J. H. CHAMBERLAIN, son of Samuel and Maria (Boyden) Chamberlain, was born in Cohocton, Steuben County, N. Y., July 25, 1839. After receiving his education in his native State, he was employed in railroading for two years, after which he worked at the carpenter's trade two years. In 1857, he located in Indianapolis, Ind., where he engaged for five years in contracting and building, during which time he built some of the principal public buildings in that city. He then took a position with the Toledo Oil Company as city salesman; he served in that capacity two years, when he was called upon to fill the position of traveling salesman for the company, which position he now holds. He has served as Deputy Enumerator of Marion County, and also County Assessor. He was married, December 25, 1860, to Martha Harden, of Madison County, Ind. Three children bless this union - Kett F., Frank C. and J. Harry. Mrs. Chamberlain died in January, 1874, and Mr. C. was next married at Russiaville, Ind., September 13, 1882, to Mrs. K. E. Cohee. She is a milliner in that place and does a good business, keeping a full stock of millinery and ladies' furnishing goods. Mr. Chamberlain is a member of the Knights of Honor, and a stanch member of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


R. T. CHANDLER, merchant, was the youngest of nine children born to Robert and Margaret (Hale) Chandler; he was born in Switzerland County, Ind., May 28, 1830, and was there reared and educated, after which he was employed as clerk in a general merchandise house in Florence, Ind. After three years at this place, he purchased a trading boat, and for two years sold goods at different points on the Ohio River. In 1853, he located at Craven Rock, Ill., where he purchased a stock of goods and engaged in business two years, when he sold out. He engaged in various pursuits until 1850, when he located at Russiaville, engaging in the mercantile business a short time, after which he engaged in the drug trade until 1864, when he enlisted in Company E, Fortieth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was soon appointed Clerk in the Inspector General's office, which position he held until the close of the war. He then returned to Russiaville and engaged in his former business; he has since added groceries and drugs to his stock. Mr. Chandler is also proprietor of the well-known Chandler House, a thriving hotel in Russiaville; he was married in Russiaville, November 4, 1860, to Malinda Ratcliff, daughter of T. E. Ratcliff, of Ohio. Mr. Chandler is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


BENJAMIN P. COSAND was bcrn January IS, 1822, in Washington County, Ind. His parents, Benjamin Cosand and Penninah (Pritchard) Cosand, natives of North Carolina, were married in 1819, and in two years settled in Indiana. Benjamin P. was one of fourteen children, and was early taught to labor on the farm. His education was limited, for he was kept out of school much of the time on account of ill health. When he was twenty-one, he bought auction goods in Louisville, Ky., and exchanged them for country produce, which he sold in the city. He continued in this business two years, when he purchased a farm in Washington County, Ind., where he remained until 1851, when he came to Howard County, and located one and three-quarter miles east of Russiaville, on forty acres of good land. He still resides on this place, and has transformed it, by improvements and additions, into a fine farm, with a good house and barn, a splendid orchard and all modern conveniences. His farm now contains 173 acres of fine land. In 1869, Mr. Cosand was recorded a minister of the Gospel in the Friends' Society, and has spent several years in the South, engaged in this work. He has contributed largely to his denomination for the construction of meeting-houses and school buildings. Mr. Cosand was married, February 12, 1846, to Elizabeth R. Overman, of Washington County, Ind. She was born August 12 ,1825, and died November 30,1866. To this union there were born five children - Malissa, Rebecca, Ann, Martha and Benjamin B., all deceased. Mr. Cosand was next married to Sarah Trueblue, September 17, 1868. By this marriage they have seven children - Penninah I. (deceased), Lodovic E., William T., Edman N., Almeda (deceased), Riley Lee and Joseph P.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


