Joseph Newby, one of the earliest settlers of Henry County, was born in what is now Wayne County, Ind., Oct. 7, 1815, the youngest of sixteen children of William Newby, a native of North Carolina, a son of Samuel Newby, who was a native of England. William Newby was a blacksmith by trade, and when only eighteen years of age took the contract to iron a large vessel. He afterward took an eighteen months' voyage to the West India Islands, and then returned to his native county. In 1813 or 1814 he moved to Wayne County, Ind. He afterward lived in Randolph County, and in 1830 moved to Henry County where he died in 1831. His wife died in 1841. He was married to Elizabeth Ratliff, who died in North Carolina. They reared a family of twelve children. He afterward married Elizabeth (Simonds) Small and to them were born four children. Our subject lost his father when he was seventeen years of age and he was left to his own resources. He was married Jan. 29, 1840, to Naomi H. Dix, a daughter of Job and Hannah Dix. He then rented a farm two years, when he bought sixty acres of partially improved land on Buck Creek, to which, by industry and good management, he has added until one time he owned nearly 400 acres of fine well-improved land which he divided equally among his four children. He is purely a self-made man, and is one of the most influential and liberal-minded men of the township. All matters of public benefit find in him an earnest advocate. He and his wife are members of the Society of Friends. They have had a family of seven children; but four are living - Jason W., Thomas A., Emory C., and Sarah A. Jesse, Josiah and Job are deceased.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 825.
Submitted by: Jeanie


J. W. Payne was born in Henry Township, Henry Co., Ind., Jan. 7, 1838, a son of John and Sarah (Wilson) Payne. He was married when twenty-two years of age, March 14, 1860. He then settled on a tract of unimproved land containing eighty acres, to which he has added till he now owns 360 acres, besides forty-four acres where he now lives, adjoining the town of Spiceland, removing to the latter in 1882 that his children might have better educational advantages. His children are six in number; but three are living - Flora, Jesse and Ollie E. Marietta and Lizzie V. died in infancy; Mary L. died May 15, 1882, aged sixteen years. Politically Mr. Payne is liberal in his views. He takes great interest in the cause of temperance and the leading reforms of the day. His wife is a member of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 825 and 826.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William R. Pearce, dealer in hardware and agricultural implements, Dunreith, Ind., was born in Vigo County, Ind., July 13, 1823, a son of Isaac and Nancy (Waldon) Pearce, the former a native of Savannah, Ga., and the latter of Kentucky. His parents came to Indiana in an early day and settled in Putman County and afterward moved to Vigo County where the mother died aged forty-five years and the latter aged sixty-two years. Our subject remained on a farm till twenty years of age. When fifteen years of age he began working for himself. He went to Clermont County, Ohio, and worked on a farm for a time; afterward was a cabin boy on the Ohio River six years. In 1851 he engaged in the mercantile business with his brother in Lockport four years. He then went to Whitesides County, Ill., and remained till 1866 when he came to Dunreith, Ind., and engaged in the general mercantile business with J. T. Crum till 1876, and since then has been engaged in his present business. He was married May 5, 1855, to Elizabeth Ann, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Kinnear) Morris. They have two children- Mary Luella and Morris T. Mr. and Mrs. Pearce are members of the United Presbyterian church. Politically he is a Republican.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 826.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Robert F. Porch, proprietor of the Humboldt Washing Machine and Furniture Factory, was born in Newport, Wayne Co., Ind., Sept. 23, 1840, a son of Samuel and Annie J. (Unthank) Porch. His early life was spent in assisting his father and in attending school. In 1875 he established his present works where he is doing a large and successful business. He was married in 1873 to Emma Vaughan, of Shelby County, Ind. They have one son - Samuel C. Mr. and Mrs. Porch are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 826.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Samuel Porch, one of the prominent men of Henry County, was born in New Jersey in 1816, a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Cassiday) Porch. When sixteen years of age he learned the carriage-maker's trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He was married in 1839 to Annie Jane, daughter of Josiah Unthank, and settled in Newport, Wayne Co., Ind. In 1849 he moved to Spiceland and built the first steam saw-mill in the place. He engaged in various kinds of manufacturing pursuits ten years, and then engaged in the store and tinware business four years. He was Postmaster of Spiceland four years. He was engaged in the manufacture of pumps and washing machines with his son Robert F. two years. To Mr. and Mrs. Porch were born four sons - Robert F., Albert W., William A. and Lee L. They were members of the Society of Friends. Mr. Porch died May 4, 1884.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 826 and 827.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Alpheus Rayle, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Guilford County, N. C., Nov. 2, 1837, the second son of Zadoc and Delilah (Hunt) Rayle. He was seven years of age when his parents moved to Spiceland, and since that time has been a native of the township, receiving his education in the Spiceland schools. He was married Nov. 27, 1862, to Ruth Emily, daughter of William and Elizabeth Edwards, and a native of Henry County. She died June 8, 1879, leaving one son - Harmon H. Dec. 27, 1883, Mr. Rayle married Emily, daughter of Alfred and Charity Bogue. Mr. Rayle owns 130 acres of finely cultivated land which is a part of the old homestead. He and his wife are members of the Society of Friends. Politically he is a Republican.