JACOB ARHEART was born October 12, 1818, in York County, Penn.; is the son of David and Mary (Hoke) Arheart, of Pennsylvania, and of German descent; his parents came to Ohio about the year 1832, and purchased a farm, on which they lived until their death in 1811 and 1843, respectively. Jacob Arheart was reared on the farm, and at the age of sixteen began the shoe-maker's trade. He was married, April 25, 1839, to Miss Lucinda Evers, daughter of David and Rachel (McDaniel) Evers, natives of Maryland, and of German and Irish descent. Mr. Arheart continued to work at his trade, and to farm in Ohio, until 1844, when he came to Burlington, Rush County, Ind., where he purchased property, and worked eleven years at his trade; he then sold out, and moved to Howard County, locating in Union Township, where he purchased a farm of eighty acres, which he began to clear and improve. By close industry and diligence, he has been able to clear out a beautiful home for his family, with all the necessary improvements. Mr. and Mrs. Arheart have had seven children, four of whom are living - Maud, Mary M., William H. and Elizabeth L. J., all of whom are married. Mr. Arheart is an active politician in the Democratic ranks, and cast his first ballot for Martin Van Buren in 1839, and Mrs. Arheart is an active member of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


J. W. ARMFIELD is the third of a family of six children born to Calvin C. and Peniah E. (Orsborn) Armfield, natives of Guilford County, N. C., and of English descent. Calvin C. Armfield came to Henry County, Ind., in 1849, and there remained about eight years, when he came to Howard County and purchased a farm of forty acres, near Greentown, in Liberty Township. He has added to this, and now has a good home of eighty acres. J. W. Armfield was born October 3, 1850, and spent his youth upon the farm. He was married, August 9, 1873, to Miss Samantha O. Chandler, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hiott) Chandler, natives of Ohio and North Carolina. They have six children - Lydia B., Leonard D., Lele Pearl, Lorena C., Lawrence W. and Leo. Mr. Armfield is at present located on a farm of 220 acres, near Centre Post Office, Howard County; he has all necessary improvements to make home pleasant, and deals extensively in hogs and cattle, shipping to Chicago, Cincinnati and Indianapolis. Mr. Armfield is an active politician, voting with the Republican party, and his wife is identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is one of its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM BAGWELL, one of the prominent farmers and old pioneers of Union Township, settled in Howard County in March, 1847, when the land was in its native state; he is the third son of six children born to Levi and Elizabeth (Garris) Bagwell, natives of North Carolina, and of French and Irish descent. William Bagwell was married, January 13,1832, to Sarah Privett, daughter of Wiley and Nancy (Crabb) Privett, natives of North Carolina and Virginia, and of Irish and French descent. Mr. and Mrs. Bagwell have had five children - Jane A., Nancy M., Wiley M., James E. and George W., three of whom are yet living. Mr. Bagwell is a prominent citizen, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. George W., the youngest of the children, was born May 23, 1853. He was reared on his father's farm, and received a good common school education. He is an industrious young man, is a genial gentleman, and a worthy member of the United Brethren Church. Wiley M., the third child, was a soldier in the late rebellion, and was killed at Baken Creek, Ky., by the enemy, while attempting to join his regiment.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM CARR was the fourth of seven children born to William and Susan Carr, natives of Ohio, and of English descent; his father came to Richmond, Wayne Co., Ind., about the year 1838, and later located in Rush County, where he engaged in the milling business, owning a combined saw and flouring mill on Ben Davis Creek; he subsequently made sale of this mill, and purchased a farm, and built a mill, which he continued to operate until 1854, when he sold out, and came to Howard County. He purchased a farm of 100 acres in Union Township, and also bought a mill. He worked in the mill a short time, and then exchanged it for a farm north of Jerome, upon which he lived until his death in September, 1880. The subject of this sketch was born in Rush County, Ind., August 19, 1841; he spent his youth on the farm, and was married, March 12, 1568, to Miss Alwilda Kates, daughter of John and Rachel (Pierce) Kates, natives of Tennessee, and of English descent. Mr. Carr has continued farming since his marriage, and is at present located on a well-improved farm of sixty acres, near Jerome. Mr. and Mrs. Carr have had four children - Dora E., Charley, Erley and John, all of whom are living. Mr. Carr is a prominent citizen, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM CHAPPELL was born in Henry County, Ind., January 14, 1832, and the son of Joshua and Sarah (Carter) Chappell, natives of North Carolina; his parents had eleven children, two of whom, Mary and Malinda, were born in North Carolina; his father removed to Oxford, Butler County, Ohio, where he worked as a farm hand; he was a brick mason by trade, and assisted in building the first brick house erected in Oxford. In 1820, he removed to Henry County, Ind., locating on a rented farm, but in 1823 he purchased a farm of eighty acres on which he lived five years; he then sold his farm and removed to New Castle, where he engaged in the grocery business seven years, when he sold his stock and engaged in the hotel business for ten years. During this time, he was Deputy Sheriff under Tabor McKee, after which he was elected Sheriff and served two successive terms. He was a prominent Republican. After his second term expired, he located on a farm in the same county and remained until 1863, when he sold out and purchased 290 acres of land in Madison County, and there lived until his death in 1872; his wife died the following year. While they lived in Henry County they had nine children - William, John E., Anna, Joshua, Matilda, Clement, Elizabeth, Harriet and Charles D. Mr. and Mrs. Chappell were among the most active members of the New-Light Church. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and received a common school education. He was married, in 1852, to Helen Carter, daughter of John and Hannah (Quick) Carter. Mr. Chappell, after his marriage, remained on the farm with his father until 1858, when he removed to Howard County, locating on forty acres of land on the banks of the Wild Cat, in Union Township; here he began to clear the land and prepare a home for his family; he endured many of the privations of pioneer life, and by economy and industry he has been able to add to his home fifteen acres more, and now has a fine farm of fifty-five acres, well improved, making a beautiful home. Mr. Chappell was a prominent member of the Union League during the war. He is an active member of the I. O. O. F., and was Secretary of the Grange organization. He is an active worker in the Republican party and has held offices of honor and trust; he is now serving his second term as Justice of of Peace of Union Township. Mrs. Ellen Chappell is identified with the U. B. Church, and is one of its most active members. While not blessed with children of their own, they have reared many children, giving them good homes.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