ABRAM T. COSAND, the subject of this sketch, bears in his veins a commingling of German and English blood, his paternal ancestors coming from the land of the castled Rhine, and his maternal ancestry from the English coast to the land of the Sunny South, North Carolina. The grandparents on both sides emigrated to the Hoosier State when it was in its infancy, to escape the evils of slavery. His parents, William Cosand, of Washington County, and Eliza J. White, of Orange County, married in 1850, and came at once to what is now western Howard County, then belonging to Clinton County, and the largest portion of it an unbroken forest. Here, near where they first settled, in a log cabin surrounded by the densest forest shade, Abram was born February 10, 1854. He is the third of ten children, seven of whom are now living, he being the eldest. Here on the farm he worked with his father in the summer, and attended district school in the winter. He was fortunate in living near one of the best schools of the county, but more fortunate in having parents who, recognizing the needs of their children's receiving an education, often made sacrifices themselves that their children might have the benefit of an uninterrupted attendance at school. Abram thus spent his time until about eighteen years of age, when he began teaching in the winter, his first term being at Alto. He continued teaching for nine winters, teaching in all over forty-two months. In the spring and summer of 1874, he attended the National Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio. Though he attended school very little, except in the district where he lived, yet, through his love of literature and science, he gained such a knowledge of it as made him stand high among the teachers of his county. He early formed the habit of reading; and took great delight in history and biography. As a result, he imbibed patriotic ideas, and is now, as is each member of the family, politically an enthusiastic Republican. On November 4, 1577, he was joined in marriage with Lizzie S. Davis, of Kokomo. This union was of short duration; Mrs. Cosand having contracted consumption a few months previous, on the morning of November 9, quietly quit her old on life, dying in Christian hope and assurance. The remains now rest in the beautiful cemetery at Dayton, Ohio. Mr. Cosand continued teaching in the winter, and in the summer making his home with his father, two miles east of Russiaville, and working with him on his farms until the autumn of 1880, when on September 9, he married Mary M. Kenworthy, of New London. They settled near Russiaville, upon a farm owned by his father. Here they remained one year, but his health not being very rugged, and thinking some indoor occupation better suited thereto, they disposed of their farm effects, and, settling in Russiaville, founded the Russiaville Observer , December, 1881. There having been several journalistic efforts here, and some of them leaving the field of adventure, while another succumbed to the destructive fire of January 22, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Cosand found it hard work to gain the confidence of the people in a newspaper venture at this place, but by industry and fair dealing they have, with the aid of their efficient foreman, Mr. R. C. O'Leary, succeeded in establishing it upon a paying basis. Mr. and Mrs. Cosand are both by birth and education members of the Society of Friends. In the full of 1883 and the following winter, they were called upon to pass through severe affliction and bereavement. Mr. Cosand, from the 1st of October till February, was confined to the house by sickness, which almost every one, at one time, thought he would scarcely survive. On the 12th of February, that winter, there was born them a little girl baby, whom they called Lena. But they were not to be long blessed with her presence. Her fine, strong form soon gave way to convulsions, which followed one another in rapid succession for about sixty hours, when nature yie1ded and she closed her eyes, and was forever at rest. Early in March, they again assumed their duties on the Observer, which had in the mean time been successfully conducted by Mr. O'Leary, and the columns of this journal indicate their ability in this direction. Having passed successfully through the difficulties incident to the early days of a country newspaper, they have apparently a prosperous future before them.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


JONATHAN DIXON, son of Silas and Mary (Lindley) Dixon, was born in Lawrence County, Ind., November 19, 1822. When he was two years old, his parents came to Orange County, Ind., and here he was reared and educated. When he was grown, his father gave him 160 acres of land, which he improved and cultivated four years, when he sold, and entered 160 acres in Tipton County. There he farmed until 1858, when he purchased 110 acres near Russiaville, Howard County. He has since added sixty-five acres, and now has his farm stocked with fine stock. In 1882, he built a comfortable dwelling in Russiaville, where he is living a retired life. Mr. Dixon was married in Lawrence County, Ind., March 6, 1845, to Miss Lorniza Maxwell, who was born in Lawrence County September 24, 1835. They have one child living, America A. Mr. Dixon is a member of the Society of Friends and of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


JOHN W. GRAHAM, son of A. J. and Lucinda (Rogers) Graham, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., November 3, 1843. When he was seven gears of age, his parents moved to Delaware County, Ind., and three years later to Madison County, where John W. received the benefit of the country schools five years. He then moved to Tipton County, and later to Hamilton County, where he remained until 1871, when he removed to Leavenworth County, Kan., and engaged in farming and stock-raising for four years. He then came to Howard County, and is now located on sixty-six and two-thirds acres of fine farm land, situated near Russiaville. He was married in Hamilton County, Ind., April 13, 1866, to Miss Nannie A. Phillips, a native of Indiana, and born December 9, 1844. This union has been blessed with seven children Luella A., Charley A., Mary L., Rosa A., Fannie B., Ora and Luke F. Mr. Graham is a member in good standing of the Odd Fellow and Masonic fraternities. He is a strong Republican, and he and wife are members of the Old School Baptist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


J. R. GRIFFITH was born in Queensviile, Ind., where he was reared and educated. In 1866, he located in Bloomington, Ill., here he learned the tinner's trade. He then went to Elizabethtown, Bartholomew County, Ind., where he pursued his occupation until 1873, when he located in Russiaville and opened a small hardware store. He continued in this business until 1877, when he disposed of his stock and worked at his trade fifteen months in Parsons, Kan. He then clerked eighteen months in a hardware store in Nevada, Mo., after which he again opened a hardware store, under the firm name of Griffith & Evans, in Russiaville, Ind. When they had been in business sixty days they were burned out, after which they built a new room, 60x100 feet, and now carry a $25,000 stock. The firm also deals in live stock, and during 1882 shipped $75,000 worth of stock. Mr. Griffith started in life a poor boy, but by close attention to business he is to-day one of the largest dealers in hardware in Central Indiana. March 10, 1870, Mr. Griffith was married to Miss Martha Springer, of Elizabethtown, Ind. She gave birth to three children - Ida M., George E. and Gracie L. April 17, 1875, Mrs. Griffith died, and Mr. Griffith was married at Kokomo, Ind., September 21, 1880, to Miss Mary E. Nixon. Mr. Griffith served in the late war, in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He is a Master Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


