that higher profit which comes to those who are really servants of mankind and which is not based upon monetary standards, and his memory long will be cherished in the community he served so long and so faithful1y.

Richard Wasson Sipe was a native of Indiana, born in Jefferson county, April 8, 1840, son of William and Mary (Wasson) Sipe, and lived on a farm until he was about thirteen years of age. When an attack of white-swelling crippled him so that for four years he was compelled to go on crutches and rendered him halt for life. Thus shut in from the ordinary activities of youth he became deeply interested in his books, presently turning his studies to account by beginning the study of medical works and thus equipped by preparatory study, when about twenty years of age entered the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, and after a four-year course in that institution was graduated with the degree of doctor of medicine in 1864. Upon securing his diploma Doctor Sipe located at Fayetteville (now Orange), in this county, opened there an office for the practice of his profession and there remained, actively engaged in practice the rest of his life. In 1872 Doctor Sipe took a post-graduate course in medicine at Indianapolis and early became recognized as one of the most thoroughly qualified physicians in this part of the state, his practice extending east as far as the White Water river, south as far as Laurel and half way to Rushville on the west. The Doctor was a busy man and ever took an active interest in the public affairs of the community. For two terms he served as trustee of Orange township and served as a member of the county council from the time of the creation of that body, being a member of the council at the time of his death. He was a stanch Republican and for many years was regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this county. A man of strong religious convictions, Doctor Sipe was a member of the Presbyterian church at Glenwood and took an active part in church work, as well as in all neighborhood good works. His death occurred at his home in Orange on June 30, 1916, after a residence of more than half a century at that place.

On May 23, 1866, in Jefferson county, this state, Dr. Richard W. Sipe was united in marriage to Sarah A. Phillips, who was born in that county, a daughter of William and Nancy (Hearn) Phillips, the former a native of the state of Pennsylvania and the latter, of Kentucky. William Phillips was a son of Joshua and Mary Phillips and was but a child when his parents came from Pennsylvania to Indiana and settled in what then was the "wilds" of Jefferson county. William Phillips was reared as a farmer and became a farmer on his own account. He died when his daughter, Sarah, was but an infant and his widow continued to make her home on the old Phillips farm, where she spent the rest of her life and where her daughter Sarah lived until her marriage to Doctor Sipe. To that union were born seven children, Eva, who died in her seventh year, William, John, Clara, Fred, Florence and Richard.

William Sipe, who continues to make his home in the Sipe residence with his mother at Orange, is successfully engaged in farming. On December 29, 1892, he was united in marriage to Hester McKee, who was born in the neighboring county of Rush, a daughter of Charles H. and Catherine McKee, the former of whom also was born in Rush county, son of John McKee, one of the pioneers of that county. Charles H. McKee spent all his life on the land which his father had entered from the government upon settling in Rush county in pioneer days. William Sipe and wife have four children, namely: Claude, who is a student at Hanover College; Margaret, who also attended school at Hanover and is now teaching school at Orange; Louise, now a student at Hanover, and Leon, who is still pursuing his common-school studies. William Sipe is a member of the Masonic order and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same.

Dr. John Sipe, second son of Dr. Richard W. Sipe, is a practicing physician at Carthage, this state. He married Anna Jones, of Rush county and has two children, Dorothy and Clarabelle. Clara Sipe married Robert F. Titsworth, who later moved to Sedalia, Missouri, where she died in November, 1894, leaving two children, John and Frank. Fred Sipe became a farmer and lived at Orange until his death in 1902. He left a widow, Anna Sipe, and one child, a daughter, Grace. Florence Sipe married Jesse Kennedy, a postal clerk, living at Indianapolis, and has two children, Lelia and Donald. Richard Sipe is a well-known lawyer at Indianapolis and was elected as one of the representatives from Marion county to the state Legislature in 1916. He married Grace Frazee, of Rush county and has one child, a daughter, Ruth.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Fred Doenges, general manager and secretary-treasurer of the White Water Creamery Company, of Connersville, and formerly and for years connected with the wood-working industries of that city, was born at Lawrenceburg, this state, March 15, 1878, son of Simon and Amelia (Kring) Doenges, who later became residents of Connersville and further and fitting reference to whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Both Simon Doenges and his wife were born in Germany, but were not married until after their arrival in this country.

