W. B. RAY was born in Wabash, Ind., October 6, 1817, and is the son of Joseph H. and Mary P. (Myers) Ray, natives of Ohio, and early settlers of Wabash, where they still live. After a preparatory course in his native town, W. B. Ray entered college at Crawfordsville, where he completed his studies in 1866. He then for a year engaged in the book and stationery business at Wabash, but disposed of his stock and was soon after appointed Deputy County Auditor; eighteen months later, he was appointed Deputy Recorder, and two years thereafter filled the position of Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court, one term, and then, because of ill health, retired from active business for some time. In June, 1877, he located at Kokomo, where he has compiled a full set of abstract books, and now possesses the only complete set in the county. In February, 1864, he enlisted in the Fourteenth Indiana Light Artillery and took part in engagements at Baldwin's Cross Roads (where he was mounded in the right temple) and Ripley, Miss.; at Nashville, Franklin and Columbia, Tenn., and at Fort Blakeley and Spanish Fort, Ala. He was married at Wabash, Ind., to Louisa Phillips, of Ohio, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Medburg) Phillips, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of the Buckeye State. He has had born to him four children - Charles M., Clara M., John F. and Maud. Mr. Ray has taken an active part in developing the public highways of Howard County, and has made preliminary surveys of all its gravel roads; he is a Republican, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the G. A. R.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


LEVI P. RICH, County Recorder, was born September 27, 1848, in Hamilton County, Ind. He is the son of Thomas H. and Betsey D. (Peacock) Rich, both natives of North Carolina, and of English descent. Thomas Rich came to Hamilton County with his parents in 1833, where he lived until 1849, when he located in Monroe Township, Howard County. Here he cleared 120 acres of land, and reared a family of six children, Levi P. being the only son. In October, 1869, he moved to Kokomo, where he lived until his death, April 18, 1873. His wife (aged sixty-seven) still lives in this city. Levi P. Rich worked on the farm until he was twenty-one, when he had the misfortune to lose his left arm while working in Hunt Brothers' planing mill, in New London. He had in his youth acquired a good common school education, and after he was crippled, he went to Earlham College at Richmond, Ind., intending to complete the course, but after a year's study he was called home by the failing health of his father. He then began to manufacture brooms, in which business he continued until 1878, when he was elected County Recorder by the Republican party, with a majority of 896. Mr. Rich was married, December 30,1873, to Miss S. Josie Heston, of Wabash, Ind., and daughter of George and Mary (Jackson) Heston, natives of Wayne County, Ind. Mr. Rich is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of Pythias, and a member of the Society of Friends. He started in life a poor boy, but through labor, economy and temperate habits he has acquired a good home. Mrs. Rich acquired a good education when young, and at the age of sixteen began to support herself by teaching school, which she followed for several years. Mr. Rich has discharged the duties of the important office which he is now filling ably and acceptably and without any assistance, and has the confidence of the general public.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


CORYDON RICHMOND, retired physician and surgeon of Kokomo, was born in Onondaga County, N. Y., November 22, 1808, and is the son of John L. and Lorana (Patchin) Richmond. His parents emigrated to Ohio in 1817, locating fifty miles from Cincinnati, and the following year at Newtown, ten miles east of that city. Dr. Richmond received but a meager education in the common schools, but this was in part supplemented by home instruction and influence, for his father was a physician and clergyman, and his mother possessed superior traits of character. He began the study of medicine in his father's office, and attended lectures in the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, during the session of 1831 to 1832, and at their close began practice in Pendleton, Madison Co., Ind., where he remained till 1838, and then removed to Indianapolis and entered the office of his father and Dr. G. W. Mears, who were in partnership. In 1844, he and N. R. Lindsay visited the Indian Reserve, as Howard County was then called, and after examining the country, both decided to settle there. Late in the season, they returned and built their cabins, and the next spring removed thither, where Dr. R. has since resided. In 1847, he was chosen to represent Howard and Cass Counties in the Legislature. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1844, and was the first Worshipful Master of Kokomo Lodge, and has taken the order of High Priesthood. In 1863, he became Assistant Surgeon in Military Hospital No 3, Nashville, Tenn., and remained until failing health compelled him to return home. In March, 1865, he again repaired to Nashville and helped to care for the wounded, and to fit up the hospital for the colored troops. In 1867, he was elected Mayor of the city of Kokomo and served two years. In politics, he was formerly a Whig, and is now a Republican. Dr. Richmond was married, February 16, 1830, to Nancy Page Stockton, who died in September, 1833. He was next married October 6, 1836, to Frances Hawkins, with whom he lived thirty-five years, when the union was broken by death October 5, 1871. He was united to his present wife, Mrs. Lydia E. Saxton, September 9, 1873. He has bad four daughters, the result of the second marriage - Louisa W., wife of J. M. Leeds; Sarah Jane, wife of Joseph Anderson (deceased); and Lucinda and Margaret, each of whom died at the age of six years. Dr. Richmond has shared the burdens, and in some degree, the success, of the people of Howard County from an early day, witnessing the gradual transformation of the country from a forest to its present cultivated state, and undergoing all the privations of a pioneer physician. He established a large and extensive practice in Kokomo and the vicinity while in active business, and has always been a diligent, honest, charitable and useful citizen, respected in all his relations, both private and public. Dr. Richmond was appointed Justice of the Peace in 1880, and in 1882 elected, which office he is still holding. He is now retired from active business and enjoying well-earned leisure after a busy life. The chapter pertaining to the early history and organization of Howard County in this book is the work of his hands, and will descend to posterity, keeping for many generations the memory green of the noble band of pioneers who were associated with him in developing the material wealth of the now prosperous county of Howard.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