DAVID HODSON, SR., was born in Highland County, Ohio, October 9, 1824. He was the youngest of thirteen children born to George and Sarah (Powel) Hodson. In 1828, his father located in Madison County, Ind., when but few white settlers were there. There he received his first schooling. When he was but ten years old, his mother died, and he lived with his sister two years. He then lived with his brother Eli, a pioneer of Madison County, two years, after which he returned to Ohio and taught school for a number of winters. In 1848, he moved to Madison County, Ind., and the following year came to Howard County, where he taught school for fifteen years. In 1856, he traded in grain and hogs for a Louisville firm. The company became insolvent, and he, being responsible, sold his land and paid all his indebtedness. He then went on his father-in-law's farm, and worked as a common laborer. At the commencement of the war, he assisted in raising troops, preaching and teaching at intervals. September 18, 1863, he was commissioned Chaplain of the Eighty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, by O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana. He was sent to Fort Pickering, where he remained until January 26, 1864. He was with his regiment during all its engagements and encampments. He resigned at St. Louis, November 24, 1864. On his return home, he was selected to represent his township at the draft commission, the duties of which he faithfully discharged. During the Red River campaign, his favorite friend, Capt. B. Gifford, of Company G, was killed. He and Capt. John E. Williams rescued the body and sent it home. During this campaign, he was taken sick, and lay in the hospital at Memphis four weeks. Mr. Hodson was married, September 21, 1845, to Miss Delilah Hart, daughter of Miles and Amy Hart. They have eleven children - Miles J., Drusilla J., Amy Ann, John L., William E., Isabel, Mary, Martha, Sarah Katherine, David B. and Laura. Mr. Hodson is a minister in the Christian Church and was baptized by Elder Benjamin Franklin. He preached in his youth in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, and has immersed hundreds. He still travels and preaches. In politics, Mr. Hodson is a Republican. He is a member of the Grand Army Post of Russiaville.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


BENJAMIN KING was born in Adams County, Penn., January 29, 1827. He is the son of John S. and Elizabeth (Reinhart) King. When he was one year old, his parents removed to Baltimore, Md., where they remained two years, when they removed to Carroll County, Md. There his father died, and in 1834 he came with his mother to Martin County, Ind., where they remained during the winter, and in the spring removed to Orange County, Ind. Mr. King there received a common school education. He followed farming for fourteen years, and in 1850 came to Howard County, engaging in farming and school teaching until 1861, when he purchased his present place, and is now engaged in farming and stock-raising. He has served as Assessor of Harrison Township, also as collector of delinquent taxes. He is now serving his second term as Township Trustee. He was married in Howard County, Ind., April 13, 1853, to Miss Margaret J. White. She was born in North Carolina September 8, 1830. They have had five children -Almira E., Joseph (deceased), Oliver M., Mary E. and John R. Mr. King is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Society of Friends.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


P. H. McCANN (deceased) was born March 19, 1829, in Pendleton County, Ky. His father, Patrick, was a native of Ireland, and emigrated to Kentucky when quite young. He died in 1836, leaving his consort, Elizabeth (Iles) McCann, and their two children - Margaret and P. H. - to struggle for themselves. Elizabeth died June 17, 1852. She was one of ten children, the result of the union of Samuel Iles with Ellen Bailey, namely, William, John, Perry, Samuel, Peggy, Hettie, Sallie, Elizabeth, Priscilla (married John, the father of Thomas and Clark Gifford), and Stephen. The latter only survives and has reared eight children, viz.: Perry, John W., S. B., William, Martha J., Margaret, Rebecca and Elizabeth, all of whom survive, save the last. The Iles family are of English descent, and emigrated to America at an early period. Samuel Iles died at the age of one hundred and five years, and served through the entire Revolutionary struggle of America. P. H., our subject, being left as he was without a father when a mere boy, had but little chance to obtain an education, and only gathered, now and then, a stray thought in the country schools. By strict attention to such books as his mother was able to secure for him, he became qualified to teach in the country school, at which he applied himself during a few winters in Clinton County, and during the summers he worked by the month for farmers. He came with the family to Fayette County, Ind., when small, and subsequently to Rush County, the same State. In 1852, he came to Clinton County (now Howard), and for a time made his home with his sister, Margaret, the wife of Ira Bishop, the parents of William H., Nancy, Mary, Margaret, Patrick, Jane, Angie, Alice, John and Belle. His mother was able to give him a little start, and this, with the means obtained by teaching and in rural pursuits as s servant, he purchased land which he owned at his decease, April 13, 1383. He was married, February 2, 1859, to Sarah E. Thompson, a native of North Carolina, then a resident of Honey Creek Township, this county. By her he was blessed with one child, Margaret E., who died May 18, 1861. His consort died April 21, 1861. He was married a second time, to Belle, a daughter of Smith and Margaret S. (Brown) Chambers, natives of North Carolina, and the parents of three children who grew up, viz.: James, Belle and Angeline. Her parents came to this county in 1852, where the father died in 1855, and the mother in 1876. Her union with our subject gave her three children, viz.: Willie O., born December 28, 1863, and died May 24, 1880; Sarah E., born September 14, 1865; and Mollie S., born August 18, 1867, and died December 31, 1869. Our subject's sorrows were again multiplied by the death of his second consort, October 10, 1872, since which time, up to his decease, he based his affections upon his son and daughter, the former of whom was taken from him in the eden of his youth by the death angel. P. H. McCann was known by every acquaintance of his to be a man of more than ordinary temperament, and of genuine uprightness, generous to a fault, and kind and accommodating to his neighbors. He was a hard worker, and has been known to have labored during the busy seasons of the year, on his farm, twenty hours each day. By frugality and honest dealings, he added to the treasure given him by his mother, which, together with some means, the property of his last wife, summed up quite a little fortune, which he left to his loving daughter, and other relatives. For a few years prior to his death, he devoted his time to the interests of his general stock of dry goods at Russiaville, in the firm of Bishop & McCann. He was for many years, and at his death, a member of the Baptist Church, the financial interests of which were benefited by his relationship, as well as otherwise. He adhered strictly to the principles of the Democratic party, and was a leader in that organization in the community where he resided.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