Fred Doenges was about thirteen years of age when his parents moved from Lawrenceburg to Connersville and in the latter city he became engaged as a wood carver in the furniture factory, a trade at which he worked there and at other points in Indiana and Ohio until in 1911, when he organized the White Water Creamery Company at Connersville, was elected secretary-treasurer of the same and was installed as general manager of the plant, a position which he still occupies. The White Water Creamery Company has built up a large business since its organization in 1911 and its product is in wide demand. The company owns a dairy farm of one hundred and sixty acres surrounding the famous old "Elephant Hill," northwest of Connersville, and there maintains one of the best herds of dairy cattle in Indiana. The dairy plant has been constructed along modern lines, embodying all the latest devices for the proper production of dairy products, the dairy barn being regarded as a model of its kind. On this dairy farm still stands the old school house, which in the days it did duty as the district school there was widely known as "Elephant Hill College." It is still in an excellent state of repair and is now doing duty as a tool house, a part of the plant of the dairy company.

On October 22, 1914. Fred Doenges was united in marriage to Magdelena Friedgen, daughter of the Reverend Friedgen, founder of the German Presbyterian church at Connersville. Mr. and Mrs. Doenges have a pleasant home in Connersville and take an earnest interest in the general social activities of the city.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


George E. Manlove, one of the well-known and prominent retired farmers of Fayette county, now living at Connersville, was born in Posey township, this county, January 25. 1845, the son of William and Margaret (Munger) Manlove.

William Manlove was the first white child born in Posey township, and his wife was born near Dayton, Ohio. William Manlove was the son of George Manlove, a native of North Carolina, who grew to manhood in that state and came to Fayette county, Indiana, in the year 1811. The trip from the North Carolina home was made with horses and wagon, a number of other families from that section coming to the Hoosier territory at the same time to seek homes in the then far west. Mr. Manlove settled in section 28, township 15, range 12 east, and entered the whole section. The tract at that time was covered with heavy timer and he later sold the place. There were many Indians in this region at that time and they caused the settlers much trouble and annoyance. Mr. Manlove let this part of the state and went south to the Ohio river, where he remained until 1815, when he returned to the township, and here the son William was born that same year, he being the first white child born in that section, so far as is known. In returning from a trip to Cincinnati, George Manlove developed a case of cholera and died in the year 1831. His wife, Mary Caldwell Manlove, whom he married in North Carolina, died in Rush county, Indiana.

Conditions of living in the settlement at that time were of the crudest sort and the early settlers suffered many hardships. They had to depend upon themselves for nearly all the necessities of life, and much of their living was obtained from the forest and the streams. Their homes were of the rudest kind and very few comforts were obtainable by even the best of the families. Yet, withal, a hardy race was developed, and many of the men and women who lived their early lives as pioneers in this Indiana county, became successful and worthy members of society. They had to do with the primeval conditions and to them was left the development of the territory and the formation of the future government. Their task was a hard one, yet they met the many difficulties with a determination that was worthy of their best efforts. Townships and counties had to be organized, schools and churches established, and business enterprises undertaken. Their work was well done and the finished product, as shown in the splendid farms, beautifu1 homes, and thriving towns and cities of Fayette county, is the result of the work done by the people of those early days.

George and Mary Manlove were the parents of nine children, John, William, Joseph, Joseph C., Lydia, Hannah, James, David and George. John grew to manhood in his home county and later became a resident of Hamilton county, Indiana; Joseph died when he was but a small child; Joseph C. and James lived in Tipton counties; Hannah became the wife of Hugh Dicky and made her home in Tipton county; Lydia married James McClure and made her home at Salem, Iowa, and David and George lived in Rush county, Indiana.