LEMUEL L. COHEE was born in Kent County, Del., March 17, 1845, and is the son of Hinson G. and Anna (Longfellow) Cohee, of Delaware; his parents were both members of the Baptist Church. Lemuel, on account of the early death of his parents, lived with his brother Jacob until he was twelve years of age, after which he lived six years with his brother-in-law, John Cook. In 1863, he came to Rush County, Ind., where he remained two years, and then came to Howard County and engaged as a farm hand in Union Township at $16 per month wages. In January, 1869, he was married to Mary Ann Flemming, daughter of Jesse and Margaret (Carr) Flemming, of Howard County. This union was blessed with three children. Mrs. Cohee died May 26, 1874, a prominent member of the Christian Church. Mr. Cohee was next married, August 21, 1875, to Serilda J. Melton, born November 14, 1856, daughter of Jacob R. Melton, a native of Indiana, and Martha (Downey) Melton, born in Kentucky. They were of English and German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Cohee have had four children, two of whom are living - Emma May, born July 6, 1866, and Alvin M., born October 18, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Cohee are both prominent members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


LEVI CONNER, M. D., was born in Tipton County, Ind., March 25, 1850, and is the son of William and Louisa A. (Plummer) Conner; his father was a native of Meigs County, Ohio, and of Irish descent; his mother was born in Marion County, Ind., of German parents. William Conner settled in Tipton County in the year 1847, and there entered eighty acres in Wild Cat Township, where he cleared a home from the forest for himself and family. Mr. and Mrs. Conner had four children - Levi, Elizabeth (deceased), Nathan and William J. (deceased). Mr. Conner died June 9, 1855, and three years later Mrs. Conner was married to M. L. Bolden. Levi Conner, for two years after his father's death, resided with his guardian, Nathan Smith, after which he spent a year in Wisconsin with his mother and step-father; he then lived a year with his uncle, Zimri Plummer, in Wayne County, Ind., after which, his mother having returned from Wisconsin, he resided with her in Tipton County, until January, 1863. He then made his home with Dr. James A. Ellis, of Union Township, Howard County, for five years, after which he attended school at Kokomo, and later at New London. He then attended the National Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, where he graduated in 1872. He taught school at Fairfield n short time, and at the close of his school teaching he began the study of medicine in the office of Dr. J. A. Ellis. He, in 1873, attended one course of lectures in the Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati, after which he returned and began his practice in partnership with Dr. Ellis. Shortly after this, he was married to Miss Emma Maris, daughter of George and Martha (Braxtan) Maris, of Kokomo. This union was blest with two children - Josephine and William G. (deceased). Mrs. Conner died November 20, 1878, after which Mr. Conner, on account of failing health, discontinued his practice for a year and in the fall of 1879 entered the Medical College at Cincinnati, graduating in March, 1880; returned home and resumed his practice, and in January, 1881, he was again married to Emma Shrader, daughter of William and Rebecca (Pyle) Shrader, of Union Township, this county. This union was blessed with one child, Bertha. Dr. Conner is a member of the Knights of Pythias, I. O. O. F. and Masonic fraternity.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JAMES CURLES was born January 13, 1839, and is the son of Samuel and Hannah A. (Brown) Curles natives of New Jersey, and of English descent. Mr. Samuel Curles located in Brown County, Ohio, about the year 1818, and was there married to Hannah A. Brown, daughter of William Brown, of New Jersey, and of English descent. By this marriage, he obtained a small farm, which he shortly increased to 125 acres, and in 1857 added 156 acres more, making in all 275 acres, on which he still lives. Mr. and Mrs. Curles had thirteen children - William, Nancy J., Asher, James, Elizabeth, Mahala, Joseph, Marion, Sarah F., Randolph, Hannah A., Mary and John, seven of whom are yet living. Mrs. Curles died in the fall of 1862, a prominent member of the United Brethren Church. Mr. Curles having the care of a large family, married, in the spring of 1864, Mary Fedrick, to which union were added eleven children, all of whom are now living. Mr. Curles has been an active politician, voting in an early day with the Whig party, and subsequently with the Republican. He is a member of the United Brethren Church, and his wife is identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. James Curles was reared on the farm, and at the age of eighteen, attended the National Normal School of Lebanon, Ohio, for one term, after which he spent two years on the farm. He subsequently returned to Lebanon, and later taught several terms of school. On New Year's Day, 1862, he enlisted, in Company I, Sixtieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, or the one year regiment, and was mustered in at Fayetteville. He was placed under Gen. J. C. Fremont, and was ordered to follow closely Gen. Jackson, and after about seven days' forced march, arrived at Franklin, Va. Here he was taken sick, and lay in his tent about four weeks, and was then taken to New Creek Station, where he was placed in a hospital. He remained there until July 4, when he was taken home to Ohio, by his father. The 1st of October, he went to Columbus, Ohio, and reported, and was sent to re-join his regiment, which was stationed at Chicago, on account of the Indian trouble, but this subsiding they were discharged. Mr. Curles, in December, 1562, engaged in the mercantile business in Fayetteville, which he continued one year, and