John Sowash, son of Abraham Sowash, was born in 1805 in Westmoreland County, Pa., where he was reared and educated. He was by trade a blacksmith, working at this trade till 1840. He then worked in the salt works of Westmoreland County nine years, and at the same time dealt exclusively in horses. In 1851 he came to Indiana and located in Prairie Township, Henry County, but three years later moved to Jefferson Township where he died in 1861. He was married in 1823 to Betsey Stone, a native of Westmoreland County, Va., born in 1799. She died in Henry County, Ind., in 1852. They had a family of seven children - Daniel, born in 1824, resides in Missouri; Rebecca, born in 1827, died in 1855; William, born in 1829, died in 1860; Abraham, born in 1831, died in 1831; Susannah, born in 1832, died in 1872; John H., born in 1835; Mary E., born in 1837, resides in Iowa. In 1853 Mr. Sowash married Minerva Conner, and to them were born two children - Samantha, now Mrs. Bowen Presnal, born in 1854, and Izetta, now Mrs. George Winnier, born in 1855. Mr. Sowash was a member of the United Brethren church, and throughout his life was strictly temperate.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 709.
Submitted by: Jeanie


John H. Sowash, son of John and Betsey (Stone) Sowash, was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., in 1835, and when sixteen years of age came with his parents to Henry County, Ind. He followed farming till 1866 when he moved to Sulphur Springs, and for two years was engaged in stock dealing, etc. In 1868 he bought an interest in the tile factory of Rife & Hoover, which he has since principally conducted. In December, 1858, Mr. Sowash was married to Susan J. McClelland, a native of Harrison Township, Henry County, Ind., born in March, 1837, a daughter of Robert and Catherine McClelland. They have three children - Alice, born in 1860, wife of James O. Wright; Albert, born in 1866, and Katie, born in 1872. Politically Mr. Sowash is a Republican.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 709 and 710.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Ira Stout, son of William W. and Rebecca Stout, was born in Henry Township, Henry County, Ind., in 1851. His boyhood was spent on his father's farm, but he early turned his attention to engineering and the machinist's trade, at which he spent the greater part of his time. He now owns and conducts a fine farm of 320 acres in Jefferson Township. He was married Feb. 22, 1880, to Jennie, daughter of William and Hannah Deaver, and a native of Henry County, born in 1855. They have one child - William, born Dec. 29, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Stout are members of the Christian church, and are among the prominent citizens of the township.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 710.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Absalom Strough, son of John and Sarah (Miller) Strough, was born in Rockingham County, Va., but has lived in Henry County from early childhood. After reaching his majority he rented and tilled a small piece of land, still assisting at home when he was needed. At the end of three years, when he was married, he had $400 at interest, a team of horses, two cows, a few head of young cattle and twelve pigs. He was married Feb. 9, 1860, to Mary C. Fultz, a native of Delaware County, Ind., born in 1840, a daughter of Daniel and Anna Fultz. After their marriage they lived on a farm rented of Mr. Strough's father nine years. In 1869 they moved to a farm previously purchased in Jefferson Township, a mile and a half northwest of Sulphur Springs, where they have since resided. Their home is well located, consists of 105 acres of choice land, and is well improved with a fine residence and farm buildings. Mr. and Mrs. Strough have had nine children - William H., Sarah Ann (wife of John Hays), John D., Otto O., Frank W., George F., Amanda E., and twins, ____ and Eddie W.; the former died in infancy, and the latter aged eleven months. Mrs. Strough is a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. Strough is a member of no religious society, but is one of the foremost in promoting the advancement of religious and moral interests.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 710.
