Fred Ailer was born in Baden, Germany, in 1822, and is a son of Dennis and Barbara Ailer, natives of that country. They came to America when Fred was seven years old and located in Baltimore, when he (Fred's father) worked on a railroad at fifty cents a day. Two years later they moved to another part of the state and he engaged in the lumber business, which he followed for three years, when he went to the Alleghany mountains and kept a boarding house for a year and a half. He then removed to Ohio, where he lived two years; then came to Floyd county, Ind., and kept a boarding house on the Paoli Pike, near Mooresville; then moved on a farm in Daviess county, near Washington; from there he went to Celestine, Dubois county, where he kept a grocery and was squire. He died in 1845, while holding that position.

Fred went to the Mexican War with Lieutenant Colonel C. C. Knafe of the First Regiment of Indiana. In 1847 he returned from there to his home in New Albany, where he has been ever since engaged in contract work.

He was married January 9, 1847, to Nancy A. Brands, daughter of Tobias and Violet (MacFarland)Brands, of this county. They have one child, adopted,-Hattie, wife of Edward C. Burton, of Indianapolis. He is a Democrat and a member of the Catholic Church.

Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington
John M. Gresham & Co. Chicago 1889
Data Entry Volunteer Dee Floyd-Pavey




Stephen J. Alexander was born in York county, Pa., Fed. 10, 1812. His father, Robert Alexander, was a native of Pennsylvania, belonging to an old Scotch family.

His mother, Elizabeth McKinley, was also a native of York county, Pa.

When the subject of this sketch was only ten years old, his parents removed to Belmont county, Ohio, where he was educated in the common schools until old enough to enter upon the study of medicine, in which he graduated with honor in 1839, and took up his residence in Clermont county, Ohio, where he practiced his profession with success until 1853, when he located at New Albany, where he has since resided, and where he stands in the front rankof his profession, with a large practice as evidence of his abilityand success as a physician.

During the war he ranked high as a hospital surgeon, in which capacity he served, during its continuance, in the hospitals at New Albany.

He is now, and has been for a number of years, a member of the board of examining surgeons of pensions, and whether as a private practitioner or in the Government, he has honored his profession by his skill and fidelity to duty.

Dr. Alexander has been three times married, and ten children were born to him of these marriages. For forty years he has been a member of the Masonic Fraternity. In all the relations of his life he has been an honored citizen, and his professional career has won for him an honorable position among his medical brethren.

Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington
John M. Gresham & Co. Chicago 1889
Data Entry Volunteer Dee Floyd-Pavey




John Meriwether
James P. and Mary (Eversole) Meriwether, both deceased, are the parents of the subject of this sketch who was born Nov. 23, 1844, in Floyd county, Ind. His wife, whom he married in Georgetown township, Nov. 15, 1866, is Indiana A. Wolf, daughter of David and Mary (Utz) Wolf, both deceased, and who was born in this township Nov. 13, 1844. This union has been blessed with five children: David E., Charles A. dec., Henry J. dec., Blanch N. and Bessie C. Comrade Meriwether was engaged in farming when he responded to his country's call for help enlisting from La Fayette, Ind., Feb. 27, 1865, at the age of 20 years. He was enrolled as a private in Co. H, 150th Ind. V. I. Owing to the lateness of his enlistment and the close of the hostilities soon thereafter, he did not take part in any battles but did guard and garrison duty in Shenandoah Valley. He was granted and honorable discharge August, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. His brother, George W. served in 119th Ill. V. I. His wife had two brothers in the service, George and David, both members of Co. C, 81st Ind. V. I. Conrade Meriwether is a member of Georgetown Post, 582, and his postoffice address is Galena, Indiana, near which place his is successfully engaged in farming.