April 16, 1863, he was married to Clorinda Covalt, daughter of Cheniah and Deborah (Jones) Covalt, of Ohio, and of English descent. The following winter, he disposed of his stock, and taught in Fayetteville, and the fall of 1864, in company with his father-in-law, came to Union Township, Howard County, and engaged in business at West Liberty, with a stock of $3,000, under the firm name of Covalt & Curles. After remaining there ten years, they traded their store for sixty acres, two miles southeast of West Liberty, and Mr. Curles lived on this farm until the fall of 1881, when he purchased a lot of five acres, upon which he built one of the finest residences in the village. Mr. Curles, upon the death of his father-in-law, in the fall of 1882, again engaged in the goods business, in which he has now a large and increasing trade. Mr. and Mrs. Curles have had five children, three of whom - Stella D., Demma M. and Eddison D. are still living. Mr. Curles is an active politician in the Republican party, and cast his first vote for President Lincoln, in 1860. He and his wife are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are among its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JOHN A. CUTHRELL was born November 14, 1841, and is the son of Joseph B. Cuthrell, a native of North Carolina; his father located in Rush County, and was there married in 1838 to Anna Bingaman, daughter of Allen and Bethanal Bingaman. They remained upon a farm in Rush County until 1848, when they came to Howard County, and entered 120 acres of land in Union Township. Mr. Cuthrell then returned with his family to Rush County, where they remained two years, after which they returned to Union Township, located on the land he had entered, built a log cabin, and began foresting out a home. By industry and economy, he was able to add sixty-six acres to this, making in all 186 acres of choice land. Mr. and Mrs. Cuthrell had seven children John A., Mary M., Samantha A., Elizabeth H., Sarah J., Anna M. and Joseph F., four of whom are living. Mr. Cuthrell was an active politician, voting with the Whig party and afterward with the Republican, until his death in 1876. He and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received a common school education. He was married to Anna Quick, daughter of John S. and Sydney (Conner) Quick, of Howard County. Shortly after his marriage, he went upon his father's firm and there remained until the winter of 1863, when he purchased thirty-five acres joining his father's land. By industry and diligence, he has since been able to add 115 acres more, making 150 acres of fine farm land. Mr. and Mrs. Cuthrell have had five children - Alwilda, Joseph F., John W., Jessey D. and Anna, four of whom are living. Mrs. Cuthrell died February 20, 1878. She was identified with the Christian Church. Mr. Cuthrell was next married, June 24, 1878, to Miss Mary J. Knox, daughter of William and Clorinda (Howard) Knox, of Union Township. Mr. Cuthrell has been a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity since 1864; he is an active worker in the Republican ranks, and was a member of the Union League during the war. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Cuthrell was drafted in November, 1864, and went to Kokomo, where he remained overnight in the barracks, but on examination the next morning was found unable for duty, and was exempted.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


ROBERT FELLOW was born in Wayne County, N. C., February 2, 1828, and is the son of John and Abigail (Coleman) Fellow, natives of North Carolina and of English descent. John Fellow came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1832, and entered a farm of eighty acres, which he began to clear and cultivate, being one of the early pioneers of that county. In 1852, he came to Howard County and purchased 115 acres of land in Union Township, to which he subsequently added forty acres. Robert spent his boyhood days on his father's farm, and at the age of twenty-four was married to Elizabeth Hubbard, daughter of Joseph and Charity (Fodrey) Hubbard, of Randolph County, Ind. This union was blessed with three children - Mary Miller, born July 15, 1856; James Riley, born February 10, 1858, died January 20, 1875; and William Harvey, born May 1, 1861. Mrs. Fellow died August 2, 1874, and Mr. Fellow married March 4, 1876, Rhoda George, born April 28,1838, and daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth (Jessip) George, of English descent. Mr. Fellow is at present the owner of thirty-five acres of good farm land three miles southeast of Jerome. Mr. Fellow and wife are identified with the New Hope Friends' Church, and are among its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


ORANGE T. FLOREA was born May 13, 1847, in Rush County, Ind., and spent his early life on the farm; he obtained a good common school education, and was married, August 31, 1871, to Miss Mattie Smith, daughter of Ebenezer Smith, a native of South Carolina, born June 14, 1804, and Mary A. (Hadden) Smith, born in South Carolina in 1809. Mrs. Florea's parents were married June 12, 1828, and located in Rush County in May, 1834. This union was blessed with thirteen children, two of whom died in infancy. In 1829, Mr. Smith united with the church, and was always one of its most active and happy members until his death. In 1871, Mrs. Smith came with her children to this county, and located on a farm in Union Township. Orange T. first obtained land in Grant County, and subsequently purchased ninety-six acres in this county, where he now resides. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1857, and his wife united with the same church in 1872. Mr. Florea's great-grandfather's name was Albert Florea; he married Miss Charity Baker, and they had ten children - Rebecca, Elizabeth, Charity, Nancy, Mary, Ruth and Rachel (twins), John, Isaac and Joshua. Joshua Florea, our subject's grandfather, was born October 14, 1787; was a native of Kentucky, and of German and French descent. He was married, August 3, 1812, to Mary Spurgin, born in Kentucky December 20, 1794, and was of English descent. This union was blessed with the following children - John, born July 11, 1813; Cyrus, born June 20, 1819; William Riley, born November 8, 1821; Joseph and Josiah (twins), born October 30, 1823; Jordon, born November 26, 1825, died October 3, 1826; and Morris, born September 4, 1830, died June 18, 1831. Joshua Florea was a soldier in the war of 1812; he died February 28, 1867, and his wife survived him over two years, and died October 6, 1869. Cyrus Florea, the father of our subject, was married January 13, 1841, to Miss Almira Keever, born August 18, 1822. They had six children - Orange T., born May 13, 1847; Mary J., born October 19, 1848; Josh E., born May 17, 1850; Sarah E., born September 15, 1852, died July 1, 1854; Joseph Dale, born July 5, 1854, died October 9, 1860; Fiorella, A., born December 24, 1856. Mr. Florea is an industrious farmer, an excellent gentleman, and a worthy citizen in the community in which he resides.