E. W. SAWYER, M. D. (Homoeopathic school), is a native of Maine, and was born in 1836. His parents, William and Fidelia (Hill) Sawyer, were also natives of the same State. His father was a prominent farmer and merchant, and occupied various public offices of trust, and is still living in his native State. His mother died when our subject was an infant. He received good educational advantages, and until sixteen years of age was reared upon a farm, after which he traveled through several States, engaged in various occupations. Learning dentistry in Lawrence, Mass., he pursued this business in Boston, New York, Chicago, and for seven years in Memphis, Tenn. During his career as a dentist, he had been applying himself to the study of medicine, and in the winter of 1868 and 1869 he entered Hahnemann Homoeopathic College, located at St. Louis, and attended one course. After leaving Memphis, he went to Sedalia, Mo., and was in practice and study for several months, under the tutelage of a brother-in-law. He then went to Chicago with the intention of attending college, and in the disastrous fire of 1871 he lost all the property he had accumulated by years of labor. During the winter of 1871-72, he attended college in Chicago, and in March, 1572, came to Kokomo, where he located and began practice, and where he has established a very successful business. In the spring of 1852, he graduated at the College of Homoeopathy of Chicago, after taking special courses. Dr. Sawyer makes a specialty in his practice of all chronic and blood diseases, and has successfully treated and cured many cases of cancer by his constitutional treatment, not calling into service the art of surgery. Dr. Sawyer is a member of the State Homoeopathic Society, and is a Knight Templar in the Masonic fraternity. He was united in marriage in 1869 with Miss Antoinette M. Smith, of Batavia, N. Y. She was a lady of much culture and intelligence. She died in 1878, leaving two children - Eugene W. and Antoinette. In May, 1882, Dr. Sawyer was united with his present wife, Miss Laura A. Bettes, of Kokomo, and a native of Howard County.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


WILLIAM SCOTT, M. D., is a native of Greene County, Ohio, and was born in 1831. He is the eldest of a family of nine children born to Charles and Sarah (Bloxsom) Scott, who mere natives respectively of Pennsylvania, and Virginia; they were married in Ohio, where they were pioneer settlers. Charles Scott was a school teacher, and remained in Ohio until about the year 1840, when with his family he emigrated to Indiana, locating in Jay County, where he engaged in farming and stock dealing. He subsequently removed to Grant County, and later to Stark County, where he engaged in stock-dealing, and resided until his death in 1859. The mother is still living and residing in Howard County. Our subject received a common school education until, when about eighteen, he attended a seminary and high schools for four years, teaching in the meantime. He then studied civil engineering and followed it for about one year, upon the Pan Handle Railroad. In 1852, he entered the office of Dr. Lomax, of Marion, and commenced the study of medicine, remaining under his instruction two years. He removed to Greentown, Howard County, in 1856 and commenced practice with Dr. Morgan, remaining with him two years; in 1857-58, attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, one course. He graduated from the Rush Medical College in Chicago in 1862. In 1863, he entered the service, and for one year was Contract Surgeon of Hospital No. 14, at Nashville, Tenn. Returning home, he was appointed Examining Surgeon of drafted men, but soon entered the field again, receiving an appointment as Assistant Surgeon of the Eighty-Ninth Indiana, Volunteer Infantry, and in three months was promoted to Surgeon. He remained with his regiment until they returned home in August, 1865. They were in the Army of the Cumberland and Tennessee. Upon his return, Dr. Scott located in Kokomo, and has been in constant and successful practice there up to the present writing. In 1870, he entered the Bellevue Medical College of New York and graduated therefrom. Dr. Scott is one of the progressive physicians of the day; he has had years of valuable experience and has availed himself of all means to add to his store of knowledge. He is a member of the Howard County Society, of which he has been President, and also of the Kokomo Academy of Medicine; he is a member of the State Medical Society, and is now Vice President of the Eleventh Congressional District Medical Association. He is one of the Faculty of the Ft. Wayne Medical College, as Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Respiratory Organs. Dr. Scott is a Chapter Mason, Medical Director of the G. A. R. of Indiana, and Surgeon of the Wabash and T., C. & St. Louis Railroads. Dr. Scott was united in marriage, in 1854, to Miss Sarah R. Tharp, of Grant County, Ind., she died in 1869. Three of their children are now living - James A,, a graduate of the Indians Medical College, and Charles A., who has also been a student of medicine, both now engaged in the drug trade in Kokomo; Amanda Etta, a student of Glendale, Ohio. Dr. Scott was married to his present wife, Miss Jennie Snorf, a native of Ohio, in 1871. They have three children Georgie A., William I. and Julia, A. Dr. Scott and wife are both members of the Methodist Church. Dr. Scott has been considerably interested in real estate in Kokomo, having laid out one addition to the city, and built the Commercial Block. He has always aided the advancement of public measures of improvement, and is a public spirited and respected citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


C. C. SHIRLEY, District Attorney, mas born at Russiaville, this county, November 28, 1859, and is the son of Dr. D. J. and Waitzell (Seaward) Shirley, natives of Kentucky and Ohio respectively. The family moved to New London when our subject was still a youth, and there he was reared. He was educated at the common schools of that town, at the high school of Kokomo, and at Asbury University, Greencastle, Ind. In 1879, he entered the law department of Ann Arbor (Mich.) University, from which he graduated in 1881, when he settled in Kokomo, and was soon after admitted to the bar. He is now associated in practice with Judge James O'Brien, an eminent lawyer of Kokomo. Mr. Shirley was elected to his present office of District Attorney in 1882, and is the youngest man ever elected in the county to fill that position. He is an active leader in the Republican party, and is a member of the K. of P.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