DAVID MIDDLETON, son of Levi and Mary (Postgate) Middleton, was born in Montgomery County, Ind., June 22, 1826. He was reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. He engaged in various occupations until 1850, when he removed to his present farm in Howard County. He purchased 162 acres of wild land, and began clearing and improving it. By labor and economy he has made it one of the best improved farms in the township, with a large two-story residence, erected at a cost of $3,000, with all necessary outbuildings, and with all modern improvements. Mr. Middleton has been a Howard County farmer for thirty-two years, and is now in good circumstances. He has served as Township Supervisor for many years, and has declined becoming a candidate for several important offices. He was married August 9, 1849, to Mary Icasbner, a native of Ohio. She died in 1859, leaving him four children - William J., Abram, Levi J., and Martha J. Mr. Middleton married his second wife, Sarah Carter, in Tipton County, Ind., May 14, 1862. He has three children by this marriage Hannah I., Mary E., and Ruth E. Mr. Middleton is a Republican, and for a number of years he has been a leading member of the Friends Society

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


DR. THOMAS McL. MOULDER is a native of Indiana, was born February 6, 1828, in Parke County, and is a son of John and Eleanor (Maris) Moulder. His parents were among the early settlers of the State, and his father was one of the Commissioners appointed by the Legislature to survey and locate the county seat of Howard County in the year 1844. The same year his parents settled on a 160-acre tract of land in the southwestern portion of Howard County. Thomas McL. Moulder received a good common school education. February 22, 1849, he was united in marriage to Eliza, daughter of James and Anna Williams. Her parents also were among the early settlers of this portion of the county, and were among the highly esteemed, intelligent and industrious pioneers of this reservation. This union was blessed with five children, all of whom are living - Dr. J. McLean, of Kokomo, and Louie, Ella, James and Anna, of Russiaville. For a number of years, he was one of the foremost teachers of the county. He taught a great many very successful schools in the western portion of Howard and Tipton Counties. Up to 1864, he had been engaged in farming and teaching, spending all his leisure time in reading medicine. About this time, after a careful course of study, he began the practice of medicine, and he still enjoys the confidence of a large circle of patrons in Russiaville and vicinity. In March, 1883, he had the honorary degree of M. D. conferred upon him at the Fort Wayne Medical College. Dr. Moulder has always been a true Republican, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and has held almost every office within the gift of his lodge. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church, and he is now one of the local preachers of his Church. Dr. Moulder is in every sense of the word an exemplary Christian gentleman.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


WILLIAM R. PAYNE was born in Tippecanoe County, Ind., Janary 19, 1856. He was the eighth of ten children born to Samuel and Emily (Greenha) Payne. His father was a native of Maryland, and his mother of Ohio. William was reared and educated in his native county until 1876, when he entered the Northern Indiana Normal School, at Valparaiso, where he finished his studies in 1877. He then taught school for two years, after which he read law under Col. R. P. DeHart, of La Fayette, Ind. He was admitted to the La Fayette bar March 24, 1880, and practiced in that city for one year. He then located at Russiaville, where he is now actively engaged in the duties of his profession, practicing in Howard and adjoining counties. In 1881, he was commissioned Notary Public, and he is doing an active business in insurance, representing the Etna and Springfield Fire and Marine Company of Massachusetts. He was married March 25, 1880, to Miss Alfa Warwick. She was born May 6, 1856, and died in Tippecanoe County, October 1, 1882. Mr. Payne is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and a member in good standing of the I. O. O. F. He is also a member of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


B. B. RICHARDS is the son of Benjamin and Eliza (Marquis) Richards, and was born in Ripley County, Ind., September 13, 1847. When he was quite young, his parents removed to Decatur County, Ind. He attended the common schools until 1865, when he entered Hartsville University, Ind., where he remained four years. He then came to Howard County anti taught school for a number of years, after which he engaged in the harness and saddler's trade in Kokomo. He afterward removed his stock to New London, and after two and one-half years he again moved to Russiaville, where he pursued the same business until 1880. He then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1882. In 1881, he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he is now filling. He is also engaged in the real estate and insurance business representing the Phoenix, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Niagara, Western, Toronto and New England Life. Mr. Richards was married to Miss Rebecca Gossett, daughter of John Gossett, of Howard County. They have two children - Ollie E. and John O. Mr. Richards is an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