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM GILSON was born in Rush County, Ind., January 20, 1828, and is the son of David and Margaret (Boon) Gilson, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, and of Irish and German descent; his father was born in 1794, and came to Rush County about the year 1821. He entered forty acr6s of land two miles north of Rushville, and subsequently added forty acres to this; he afterward sold this tract, and purchased 160 acres one mile further north, upon which he is now living, enjoying the fruits of a successful life; he was an early pioneer of Rush County, and he and wife are prominent members of the Baptist Church. William Gilson was reared upon his father's farm, and received the advantages of a common school education; he engaged in the saw mill business for five years, and in 1861 he sold his mill, came to Howard County, and purchased a farm of sixty acres, two miles northeast of Jerome; he returned to Rush County, and was married to Ivy A. David, born July 27, 1837, daughter of Jacob and Catharine (Kiplinger) David, of German descent. Shortly after his marriage, he located on his farm in Howard County, where he lived until August, 1874, when he exchanged this farm for 110 acres two miles southeast of Jerome, upon which he is still living. Mr. Gilson is an active politician in the Democratic ranks, but cast his first ballot for Zachariah Taylor in 1848. He was Treasurer of the Grange movement, and his wife is identified with the Christian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Gilson have had the following children: Margaret C., born May 28, 1863, died August 25, 1864; David E., born February 27, 1865; Jacob B., born April 26, 1867; and John F., born August 30, 1869, and died August 21, 1871.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM HANCOOK, born November 16, 1828, in Delaware, is the eldest of three sons born to John and Claracy (Billings) Hancook; his father died in 1834, and in 1835 his mother moved with her family to Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. There his mother was married to William Truitt, after which, she and her husband located in Raysville, Henry County, Ind. Mr. Truitt rented a farm, and our subject worked until 1839, when he removed with his parents to Rush County, where he received a limited education in the common schools. In 1849, he was married to Sarah J. Gorman, daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Corbin) Gorman. Her father worked at the carpenter's trade until 1822, when he was married, and began farming. Mr. Hancook, soon after his marriage, purchased forty acres of land, where he remained until 1852, when he removed to Howard County, and purchased 120 acres of land in Union Township. Here he erected a log cabin, and began to clear from the forest a home. He still resides here, and now owns eighty acres of as beautiful land as can be found in Union Township. Mr. and Mrs. H., have five children - John W., Hannah A., William D., Mary E. and Jessie F. Mr. Hancook has been an active member of the Masonic order since 1864, and his wife has received the degree bestowed upon her sex. He is an active worker in the Republican party, and has held offices of honor and trust. He is at present Trustee of Union Township, serving his third term. Mr. and Mrs. Hancook are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are among its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JOHN J. HANCOOK is the second son of the three children of John and Claracy (Billings) Hancook. He was born February 1, 1831, and was reared upon a farm, receiving a common school education. At the age of twenty-two, he was married to Marilda J. Simpson, daughter of Solomon and Lovicia (Conaway) Simpson, natives of Indiana. Seven years after his marriage, he came to Howard County, and purchased forty acres in Union Township; he has since added to this until now he has a good farm of eighty acres, with all necessary improvements to make home pleasant. Mrs. Hancook was a member of the Christian Church, and died in January, 1865, leaving three children - Sarah L. Tolle, born October 14, 1854; J. J. and J. M., born July 22, 1858. Mr. Hancook was next married, April 29, 1867, to Samantha A. Ballenger, widow of Robert Ballenger, who was captured at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., and died in the Andersonville Prison. Mr. and Mrs. Ballenger had one child - Anna E. Shockley. To Mr. and Mrs. Hancook was born one child - William B., March 5, 1572. Mrs. Hancook is the daughter of Joseph and Anna (Bingaman) Cuthrell, natives of North Carolina and Indiana. Mr. Hancook is an active politician in the Republican ranks, and has held the office of Assessor of Union Township four successive terms. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM HATFIELD, farmer, was born in Franklin County, Ind., October 8, 1822, and is the son of John and Drusilla (Blackburn) Hatfield. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, his mother of Kentucky. John Hatfield came to Rush County, Ind., about the year, 1828 and entered 160 acres of land one and a half miles west of Andersonville, where he made for himself a good home. Our subject was reared upon a farm, and received a limited education from the common schools. At his majority, he was married to Miss Mary E. Jones, born April 14, 1826, daughter of George and Sarah (Summers) Jones, of Welsh and English descent. Four years after his marriage; Mr. Hatfield came to Howard County and entered 160 acres of land, near Sycamore Corner, in Jackson Township. After remaining there seven years, he sold his claim and moved to Liberty Township, where he purchased eighty acres one mile east of Greentown. In this township, he lived six years, and then bought 120 acres, one mile northeast of Jerome, upon which he is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield, have had six children - Isabel J. (Brown), born November 11, 1846; Sarah E. (Benson), born May 16, 1851; Joseph H., born August 27, 1853; L. D., born February 20, 1859; William A., born July 12, 1863, and Luella, born October 21, 1866. Mr. Hatfield is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, and his wife is identified with the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JACOB JESSUP is the eighth of nine children born to John and Mary (Smith) Jessup, natives of Pennsylvania. He was born