William Manlove received his education in the primitive school held in the old log school house. He was ever a student and received much of his education through his own efforts, coming to be considered a well-educated man for those days. He taught school in the county and met with much success in the work. He continued to live at home until he was twenty years of age, when he married and located on a farm which he had purchased, one mile west of the old homestead. That eighty-acre farm he developed and there he made his home until 1876, when he purchased another farm farther south, to which he added until he became the owner of eight hundred and fifty acres of splendid land. There he engaged in general farming and stock raising and became well known throughout the county. Politically, he was as a young man identified with the Whig party and later with the Republican party. He always took a deep interest in local affairs and was a man in whom all had confidence and for whom all entertained a feeling of respect, while he was not a seeker after office, he had much to do with the civic life of his district.

William and Margaret Manlove were the parents of the following children: Oliver, George E., John L., Emory and Mary L. Oliver Manlove married Elizabeth Scott and was for many years a successful teacher, farmer and mechanic. His death occurred some years ago. John L. Manlove is now living on the old home place in Posy township. He married Mary Ella Scott, who now is deceased. Emory Manlove, who owns a part of the old home place, is now living at Connersville. He married Emily Johnson. Mary L., the widow of Calvin Myers, now lives south of Bentonville.

George E. Manlove received his early schooling in the home schools and later attended the Dublin high school. He was reared on the old home farm, where as a lad he assisted his father with the work. He remained at home until 1877, when, in January of that year, he was united in marriage to Malinda Wallace, of Wayne county, daughter of James and Nancy (Cluckner) Wallace. Her father was a native of Indiana, having been born south of Milton, and her mother was born in the state of Pennsylvania. The father of James Wallace was John Wallace, a native of Scotland, who married Mary Banks. John Wallace left his native land in his young manhood and came to the United States, coming on out to Indiana and locating on a farm two and one-half miles south of Milton, where he entered three hundred and twenty acres of land and where he married and established his home.

John and Mary Wallace were the parents of the following children: Oliver, Cyrus, Stephen, James, John, William, Preston, Sallie, Richard, Emily, Allen and one who died in infancy. Oliver Wallace lived for many years on a farm near the old home place. Stephen Wallace died at the age of twenty-one years. Cyrus and John Wallace were farmers in their home county. William, Preston and Richard Wallace were residents of Wabash county. Emily Wallace married James Williams, a farmer living south of Milton, and Allen Wallace died in Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace were prominent in the activities of their home community and were highly respected in that community.

James Wallace was born on February 17, 1821, and died in the year 1880. His wife was born on July 20, 1829, and died in the year 1903. They were members of the Christian church and took much interest in church work and in the general social life of the county. They were the parents of three children, Alonzo, Malinda and Clara. Alonzo Wallace was born on July 30, 1850. He was united in marriage to Phoebe Caldwell and they lived on the home place until the time of their deaths some years ago. Malinda Wallace married George E. Manlove and Clara Wallace married Albert Grifin and lives southeast of Connersville.

To George E. and Malinda (Wallace) Manlove have been born two children, Bertha and Ortha. The former is the wife of Homer Florea, a successful farmer and stockman of this county. They have one child, a daughter, Hazel. Ortha is the wife of Ray Thornburg, a well-known farmer, stockman and automobile dealer, living south of Bentonville. They are the parents of one child, a daughter, Ethel. Soon after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Manlove located on a farm in section 33, Harrison township, where for thirty years Mr. Manlove was successfully engaged in general farming and stockraising. In the year 1905, he retired from the more active duties of life and moved to Connersvlle, where he and his wife now live in their beautiful home at 1307 Central avenue.