SAMUEL RUNK, an enterprising pioneer, is a native of Virginia, and was born in Berkeley County November 27, 1816. His father, John, was born in Hanover County, Penn., and was a son of Valentine, a native of the same State and the son of Valentine Runk, who emigrated from Germany when quite young to the State of New York, where he labored seven years on a farm, to obtain money to pay to a party from whom he borrowed to defray the expense of his passage across the ocean, after which he labored seven more years, receiving the means by which his parents were transferred to the American continent. He finally settled with them in Pennsylvania. John, the father of Samuel, served in the war of 1812; married Elizabeth Miller, a native of Pennsylvania; they settled for awhile in Maryland, where to them were born John and Daniel. They subsequently located in Virginia, where they were blessed with Betsey, Samuel, George, William, Jacob L., Nary and Joseph T., all of whom survive. In 1836, the family moved by team to Clinton County, Ohio, where the father died at the age of eighty-four and the mother at eighty-nine. Samuel's only advantage of school was sixteen days while in Virginia. About the time of reaching his majority, he was married to Margaret Ratcliff. Her father, Edom Ratcliff, was a native of North Carolina, and with his wife, Hannah Smith, was among the first settlers of Highland County, Ohio, where they remained until 1844, when they came by wagon to what is now Honey Creek Township, and settled near the present site of Russiaville, where they died, having reared nine children, viz.: William, Mahala, Margaret, Rachel, Edom, Hannah, Andrew, Matilda and Sarah. Our subject settled where he now lives, in Honey Creek Township, in 1844. The country was then an unbroken wilderness, save here and there a small patch around a rude log cabin. The forests were inhabited by wild animals, and Mr. Runk sustained his family partly by the mild meats he could easily slaughter. By strict economy and hard labor, he has secured and improved some fine farms. In April, 1877, his wife died, having blessed him with nine children, viz.: Matilda (deceased), married Joseph Elliott, the result being two children, William and Jennie; Hannah E., who married F. M. Duncan, whom she blessed with Alice (deceased), Samuel, Orpha, Maggie (deceased), and Earnest; William A., enlisted in the late war, where he died; Jacob; Miles, who married Sallie A. Orr, by whom he has Norman and Luella; John M., attended the country, Kokomo and Lebanon, Ohio, Schools; taught nine years, including normal terms at Kokomo and Russiaville; began compiling biographical matter for Chicago publishing house in 1878, for which he has since labored, excepting a period as one of the editors of the Kokomo Gazette; Louisa A., married Thomas Carter, the result being two children, viz.: Elmer and Lillie; Maggie E. (deceased), married George T. Lindley, whom she blessed with Freddie. The last child was Abraham L. Although our subject had but little chance of education himself, he has given his children such advantages as times and limited means would permit, and five of the nine have taught school. Mr. Runk has for many years been a member of the A., F. & A. M. of Russiaville, and is a stanch Republican, as are also his entire family. He is now enjoying good health, with his second wife, Mrs. Caroline Lake, the only daughter of Thomas and Mary E. (Coleman) Blackburn.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


MAJ. MELL SEWARD, son of Charles and Ann P. (Taylor) Seward, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, July 2, 1848. When young, he moved with his parents to Howard County, where he was reared and educated. In 1863, he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirtieth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private. He was soon made Duty Sergeant, then Orderly Sergeant, after which he was promoted as Second Lieutenant, and later he was made First Lieutenant, which position he held until the close of the war. He participated in the engagements at Resaca, Dalton, siege of Atlanta, Nashville, Fort Anderson, Wilmington and West Fork. At the close of the war, he returned to Howard County and went on a farm. In 1871, he located in Russiaville, and engaged two years in milling, when he sold out and engaged in merchandising a short time. He then purchased a half-interest in the Russiaville Flouring Mills, where he is doing a large merchant and custom trade. The mill is a two-story frame building, 40x48, is propelled by steam, and has a capacity for making fifty barrels per day. Mr. Seward was married at Russiaville, November 14, 1868, to Frances C. Jones, a native of Indiana. By this union they have three children - William A., Lulu H. and Fred G. Mr. Seward is a member of the I. O. O. F. and Masonic fraternity, also of the Grand Army of the Republic. His sympathies are with the Republican party. It was said by Hon. Oliver P. Morton, that Maj. Seward was the youngest commissioned officer of this State, during the late war. He is, at present, Aid-de-camp upon the staff of Gov. Porter. In the spring of 1883, he was appointed Deputy Revenue Collector of the Eleventh District, under Capt. T. M. Kirkpatrick, and is now serving in that capacity.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


R. W. THOMPSON wits born in Fayette County, Ind., October 11, 1842, and was the eldest of seven children born to James L. and Elizabeth (McCarty) Thompson. When he was eight years old, his parents removed to Howard County. After he had received the benefit of the country schools for some time, he attended the High School at Lebanon, Boone County. He returned home, and completed his course in Kokomo in 1867. He then taught school three terms, and soon after located on a farm and has since followed agricultural pursuits. His farm is located west of Russiaville. It consists of the best soil, is well drained, and has all the modern improvements. In 1875, he began to labor as minister, in the Old School Baptist Church, and has given much of his time to this work. He was married, August 22, 1867, to Miss Sarah E. Hodson. She was born January 3, 1849, in Highland County, Ohio, and is a daughter of Jonathan and Delilah (Hart) Hodson. This union has been blessed with three children - George W., Mary L. and Millie E. Mr. Thompson's sympathies are with the Democratic party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