June 7, 1823, in Hamilton County, Ohio, and came with his parents to Parke County, Ind., the same year, where he spent his boyhood on the farm and attended school in the pioneer schoolhouse. He was married, March 16, 1848, to Nancy T. Sparks, born May 25, 1831, in Indiana. He fell heir to the old homestead, upon which he lived four years, when he sold it and moved to this county in the fall of 1852, locating in Union Township, where he at present resides. This farm he has cleared and cultivated until now he has one of the best farms in the township, with all the modern improvements. Mr. and Mrs. Jessup, had ten children - Elizabeth, Mary C., Minerva, Emily (deceased), Anna E., Sarah E., Lydia I., John W., Amanda and Florence (deceased). Mrs. Jessup was an active member of the Christian Church until her death, January 19, 1866. Mr. Jessup was married in April, 1372, to Hester A. Sprunce. They have one child - Gertrude. Mr. Jessup has been identified with the Christian Church for over forty years. He was Chaplain of the Grange organization, and is an active politician in the Democratic party. Mr. Jessup, while in Parke County, came in conflict with a catamount, and after a struggle came off conqueror.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JAMES J. LORD was born in Kent County, Del., October 11, 1828, and was the son of Andrew and Letitia (Reed) Lord. Andrew Lord, of English descent, was a farmer of Delaware. He was married to Letitia Reed, of Scotch-Irish descent, in 1814. They had ten children William H., Sarah A, Catherine A., Jeanette, Mary A., Jobn A., Letta J., James J., Jonathan L. and Richard T. C.; six now living. Andrew Lord died in 1835, and two years later his wife and family moved to Belmont County, Ohio, where they remained two years, when they located in Butler County, Ohio. Two years later, they removed to Rush County, Ind., where she remained until her death, September 20, 1875. James J. Lord was reared on a farm, having the advantage of the common school, but, under necessities of work, having with older brother the care of the family, he received but a limited education. He was married in Rush County, Ind., October 11, 1855, to Miss Sarah Billing, daughter of Andrew and Harriet (Wyat) Billing, of Delaware. He lived in Rush County until 1860, when he removed to Howard County, Ind., and purchased an eighty-acre farm on the banks of Wild Cat, near the village of West Liberty. By hard work he succeeded in clearing out a home, and by diligence and economy has added 100 acres more, making him a farm of 180 acres of well-improved land. Mr. and Mrs. Lord have had seven children - William A., Joseph L., Francis O., Lilly J., Annie E., Thomas E. and Harriet L., five now living. Mr. Lord was a prominent member of the Union League during the dark hours of his country; he holds the position of Worthy Chief in the Good Templar Lodge, and has occupied a prominent membership in the Grange movement, holding the office of Worthy Master. Mr. Lord is an active politician, voting with the Republican party since 1849, and he and wife are among the most active members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JOHN MANN is the eldest of seven children born to Joseph and Rebecca (Gibson) Mann, natives of Virginia; he was born August 1, 1822, in Monroe County, Va., where he remained until he was fourteen, and in 1837 removed with his parents to Henry County, Ind. Here he worked out by the month until he was twenty-eight years of age, and in 1850 came to this county, locating on eighty acres he had purchased a few years before. He has added to this until now he has a good farm of 164 acres, with all the modern improvements, all of which he has accumulated by hard labor and economy. Mr. Mann was married, December 7, 1848, to Barbara Fatic, a native of Virginia. She was the fifth child born to Andrew and Barbara (Thumma) Fatic, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Mann have two children - Christina Brown, born August 6, 1850, and William F., born July 16, 1852. Mr. M. is at present County Surveyor. Mr. Mann attended school only eighteen months during his life, and has taken a pride in giving his children a good education. He was at one time Township Trustee, and he and wife have been active members of the Christian Church over twenty years; he was formerly a member of the Democratic party, but since 1856 has been an active worker in the Republican ranks.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JACOB R. MELTON, farmer, was born in Rush County, Ind., March 6, 1882, and is the son of Hiram F. and Catharine (Rosier) Melton, of German and English descent. Hiram F. came to Rush County in an early day with his father, who was one of the old pioneers of that county. Jacob R. was reared upon his father's farm and attended the common schools, but owing to the necessity of work received but a limited education; he was married to Miss Martha Downey, born August 25, 1830, daughter of James and Rebecca (Hinton) Downey, natives of Kentucky, and of English descent. This union has been blessed with three children - James F., born November 5, 1855; Serelda J. Cohee, born November 14, 1857; and John W., born August 18, 1863. They also have one adopted daughter, Mary R. Downey, born January 20, 1872. Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Melton purchased a farm of sixty acres in Union Township, Howard County, one and one-fourth miles northeast of Jerome, and in January 1559, located on this farm, where he has since lived, and by industry and economy has been able to add eighty acres, making a good farm of 140 acres. Mr. Melton was mustered into service in November, 1864, was sent to Louisville, and placed under Capt. John W. Aughe, of Company E, Fortieth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; he was transferred to Nashville, thence to Columbia, Tenn., and was engaged in the battle of Franklin, Tenn., between Hood and Thomas. His regiment then retreated to Nashville to fortify and prepare for the battle of Nashville. From Nashville the troops were marched to Lexington, Ala., thence to Huntsville, Ale., where they remained until March, 1865, when they were sent to Blue Springs, East Tenn.; here they remained until the 1st of May, when they were sent to Johnsonville, Tenn., and took passage on a steamer for New Orleans. Thence they went to Texas, and while at San Antonio, Mr. Melton was discharged October 25, 1865. Mr. Melton is an industrious farmer, and was a prominent member of the Grange movement, having held the position of Steward of that organization. Mrs. Melton is identified with the Christian Church, and is one of its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