While on his farm of three hundred and fourteen acres George E. Manlove devoted much attention to the breeding and raising of live stock, and was particularly interested in Shorthorn cattle, Poland-China hogs and draft horses. He was always a lover of good horses and at various times owned some fine ones, his success as a stockman being widely known throughout the district. Mr. Manlove is now one of the directors of the Central State Bank at Connersville and is a man of much influence. He and his wife have many friends in Connersville, as well as throughout the county. The records of the Manlove family have been traced back to 1663.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


William R. Porter, a well-known and substantial farmer of Connersville township, this county, and the proprietor of a fine farm about three miles southwest of Connersville, in that township, was born on a farm in that same vicinity, December 7, 1850, and has lived in this county all his life, with the exception of a few years spent in Wabash county, this state, during the days of his young manhood. He is the son of Clark and Elizabeth (Reed) Porter, both of whom were born in Connersville township and who spent all their lives there, substantial and influential farming people.

Clark Porter was born on the same farm as was his son, mentioned above, in 1817, a son of Joshua Porter and wife, who settled in that community among the earliest settlers of Fayette county and there spent the rest of their lives, usefu1 pioneers. On that pioneer farm Clark Porter spent all his life one of Fayette county's best-known citizens. He acquired a good piece of property and was quite well circumstanced at the time of his death, which occurred in 1894, he then being seventy-seven years of age. His widow survived him about four years, her death occurring in 1898. She was born in the same neighborhood as was her husband, a bit more than three miles southwest of Connersville, a daughter of Thomas and Susanna (Pollard) Reed, well-known among the pioneers of that community. Thomas Reed came to this country from Ireland and entered a quarter of a section of land in section 34 of Connersville township, this county, getting the land from the government for one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre. His tract was covered with timber, much of which was fine walnut, and upon locating there he cleared a small tract and put up a log cabin, the floor of which was the earth, and he and his wife started keeping house there with tables and seats hewed out of logs. Later he built a better log house, this latter having a plank floor, and afterward added to tile same another room built of brick. There he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring about 1850. To Clark Porter and wife were born seven children, five of whom, Wallace, Thomas R., Clark, William R. and Robert M., grew to maturity, and three of whom, Thomas R., William R. and Robert M., are still living.

William R. Porter received his schooling in the schools in the neighborhood of his old home and remained at home until he was eighteen years of age, when, in 1868, he and one of his brothers went to Wabash county, where, in the vicinity of LaGro, they began farming a place of eighty acres which their father had bought there, land that had been entered by their mother's brother, Thomas Reed. Later Clark Porter bought another eighty adjoining that place, and William R. Porter remained there farming with his brother for a couple of years or more, at the end of which time he returned to the old home farm in this county and there remained until his marriage in the spring of 1876, when he and his wife located on the farm where they are now living, three miles southwest of Connersville, and there have ever since made their home. The farm which Mr. Porter bought at the time of his marriage, a tract of ninety acres, was a bit of natural meadow and he was spared the difficulties of clearing the same. He has made all the improvements on the place and has one of the best farm plants in that part of the county, including a neat and commodious dwelling, and he and his family are very pleasantly situated. Mr. Porter has done well in his farming operations and as he prospered bought seventy-six acres adjoining his original place on the west and another tract of eighty acres, a part of Grandfather Reed's old farm, and is now the owner of two hundred and forty-six acres of excellent land. Mr. Porter is an ardent Prohibitionist and for years has taken an active and earnest interest in the affairs of that party, attending the state and national conventions of the same and in many ways doing his part in promoting the principles of the party.

In the spring of 1876, William R. Porter was united in marriage to Alice Martin, who was born at Bentonville, this county, a daughter of Ezra and Caroline (Dale) Martin, further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, and to this union five children have been born, namely: Martin D., who married Lottie Guffin and lives on a farm adjoining that of his father on the west; Clarence E., who is a photographer at Connersville; William G., who is at home; Grace, who married Charles Schuler, of Connersville, and has had four children, two, Esther and Dorothy, living, and two who died when about two years of age, and Ernest, who is employed in a foundry at Connersville. Mr. and Mrs. Porter are members of the Christian church and take a proper part in church affairs. Mr. Porter is a member of the local lodge of the Improved Order of Red Men and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Harry H. Smith, superintendent of the Fayette county infirmary, or "county farm," is a native of the state of Missouri, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his infancy. He was born in Maysville, Missouri, February 18, 1872.,son of Carey and Eva (Hamers) Smith, the former of whom was born in Mississippi and the latter in Missouri, but both of whom were reared in Indiana, where they spent most of their lives.