G. W. TOPPING was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, October 8, 1862, and was the youngest of two children born to James I. and Margaret (Moore) Topping. When he was but sixteen years old, his parents moved to Centertown, Ind., where, after completing his studies, he accepted a position as clerk in a drug store. After a short time, he located in Brazil, Ind., and was employed in the drug trade fifteen months, after which he went to Indianapolis, and filled a position in a drug store until October, 1882, when he purchased a stock of drugs and located at Russiaville, establishing the firm of G. W. Topping & Co. Mr. Topping is an energetic business man. His stock is full and complete, and he is rapidly building up a large and excellent trade.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


HON. SAMUEL WOODY was born April 14, 1828, in Orange County, N. C. His parents, John and Mary Woody, located in Parke County, Ind., in 1829. There he worked on the farm, attending the common schools in the winter. His education was limited, but he has obtained a goodly stock of general information through reading. In 1847, he came West with his aged parents, and settled on eighty acres of land in the Miami Reserve, where he still lives. He worked hard to pay for this farm, but he now owns 400 acres of fine farm land, well cultivated, having all the modern improvements. In an early day, Mr. Woody was Township Trustee for six years. In 1874, he was elected Joint Representative from Howard and Miami Counties, and during his term of service introduced several important bills, which afterward became laws. Formerly Mr. Woody was a Whig, but has been a Republican ever since the organization of that party. He has long been an earnest worker in the temperance cause, and has ever been ready to aid in any charitable enterprise. He has given liberally to many churches, and has assisted in building many church buildings in the county, as well as in the city of Kokomo. Mr. Woody was instrumental in organizing Honey Creek Township. He was married, February 11, 1849, to Miss Margaret Lybrook, daughter of John C. and Elizabeth Lybrook. Her parents were natives of Virginia, and pioneers of Honey Creek Township. Mr. and Mrs. Woody have had seven children - Horace G., Professor of the Kokomo High School; John L., of Russiaville; William P.; M. Pearl, of Arkansas; Mrs. M. E. Alma Dimitt, Sarah L. and N. E. Ina. Mrs. Woody died January 6, 1883.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


DR. J. C. WRIGHT was the sixth of ten children born to David and Jane A. (Bower) Wright. His father was a native of Ohio, and his mother of New Jersey. Dr. Wright is a native of Highland County, Ohio, and was born September 17, 1852. He was reared and educated at New London, Ohio, after which he was employed as clerk in a dry goods house two years. He then took a practical course in pharmacy in a drug store one year, when he chose as his preceptor Dr. J. F. Bower, of New Lexington, Ohio. He remained with him three years, after which he entered the Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, and graduated from that institution. He then located at Russiaville, Ind., where he engaged actively in the duties of his profession, making a specialty of the eye. In 1879, he began the study of dentistry, in which art he has gained considerable reputation. Dr. Wright was County Coroner for two years, during which time he acted in several celebrated cases, among them the shooting of Mayor Cole and the hanging of Richard Long. Dr. Wright was married at Russiaville, Ind., October 9, 1873, to Miss Emma C. Ratcliff, of Highland County, Ohio, and daughter of Thomas E. and Jane (Smithson) Ratcliff, both natives of Ohio. By this marriage they have two children, Bertha J. and James C. Dr. Wright is now in active practice of dentistry, having established a successful business and a reputation as a skillful and efficient workman in that line. He also continues, to some extent, his medical practice. Dr. Wright has established a leading reputation as a writer for the newspapers, and is well read in history, science, art, and the miscellany of the day. He is one of the promising young men of Howard County, an intelligent and genial gentleman.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Honey Creek Township


W. F. GORDON was born in Clarke County, Ohio, April 30, 1835, and is the eldest of eight children born to Adonijah and Synder (Reeser) Gordon, both natives of West Virginia. While quite young, our subject moved with his parents to Tippecanoe County, Ind., where he received the benefit of the country schools until 1848, when he moved with his father to Howard County, and here completed his education. His father is one of the pioneers of Indiana, and helped build one of the first schoolhouses in Monroe Township. W. F. Gordon started in life as a renter, but by economy and industry he soon accumulated means, and purchased 160 acres of land in Clinton County, Ind., on which he lived for some time. In 1865, he located on his present place of 374 acres. His farm is in every respect a model one. He has a large two-story brick dwelling containing ten rooms, erected at a cost of $3,500, and mammoth barn and granary. Mr. Gordon has taken an active part in improving the stock of this section, having invested $4,000 in thoroughbred short-horn cattle. His herd consists of the best families, some of which may be mentioned: The Amelia tribe, Mary's Princess, Duke's Breast Plates, and Philleses. In 1878, he was elected County Commissioner, and reelected in 1882. He has taken an active part in improving the public highways, having served as Supervisor for twelve years. He was married in Honey Creek Township, Clinton County (now a part of Howard County), November 23, 1856, to Harriet M. Williams, of Logan County, Ill. She was born February 21, 1840. By this union they have nine children - Ormanda, Charles H., Adonijah W., Ortha A., Sarah C., John S., Milvin L., Nora and William C. Mr. Gordon is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a strong believer in Woman's Rights; and a member of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