SOLOMON B. MILLER, a prominent farmer of Union Township, was born in Darke County, Ohio, February 14, 1841, and is the son of John and Sarah (Brodrick) Miller, of German and English descent. Solomon B. was reared on a farm and received the benefit of a common school education; he came to Howard County in the spring of 1861, in company with his father, who at this time purchased eighty acres of land one mile northeast of Jerome, in Union Township. Mr. Miller enlisted in August, 1861, in Company D, Thirty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Indianapolis. He was sent to Munfordsville, Ky., where he remained about nine months. He engaged in battle at Munfordsville, and was subsequently discharged on account of ill health; he returned home and again enlisted in the fall of 1863, in the Eleventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Cavalry, under Col. Steward; he was sent to Nashville, Tenn., and from there to Bellfont, Ala., and engaged in battle at Huntsville. After this, he was sent with a re-enforcement to Gen. Thomas, at Columbia, Tenn., and was engaged with Gen. Thomas all through his encounters with Hood, until the disbanding of Hood's army; he was then taken to Eastport, Miss., and from there to St. Louis; thence to Western Kansas, and from there he wits transferred to Leavenworth, Kan., where he was mustered out September 11, 1865; he then returned home and resumed farming; he was married, March 17, 1876, to Miss Sarah E. Riege, born April 4, 1852, daughter of William and Lydia J. (Jones) Riege, of Grant County, Ind. This union has been blessed with two children, John W., born May 22, 1877, Henry, born September 30, 1879. Mr. Miller is at present the owner of fifty-two acres of land one-half mile east of Jerome; he is s successful farmer, and a prominent and worthy citizen. In the spring of 1875, he became a member of the Masonic fraternity; is also an active politician, voting the Republican ticket, and cast his first Presidential vote in 1868 for U. S. Grant.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


BARCLAY MOON is the eldest son of ten children born to Jesse and Phebe (Hocket) Moon, of English descent. He was born in Clinton County, Ohio, April 10, 1532, and in early life received an education which enabled him to become a prominent teacher, having taught twenty schools in Howard and Grant Counties. Mr. Moon was married, October 20, 1858, to Miss Ann Peacock, daughter of William and Phebe Peacock, of Grant County, natives of North Carolina. This union has been blessed with four children - Alpheus, Barnabas, Belinda and Esli, three of whom are living. Mr. Moon was Secretary of the Grange organization, and is a member of the New Hope Friends' Church; his wife (now deceased) was also a member of the same denomination. Mr. Moon is at present living on a farm near Jerome, and deals extensively in thoroughbred poland-China hogs; he takes pride in educating his children, and his eldest son, Alpheus W., is one of the most able teachers of the county, and is at present taking a collegiate course in the State University at Bloomington, Ind. Mr. Moon participates in handling the Plymouth Rock poultry, and has shipped from Kansas to Pennsylvania and has received orders for 119 in sixteen days.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM NASH was born in Adams County, Ohio, November 20, 1818, and is the son of Jesse and Mary (Pike) Nash, of English and German descent; his parents were married March 7, 1816, in Adams County, Ohio, where they remained about thirteen years. Jesse Nash then removed with his family to Hamilton County, Ohio, where he worked in a boat yard at $1 per day, for one year; he then moved to Brown County and lived three years on a rented farm, when he purchased sixty-five acres, near Woodville, Ohio, on which he lived until the year 1847; he then sold his land and removed to Howard County, purchasing 150 acres in Union Township, near West Liberty. Here he remained until his death, which occurred, November 20, 1856, having survived his wife six years. Mr. and Mrs. Nash were members of the Baptist Church, in good standing. Mr. William Nash worked at home with his father until he was twenty-six years old, receiving a limited education in the common schools; he then engaged as a farm hand, at from $9 to $13 per month; he was married, September 20,1847, to Lucinda Brandenburg, daughter of William and Mary Brandenburg, of Maryland, and of German descent. Mr. Nash, about four years after his marriage, purchased seventy-five acres of land in Union Township, where he still lives, having since added twenty-eight acres of good land to his farm. Mr. and Mrs. Nash have bad five children - Evermont, Wilford, Ann, Caroline and William B., four of whom are living. Mrs. Nash died January 21, 1861, a true Christian, and member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Nash was next married September 5, 1862, to Rachel A. Harper, daughter of John and Jemima (Williams) Harper, of English and Irish descent. To this union have been born six children - Martha A., Henry T., Emma F., John F., Lucretia and Stella, four of whom are yet living. Mr. Nash was a prominent member of the Grange movement, and he and his wife are identified with the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JOSIAH REED was born October 27, 1822, in Preble County, Ohio, and is the son of James and Sarah (Curry) Reed, of Pennsylvania, and of Irish descent; his father located in Preble County, Ohio, in 1816, and purchased eighty acres of land, upon which he remained until his death, in 1826; his wife died in 1855; his parents had ten children, two of whom, Josiah and Mary A., are yet living. Our subject was reared upon a farm, where he received a common school education, and at the age of eighteen began teaming in Cincinnati; this he continued until September 15, 1844, when he was married to Lucinda King, born in 1826, and daughter of John and Elizabeth (Price) King, natives of Tennessee and of English descent. Shortly after his marriage, he located in Wayne County, near Richmond, where he farmed five years; he then located in Gettysburgh, Ohio, and subsequently made sale of his personal property, and engaged in the mercantile business for eighteen months, after which he began the cooper trade. In 1860, he came to Huntington County, Ind., and purchased fifty-two acres of land, upon which he remained until 1877, when he moved to Kansas. Two months later, he returned to Indiana and purchased eighty acres of land in Howard County, two miles northeast of West Liberty, where he still lives. Mr. Reed was a member of the Grange movement; is also an active politician in the Republican ranks, having cast his first ballot for Henry Clay in 1844, and Mrs. Reed is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have had the following children: Sarsh E. Coolman, born December 1, 1845; Cythia J., born April 5, 1847; William J., born March 27, 1851, died February 15, 1852; Samuel A., born May 26, 1853, died March 27, 1855; David A., born March 28, 1855; Emma A. Tolle, born March 5, 1562, and Leander, born July 15, 1864.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