Presidents, soldiers and Statesmen, vol. 2. Hardesty Publishers, New York, Toledo, Chicago. Published in 1893
Data Entry Volunteer Sharon Pike




RICHARD L. CHEW, living on section 31, Doyle Township, was born in Floyd County, Indiana, March 29, 1845, a son of Richard A. and Jane (McCutchen) Chew, the father a native of Floyd County, born August 18, 1817. They were the parents of fourteen children, of whom nine still survive-- John W., Samuel F., Allen W, Lawson S., George H., Hannah R., Frances S., Emma J. and Richard L., our subject.The father came with his family to Clarke County, Iowa, in the fall of 1854, and has since made his home in Doyle Township, where he has eighty-six acres of land under excellent cultivation. He has always followed agricultural pursuits. He is a member of the United Brethren church.Richard L. Chew, whose name heads this sketch, was also reared to agricultural pursuits, which e has made his life work. He has lived in Clarke and Decatur counties with the exception of three years in St. Clair County, Missouri, and the time spent in the late war, since about nine years of age, he having come with his parents in 1854.He enlisted in Company I, Fifth Missouri Cavalry, being in that company's service about eleven months.October 26, 1865, he was married to Margaret Shoe, a daughter of Christopher Shoe, who is living in St. Clair County, Missouri. Of the five children born to them but two are living--Frances A. and Albert A. In connection with his general farming Mr. Chew devotes some attention to stock-raising. He is meeting with good success in his farming, and has a good farm of 130 acres, where he resides. He has served his township as trustee. He is a member of the Methodist church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the Republic.

Submitted by: Lora
Clarke County Historical and Biographical Record by Lewis Publishing, 1886. p.71.


Lieut. Frederick P. Bethel is a son of Isaac and Sarah (Pimblott) Bethel, parents both now deceased, and was born in Manchester, England, Oct. 28, 1828. Since 1848 he has made his home in Floyd county, Indiana, and was married in New Albany, this county, Feb. 6, 1853, to Julia A. Shields. Four children were the result of this union: Rovilla C. dec., Mary E. dec., Julia A. dec. and Margaret A., their births occurring in the order here given. His wife was born in Taylor township, Harrison county, Ind., May 21, 1832. She was the daughter of Robert and Julia (Brewer) Shields, parents no longer numbered among the living. When the war between the states broke out, our subject was an iron moulder in New Albany, Ind. He was 33 years old when he went into the Union army, Nov. 21, 1861, at Jeffersonville as a private in Co. C, 49th Ind. V.I., 2nd Brig., 1st Div., 13th and 19th A.C. He rose to the rank of Ord. Sergt., and to 2nd Lieut., June 1, 1862. In February, 1863, he was detailed as Q.M. of the Regt., to serve as such until May, 1863. In the fall of 1863 he was confined in hospital at New Orleans, La., two months with spinal fever. He was also detailed the same fall to act as Batl. Q.M., of Convalescent Camp two months; again January, 1864, he was detailed as Reg. Q.M. He was also detailed as Q.M. at Algiers, La., of Hawhee Batl., acting as such until granted an honorable discharge Nov. 29, 1864, at Indianapolis, Ind. He was furloughed in the summer of 1863 from Vicksburg, Miss., for thirty days and reported for duty at end of time. He fought at Big Creek Gap, Cumberland Gap, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Siege of Nicksburg, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Black River Bridge, 2nd Siege of Jackson and Yellow Bayou. His wife's brother, John B. served in an Illinois Regiment and was wounded in hand. Comrade Bethel is an iron moulder and his address is New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1184


Edward H. Baldwin, born Aug. 16, 1838, in Louisville, Ky., was a son of Robert and Hannah (Plummer) Baldwin, both now deceased. He came to Floyd Co., in 1853 and was married Nov. 26, 1861, in New Albany, Ind., to Susan E. Spitler who was born in New Albany, Floyd Co., Ind., Jan. 20, 1843. Her parents, both of whom are dead, where John and Catherine (Smith) Spitler. Six children have blessed this marriage, born in the order here given: Kate P., Harry A., Edward C., James S., John H. and Susan M. Comrade Baldwin was Capt. of a ferry boat when President Lincoln issued the first call for troops. He was enrolled at Mound City, Ill., when 24 years old Nov. 25, 1862, as a pilot in U.S. Navy on U.S. steamer "Soveriegn" Miss. Squardron.