R. H. SMITH, M. D., a native of Howard County, is the fifth of eight children born to William B. Smith, a native of Ohio, and Sarah E. Smith, of Kentucky. His father came to Howard County about the year 1844, being one of its pioneer settlers. He first located in Clay Township, on land which he entered, and has followed farming since. He has improved over 600 acres of land, and is now living a retired life on a farm in Centre Township. He now owns over 600 acres of good farm land. He and his wife are both members of the Baptist Church, in good standing. The subject of this sketch was born in 1846, and received a common school education, supplemented with an academic course. He first clerked in a dry goods and grocery store, and then went into the drug trade at Galveston, Cass County, where he remained two years. He then came to Kokomo and started the drug store now owned by Wood & Harbster. He continued in business there ten years, and during that time was in partnership with Dr. James, Dr. I. C. Johnson and Dr. J. W. Wherrett; he had commenced the study of medicine about 1860, studying with Dr. Dayhuff, about eighteen months. While he was in the drug store, he studied under Dr. James and Dr. Johnson, and after ending this business, he went to Montgomery County, Ind., where he practiced one year. He then returned to Kokomo and entered the Medical College of Indiana, from which institution he graduated in 1880. He returned to Kokomo and formed a partnership with Dr. Ross, which continued six months; since then he bas practiced alone. He is a member of the State Medical Association, the Kokomo Academy of Medicine, and is Treasurer of the Howard County Association. He has been a member of the Board of Health, and is the Clay Township Physician. He was elected Coroner in 1882, which office he is now filling; he is also a member of the I. O. O. F. Dr. Smith was married, in 1867, to Miss Miranda A. Freeman, a native of Indiana. This union has been blessed with six children - Lillie, Byron K., Mary P., Freeman, Fred and Gussie.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


L. SNIDER, manufacturer of heading and staves. His factory was established in 1878, and the first year turned out $10,000 worth of work, and in 1882 $75,000. He employs about, seventy-five men, and ships nearly all the heading and staves to New York and Philadelphia. He now ships the timber that he works from the adjoining counties. He uses all the improved machinery, and has a heading saw in Hamilton County which does a good business. Mr. Snider was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, December 25, 1851. He was the fifth of twelve children born to A. B. and Martha (Lowe) Snider, both of German descent. They still reside upon their farm in Montgomery County, Ohio, enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. Our subject had a limited education in the common schools, and at the age of sixteen began to work out with his brother, for wages, in a stave factory. In 1878, he came West, with limited means, and engaged in his present business, expending $3,500 in building. He has been adding nearly every year since, and now has buildings and machinery to the amount of $8,000. He has $18,000 worth of stock on hand, and is the leading manufacturer of Howard County. Mr. Snider was married, April, 1875, to Miss Clara A. Constantine, of Madison County, Ind. She was born in Illinois April 2, 1857. They have two children - Maggie E. and Martin A. Mr. Snider is a Republican in principle, but quite liberal in his views. His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


DAVID C. SPRAKER is the son of Daniel and Martha (Miller) Spraker, and was born February 15, 1848, in Decatur County, Ind., where he attended school until 1860, when he came to Howard County, lived with his uncle, John Miller, attended school five years, and then entered the high school at New London. His first business experience was had in that town, where he clerked for some time, and then engaged in the drug business on his own account. In 1877, he sold out, and in the spring of 1878 was nominated, and in the fall elected, County Treasurer, and re-elected in 1880, on the Republican ticket. He served both terms with credit to himself and to the county. He has taken a leading part in politics, and has served as delegate to the State Conventions. He is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., and K. of P. fraternities, and is a Director of the Howard National Bank. He is the owner of two farms, comprising 183 acres of finely improved land, and also owns a half-interest in a tile factory, but leads a comparatively retired life.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


WILLIAM STYER, of the Spring Mills, was born in Delaware County, Ohio, November 35, 1832, and is the son of Joseph C. and Rachel Styer. Joseph C. was a native of Pennsylvania, and his wife of New Jersey. William Styer worked on the farm, and went to school in the winter until he was sixteen, when he began to teach school at $13-1/2 per month, boarding around. He taught at intervals for ten years, until 1856, when he and his brother Henry engaged in the grocery business in Kokomo, continuing for two years, when William took charge of Russell & Dolman's elevator for three years. In 1862, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company D, Eighty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Indianapolis, when they went South, and engaged in battle at Munfordsville. In December, 1863, Mr. Styer resigned his commission on account of disability. He engaged in the sale of maps and charts throughout Indiana for a year, when he clerked awhile in a grocery, and then quarried stone, and took contracts for stone work two years. He was then interested in the grain and hardware business for three years, and in 1872 he and his brother Henry established the City Book Store, which is doing a business of $15,000 per annum. Mr. Styer gave his entire attention to the book store until 1881, when he took charge of the Spring Mills, owning one half interest, and leasing the other half. The mill property is worth $9,000, has five sets of buhrs, two sets of rolls, and a capacity of 200 bushels of wheat and 100 bushels of corn per day. This business he has since successfully managed. Mr. Styer was School Trustee and Town Clerk for a number of terms. He is an active member of the Republican party. He was married, in 1857, to Miss Susannah Deffenbaugh, of Howard County. She was born November 25, 1836, in Madison County, Ohio. They have two children - Charles A., clerk in the book store, and Carrie M. Mr. and Mrs. Styer are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Styer is a member of the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