Carey Smith was but a child when his parents moved from his native Mississippi and came to Indiana, locating at Indianapolis, where he grew to manhood and where he married Eva Hamers, who was born in Missouri and who was but a child when her parents, Andrew and Eliza Hamers left that state and came to Indiana, locating in Madison county, near Anderson. Following their marriage Carey Smith and wife went to Missouri, locating at Maysville, where they made their home for two years and where the subject of this sketch was born. Carey Smith was a stonecutter by trade and upon his return to Indianapolis from Missouri engaged in that vocation there and was thus engaged at that place until his death in 1875. His widow married John McCornlack and moved to Cadiz, in Henry county, this state, where she spent the rest of her life, her death occurring in 1912.

Harry H. Smith was about three years of age when his father died and the most of his youth was spent in Tipton county, where, when old enough to do so he became engaged in farm work. When seventeen years of age he came to Fayette county and began to work on farms in Connersville in Jackson townships and was thus engaged until his marriage in 1895, when he and his wife began keeping house on the Welch farm near Alquina, presently moving thence to a farm in Columbia tonrnship, where Mr. Smith farmed until about 1899, when they moved to a farm about one and one-half miles west of Connersville, later moving to Jackson township, where they lived until Mr. Smith received the appointment from the board of county commissioners in March, 1914, to the position of superintendent of the county farm, since which time they have occupied the administration building at the infirmary. Since Mr. Smith's appointment to the position of superintendent of the infirmary, the county has erected new buildings on the old county farm and in other ways has greatly improved conditions at the institution, which is now regarded as one of the best-equipped and most capably conducted county infirmaries in the state. Mr. Smith is a Republican and for years has taken an active interest in local political affairs.

On October 2, 1895, Harry H. Smith was united in marriage to Clara Stevens, who was born near Orange, this county, a daughter of William and Ellen (Stephen) Stevens, both members of pioneer families in this part of the state. William Stevens was born at Laurel, in the neighboring county of Franklin, in 1853, a son of Abner and Elizabeth Stevens, who lived in or near Lauel until their children were grown, after which they came to this county and located on a farm west of Alpine. Abner Stevens was a member of one of the first families that settled in this part of the state. One of his aunts was stolen by the Indians when three or four years of age and grew up among Indians. She married a red man and spent her life among the members of the tribe which had brought her up. When Abner Stevens came over into Fayette county his son, William, accompanied him and here William Stevens married Ellen S. Stephen, who also had been born at Laurel, about a year after his birth, a daughter of Levi and Elizabeth Stephen, who had moved to this county about the time the Stevens family came over, the Stephen family also locating west of Alpine. After their marriage William Stevens and wife made their home on a rented farm in Orange township until about 1890, when they bought a small farm in that same township and there Mrs. Stevens died about ten years later. William Stevens now lives with one of his daughters, Mrs.Leona Eddy, near the line between Orange and Columbia townships. Mrs. Smith grew up in Orange township and was living in Columbia township at the time of her marriage.

To Mr. and Mrs. Smith seven children hare been born, Austin, Pearl, deceased, Carl, Dorothy, Elma, Elbert and John. Austin died on September 30, 1915, he then being eighteen years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Christian church and Mr. Smith is a member of the local lodges of the Red Men, of the Haymakers and of the Loyal Order of Moose, in the affairs of which several organizations he takes a warm interest.

"History of Fayette Counties, Indiana"
published by B. F. Bowen & Co. Indianapolis, IN 1917


Deb Murray