ELIHU HOBSON, a pioneer of Howard County, was the first of ten children born to Jesse and Lydia (Newlin) Hobson. He was born in North Carolina September 4, 1524, and when but four years of age removed with his parents to Parke County, Ind., where he was reared on his father's farm and received a common school education. He then rented a firm in Parke County where he lived until 1847, when he moved to Howard County and settled on his present place of 130 acres, then in its native state. Being handy with tools, he has made many improvements with his own hands. His farm is in a high state of cultivation, with fine dwelling, all necessary outbuildings and with macadamized road leading from his house to the main pike. He has taken an active part in improving the highways in this township, having served as Supervisor about fifteen years. Mr. Hobson has been twice married, first in Parke County, Ind., February 8, 1846, to Margaret Hadley, of North Carolina. She died April 23, 1854. By this marriage they had four children - Levi, Lydia, Mary (deceased) and Martha (deceased). The second marriage occurred at New London, Ind., November 14, 1855, Sarah Icing of Frederick County, Md., being the bride. She was born April 19, 1831. They have by this marriage eight children - Ossian, Cadmus, Estella, Luella,, Aaron, Amy E., J. J. Gurney and Alford S. Mr. Hobson is a stanch Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


JOSEPH G. McCOY, Sr., son of Gilbert and Huldah (Cram) McCoy, was born in Ohio April 18, 1819, and was reared and educated in his native State. He followed farming in Ohio until the spring of 1844, when he came to Indiana and settled in Howard County, on his present place. He is one of the oldest settlers in the county and has experienced many of the privations of pioneer life. He settled on his farm when all around was a wilderness, but he has labored upon it and improved it until now he has a good cultivated farm. He was married in Miami County, Ohio, October 24, 1939, to Lodicia Hollingsworth, of Ohio. She was the daughter of Joel and Annie B. (Conwell) Hollingsworth, both natives of South Carolina. By this union they had six children - Huldah A., Anna B., Harvey H., Elmira C., Mary J. and Christopher C. (deceased). Mr. McCoy is a strong worker in the temperance cause, and he and wife are active members of the Society of Friends.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


W. F. NEWBY was the second of three children born to E. J. and Elizabeth A. (Trueblood) Newby, both natives of Washington County, Ind. The subject of this sketch was born in Monroe Township, Howard County, Ind., May 24, 1858, and received the foundation of his education in his native county. He completed his course of study at Spiceland Academy, Henry County, Ind., in 1880. He then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and is now located on a farm about one mile east of New London, where he is extensively engaged in farming. Being reared on a farm, he is well acquainted with the duties of an agriculturist, and has every evidence of becoming a wealthy farmer. He was married at New London, Ind., November 19, 1881, to Merab J. Shirley. She was born in New London February 17, 1864, and is the daughter of Dr. J. and Waity (Seaward) Shirley. They have bf this union one child, Frank C. Mr. Newby is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


ZIMRI NEWLIN, son of John and Ruth (Wordey) Newlin, was born in North Carolina October 15, 1820. When he was six years old, he removed with his parents to Parke County, Ind., where he was reared and educated. He then farmed for about six years, and in 1846 he located on his present farm in Howard County. This farm is situated a half mile east of New London, and is now finely improved. Mr. Newlin is one of the pioneers of Howard County, and has experienced many of the privations of pioneer life. He was married in Parke County, Ind., January 22, 1846, to Isabella Chapman, of England. She died August 16, 1870, in Howard County, Ind. By this marriage he had born to him eight children - Mary A., Martha, William, Ruth, Lucinda, Elvin, Cora A., and Ella I. Mr. Newlin was next married at New London, Ind., December 13, 1872, to Nancy A. Whitson. She was born in Darke County, Ohio, May 1, 1832. Mr. Newlin is a Republican, and he and family are members of the Friends' Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


JOSEPH PEACOCK was the eighth of nine children born to Asa and Dinah (Rich) Peacock, both natives of North Carolina. Asa Peacock was a soldier of the war of 1812. The subject of this sketch was born in Randolph County, N. C., August 5, 1826. When he was three years of age, he was taken by his parents to Wayne County, Ind., coming through by wagon and team, which made it a long and tedious journey. Joseph lived in Wayne County until he was thirteen years old, when he removed with his father to Grant County, Ind. It was there that our subject was reared to manhood and educated. He then purchased a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until 1865, when he sold and came to Howard County and purchased his present place of 195 acres. Mr. Peacock has one of the finest farms in the county. His dwelling is a large two-story brick, with eleven rooms, built at a cost of $4,000. His firm is well improved, has all necessary outbuildings, and is well stocked. Mr. Peacock was married in Grant County, Ind., February 21, 1849, to Caroline Jones, of North Carolina. By this union they have nine children - Mary, Ruth E., Jason, Miles, Lydia. A., Levi, William J., Adaline and Clara. Mr. Peacock is a member of the Republican party, and he and wife are active members of the Society of Friends.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