W. H. SUMPTION is a son of John and Mary (Ward) Sumption, and was born in Randolph County, Ind., October 12, 1840. His mother died when he was very young, and when he was but ten years of age he lost his father, when he was placed under the guardianship of his uncle, Thomas Ward. After receiving a few months' schooling, he was apprenticed to a harness-maker; he next worked a gear at carriage trimming, and then engaged in various pursuits until the spring of 1862, when he entered Company F, Fifty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as Orderly Sergeant, and served until September of the same year. He then engaged in the harness trade in Kokomo until October, 1863, when, being commissioned Recruiting Officer, he assisted in raising Company E, Eleventh Indiana Cavalry. He was soon after commissioned First Lieutenant of this company, and in May, 1864, was promoted to the Captaincy, which position he held until mustered out at Indianapolis, with honors, in September, 1865. He then engaged in business at different points for two or three years, when he returned to Kokomo and resumed harness-making, continuing until 1870, when he engaged in his present business of manufacturing carriages, buggies and spring wagons. Since 1881, the firm name has been W. H. Sumption & Son. The firm have a large trade and keep constantly at work ten men. Mr. Sumption was married at Kokomo, June 30, 1863, to Elmira Welch, of Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born three children - William, J. Ward and John F. Mr. Sumption is a member of the A., F. & A. M. and the G. A. R., and in politics is a Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


GEORGE D. TATE, wholesale dealer in walnut, ash, poplar, oak and cherry lumber, was born at Lawrenceburg, Ind., January 11, 1838. His father, William Tate, was a native of Massachusetts and of Scotch descent. His mother, Anna (Kincaid) Tate, was a native of New York and of English descent. George D. Tate had access to the common schools of Lawrenceburg, attended College at Cincinnati, acted as bookkeeper at intervals for his father, who was a lumber dealer, and also clerked in a dry goods store. When seventeen years of age, he learned the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked three years. He then enlisted in Company F, Thirty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private, in the fall of 1861, and was soon marched into Kentucky, thence into Tennessee, participating in a number of skirmishes. After being in the service one year, he was commissioned Quartermaster of the Eighty-third Regiment of the Fifteenth Army Corps, which formed a part of the Army of the Tennessee. He accompanied Gen. Sherman on his march to the sea, and around to Washington, where Mr. Tate was discharged, after which he returned to Dillsboro, Ind., where he engaged in farming for one year. The fall of 1867, he removed to Kokomo, where he soon after engaged in the lumber trade, having but two loads of lumber in his yard to begin with. Now he handles upward of four million feet per year. He started in life a poor boy, but by living within his means, and being attentive to his business, and of late years dealing in real estate, has acquired a large amount of property, having city property in Indianapolis worth $50,000, besides city property in Kokomo and 260 acres of good farm land in Howard County. In the summer of 1882, he raised on one 180-acre farm, 1,300 bushels of wheat, 2,000 bushels of corn and sixty tons of hay. He has this farm well-stocked and uses all the improved machinery. He has been one of the leading and active politicians in the Democratic ranks, serving as Chairman of the Central Committee for years. Though a Democrat he has been elected in a Republican ward successively for the last ten years as a member of the City Council. He is now worth about $100,000. He was married in May, 1863, to Miss Helen Kincaid, of Ripley County, Ind., daughter of Warren Kincaid, now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Tate have had three children, two of whom are now living, Henry E. and Anna.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


RAWSON VAILE, attorney at law, was born May 28, 1812, in Bennington County, Vt. He worked on the farm and went to school until he was grown, when, in 1834, he entered Amherst College, and worked his own way through, by teaching school, until he graduated with honors in 1839. The following spring he came to Wayne County, Ind., and taught two years, when he was employed in the County Seminary at Centerville, Ind., until 1848. In the meantime, he had taken up the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1844. In 1848, he was induced to enter the editor's sanctum in Centerville, and published the Free Territory Sentinel. He was a Free-Soiler and anti-slavery man, advocating the free homestead law. In 1852, he edited the Free Democrat in Indianapolis; in 1854, when this paper united with the Journal, Mr. Vaile continued as one of the editors. The Free Democrat was the only Free-Soil paper that survived, although many were established. This paper continued until 1854, when the Free-Soilers joined the Republican party. In 1855, through failing health, he abandoned the editorial profession, add the next year began to practice law. In 1857, he removed his family to Kokomo, and opened a law office, and has been for years a leading practitioner of this county. In 1867, he was elected School Examiner, and served until 1872. He served as Town Trustee one term, and was one of the prima movers in establishing the free school system, and much was done by him in behalf of the Kokomo Normal School, as he was a stockholder, as well as one of the leaders in prosecuting the work. Mr. Vaile was married April 16, 1840, to Miss Anna E. Pope, of Spencer, Mass., who bore him five children - William P., cashier of Howard National Bank, Kokomo; Sarah L., deceased; Joel Fred, a graduate of Oberlin College, and attorney at law, Denver, Colo.; Joseph E., book-keeper and insurance agent; and Charles S., a graduate of Oberlin College, and a Congregational minister at Santa Barbara, Cal. Mrs. Anna Vaile died January 11, 1852, and Mr. Vaile married his second wife, Mrs. Rebecca G. Robinson, of Indianapolis, in April, 1854. She gave birth to two children, Emma and George R. In 1876, Mrs. R. G. Vaile died, and December 12,1882, Mr. Vaile married his present wife, Mrs. Minerva Montgomery, of Howard County.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