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 827.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William H. Rayle, farmer and stock-raiser, Spiceland Township, was born in Guilford County, N. C., Sept. 30, 1841, a son of Zadoc and Delilah (Hunt) Rayle, and was three years of age when his parents came to Indiana. He was reared and educated in Spiceland Township, remaining with his parents till manhood. After reaching his majority he bought a farm of ninety acres in Hamilton County, a mile north of Eagletown, which he sold five years later and bought one of eighty-five acres in Spiceland Township, Henry County, where he has since resided. He has added to his farm till he now owns 152 acres of finely cultivated land. He was engaged as a public auctioneer for nineteen years and in this work lost his health. He was married Nov. 14, 1867, to Julia Stalker, daughter of Thomas and Sallie (Milliken) Stalker. They have two children - Walter S. and Mary L. Mr. and Mrs. Rayle are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 827.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Zadoc H. Rayle was born in Guilford County, N. C., March 8, 1808, a son of George and Hannah (Cannada) Rayle, and grandson of George Rayle, a native of Ireland, and Charles Cannada, of North Carolina. He received a common-school education and when eighteen years of age began to learn the hatter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two and a half years. He worked at his trade ten years and then bought a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits till 1845, when he came to Henry County, Ind., and bought 115 acres of fine land in Spiceland Township, where he has followed farming till 1879, when he moved to Spiceland and has since lived rather retired. He has a good property gained by his own exertions, and is a prominent and influential citizen. He was married July 16, 1829, to Delilah, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Griffin) Hunt, and to them were born nine children, four of whom are living - Addison C., Alpheus, William H. and Samira F. The deceased are - Julia A., Perlina, Thomas E., Harmon K. and George W. Mrs. Rayle died April 4, 1874. May 4, 1876, Mr. Rayle was married to Isabella A., daughter of Absalom and Mary (Hodson) Poer, who came to Henry County from North Carolina in1851. Mr. and Mrs. Rayle are members of the Society of Friends. Mr. Rayle is a strictly temperate man, never having used tobacco or spirituous liquors in any form.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 827 and 828.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Job Reynolds, deceased, was born in Randolph County, N. C., May 14, 1794, a son of Francis and Sarah Reynolds, natives of North Carolina, of English origin. He was married Nov. 30, 1814, to Phoebe Hocket, daughter of Mahlon Hocket. Her great-grandmother was stolen from her parents in Ireland and brought to America and sold, never seeing her friends again. Mr. Reynolds followed milling a number of years, meeting with success. He afterward built an iron foundry which he carried on till his removal to Indiana in November, 1839. He located in Newport, Wayne County, where he bought a half interest in a flouring mill. Five years later he sold out and moved to what was known as the New Garden settlement and purchased a water-mill which he owned six years. He then moved to Ogden, Henry County, and bought a flour-mill, which he owned till his death in 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds had a family of fourteen children; eleven lived till maturity. Job Reynolds and wife were born in Friends' Society, called Quakers; remained in that denomination as long as they lived; his wife was a minister of the gospel. She died in 1881.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 828.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Jacob Taylor, one of the most enterprising men of Henry County, was born in Clinton County, Ohio, May 5, 1828, a son of Jesse and Deborah (McMillan) Taylor, his father a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother of Ohio. His grandfather, Jacob Taylor, came from England and settled in Pennsylvania and subsequently moved to Clinton County, Ohio. His maternal grandparents, David and Hannah McMillan, were of Irish descent. His parents removed to Indianapolis, Ind., from Ohio, and while on a visit to Richmond, Ind., died, his father only three months before his mother. He remained with his parents till manhood, and when twenty years of age bought his time of his father and bought a farm in his native county, remaining there till 1854, when he came to Henry County and settled in Spiceland Township, where he has since resided. He has always been among the foremost to advance anything of interest to the county; was one of the prime movers in the introduction of pike roads. He was one of a company who imported short-horned cattle to the county of Clinton, Ohio, and for many years was extensively engaged in stock-raising. He was married Nov. 20, 1851, to Sarah, daughter of George and Mary (Hasket) Evans, who were pioneers of Henry County. They have had six children; but three are living - Jesse Frank, a farmer near Spiceland; Ella, wife of Dr. William N. Wilson, of Richmond, and Oliver P., of Minneapolis, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 828 and 829.