March 27, 1863, he was transferred to U.S. steamer "Gen. Price" at Mound City, Il. He was honorably discharged from first enlistment June 11, 1863, at Vicksburg, Miss., and re-enlisted at Mound City, Ill., Sept. 8, 1863. He took part in the engagements about Haines Bluff, Black Bayou, Vicksburg, Grand Gulf and Red River expedition. He was finally honorable discharged July 1, 1865, at Mound City, Ill. upon the close of the war. He had three brothers in the volunteer service, Nathaniel P., in Miss. Squadron, James F., in Miss. Squadron and John B., in Co. E, 23d Ind. V.I., was later transferred to U. S. Navy. Comrade Baldwin is a member of Sanderson Post, he is a member of F. & A. M., also a member of Pres. Church, he is clerk in Jeffersonville Gov. D ept. of U.S.Q.M. Dept., and he resides in New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1183


Joseph F. Armstrong was born in New Albany, Ind., January 30, 1844, and was a son of Archibald and Mary E. (Brown) Armstrong, both deceased. He was happily married, April 13, 1873, in this county to Laura E. Tyler who was born near Georgetown, Ind., Oct. 7, 1853. Her parents, David and Catherine (Richards) Tyler are still spared. One child was the result of this union: Joseph. Comrade Armstrong was a jeweler living in Harrison County, Ind., when the war broke out and enlisted Feb. 17, 1862, at Bowling Green, Ky. for three years, at the age of 18 years. He entered the ranks of Co. D, 4th O. Cav., Army of the Cumberland as a private. He was one of a line of couriers, stationed between Nashville and Huntington in the spring of 1862; he was captured while on duty, May 14, 1862, at Fayetteville, Tennessee; he was held at Macon, Georgia, was then sent to Richmond where he was held until paroled and exchanged. He was held in Camp hospital several times on account of sickness; after his release from prison, he was treated in hospital at Georgetown, D.C., for consumption and chronic diarrhea. He remained in this hospital until granted an honorable discha rge Dec. 19, 1862, being unfit for further field service. During his enlistment he participated, mostly in scouting and skirmishing. He had two brothers in the service, David A., in Co. D. 13th Ind. Cav., and Benjamin in the same command. His grandfather, Archibald Armstrong, served in the Indian war, was wounded and died on the way home. His wife's grandfather, Isaac Richards, served in the Simenole war under Gen. Jackson. Comrade Armstrong is in receipt of a pension, he is a jeweler and he resides in Georgetown, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1183


William H. Brown whose father, Thomas Brown is deceased, but whose mother, Catherine (Sullivan) is still spared, age 77 years (1896), was born Sept. 9, 1837, in New Seymour, Indiana. He was wedded in 1865 in Rockford, Indiana to Mary Steelman who was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, March, 1839, and who passed to her reward, Dec. 1, 1893. Her father, Phaninel Steelman is also deceased, By this marriage there are five children: James C., John T. dec., Edward L. dec., Mary E. dec. and William C. He married, secondly, July 16, 1894, Sophrona Dodyin who was born March 14, 1855, in East Tennessee. She was a daughter of A. B. and Sarah (Wilson) Dodyin. No children were born to this marriage. Comrade Brown was a laborer when he entered the Federal Army, July, 1861, when 24 years of age. He was enrolled from Jackson Co., Ind., as a private in Co., E, 22d Ind. V.I., which was assigned to 4th and 14th A.C. He was ill and kept in hospital at Louisville, Ky., about 5 weeks, in September, 1862, on account of chronic diarrhea and chills. His battle record includes: Pea Ridge, Corinth, Nolensville, Stone River, Liberty Gap, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Tunnell Hill, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty, Vining Station, Chattahoochee River and Peach Tree Creek. He was finally honorably discharged Aug. 27, 1864, at Louisville, Ky. His second wife had two brothers in the late war, William who was drowned at Harpers Ferry, Va., on May 12, 1863, and John was captured and taken to Camp Chase, O., where he remained eleven months; both served under the banner of the Confederacy. Mrs. Brown, by a former marriage, had two sons, Arthur B. and William A. Jenkinson now residing in Lafayette, Ind. Comrade Brown is a flagman on the P.C.C.R.R. and his address is New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1186