WILLIAM P. VAILE, cashier of the Howard National Bank, is a son of Rawson and Anna E. (Pope) Vaile. He was born December 27, 1840, in Richmond, Ind. When young, his parents moved to Centerville, Wayne County, where his education vas commenced. In 1853, he attended school at Indianapolis, and upon coming to Kokomo, in 1859, finished his studies in the schools of the city. In 1862, he was appointed Deputy Auditor, which position he held about four years. He then accepted a situation as book-keeper in the First National Bank, and subsequently became cashier of that institution. The latter position he held until 1877, when he engaged in the loan and insurance business, continuing one year. In 1878, he accepted the position of cashier of the Howard National Bank, which position he has held up to the present writing. Mr. Vaile possesses splendid business qualifications, and is one of the leading citizens of Kokomo in all matters of progress. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P., and in politics a Republican. In 1864, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until October, 1865. Mr. Vaile was united in marriage with Miss Julia M. Andrews, July 3, 1872. She is a native of New York, and a daughter of Moses R. Andrews, Esq., of Kokomo.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


DANIEL A. WOODS is a native of Preble County, Ohio, where he was born September 24, 1854. His parents, Josiah and Sarah (Miller) Woods, removed with a family of five children to Howard County, in September, 1859. Daniel A. received a good education, commencing in the country schools of Howard County, and subsequently attending the educational institutions of Lebanon, Ohio. He commenced the study of law with O'Brien & Garrigus, of Kokomo, and subsequently graduated from the law school of Ann Arbor, Mich. In the fall of 1878, he began to practice in Kokomo, and has succeeded in establishing a prominent position among the attorneys of Howard County. He is now in practice in association with Charles E. Hendry. In politics, he is a Democrat, is an active worker, and takes a leading interest in all the political questions of the day. Mr. Woods is a close student and a great reader. He has accumulated a large and valuable library of choice books, and is still adding to it many new publications. He is a fluent and polished writer, and in this field me predict for him a brilliant future. July 9, 1877, he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah R. Fagley. They have one child, Roxy June, born May 9, 1880.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JAMES H. WATSON is a native of Darke County, Ohio, where he was born January 1,1841. His parents, James H. and Sarah (Blendenhall) Watson, were natives of Pennsylvania, and followed farming in Ohio. His father died in 1843; his mother subsequently re-married and came to Indiana, where she died in 1852. James H. was reared upon a farm, and at the age of fifteen he learned the cooper's trade in Grant County, Ind., which occupation he followed for three years. In the spring of 1562, he came to Kokomo, and engaged in the lumber trade, representing H. Morgan, of Cincinnati, buying lumber for this firm for five years. He then entered the lumber yard of Dr. Henderson, conducting his business for two years, and also with Tate & Henderson one year as foreman. He then embarked in business for himself, buying a saw-mill in Clay Township, and contracted to saw 3,000,000 feet of lumber. This, with other business in the line, occupied him two years, achieving remarkable financial success. He then accepted s situation as foreman in the lumber yards of George Tate, with whom he remained until August, 1882. He then was engaged for a few months as bridge contractor. February 1, 1883, he bought the Clinton House saloon, which he has enlarged and refitted, and has now the finest rooms in the city. Mr. Watson keeps a strictly first-class place, and deals in the best and purest articles in his line. He owns eighty acres of improved land in Centre Township and valuable town property. He is a Mason, and in politics a Democrat; has served upon the City Council two years, during which period the streets were improved. Mr. Watson was married, March 27, 1861, to Miss Melinda C. Nelson, s native of Clinton County, Ohio. They have three children - Ida, Thornton and Guy.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JOHN ALBRIGHT is the third of twelve children born to William and Elizabeth (Snoderly) Albright, natives respectively of North Carolina and Tennessee. His parents came to Howard County in 1847 and located in Taylor Township. Our subject was born May 38, 1822, in Anderson County, Tenn., and removed with his parents to Preble County, Ohio, when but twelve years of age. He attended the public schools and worked on his father's farm until he was twenty-one. He then formed a partnership with his father in the stone and brick laying business, and in 1845 came to this county and took a claim in Taylor Township. He remained there until the spring of 1883, when he sold his farm for $16,600, and removed to Centre Township, where he at present resides. He is one of the leading farmers of the county and for several years has been overseeing his farm and working at his trade with his brother, William B. Mr. Albright was married, June 30, 1847, to Jemima Thatcher, a native of Indiana. They had eleven children - William A. (deceased), Daniel A., Nancy J., Ephraim T. (deceased), Henry B., Charity T., James T., Elmer E., Maggie O., Dolly A. and Perry O. Mrs. Albright died January 21, 1871, and December 15, 1873, Mr. A. married Nancy Elston Hugman, a native of Kentucky. One child blessed this union - Foster A. Mr. Albright lost his second wife January 6, 1877, and was next married to Anna E. Hammel, a native of Pennsylvania, January 1, 1878. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for about forty-nine years, and is at present an active member of the Sons of Temperance. He is a Democrat in politics, and is at present sole proprietor of a tile factory located on his farm.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