ISAAC REED, County Commissioner, was born in Kent County, Del., July 22, 1826, and is the son of William L. and Rachel (Cohee) Reed, natives of Delaware, and of Irish and English descent; his parents had eight children - Isaac, Lydia Brown, William C., Hannah Allen, Sarah, Martha, Mary and Elizabeth Conway, five of whom are yet living. Mr. Reed located in Rush County, Ind., in 1836; he and his wife were identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Isaac spent his early life on a farm, and was married, December 27, 1849, to Miss Hannah Osburn, born April 19, 1833, daughter of Harmon and Elisa J. (Packard) Osburn, natives of Ohio and Delaware. Mr. Reed came to Howard County in 1853, and purchased 160 acres of land in Union Township, which he began to clear and make for himself and family a home. By industry and economy, he has been able to add seventy-six acres more, and now has a comfortable home. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have had twelve children - Sarah E. Powell, born November 2, 1850; William W., born November 10, 1851; Rachel A. Elmore, born June 1,1854; Harmon O., born May 17, 1856; John H., born September 17, 1858; Benjamin E., born August 5, 1860, died December 5, 1861 ; Mary J. Frasier, born June 25, 1862; Oliver L., born April 23, 1864; Laura. B., born June 19, 1866, died September 18, 1866; Edith L., born September 7,1869; Frank A., born January 24, 1874, and Etta P., born August 3, 1875. Mr. Reed is an active working politician, voting with the Republican party; he cast his first ballot for Franklin Pierce in 1848; he held the office of Township Clerk for two years, and has served four terms as Township Trustee ; he is now holding the office of County Commissioner, this being his second term, and he and wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JOHN ROE was born November 6, 1835, and is the son of Harrison and Sarah (Street) Roe, natives of Ohio, and of German and English descent. Harrison Roe was married in Indiana, about the year 1832, and soon purchased a farm of 160 acres in Wayne County, where he lived two years, and then sold out and moved to Henry County, where he purchased a farm of 240 acres, and here remained about fifteen pears, when he sold his farm and located on 160 acres in Wayne County, near Hagerstown. After living there about four years, he sold out and moved to Grant County, where he purchased 160 acres of land near Point Isabel, on which he lived five years, when he sold out and purchased 135 acres in Delaware County, upon which he remained four years, when he again sold and came to Howard County. He bought 160 acres about one and a half miles northeast of Tampico, where he lived two years, at which time he returned to Delaware County, locating on the farm he had formerly owned. He again returned to Howard County, and is now living on 160 acres of land two and s half miles northeast of Tampico. Mr. and Mrs. Roe have had eleven children, nine of whom are living. Mr. Roe is a member of the Republican party, and he and wife are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church. John Roe was reared on the farm, and received a limited education in the common schools. When he was twenty years of age, he was married to Miss Louisa Howard, daughter of John T. and Elizabeth (Jarvis) Howard, of Howard County. About five years after his marriage, Mr. Roe purchased forty acres of land near Tampico, this county, where he lived two years, at which time he leased this tract, and located on a rented farm of 120 acres near Greentown. Later, he sold his farm near Tampico, and purchased seventy-eight acres, three-quarters of a mile east of West Liberty, where he farmed two years; he exchanged this for a farm in Grant County, which he again exchanged for a farm of seventy-five acres one mile from West Liberty, and has since added sixty acres more. Mr. and Mrs. Roe have had nine children - Henry H., Lydia A., Melissa E., William, Esther J., Mary E., Anderson, Frank and Aubrey T., seven of whom are living. Mr. Roe is an active member of the Republican party, and cast his first ballot for Fremont in 1856. Mr. Roe and wife are among the most active members of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


ANDREW J. SEAGRAVE is the fourth of fourteen children born to Luther and Matilda (Keever) Seagrave, natives of New Jersey and Ohio, and of English and German descent; his parents moved to this county in the fall of 1847, and took a pre-emption claim in Liberty Township; his father erected the first saw mill in that section of the country, and was shortly afterward drowned in the forebay of the mill, and his inquest was the first held in the county. Andrew was born December 31, 1831, in Henry County, Ind.; spent his youth in his native county, and by diligent study obtained a moderate education from the pioneer schools. He came to this county in company with his parents in the fall of 1847; remained in Liberty Township until 1859, when he located in Union Township and engaged in the saw mill business, which business he is at present managing for John Chandler. He received $375 from his father's estate, but lost it all in a mill; he then began life anew, and by being economical in his expenses, and saving in his earnings, has obtained a good farm of eighty acres. Mr. Seagrave was married, April 10, 1852, to Elizabeth J. Stephenson. One child crowned this union - Louisa M., who died at the age of three months. His wife died in the fall of 1853, and he married Elizabeth A. Chandler (now deceased) October 29, 1859. They had eleven children - Artes L., Franz S., Nora B., James L. (deceased), Edmond O., Ora O., Effie M., Maggie M., Willard, Leo and an infant. Mr. Seagrave, in the fall of 1879, formed a partnership with B. L. Mugg, in raising Poland-China hogs for breeding purposes. In the last year he has shipped to parties living in ten different States. In the last nine months, he has shipped 304 fine hogs. They received a $20 castor as a prize offered by parties in Chicago, for three of the finest hogs in the State of Indiana. Mr. Seagrave is an active worker in the temperance cause, and was identified with the Grange society. He cast his first ballot for a Democrat, but has since voted the Republican ticket.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