Francis M. Briscoe was born in Harrison Co., Ind., March 20, 1838, and took up his residence in this county in 1869. His parents, both deceased, were John and Nancy (Lincoln) Briscoe. His wife, whom he married April, 1865, in Crawford county, Ind., was Sarah M. Totton who was born in that county, in 1847. She was the daughter of Joseph Totton who is still living, and Betsy (Austin) now deceased. The record of their children is as follows: George A., William, Joseph O., Ida deceased, Emma A., Iva R., Charles F., Florence deceased, Daisey and Henry B. Comrade Briscoe was 22 years old and was employed in farming when he decided to enlist in defence of his country, December, 1861; he was enrolled at Valine, in Co. F, 59th Ind. V.I., as a private. This Regt., was assigned to 4th Brig., 2nd Div., 15th A.C. He was promoted to Corp., and served in the Atlanta Campaign, Shermanís March to the Sea, the Carolinas and Grand Review at Washington, D.C. In the fall of 1861 he was cared for in hospital at Paducah, for fever and paralysis until December, 1863. February, 1862, he was given a sick furlough of eight days, this was extended twenty days and he returned to New Madrid. He was honorably discharged in Dec., 1863, to re-enlist in same command as a veteran. In 1864 he was detailed as guard to Gen. McPherson about two months at Huntsville. He was granted his final honorable discharge August, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. His brother, Anthony, served in Co. F, 59th Ind. V.I. and was wounded at Vicksburg. Comrade Briscoe is engaged in farming and his address is Greenville, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1186


Lewis Bir was born in Clark Co., Ind., Aug. 19, 1843, and settled in New Albany in 1866. He was married April 23, 1867, to Miss Sophia Cheap. Two children were born to this union, Mary E. Bir and Edard M. Bir. At the time of his enlistment Comrade Bir was 18 years of age and was engaged in farming; he entered the U.S. service, Aug. 1, 1862, at New Albany, Ind., as a private of Co. K., 93rd Regt., Ind. V.I., and was soon promoted to Corp. and Sergt., of his Co. He served under Grant, and in the winter of 1862-63 marched from Memphis to Corinth and Moscow; his Brigade made a forced march back to Holly Springs, when Van Dora captured the place and got there just in time to see the last of our supplies burned up by Van Dora who then retreated. This Brigade then made a forced march to Grand Junction, the nearest point for supplies, and then back to Memphis. Soon the Vicksburg campaign opened where he helped to dig the canal at Duck Point, then marched to Grand Gulf, crossing the river and took part in the battles of Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill, Black River and others. May 18, he helped to drive the pickets and army of Pemberton in Vicksburg and took part in the charge and assault on that place, May 19-22. Then with Sherman returned to Jackson and drove Jo. Johnson back again the second time; also Meridian and from Memphis was engaged in a number of raids and fights with Forrestís Cavalry in the fall of 1863 and winter of 1863-64; was in the Guntown fight, the Tupelo and Oldtown fights, and in the fall of 1864, was after Price from Little Rock, through Arkansas, Missouri and nearly to the Kansas line, thence back through Missouri to St. Louis; thence to Nashville, Tenn., where they took part under Gen. Thomas in his two days fight with Hood and pursued his routed army to East Port, where the remnant of his forces escaped across the Tennessee River. From Nashville, Comrade Bir with his Regt., went to New Orleans and Mobile, and through the campaign against the Spanish Fort. After the fall of Mobile, they marched to Montgomery, Ala., and they learned of the surrender of Lee. They then remained in Ala., until fall when they proceeded to Indianapolis and were mustered out on November 20, 1865, his Regt. Having traveled about 11, 000 miles during service; he was taken prisoner the day after the Guntown fight, where he and seven of his comrades made a stand and killed eleven of the rebels; he escaped from his captors the next day, and was hid away and concealed by a colored man right in Forrestís camp for four days, and then made his way to the Union lines 56 miles away in about 10 hours, arriving there, bare-footed, bear-headed, nearly naked and famished, with the flesh torn from his feet and ankels.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1185