COL. WILLIS BLANCHE was born in Ross County, Ohio, May 24, 1825, and is the son of John and Catherine (Osborn) Blanche. His father was a native of the Isle of Guernsey, near the coast of France. He was a scholar, and in early life acquired the knowledge of seven languages. At the age of twenty-five, he came to America, and later served in the border wars under Gen. Wayne. Mr. Blanche, with a limited education, at the age of seventeen left home and came into Howard County, where he worked as a laboring hand. At the end of two years, he purchased a few acres of land, and in February, 1847, was married to Miss Mary Morrow, who died two months later. In October of the same year, he married Miss Anna Shaul, his present wife. In 1850, he, with his brother-in-law, J. T. McClintock, set out for California overland, with a company of forty-four men, Mr. B. acting as leader. At Sacramento, he and Mr. McClintock bought a load of provisions and started for the Nevada mines, but at Grass Valley their team was stolen, but it was soon recovered and they remained in the village and opened a provision store. In December, 185l, Blanche returned home and purchased the homestead near Kokomo, on which he now resides. This is naturally one of the best farms in the county, and is also one of the best improved. In 1861, he raised a company in Kokomo, and joined the Fifty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, leaving his wife to assume the management of the farm and the care of four children - Marinda C., Mary Frances, Julia B. and Charles Willis. He was on the march to Nashville, in the siege of Corinth, the campaign in Tennessee, the retreat to Louisville, the second advance through Kentucky, the struggle at Perryville, the Murfreesboro campaign, battles of Stone River, Wartrace, Chattanooga, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge, the march to Atlanta, battles of Resacs, Pine Mountain, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw, Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville. His Captain's commission dates October 30, 1861, and he was commissioned Major February 12, 1863, upon the resignation of Maj. Jordan. His promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel occurred July 28, 1863, and to Colonel, June 24, 1864, upon the death of Col. Leonard. Col. Blanche was wounded at Mission Ridge and also at Nashville, where he fought with distinguished valor, leading his shattered regiment in a successful charge upon the enemy's intrenchments at the Franklin Pike. When he had partially recovered from his wound, he returned home on a furlough, and when he recovered his health he rejoined his regiment, but there being no more important service, resigned. In 1866, he was elected on the Republican ticket to represent Howard County in the Legislature, and in 1868 was elected by the Legislature a Director of the Northern Prison at Michigan City. He remained in this position two years. In 1872, he was chosen Sheriff of Howard County and served one term. Col. Blanche is a man of great courage, executive ability, power of comprehension, and capacity for untiring effort, and these are the characteristics that have enabled him to perform the duties of both military and civil offices in the most efficient manner.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


EDMOND CAIN, son of Arnold and Nancy (Allen) Cain, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, who came to this State in an early day, was born October 9, 1817, in Washington County, Ind. He remained with his parents until he was twenty-two, and during this time they removed to Boone County. He received a common education in the pioneer schools, and was married, June 27, 1839, to Rebecca Reed, born March 14, 1820, and a native of Ross County, Ohio. After his marriage, he lived on the farm with his father two years, when he purchased forty acres, cleared it, and lived on it about six years. He then sold out, and in the fall of 1847 came to this county, locating in Centre Township. He built a pre-emption cabin and secured his claim. He returned to Boone County, by the request of his father, and remained two years. He then, on account of his wife's ill health, returned to Howard County, where he has since resided, and cleared 100 acres on his farm. Mr. and Mrs. Cain have reared two orphan children, taking Harrison Murphy when but seven years of age, who is now living in Tipton County, and Amanda C. Polson, when but five years old, and reared her to womanhood. She was married to John F. Stann (now deceased), and since his death, has returned home with two small children. Ida M. Donson, another orphan, is now living with them. Mr. and Mrs. Cain are both noted for their kindness to the poor and unfortunate. Mrs. Cain has been identified with the Baptist Church since 1838. Mr. Cain was Trustee of the Grange organization, and has always voted the Democratic ticket, until Peter Cooper was nominated for President, since when he has voted the Independent ticket.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


CALVIN G. CULBERTSON was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1838, and located in Howard County in 1861. He was married in Howard County to Miss Martha E. Woods, in 1864. The fruits of this union were six children - Clara B., Martin C., Frank S., Harriet E., Oma D. and Arthur B. Mr. Culberston has always led a farmer's life, except when he was in the army. He enlisted in April, 1861, in the three months' service, and re-enlisted in September, 1861. He was taken sick at New Madrid, Mo., and was given a furlough, after which he went back and was discharged September 15, 1862. He went back again in September, 1864, and was discharged in September, 1865. He is a member of the G. A. R., and is a Corporal in the State militia at the present time. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, at the age of eighteen. He has held some of the minor offices of his township, such as Constable, and is a worthy citizen in his community. His father, Davidson Culbertson, was a native of Kentucky, where he followed farming, and has since held the office of County Treasurer in Grant County.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


JOSEPH DELON, the eldest of three children born to Mark A. and Mary (Prichard) DeLon, was born in Pasquotank County, N. C., March 17, 1826. His parents died when he was quite young, and he was taken an orphan to Newport, Wayne Co., Ind., where he remained two years. He then removed to Washington County, remained about the same period, and thence to Orange, where he was bound out until he became of age. Having served his time, he located on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits in Orange County, until 1850, when he moved to Howard County, on a rented farm. Two years later, he located at New London, where he engaged in the harness, saddlery and grocery business. After remaining there five years, he sold out and located on a partially improved farm. In 1863, he moved on his present place, where he has since resided. His estate is conveniently located to New London, and shows that Mr. DeLon has spent much time and honest toil in making the present improvements. He has served two terms as Supervisor, and has given general satisfaction. Mr. DeLon was married in Orange County, Ind., September 20, 1848, to Rebecca King, a native of Maryland, born April 22, 1829. By this union they have eight children - Benjamin, Mary P., John A., Aubrey, Austin, Richenda, Francis and Julia Emugene. Mr. DeLon is a member of the Republican party, and he and his wife are active members of the Society of Friends.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