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Edward Y. Teas, proprietor of the Dunreith nursery, was born in Union County, Ind., March 8, 1830, a son of Thomas S. and Sarah C. (Strattan) Teas. After completing his education he was sent to Kansas by the Richmond Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends and spent two years teaching the Indians. He then returned to Henry County and became established in the nursery business. Six or seven years later he went to Indianapolis and was in the same business there, and at Richmond, Ind., till August, 1876, when he came to Dunreith and established his present place of business. He has had over thirty years' experience and is one of the most successful nurserymen in the county. He was married in 1854 to Maria, daughter of James and Ann Given, a native of Danville, Ind. She died in 1863 leaving two children - Ellen M. and William S. In 1866 Mr. Teas married Mrs. Sarah A. Coffin, daughter of Amos and Matilda Stuart. They have three children - Frederick E., Mary M. and Frank H. Mr. and Mrs. Teas are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 829.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Thomas S. Teas, deceased, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1792, a son of John and Rachel (Nicholson) Teas, the former a native of Ireland, who came to America before the Revolutionary war, and the latter a native of New Jersey, of English descent. He learned the carpenter's trade in his native city, and soon after reaching his majority came to Indiana and worked at his trade a year. He then loaded a flat-boat with bacon and flour and took it to New Orleans, and from there to the West Indies, where he sold his cargo and returned to Philadelphia. Soon after he again came West and was married in Preble County, Ohio to Sarah C. Strattan, daughter of Eli and Eunice (Dallas) Strattan, natives of New Jersey, of English descent. After his marriage he settled in Union County, Ind., and built the first oil-mill in Indiana. He remained there several years and then bought a farm adjoining Richmond, where he lived till 1834, when he came to Henry County and built the Spiceland Flour-Mills and engaged in milling till his death in 1850. His wife survived him about twenty-one years. They had a family of six children - John C., Edward Y., Martha D., Rachel (deceased), Eunice (deceased), and Thomas S. Mr. and Mrs. Teas were members of the Society of Friends, he being Clerk of the Spiceland Quarterly Meeting a number of years.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 829 and 830.
Submitted by: Jeanie


a name="fthomas"> Francis W. Thomas was born in New Garden Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Jan. 15, 1823, a son of Francis and Lydia (Woodard) Thomas, natives of North Carolina, who came to Indiana in 1811, and settled in Wayne County. They were worthy members of the Society of Friends. Our subject received his early education in the subscription schools, and afterward, by studying at home, fitted himself for a teacher. He afterward began preaching for his society and has been a leader of the Friends for many years. He lived in Randolph County several years, and in 1865 came to Henry County and bought the farm where he now resides. In 1869 he organized a church at Dunreith. He has visited Indiana, Iowa and Kansas in the interest of ministerial work. He has been a very useful man in the church and community, taking an interest in every thing of public benefit, especially religious and educational matters. He was married July 21, 1843, to Rebecca, daughter of Jeremiah and Mary Corbet. They have had five children - Jeremiah, Mary Matilda, Carleton, Michael W. and Charles Francis.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 830.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Josiah T. Unthank, Trustee, Spiceland Township, is a native of this township, born April 23, 1837, the youngest son of William B. and Rebecca (Hiatt) Unthank. When seventeen years of age he began to work at the carpenter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of two years. In 1856 he went to Iowa and located in Pella, Morrison County, remaining there a year. He then returned to his native town and worked at his trade till 1871, when he went to Richmond, Wayne County, and manufactured coffins till 1875, when he went to Indianapolis, and shortly after returned to Henry County, and was employed as foreman of the Union Burial Case Company for two years. He then came to Spiceland and worked at his trade until 1882, when he was elected to the office of Trustee. He was married March 27, 1861, to Susan B., daughter of Joseph and Ann (Gause) Hunt. They have had three children; but one is living - Josie. Eva and Morrison are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Unthank are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 830 and 831.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William B. Unthank, one of the earliest settlers and oldest citizens of Henry County, was born in Guilford County, N. C., Jan. 27, 1802, the eldest son of Josiah and Annie (Britton) Unthank, and grandson of Josiah Unthank, a native of England, who came to America in an early day. He was reared and educated in his native county, attending school in the first brick schoolhouse built in the county. In 1825 he came to Indiana and lived in Wayne County till 1830, when he came to Henry County and bought the farm where he has since resided. At that time it was wild, heavily-timbered land, but he has made of it one of the finest farms in the county. He is a natural mechanic and for many years worked at the carpenter's trade, in connection with farming. He was married in March, 1830, to Rebecca, daughter of William and Charity Hiatt, of North Carolina. They had a family of ten children, but five of whom are living. Mrs. Unthank died in 1852. Feb. 6, 1854, Mr. Unthank married Mrs. Deborah Nixon, daughter of William and Priscilla (Coffin) Hobbs. Mr. and Mrs. Unthank are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 831.