Capt. Richard Burk
Daniel and Sarah (Duggins) Burk, both deceased, are the parents of the subject of this sketch who was born in Lawrenceburg, Ind., Jan. 31, 1825. In 1847 he made his home in New Albany, Indiana, where he was married Dec. 19, 1847, to Martha A. Davis. His wife was born in Lexington, Ky., Jan. 19, 1829 and passed away July 28, 1895, at her home in New Albany, Ind., and her remains were interred in Fairview Cemetery, overlooking her old home. Three children born to this marriage: Robert E., Malinda A. dec. and Mary E. Her parents, both deceased, were Joseph and Malinda (Hatfield) Williams. Feb. 3, 1896, Comrade Burk was again married to Mrs. Mary Ann Bell, at New Albany, Ind. She was born near Baltimore, Md., in 1832. Many of her relatives served faithfully in the late war. Comrade Burk was a ship carpenter and was 36 years of age when he was enrolled Aug. 10, 1861, at New Albany, Ind., as a private in Co. F, 23rd Ind. V.I., and was subsequently promoted to Ord. Sergt., 2nd Lieut. and 1st. Lieut. At the Battle of Shiloh he received a slight gunshot wound. Nov. 14, 1862, he was honorably discharged at Lagrange, Tenn., by reason of resignation. He re-enlisted March, 1865, at Wabash, Ind., in Co. F, 146th Ind. V.I., as 1st Duty Sergt. He was furloughed for ten days and returned to Baltimore, Md., at end of time. He was detailed, by order of Brig. Com., as forage master near Winchester, serving as such until honorably discharged August, 1865, at Baltimore, Md. He fought at Shiloh, Iuka, Pacahoutas and several other minor engagements. His grandfather, John Burk, served under Gen. Washington several years. His maternal grandfather, Richard Duggins, served under Gen. Jackson and participated in the battle of New Orleans. His wife also had two brothers in the service, George and Calvin; the former in 12th Ky. Cav., was wounded, slightly, several times; the latter, was killed near Nashville, Tenn. Comrade Burk receives a pension, he is by trade a carpenter and his address is 187 Spring street, New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1187


Lafayette Burkhart whose parents, Jacob and Catherine (Brock) Burkhart, are deceased, was born in Floyd Co., Indiana, April, 1842. April 11, 1868, he was wedded in Georgetown twp., this county to Sarah Cook who was born there July 20, 1844. Her father John Cook, is deceased, as is also her mother, Elizabeth (Yenawine) Cook. The only issue of this union is one son, Charles M. Comrade Burkhart was a farmer by occupation and was 20 yeas of age at the time of his enlistment, which occurred at Georgetown, Indiana, Aug. 12, 1862, joining Co. A, 81st Ind. V.I., which was assigned to 1st Brig., 1st Div., 4th A.C. In the summer of 1863 he was detailed as teamster and was not released from this duty until after the battle of Chickamauga. His active hostilities were: Stone River, Tallahoma, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta Campaign, Spring Hill, Nashville and Ashville. Upon the close of the war, he was honorably discharged June 13, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. His brother, George, served in Co., A., 81st Ind. V.I., and died in service at Nashville in the fall of 1862. Comrade Burkhart is a member of Georgetown Post, and his address is Edwardsville, Indiana, near which place he is successfully engaged in farming.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1188


Dennis L. Byrn
The subject of this record was born in Harrison Co., Ind., April 10, 1826. The maiden name of his wife, to whom he was married June 4, 1854, in Harrison Co., Ind., was Martha J. Fite who was born in Jeffersonville, Ind., Jan. 25, 1836. Her father, John Fite and her mother, Eliza (Starr) Fite have both passed away. Two children were born to this marriage: Norman and Arthur, the latter being deceased. Our subject was following his trade as a blacksmith at the time of his enlistment which occurred Sept. 23, 1864, at Jeffersonville, Ind., when 38 years old. He cast his lot as a soldier with Co. I, 42d Ind. V.I. He was put on detached service most of his enlistment until stricken with chronic diarrhea when he was treated in Co. Qtrs. He was honorably discharged June 18, 1865, at Louisville, Ky., and died at Byrneville, Indiana, Sept. 2, 1865, from chronic diarrhea contracted in service and from which he never recovered. His wife had three brothers in the volunteer service: Samuel in 66th Ind. V.I. was captured and released on parole, John in Co. C, 81st Ind. V.I., and Capt. Andrew in 66th Ind. V.I. She had two uncles who served through the war, David and Daniel Starr. Daniel Starr also served in the Mexican war. Our subjectís widow has a pension and her address is New Albany, Indiana.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1188