RUSSELL B. ELLIS was born in West Virginia in 1810, and emigrated with his father to Kentucky in 1812, locating within six miles of Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1860, he moved to Clermont County, Ohio, where he remained four years, when he removed with his family to Howard County. He left Kentucky on account of his anti-slavery views, and had two sons in the Union army. Mr. Ellis has always been a strong temperance man, and now is enjoying the best of health. His mother lived to be ninety-nine years old, and was then quite vigorous, but took the small-pox and died. Mr. Ellis was married, April 17, 1837, to Miss Phebe Griffin, of Kentucky. They have five children - Mary J., Andrew R., Vandake, Sarah M. and Arthur G. (deceased). Mr. Ellis has been a member of the Christian Church and the Masonic fraternity for over forty years. He was Justice of the Peace for eight years in Kentucky, and never had an appeal taken from his court. He is a worthy citizen, and a man highly respected by all who know him. He is now in comfortable circumstances, owning 180 acres of good farm land, well improved.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


THOMAS R. HITE is the fifth of thirteen children born to Alexander Hite, a native of Virginia, and Mary A. (Lowrey) Hite, a native of Kentucky. He was born March 30, 1837, in Rush County, Ind., and was reared on a farm, attending school during the winter. He came to this county in 1856, worked on a farm about one year and then returned home; then shortly came again to this county, and July 30, 1858, was married to Lydia A. Willis, a native of Indiana. She was the daughter of David Willis, a native of Tennessee, and Lydia (Cogshell) Willis, a native of North Carolina. Her parents came to this county in 1851 and made for themselves a good home in Centre Township. Mr. and Mrs. Hite have had nine children - David A., born June 19, 1859 ; Edgar L., born April 13, 1862; James E., born January 6,1865; Elmer E., born March 7, 1868; Liew E., born November 25, 1870; Elizabeth, born August 25, 1873; Rolly and his twin brother (deceased), born June 19, 1876; and Susan B., born October 8, 1880 (deceased). Mr. Hite resided for several years in Union Township, but is at present living on a good farm of forty acres in Centre Township. He has always voted the Republican ticket, and is an active worker in his party. He is a friend to education and takes a pride in trying to educate his children.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


WILLIAM JACKSON was born in Chester County, Penn., in 1803, and was the son of William and Mary (Keech) Jackson. In 1834, our subject moved to Muskingum County, Ohio, and in 1850 he came to this county, locating on the place where he now resides. In 1832, he was married to Miss Keziah Green. The fruits of this union have been six children, five of whom are living - Lydia A,, William, Mary, Emma, Eliza and Jessie. Mr. Jackson was reared on a farm, and has always followed agricultural pursuits, with the exception of a few years when he worked at the shoe-maker's trade. When he came to Howard County, he found the land in its native state. He came through with his family from Ohio in a covered wagon, and at once began to clear and improve his farm, until now he has 120 acres of good land with fine improvements. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and his wife and family are members of the Christian Church in Kokomo. Mr. Jackson is now growing quite old; is a worthy citizen, and a man highly respected in his community.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


ELIAS LOCK was born in Preble County, Ohio, and was one of ten children born to Abraham and Rebecca Lock, both natives of Virginia. Elias Lock came to this county in 1850, purchased eighty acres in the timber, and at once began to clear his land and improve it. He was married in Preble County to Miss Sarah Ann Brown, about four years previous to locating there. He came overland with his wife and two children, and still living on the same farm where he first settled. He now has a good home, with good improvements, and fine large brick house. Mr. and Mrs. Lock have had ten children, nine of whom are living, seven boys and two girls. Mr. Lock saw the first locomotive that crossed the Wild Cat Bridge, every one in the neighborhood turning out to see the sight. He now owns ninety-two acres in Centre Township and one hundred acres in Howard Township. Mr. Lock has been a hard-working farmer, has spent his entire life in agricultural pursuits, and is now enjoying the fruits of his labor. His father, Abraham Lock, was a soldier in the war of 1812.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


JOHN A. LOCK was born February 4, 1817, in Preble Couny, Ohio, and is the son of Abraham and Rebecca Lock. In 1844, our subject was married, in Preble County, to Miss Deborah Dinwiddie. This union has been blessed with six children, four of whom are living - Amanda, Rebecca, Jacob and Andrew. Mr. Lock located in Howard County in February, 1848, and entered a one-quarter section of land, upon which he is still living. His farm was in its native state, but he has improved and cultivated it until now he has one of the best farms in the county. He started in life a poor boy, and only through labor and economy has he been able to obtain for himself a comfortable home. His grandfather, John Lock, was a Captain in the Revolutionary war, and his father was in the war of 1812. The subject of this sketch hits been a member of the Lutheran Church ever since he was twenty years of age. His wife died December 12, 1880. She had been a member of the U. B. Church ever since she was seventeen years old.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


T. R. McLAUGHLIN was born in Marion County, Ind., in 1839, and lived there until the spring of 1859, when he located in Howard County. May, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Thirteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in battle at Winchester, Alleghany Mountains, Greenbrier, and several smaller engagements. He escaped being wounded, but at one time had his belt shot off of him. He had a narrow escape at Dogtown, W. Va., where his companions crawled under a schoolhouse and were captured, but he lay under a bank and finally escaped by running the gantlet. Mr. McLaughlin was discharged from service February 12, 1863, and was married the same year to Miss Jennie Field, of Miami County, Ohio. This union has been blessed with two children, Clara, who is married, and Laura, who is living at home with her parents. Mr. McLaughlin is a member of the G. A. R. He has always lived a farmer's life, and he is a well respected and worthy citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