Submitted by: Jeanie


David L. Vickrey was born in Rush County, Ind., Feb. 7, 1832, the sixth of sixteen children of Martin and Margaret (Galbreath) Vickrey, his father a native of Guilford County, N. C., of English descent, and his mother a native of Kentucky, a daughter of David Galbreath, who was a native of Scotland, and came to America when a young man, settling in Kentucky, but subsequently moved, with his family, to Wayne County, Ind. Our subject remained with his parents till manhood, receiving a common-school education. April 25, 1855, he was married to Tabitha J. Fletcher, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Tachet) Fletcher, natives of Virginia, but among the earliest settlers of Henry County, Ind. After his marriage Mr. Vickrey bought eighty acres of land in Rush County, giving his note in payment. In seven years he had his land paid for and sold it and bought a farm in Franklin Township, Henry County, where he lived till 1882, when he traded it for the place where he now resides, moving his family to it Dec. 12, 1882. His farm contains 240 acres of fine land. Mr. and Mrs. Vickrey have nine children - Margaret E., Lydia E., Omas F., Addie B., Emma V., Curtis, Isaac, Amos and Martin. They are members of the Baptist church. Politically Mr. Vickrey is a Democrat.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 831 and 832.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Isaac White, deceased, was a native of Guilford County, N. C., born in September, 1798, a son of Stanton and Sarah (Stanley) White. He was married in his native county to Louisa Bundrem, and in 1828 they came to Indiana and settled in Henry County, where he entered 160 acres of land in Wayne Township. He afterward traded this farm for one near the present site of Spiceland, which he cleared and improved. He also taught school several terms, and was one of the first teachers in the county. He was one of the most enterprising men of the county, and a prominent member of the Society of Friends, an Elder of the society. He accumulated a good property and gave his children a good education. He died Aug. 4, 1840. His wife remained in the township for or five years, and then went to Hamilton County and from there to Minneapolis, where she died in April, 1881, aged eighty-three years. They had a family of nine children - M. C., Lilburn, Jesse (deceased), Martha, Mordecai, Aletta C., Catherine, Gamaliel (deceased) and Isaac.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 832.