Timothy Clary, a native of Ireland, was born in County Queens, Aug., 1840 and became a resident of Floyd Co., Ind., in 1869. He was a son of Timothy and Mary (Reed) Clary, both of whom have gone to their reward. He was joined in wedlock to Alice T. McGinn, Feb. 18, 1873 in New Albany, Ind. His wife was a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Deen) McGinn, deceased, and was born in New York City, May 10, 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Claryís family consists of six children, their births occurring in the order here given: Mary A., Joseph T., James J., Anna S., Cornelia R. and Francis C. Comrade Clary was engaged in farming when he decided to take up arms in defence of his adopted country. He was enrolled under the first call, April 1861 at Centreville, Wayne Co., Ind., at the age of 20 years, becoming a member of Co. K, 10th Ind. V.I. His term having expired, he was honorably discharged Aug. 1861, and re-enlisted Dec. 2, 1861 at Richmond, Ind. in Co. D, 19th U.S. Inf., 14th A.C. He was wounded by fragment of shell in right side at Shiloh; he was again wounded at Hoovers Gap by gunshot on nose and left ear; at the battle of Chickamauga, he received a third wound in right knee; in the summer of 1864, he entered hospital where he was treated four weeks for scurvy. His battle record is: Rich. Mt. Siege of Corinth, Stone River, Hoovers Gap, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta Campaign, Resaca and several minor engagements. He was honorably discharged Dec. 18, 1864, at Lookout Mt., at end of time. His Capt. Edwards says on his discharge that Timothy Clary was a good and faithful soldier. His wifeís brother, John served in Marine Brigade. Comrade Clary belongs to Sanderson Post, 191, and Encampment, U.V.L., No. 101, he is a line repairer and his address is New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1189


James M. Colpin, son of John and Mary (Dyer) Colpin, neither of whom are living, was born in Green Co., Kentucky, Feb. 11, 1830. He became a resident of Floyd Co., Indiana in 1865, having married in Harrison county, this state, Mary A James. His wife was a native of Ohio, and was the daughter of James and Susan (Warren) Colpin, both deceased. The record of their children is as follows: John dec., Helen, Amanda dec., Victoria dec., Magenta dec., Coleman dec., Katie dec., and Alonzo deceased, their births occurring in the order named. Comrade Colpin was a boatsman and was 33 years old when he entered the Federal army, in the fall of 1861 at Amsterdam, Ind., for a term of three years. He was enrolled as a private of Co. F, 49th Ind. V.I., Army of the Cumberland. He was never wounded but was held in hospitals, in the winter of 1861-62, at Cumberland Gap, Louisville, New Albany and Indianapolis, Ind., suffering with chronic diarrhea and scurvy. He took active part in the battles of Cumberland Gap and was honorably discharged in the spring of 1862 at Louisville hospital on surgeonís certificate of disability, being unfit for further field service. His brother, Stephen R. served in 23d Ind. V.I. and 4th Ky. Cav., for three years. Comrade Colpin is a pensioner, he is a flagman on P.C.C.R.R. and is a resident of New Albany, Indiana, where he may be addressed.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1189