JOHN RODKEY (deceased), son of John and Esther (Christian) Rodkey, was a native of Pennsylvania, and was born January 15, 1826. When but six years of age, he removed with his mother to Miami County, Ohio, where he was reared and educated. In 1844, he came to Clinton County, Ind., and learned the tanner's trade, which he pursued four or five years. He then returned to Ohio and engaged in farming a short time, after which he returned to Indiana, and located in Howard County, having purchased a large tract of land. He improved this place until it was one of the finest farms in the county. Mr. Rodkey was a man of fine business qualities, and assisted greatly in developing Howard County. The large brick dwelling, surrounded by broad acres, still stands, to show that he was not idle, but improved all opportunities offered, to provide for his widow and loved ones, leaving an ample share for each of his children. He died September 29, 1875, since such time Perry, the eldest of his sons, has managed the estate. Mr. Rodkey was elected County Commissioner in 1868, and re-elected in 1871, holding the office at his death. He was married in Carroll County, Ind., June 4, 1853, to Eveline Fennell. She is a native of Virginia, and was born September 25, 1827. They had five children - Perry, Laura J., Mary C., Joseph M. and Jessie Selle. Mr. Rodkey was a member of the Masonic fraternity, and the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


SILAS STOUT, a pioneer of Howard County, is a native of Indiana, and was born in Orange County July 17, 1816. He was the fifth of eleven children born to John and Elizabeth (Moon) Stout. He was reared on a farm, attending school in winter, and assisting his father during the spring and summer. When he was well advanced in his studies, he entered the high school at Salem, Ind., and completed his course. He then returned to Orange County, where his time was mostly occupied in teaching, as well as in Parke County. He then located on a farm in his native county, where he remained until 1849, when he removed to Howard County, purchased eighty acres of land, and erected a cabin in the forest. He still lives on the same farm, which is now in a high state of cultivation, with good dwelling house and all necessary improvements. In 1870, he was elected County Surveyor, which position he held three terms, giving general satisfaction to the entire community. Mr. Stout is a trustworthy citizen, and has served as administrator to important estates, and as a guardian for some of the best families in the county. He was married December 22, 1841, in Orange County, Ind., to Martha King, born in Baltimore, August 15, 1819. By this union they have six children - Edwin, Mira, Elmit, Albert, Charles and Lewis E. He and family are members of the Society of Friends. Mr. Stout is in his sixty-seventh year, has never used glasses, and enjoys splendid health. He is a stanch member of the Republican party, and a worthy citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


BENJAMIN TUCKER was born in Miami County, Ohio, January 22, 1827, and was the fifth of thirteen children born to Jacob and Elizabeth (Kessler) Tucker. He was reared and educated in his native State, and in 1847 came to Howard County, and settled on eighty acres of unimproved land in Ervin Township. This he farmed and improved until 1867, when he sold it and purchased his present farm of sixty-eight and one-half acres. This he has improved and made a model farm. Mr. Tucker is an excellent farmer, a highly respected and good citizen. He was among the first teachers of Ervin Township, and has been school director for quite a number of years. He was married in Miami County, Ohio, April 30, 1845, to Mary A. Sence, a native of Pennsylvania. By this union they had three children-Newton, Jasper, and Erasmus C. His wife died in Howard County, February 8, 1860, and Mr. Tucker's second marriage was March 13, 1861, at New London, to Miss Mary E. Newlin. She was born October 18, 1832, in Orange County, Ind. They had three children by this union - Addison, William and Elwin. Mr. Tucker has been a member of the Society of Friends from infancy. In politics he is a Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


E. C. TUCKER is the youngest of three children born to Benjamin and Mary (Sence) Tucker, the former is a native of Ohio, the latter of Pennsylvania. Our subject is a native of Indiana, and was born in Ervin Township, Howard County, April 11, 1855; here he lived until he was fifteen, when his father moved to Monroe Township, near New London. Here Mr. Tucker was educated, completing his studies in New London in 1878. For the next three years, he was employed as a clerk in New London, at the end of which time be bought one-half interest in the store of Newlin & Beeks, and the business is now conducted under the firm name of Newlin & Tucker. They keep a stock of drugs and groceries to the amount of $2,000, and are doing u thriving business of $8,000 per annum. Mr. Tucker is a man of fine business qualifications, and with his polite and agreeable manners would succeed in any locality. He has just completed a handsome dwelling, with all modern improvements and conveniences, making it one of the most desirable homes in the town. He was married at New London, Ind., December 14, 1881, to Miss Susan J. Snider, who was born in St. Clair County, Mo., February 25, 1859. She is the daughter of Pearson and Helena (Barkalow) Snider, both of English descent. Mr. Snider is a native of New Jersey, and his wife of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker have one child, Fay Ethel, born October 3, 1852. Mr. Tucker is a member of the I. O. O. F., and in politics he is a Republican.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


HORACE W. TUCKER, son of George W. and Sarah M. (Huntsman) Tucker, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 5, 1850. His father was a native of Massachusetts and his mother of Ohio. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in Cincinnati. When he was nineteen years of age, he moved to Miami County, Ind., where he engaged in farming for eighteen months. He then spent several months in Sangamon County, Ill., on a farm, after which he returned to Miami County, and later he came to Howard, where he purchased a farm of 117 acres. Here he farmed for eight years, and then purchased the place on which he now lives, thirty-two and a half acres, in the suburbs of New London, making in all 140 acres of land, all well improved. He was married in Marion County, Ind., April 2, 1873, to Miss Sarah M. Carr. She was born in Marion Countv March 23, 1853. By this union they have two children Lena B. and Carry A. Mr. Tucker is a Republican in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Monroe Township


Deb Murray