DAVID MAPLE is the fourth son born to David and Frances (Gore) Maple, natives of Virginia, and of German and English descent. His father came to Indiana and purchased a farm in Shelby County, and is at present living near Shelbyville. His parents had eight children, all of whom are yet living - Martha, Nerva, John W., Emily, Melvin, William, David and Missouri. The subject of the sketch was born December 23, 1855; was reared upon a farm and received a common school education. He remained at home until November 1, 1877, when he was married to Mary C. Lee, born January 1,1859, daughter of James F. and Liza A. Lee, of Shelby County. Mr. Maple engaged in farming in Shelby County until August, 1882, when he came to Howard County and purchased forty acres in Centre Township, two miles northwest of Tampico, and it is here he now resides on a good farm with all necessary improvements. Mr. and Mrs. Maple have two children - Nora, born September 11, 1078, and Celesta, born October 17, 1880. Mr. Maple is an active supporter of the Republican party, having cast his first ballot in 1876 for R. B. Hayes.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


WILLIAMS PETTY is one of ten children born to Josiah Petty, a native of North Carolina, and Sarah (Sheats) Petty, a native of Germany. Our subject was born, May 18, 1820, in Montgomery County, Ohio, and remained with his parents until he was nineteen years of age, when he came to the Miami Reserve on foot, selling pictures to the Indians. He helped to erect the first saw mill in the Miami Reserve, and subsequently took a claim. Later, he sold this and engaged in general goods business in Waupcong, where he remained two years. He then spent one year in Howard County, after which he returned to Waupcong and re-engaged in mercantile pursuits. In a short time he located in Miami, and later purchased a saw mill in Wayne County, after which he bought two farms in Southern Illinois, and engaged in the stock trade. Later, he was in general business at Cassville, and subsequently removed his stock to Windfall. He sold his stock, purchased a farm in Union Township, Howard County, and seven years later located in Centre Township, where he now resides. Mr. Petty was married, February 6, 1852, to Catharine Busbey. They have had six children - Harriet, Jennie, Mary, William D., Ida M. and John M. Mrs. Petty died February 1, 1879, and Mr. Petty was next married, February 11, 1880, to Alcinda Davis. Mr. Petty has been a member of the I. O. O. F. for thirty years; cast his first vote for Gen. Harrison, in 1840, and has been a Republican ever since the formation of the party. He is one of the oldest auctioneers in the county, and has been sent for over a hundred miles to conduct sales.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


FRANK M. PITZER is the first of six children born to George C. Pitzer, a native of Virginia, and Clarinda (Snodgrass) Pitzer, a native of Ohio. His parents came to this county in the fall of 1847, and located in Harrison Township, where they now reside. F. M. Pitzer was born March 31, 1849, in Howard County, Ind., and has always made his home in this county. He assisted his father in clearing and cultivating the old homestead in Harrison Township, and his father rewarded him for his labor with a good farm of ninety-four acres in Centre Township. Upon this he is living, engaged in agricultural pursuits and dealing very extensively in thoroughbred Poland-China hogs. Mr. Pitzer was married, May 14, 1871, to Miss Lyda A. Hunt, a native of Indiana. Three children bless this union - Harry P., born January 28, 1872 ; Pearl D., born December 9, 1874, and Myrtle C., born February 4, 1879. Mr. Pitzer is an active member of the Republican party, and joined the I. O. O. F. at Alto in 1875. He is a prominent farmer, and a worthy citizen in the community in which he lives.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


ANDREW J. RECORD is the eldest of a family of eight children born to John F. and Melissa (McMasters) Record, natives of North Carolina, of German and English descent. His father came from North Carolina to Indiana, in 1867, and settled in Clay Township, four miles north of Kokomo, and here continued to farm until his death, June 14, 1880. Andrew J. was born September 12, 1841, and was reared upon the farm in North Carolina, where he received a common school education. At the age of twenty-four, he was married to Elvira Wincy, daughter of Joseph and Syntha (Craven) Lane, natives of Randolph County, N. C., 2nd of English and German descent. Mr. Record has since his marriage engaged in farming and gardening. He came to Indiana in company with his father in 1865, and is at present located two and one half miles southwest of Kokomo. He grows many varieties of fruits, and makes a specialty of all kinds of garden vegetables. He is identified with the Republican party, and is a stanch advocate of its principles. Mr. and Mrs. Record have had three children - Mary E., U. S. G. and C. C. (deceased).

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


JOHN E. SMITH is the eldest of five children born to Peter and Malinda (Elmore) Smith, of Irish and English descent. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother was born in Indiana. Our subject was born November 25, 1829, and at the age of seven years, on account of his father's death, was bound out, and at the age of twenty-one received n horse, bridle and saddle, and suit of clothes, all valued at $100. Mr. Smith then began farming as a hand at $8 per month, and at the age of twenty-two was married to Minerva E. Canine, daughter of Cornelius and Docia (Vannice) Canine, natives of Kentucky. Mr. Smith, in 1819, purchased a farm in Harrison Township, Howard County, but lived on the farm of his father-in-law in Montgomery County, until the latter's death, after which he purchased the farm. One year later, he sold this and in January, 1868, came to Kokomo. The following March, he purchased 240 acres of land one and one-half miles north of Kokomo, upon which he moved in May, 1871. It is here he is now located, with all the improvements necessary to make home pleasant. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have had nine children - Mary M. (deceased), Anna A. Jessup, Charles W. (deceased), Martha A., Mary J., Joseph H., Franklin M., Isaac N. and one infant. Mr. Smith is s prominent member of the Odd Fellows fraternity, and he and his wife are active members of the Congregational Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Centre Township


Deb Murray