Submitted by: Jeanie


James White, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Perquimans County, N. C., Aug. 26, 1826, a son of Caleb and Mary White, who came to Henry County, Ind., in 1835, and settled in Wayne Township, near Knightstown, where our subject spent his youth, attending the subscription schools, and later attended Earlham College, Richmond. In 1854 he took a herd of cattle to Illinois and remained there two years. With this exception he has made his home in Henry County. After his return to the county he bought a farm in Spiceland Township, where he has since lived. He was married Nov. 25, 1858, to Jemima D., daughter of Elias and Judith (Mendenhall) Henley, natives of North Carolina, who settled in Rush County, Ind., in 1830. Mr. and Mrs. White have had ten children; but six are living - Mary E., Elias H., George E., Sibyl J., Francis C., Clara A. The deceased are - Nereus, Caleb, Miles Oren and Margaret Orianna (twins). Mr. White and his family are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 832 and 833.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Lilburn White, son of Isaac and Louisa (Bundrem) White, was born in North Carolina, March 21, 1821. He was seven years of age when his parents came to Henry County, and spent his youth on his father's farm. When he was twenty years of age his father died, and this left the care of the mother and younger children to him and his elder brother. He was married April 18, 1844, to Elizabeth, daughter of Josiah Small, of Henry County. In 1845 he moved to Hamilton County, and in 1871 returned to Henry County. He has been a Notary Public for twenty years and in the meantime has settled sixty large estates. His wife died in 1854. They had four children - Rhoda and Jane (deceased), Aletha A. and Abigail. In 1856 Mr. White married Adelia R. Barnes. They had one child, Romanzo, who died when nine months old. Mrs. White died in September, 1877, and in August, 1879, he married Martha Ann, daughter of Solomon Macy. Mr. and Mrs. White are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 833.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Robert H. Whiteley, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Caroline County, Md., Aug. 27, 1815, the eldest son of William and Frances (Newman) Whiteley, also natives of Maryland. When he was nine years old his father died and he lived with his uncle, Daniel Whiteley, five years. When fourteen years of age he began working for farmers by the year, receiving $24 for his first year's work. In 1839 he came to Indiana and located in Milton, Wayne County, where he worked on the canal a short time. In 1846 he came to Henry County and bought forty acres of land in Spiceland Township, where he has since lived, and by economy and industry has accumulated a valuable property, owning at the present time 147 acres of fine land. He was married Jan. 2, 1837, to Jane, daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Cockran) Woolen. They have had twelve children; all lived to maturity and married; eleven are still living - Frances Ann, Mary Elizabeth, George Calvert, Laura Jane (deceased), William Henry, Jacob W., Alexander C., Ruth Hannah, Sarah Catherine, John A., Alice O. and Martha M. Mr. and Mrs. Whiteley are members of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 833.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Jethro Wickersham, one of the most prominent pioneers of Henry County, was born in Union County, Ind., April 9, 1823, a son of Caleb and Eunice (Folger) Wickersham, natives of North Carolina, the father of Guilford County and the mother of Stokes County. His paternal grandfather, Jehu Wickersham, was a native of Pennsylvania, of English descent. His maternal grandfather, Latham Folger, was also of English descent, a native of Nantucket, and came to Indiana with his family in 1820, settling in Union County. Caleb Wickersham left North Carolina for Indiana in 1813. He followed the cabinet-maker's trade in North Carolina, but after coming to Indiana engaged in farming. He remained in Union County till 1831 and then moved to Henry County and settled on a farm in Franklin Township, where he died in 1872, aged nearly ninety-three years. His wife died in 1846. He was a good business man and accumulated a large property, owning a landed estate of 1,000 acres. Jethro Wickersham was eight years of age when his parents moved to Henry County. He remained with his parents till his marriage and then settled on a farm in Franklin Township. In the fall of 1882 he moved to Spiceland, where he is now living rather retired from active business. He has been successful in his business pursuits and is now one of the most influential men of the county. Mr. Wickersham was married May 25, 1843, to Mary Stewart, a native of Wayne County, Ind., a daughter of S. W. Stewart, a native of New Jersey, but an early settler of Wayne County, who moved to Henry County in 1828. To Mr. and Mrs. Wickersham were born five children - Huldah, wife of Benjamin S. Parker; Louisa; Arthur; Emma, wife A. L. Binford, of Washington Territory; and Eunice, deceased. Mrs. Wickersham died Aug. 29, 1878. Mr. Wickersham is politically a Republican, and has taken an active interest in all great questions of public interest, especially anti-slavery and prohibition. He is a member of the Society of Friends.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 833 and 834.
Submitted by: Jeanie


William W. Wiggins, Postmaster and druggist, Ogden, Ind., was born in Rush County, Ind., Nov. 20, 1856, a son of Joseph F. and Hannah (Morris) Wiggins. His father was a native of Kentucky, and, as was also his father, David Wiggins, was prominently identified with the early settlement of Rush County. His mother was born in Spiceland Township, Henry County, a daughter of the late Benjamin Morris, a prominent pioneer of the county. The early part of the life of our subject was spent on the farm and in attending school. He then engaged in the lumber trade in Ogden, which he continued successfully three years. In June, 1882, he purchased his drug store, and the same month received the appointment of Postmaster. Oct. 15, 1879, he was married to Lucy O., daughter of Henry and Rachel M. (Isqugg) Foust, prominent pioneers of Rush County. They have one children - Paul Russell.

From the History of Henry County, Indiana. Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co. 1884.
Spiceland Township.
Page 834 and 835.
Submitted by: Jeanie


Deb Murray