Submitted by: Jeanie


John Strough, deceased, was a native of Rockingham County, Va., and died in Henry County, Ind. He was reared, educated and married in his native county, and in 1840 came to Indiana and settled in Fall Creek Township, Henry County, two miles east of Middletown. He bought eighty acres, only a small patch around the house cleared, and went to work to cultivate and improve it. In early life he learned the tailor's trade, working at it several years, and after he commenced farming he worked at his trade in the winter. His wife was Sarah Miller, also a native of Rockingham County, Va. They had a family of fifteen children, eleven of whom attained their majority - Harvey; Elizabeth, wife of John Good; Absalom; George; Sarah, wife of C. Bowman; John, of Holt County, Mo.; Levina, wife of George W. Reedy; Abraham and Jacob, of Holt County, Mo.; Joseph, of Hamilton County, Ind.; Ellen, wife of Samuel Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Strough were members of the Dunkard church.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 710 and 711.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Noah W. Warner was born in Rockingham County, Va., March 10, 1832, and has lived in Henry County, Ind., since 1835. In his early life he worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Eighth Indiana Infantry, and in 1862 re-enlisted in Company H, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantry. Aug. 31, 1862, he was wounded at Richmond, Ky. Sept. 29, 1866, he was married to Ellen Ice, a native of London, Eng., born in 1841. She died Feb. 17, 1874, leaving one son - Jefferson Lee. After his marriage, N. W. Warner opened a restaurant in Sulphur Springs, which he carried on a number of years. Since 1878 he has been Postmaster and also carries on a grocery and barber shop. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Post No. 119. His father, Daniel Warner, was born in Montgomery County, Pa., March 30, 1793. His wife, Lydia (Cook) Warner, was born in Shenandoah County, Va., April 14, 1803. In 1825 Daniel Warner came to Indiana and bought forty acres of land in Fall Creek Township, Henry County. He then returned to Virginia, and in 1835, with his wife and ten children, came to Indiana and settled on his land, at the same time buying an additional forty acres. With the assistance of his sons he cleared and cultivated his land, and afterward bought forty acres more. He was one of Henry County's first surveyors and one of the first Trustees of Fall Creek Township. He was in early life a school teacher, and after coming to the new country was anxious for the establishment of good schools, doing all in his power to further the cause of education. He and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. Mrs. Warner died Oct. 3, 1870, and Mr. Warner, Jan. 28, 1872. They had a family of twelve children - Mary, Lucinda, David, Peter, William, John, Edward, Andrew, Noah, George W., Samuel and James K. P. Peter and John were members of the Eighty-fourth Indiana Infantry; George W., of the Twelfth Indiana Battery, and Samuel, of the Eighth Indiana Infantry. Peter and George died at Nashville, Tenn.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 711 and 712.
Submitted by: Jeanie


A. M. Weston was born in 1836, in Cleveland, Ohio, where he passed his boyhood and received his early education. When sixteen years of age he entered Oberlin College, and took half his course; then entered Antioch College, where he graduated, after which he taught two years. He then engaged as local editor of the Cincinnati Penny Press till 1862, when he enlisted in Company K, Fiftieth Ohio Infantry, and served three years. After his return home he took charge of the academy and public schools of Vernon, Ind., and when entering his third year at Vernon was induced to accept the professorship of mathematics at Hiram College, Ohio. He remained there two years and then went to Eureka College, Ill., to assume the professorship of Greek. He was for three years President of this college. He then returned to Indiana and bought a farm of fifty-eight acres in Jefferson township, Henry County, where he has since resided. Since the war Mr. Weston has devoted considerable of his time to the ministry of the Christian church. He has also written a work on a Biblical subject entitled "Evolution of a Shadow," pronounced by the editor of the Christian Standard "both novel and valuable," and from the press of the Standard Publishing Company of Cincinnati. He was married in 1867 to Miss Julia Pardee, of Hiram, Ohio, before her marriage a very acceptable teacher of the college. They have one child - Nell E.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 712.
Submitted by: Jeanie


John W. Whitworth, son of W. B. and Elizabeth Whitworth, was born in Jefferson Township, Henry County, Ind., March, 1841. He was reared and educated in his native township, spending his boyhood on his father's farm. In 1861 he enlisted in Company E, Eighth Indiana Infantry, and served four years. After his return from the war he engaged in farming, and now owns 132 acres of fine, well-improved land. He was married June 27, 1869, to Vermelia Ann Marlow, a native of Henry County, born in 1847, and a daughter of Johnston and Naomi Marlow. They have had three children - Charles, born August, 1872, deceased; Bert, born March, 1875, and Joseph, born in 1879. Mrs. Whitworth is a member of the United Brethren church.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 712.