Frederick D. Conner was born in Perry Co., Indiana, Feb. 17, 1841, and became a resident of Floyd county, Ind., in 1870. His parents, no longer numbered among the living, were Torrance and Nancy (Tate) Conner. He was united in marriage, Oct. 3, 1871, in New Albany, Oct. 3, 1871, to Harriet Sackett who was born in New Albany, Dec. 5, 1850. Her father, Charles Sackett is still living, age 82 years but her mother, whose maiden name was Joyce Gresham is dec. To this union two children were born: Edna C. and Alma. Comrade Conner was a teacher and farmer by occupation at the time of his enlistment which occurred August, 1862, at Louisville, Ky., for three years. He was 21 years old when he entered the Federal army, as Corp. of Co. K, 34th Ky. V.I. August, 1863, he entered hospital at Glasgow, Ky., until October, when he was transferred to Louisville and thence to New Albany, for five months and later to Madison hospital where he was treated for chronic ophthalmy results of typhoid fever, until honorably discharged June 6, 1865, by G.O. of W.D. October 1864, he was furloughed for thirty days, at the expiration of which he returned to Madison hospital. He was detailed as commissary Serg. of subsistence until June, 1863; was detailed as chief clerk for Gen. Judah until his death and again as chief clerk in Madison hospital under Surgeon Grant, serving as such when discharged. His brother, John served in Co. E, 49th Ind. V.I., as Serg.-Maj. Comrade Connor is a member of Sanderson Post, he has been deputy collector of internal revenues from May, 1870, to May 1885; he is a real estate dealer and insurance agent and his address is New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1190


George W. Cook was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1837, and took up his residence in Floyd Co., Ind., in 1858. His father, John Cook has passed away but his mother, whose maiden name was Rose Myers is still spared. Feb. 20, 1867, our subject was united in marriage with Mary A. Reser in Navelton, this county. His wife was born near Shelbyville, Ky. and was a daughter of Daniel and Mary (Razor) Reser, both now dead. Of this union were born two children, Rebecca W. and Mary A. Comrade Cook was a moulder by occupation when he entered the military service, July, 1861, at Greenville, Indiana, at the age of 23 years. He went into Co. C, 23d Ind. V.I., 17th A.C., as a private and was subsequently promoted to Corp. and to Serg. He was honorably discharged from his enlistment, Feb. 28, 1864, at Vicksburg, Miss., in order to re-enlist as a veteran in old command. He was given a regular veteranís furlough and reported for duty at the end of time. His active hostilities were the battles of Shiloh, Thompson Hill, Siege of Vicksburg, Raymond, Jackson, Atlanta Campaign, Shermanís March to the Sea, the Carolinas and the Grand Review at Washington, D.C. He received his honorable discharge July 23, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. He had two brothers in the war, John in Co. C., 23d Ind V.I., and Fred a member of 59th Ind. V.I. Comrade Cook may be addressed at Navelton, Indiana, near which place he is at present engaged in farming.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1190


Lieut. George Denny was born on the Atlantic Ocean, in 1841, and was a son of Michael and Sarah Denny, long ago deceased. His wife, Clara Dewees, to whom he was married in Floyd Co., Ind., in August, 1865, was born in Harrison Co., Ind., in 1856. [sic] Her father, Chas. L. Dewees served during the late war in Co. B., 38th Ind. V.I., ranking as Capt., and fell at the battle of Bentonville, in 1865. Her mother, Mary (Sands) is also dead. Of this union were born: Cora, Charles, Willard, Bettie, Carrie, Agnes, George W., Jessie and Jennie. Our subject was a blacksmith when he enlisted in the fall of 1861 at Joe Holt, Ind., when 21 years of age. He was enrolled in Co. C., 49th Ind. V.I., as 5th Serg., and won successive promotions to Ord. Serg., and 1st. Lieut. He was ill about three weeks on account of disability. April, 1862, he was furloughed for twenty days from Cumberland Ford and reported for duty at the end of time. He was honorably discharged to re-enlist as a veteran in winter of 1863-64 in old command. In 1865 he was detailed as military conductor on Lexington and Covington R.R., he also had charge of hospital at Barracks at Lexington, about two months. He fought with his command at Cumberland Gap, Haines Bluff, Arkansas Post, Vicksburg, Pt. Gibson, Thompsons Hill, Champion Hill, Black River Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Raymond, Red River Campaign, Big Creek Gap and was honorably discharged August, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. After the Vicksburg Campaign he was sent to N. O., under Gen. Lawler as far a Matagorda Bay, Corpus Christi and to Old Town Tex., returned to N.O., and then joined the Red River Campaign under Gen. McClernand. He had two brothers in the service, John in Co. C, 49th Ind. V.I., and William in Co. C, 38th Ind. V.I., was fatally wounded. His wifeís brother, John belonged to Co. K, 91st Ind. V. I. Comrade Denny is a blacksmith and his address is New Albany, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1191