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William B. Whitworth, son of Archibald and Elizabeth Whitworth, was born in Guilford County, N. C., Aug. 4, 1814. When fifteen years of age he came to Indiana with his uncle, Judge John Tomlinson, who entered a farm of 240 acres in Delaware County. He spent five years in assisting his uncle clear up the land, and then went to Muncie, Ind., which was then in its infancy, and began working at the carpenter's trade. A year later he came to Henry County and entered eighty acres of timber land in which is now Jefferson Township. He went bravely to work to clear up his farm and put it under good cultivation, at the same time working at his trade. Mr. Whitworth has always been one of the most industrious and progressive men in the county, and has done all in his power to advance all interest of common benefit. He has served as Town Trustee a number of years. A Republican in politics, he has always taken an interest in political affairs, and because of his enthusiasm was nick-named after one of Ohio's senators, "Old Ben Wade." He was for a number of years an active member of the Methodist church, until services of the society were discontinued in his neighborhood. His wife is a member of the United Brethren church. Mr. Whitworth was married Oct. 4, 1835, to Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth Tomlinson. She was a native of Rowan County, N. C., born Oct. 20, 1810, and died Sept. 28, 1853. They had a family of six children - Sarah Ann, deceased; Margaret, wife of V. Cummins; John W.; Mary E., deceased, wife of Abraham White; Granville S.; Jemima J., wife of Joseph Hurst. May 28, 1854, Mr. Whitworth married Catherine, daughter of Richard and Henrietta Deaver. She was born in Rowan County, N. C., Dec. 8, 1823, and came with her parents to Wayne County, Ind., in 1828, and to Henry County in 1835. They have had eight children - Eliza J., deceased; Celinda E., wife of Patrick Smith; Celica C.; William W.; Artenia C. and Eugenia E. (twins), the former, wife of John F. Coffman; Ulysses S. G., and Philip H. S.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 713.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Albert N. Yost, a son of William S. and Mary C. (Weaver) Yost, was born in Virginia in 1836 and came to Indiana, where he was reared and educated. He has always following farming, and now owns 290 acres of fine land. For twenty years he has, in connection with carrying on his farm, been engaged in auctioneering. In April, 1861, Mr. Yost enlisted in Company B, Eighth Indiana Infantry, for three months. He then enlisted in the Eight-fourth Indiana Infantry and served three years, when he was transferred to the Fifty-seventh Indiana Infantry, where he served several months, making a total of forty-three months in the service. He was married in 1867 to Mary C. Sowash, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1847, and a daughter of David and Uta Sowash. They have seven children - Harris E., Clem O., Charles M., Nicholas S., Nellie A., Paul and Uta. Mrs. Yost is a member of the Christian church. Mr. Yost, although a member of no church, is an earnest worker for any cause that tends to the upbuilding of society.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 713 and 714.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William S. Yost was born in Augusta County, Va., about 1800. He was reared and educated in his native county, and there married Mary Catherine Weaver, also a native of Virginia, born in 1800. In 1839 they moved to Ohio, and lived near Dayton a year, then moved to Indiana and settled in Sulphur Springs, where he spent the remainder of his life. He laid off the town and opened the first store in Sulphur Springs, and it was at that time known by the name, although there was no village. He was obliged to carry his produce to Cincinnati and bring his stock from there with teams. A postoffice was established in1843, and Mr. Yost was the first Postmaster. He continued in business thirteen years, when his son, J. W., succeeded him. In the early part of his residence in Henry County he bought 300 acres of land, mostly heavily timbered. His property accumulated until at the time of his death he owned 880 acres of land. He assisted in building the first and only mill in the township, for Veatch & Bros., in 1853, and in 1858 bought the mill and ran it five years. Mr. Yost was one of the foremost in advancing all public enterprises. He liberally assisted in getting railroads through the county, and all educational and religious enterprises found in him a friend. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Yost died in January, 1863, and his wife in December, 1870. They had a family of eleven children, eight living till maturity - Samuel, died in 1861; Levi S., died in 1863; William M., died in 1863; Mary Catherine, wife of Peter Warren, died in 1863; Harriet V., died in 1863; J. W. and Albert N., reside in Jefferson Township; Sarah, wife of Joseph Thompson, of Henry County.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Jefferson Township.
Page 714.
Submitted by: Jeanie


James Armstrong, merchant-tailor, New Castle, Ind., is a native of County Sligo, Ireland, born Dec. 20, 1831. He learned the tailor's trade in his native country, serving an apprenticeship of five years. After completing his trade he came to America, and remained in Philadelphia, Pa., eighteen months; then went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was employed as a cutter till 1871. He then came to New Castle, and was employed as cutter for Shroyer & Loer eighteen months when they went out of business. Mr. Armstrong then opened a shop in the second story of the Shroyer building and subsequently moved to his present place of business on Broad street, opposite the court-house, where he is well established carrying a full line of clothing, cloths and trimmings. He was married to Mary, daughter of Michael O'Donnell, of Cincinnati. They have eight children, four sons and four daughters. Two of his sons, Hugh and James, are practical tailors. Mr. Armstrong is a member of Fidelity Lodge, No. 59, I. O. O. F.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 458.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William O. Barnard, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, of Henry County, Ind., was born in Union County, Ind., Oct. 25, 1852, the eldest son of Sylvester and Lavina (Myers) Barnard, now of Spiceland. He was principally educated in the Spiceland Academy, and subsequently taught district schools there winters. He was principal of the schools of Economy, Ind., a year and then accepted the same position in the schools of New Castle. In the meantime he studied law with James M. Brown, and was admitted to the bar in 1876. In 1878 he began the practice of his profession, being associated with D. W. Chambers two years, and since then has conducted his business alone. He served as Treasurer of New Castle two years, and in October, 1883, was appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for a term of two years. He was married in 1876 to Mary V., daughter of Nathan H. Ballinger. They have three sons. Mr. Barnard is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 458.
Submitted by: Jeanie


John W. Bell, Superintendent of the Henry County Poor Farm, was born in Blue River Township, Henry Co., Ind., May 9, 1846, a son of Nehemiah and Emeline Bell, his father a native of North Carolina and his mother of Virginia. His mother came to Henry County with her parents in 1822, aged four years, and lived here till her death in 1880. His father was born in 1804 and came to Henry County when a small boy, still residing here, in his eightieth year. John W. received a good education and subsequently taught school six years, and since then has engaged in farming. He was appointed to his present position in 1880, and has proved himself fully competent to fill it, everything being kept in good order, and satisfactory to the county. He was married in 1871 to Mary E., daughter of Rev. Samuel and Mary Sayford. They have one daughter - Irene S. Mr. Sayford died many years ago. Mrs. Sayford is living in Delaware County, Ind.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 459.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Rev. William S. Birch, Presiding Elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Richmond District, Ind., is a native of Hocking County, Ohio, born March 29, 1825, the eldest son of Benjamin and Eliza Birch, natives of Virginia. His parents moved to Tippecanoe County, Ind., in an early day, and he received his primary education in the schools of that county. He afterward attended Asbury University for a time and then taught school two years. In the fall of 1849 he entered the ministry of the Northern Indiana Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has since faithfully performed the duties of an itinerant minister. He has served as Presiding Elder of Goshen, Fort Wayne and West Fort Wayne districts, in all eleven years. In 1872 and 1876 he was a delegate to the General Conference. He assumed the pastoral charge of the church in New Castle in May, 1883, and in April, 1884, was appointed Presiding Elder of Richmond District. He has for many years been President of the Board of Trustees of Fort Wayne College. Mr. Birch was married Aug. 28, 1851, to Cynthia A., daughter of Caleb and Malinda Stevens, of Wabash County, Ind. They have three children - Emma L., wife of Rev. W. H. Daniels; Eddie A., and Rose M.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 459.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Jesse Bond, deceased, emigrated from Grayson County, Va., to the then Territory of Indiana, and purchased and settled on the farm where Earlham College is now located. After a few years' residence in Richmond, he moved to a farm near the present site of Washington and resided there till his death, April 11, 1862. He was a member of the Society of Friends and one of the first ministers of Whitewater Meeting. Though a recorded minister for sixty-four years, it was not his mission to travel in that capacity. His communications were not embellished by human learning, yet his ministry was clear and powerful. He seldom gave extended dissertations on abstruse questions of doctrinal controversies. His object was to draw the minds of the people to practical rightness - from all outward dependencies to the sure foundation. His devotion to religious truth and duty was strikingly shown in the fact that after being in a measure cut off from other opportunities he erected a meeting-house on his farm, where, for many years meetings were held regularly twice a week, composed of his own family, and the families of his children, and such of his neighbors and others as saw proper to meet with him. He early felt the enormity of African slavery, and his testimony was strong against it. When the schism in the Society of Friends occurred, he plead with his friends against separate organizations, recommending them to the light of Christ within, as He was one with the Father and all men are brethren. His mental powers continued unimpaired to the close of his life, a period of four score years and ten. His clear perception of spiritual truths remained undimmed. His wife, Phoebe, daughter of the late Robert Commons, a true helpmeet and worthy companion, died a few years before her husband.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 459 and 460.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Jonathan C. Boone was born in Spiceland, Henry Co., Ind., Aug. 14, 1852, a son of Driver and Elizabeth C. Boone. His father was a native of North Carolina, and came to Indiana in 1830, settling in Spiceland, where he resided till his death in 1880, aged eighty-five years. He opened one of the first stores in the place and was appointed the first Postmaster. He was married in North Carolina to Anna Kesey, who died soon after coming to Indiana. He afterward married Elizabeth, widow of Richard Ganze, and to them were born five children - Richard G., now Superintendent of the Franklin, Clinton County, schools; Christina B., widow of Dr. Thomas Ganze; John W. and Anna J., died in childhood; and Jonathan C., who was reared and educated in Spiceland. When sixteen years of age he began clerking for Samuel Parch. He afterward clerked for Halloway & Stanly four years, and for O. H. Nixon, druggist. In 1879 he entered the office of T. B. Reeder, Recorder, and remained with him two months when he was employed by Milton Brown to complete a set of abstract-books. In 1882 he was elected County Recorder, his duties to begin Nov. 4, 1884. Mr. Boone was married in August, 1878, to Mary A. Dennis, of Wayne County, Ind. He is a member of Crescens Lodge, No. 33, Knights of Pythias.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
New Castle and Henry Township.
Page 460 and 461.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Deb Murray