Thomas Dodge, born in Floyd Co., Ind., Aug. 7, 1834, was a son of Joshua and Dorcus (Groves) Dodge, the parents both deceased. He was united in wedlock March 23, 1864, in New Albany, to Sylvania Smith who was born in Floyd Co., Ind., Oct. 28, 1844. His wifeís parents, Peter and Sarah (Akers) Smith are both deceased. Of this union were born nine children, Peter, Elenora, Jesse, Joshua, John, Robert, Sarah A., Mary E., and Clarence deceased. Comrade Dodge was farming and was 25 years of age when he entered the army, December, 1861, at Jeffersonville, Ind., for three years, as a private in 12th Bat. Ind. V. Art., 14th A.C. In 1862 he was confined in hospital at Nashville one week for hernia; the following year he was again stricken with hernia but did not enter hospital. He was taken prisoner at Clinch Mt., in 1863 but escaped shortly afterwards. In the fall of 1862 he was honorably discharged at Nashville, on surgeonís certificate of disability and re-enlisted a year later in Co. F, 117th Ind. V.I. In the winter of 1863-64 he was detailed to transfer prisoners from Tenn., to Camp Chase, O., about three weeks. During his first enlistment he was stationed at Ft. Negley most of the time; during his second enlistment he fought at Clinch Mt., Chickey River, Sulpher Springs and Bull Gap. He was honorably discharged in 1864 at expiration of time. His grandfather, Geo. Groveís sympathies being with the strugling colonists, he espoused their cause and joined them. Our subject is at present engaged in farming and his address is Greenville, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1192


James E. Engleman, born in Georgetown, Floyd Co., Ind., Jan. 7, 1840, was a son of Lewis and Mary A. (Richards) Engleman, the latter deceased; the former, born in 1814 is still spared. Our subject was happily married, April 11, 1864, in this county, to Susan Tyler who was born Dec. 22, 1837, in Georgetown township, this county; her parents, no longer numbered among the living, are William L. and Catherine (Utz) Tyler. To this marriage were given three children: William A. dec., Edward S. and Jesse H. dec. Comrade Engleman was 22 years old and his occupation was that of a farmer when he went into the service, Jan. 1, 1862, joining Co. D, 53d Ind. V.I., 1st Brig., 4th Div., 17th A.C., at Camp Noble, Ind. He entered the ranks as a private and was subsequently promoted to Corp., Sergt., Ord. Sergt., and 1st Lieut. In the summer of 1863 he was detailed as Sergt. to Provost Guard at Natchez, Miss. for about one month. He was granted an honorable discharge to re-enlist Feb. 24, 1864, at Camp Hebron, Miss., as a veteran and was granted a veteranís furlough. His battle list includes the following Ė Siege of Corinth, Hatchers River, Holly Springs, Cold Water, Siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Meridian, Atlanta Campaign, Jonesboro, Lovejoy Station, Galesburg, Shermanís March to the Sea, Tree Creek. He was finally honorably discharged July 22, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. His father took part in Morganís raid. His grandfather, Abraham Engleman, served in the War of 1812 and his great-grandfather, Philip Engleman served for seven years in the Revolutionary war. His wife also had two brothers in action, John in Co. C, 81st Ind. V.I., was discharged on account of disability, and Rolla in same Co. Comrade Engleman is a member of Georgetown Post, in which he has held various offices, including Adjt. And P.P.C., he has been township trustee two terms and J.P. one term. Both Mr. and Mrs. Engleman have been members of the M.E. church for twenty years, and most of the time he has been trustee of the same; the has been a member of the I.O.O. F. for twenty-three years and the K. of P. fourteen years. His occupation is that of a farmer and his address is Georgetown, Ind.

Submitted by: Sharon Pike
Presidents, Soldiers, Statesmen
Vol. II (Floyd Co., Indiana)
H.H. Hardesty, Publisher
N.Y., Toledo, Chicago
1893
Pg. 1192


Deb Murray