STEPHEN D. SHOCKNEY was born in Carle County, Md., February 15, 1831, and is the son of John and Jerusia (Manning) Shockney, natives of Maryland, and of Irish and English descent; his father came to Randolph County, Ind., in 1838, and purchased n firm of eighty acres near Union City, which he began to clear from the forest. He built a log cabin, and resided on this place until his death in 1873, his wife surviving him but a year. Stephen, in 1853, came to Howard County, and worked as a farm hand in Union Township until March 8, 1857, when he was married to Abigail Fellow, daughter of John and Abigal (Coleman) Fellow, natives of North Carolina, and of Scotch and Welsh descent. Shortly after his marriage, he purchased eighty acres in Tipton County, upon which he lived until the fall of 1876, when he moved to Howard County, and purchased ninety-five acres in Union Township, near Jerome, upon which he now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Shockney have had four children - Elizur J. Thomas, born January 12, 1858; O'Key K., born July 9, 1860; Josephine C., born July 3, 1862, and Abigail S., born August 9, 1867. Mrs. Shockney died May 15, 1869, and Mr. Shockney, having the care of a family, married, September 9, 1870, Caroline Thomas, born October 10, 1847, and daughter of Henry and Lydia (Elliott) Thomas, natives of Indiana. This union has been blessed with eight children - Ida, born September 9, 1871; Henrietta, born April 25, 1873; Eva, born August 5, 1874; David J., born February 20, 1876; Rachel, born August 27, 1877; Rolo, born January 13, 1879; Roscoe, born February 13, 1830, and Earl, born January 3, 1882. Mr. Shockney is a worthy citizen, and a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. He is an active politician in the Republican ranks. He cast his first ballot in 1856 for Buchanan, but has since voted the Republican ticket. He and wife are identified with the Friends Church, and are among its most active members.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


WILLIAM HENRY SLAUGHTER was born October 9, 1845, and is the son of William Slaughter, a native of Virginia and of Scotch-Irish descent. William Slaughter was a farmer who came to Indiana about the year 1835, and was shortly married to Miss Pinia Beck, of Fayette County, Ind. Soon after his marriage, he moved to Hancock County, and there purchased a farm of eighty acres, where he has since lived. Mr. and Mrs. Slaughter have had eleven children, seven of whom are still living - James C., Samuel, William Henry, Mary E., Francis M., Lavinia and Robert A. Mr. Slaughter was a prominent member of the Good Templars, and has been an active worker in the Democratic party since the year 1831, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. William Henry was reared on his father's farm, and lived at home until he was married in March, 1867, to Louisa Johns, daughter of Mathew and Ellen (Maggart) Johns. Her father, a native of Tennessee, and of German descent, was a farmer and a blacksmith by trade. Mr. Slaughter, after his marriage, rented a farm for fourteen years, during which time he purchased sixty acres of land in Union Township, Howard County, which he rented for two years, and in 1881 removed to this county, where he has since made his home. By industry and economy, he has been able to add forty acres, and now owns 100 acres of good farm land. Mr. and Mrs. Slaughter have had five children, all of whom are living - Martha E., Robert A., Minnie B., Charles E. and Francis M. Mr. Slaughter has been a prominent member of the Good Templars' Lodge, and has closely adhered to its principles. He is a conservative politician in the Democratic ranks, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


DR. SOLOMON SIMPSON, one of the prominent farmers and merchants of West Liberty, is the youngest of a family of eleven children born to Thomas and Sarah (Mabray) Simpson, natives of Georgia and Virginia, and of English descent. Thomas Simpson came to Indiana in 1809, and settled upon the creek now bearing his name, in Fayette County. His father was s soldier in the Revolutionary war under Gen. Marion, and he was a, soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Simpson remained upon his farm, near Connersville, until his death in 1847. Dr. Simpson was born February 15, 1815, and was reared on the farm. At the age of twenty, he was married to Lovicia Conaway, born February 27, 1817, daughter of James and Sarah (Sparks) Conaway, natives of South Carolina, and of English descent. Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Simpson began the study of medicine, and soon entered into a practice which he continued for about forty years, twenty-five years of which were spent in Rush County; he sold his farm in 1865, came to Howard County, and purchased 200 acres of land north of West Liberty, where he now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson had eleven children Marilda J. (deceased), born September 4, 1836; Mary H. (deceased), born January 10, 1837; Daniel W., born October 27, 1839; Sarah A. (deceased), born December 13, 1842; R. H. L., born July 4, 1845; Marshal T. (deceased), born August 28, 1847; John C. (deceased), born February 2, 1851; James T., M. D., born November 18, 1852; S. F., born November 23, 1854; Lovicia A., born July 8, 1857, and Nancy C. (deceased), born June 18, 1859. Mrs. Simpson was an earnest supporter of religious principles until her death, which occurred April 5, 1876. Mr. Simpson in an early day was a Whig, having cast his first vote for President Harrison, in 1836, but later has voted with the Republican party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a Phenominal Spirtualist.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


DANIEL W. SIMPSON mas born in Rush County, Ind., October 19, 1839, and is the son of Solomon and Lovicia A. (Conaway) Simpson, natives of Indiana, and of English descent. Daniel spent his boyhood days at home on the farm, and in August, 1862, enlisted in Company D, Sixty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Greensburg, Ind. He participated with his regiment in battle at Munfordsville, where they were taken prisoners, paroled and returned to Indianapolis. They remained here until the spring of 1862, when they were exchanged and sent to Nashville, thence to Resaca, where they engaged in battle. Thence they marched to Knoxville, Tenn., and from there to Cowen Station, where Mr. Simpson was taken sick and was sent to the hospital at Nashville. The following spring he joined his regiment and was detailed to drive and guard cattle for the army; he was cut off from his regiment, and was transferred to Sherman's army, and was with him on the march to the sea. They went to Savannah, Ga., thence to Raleigh, N. C., and thence to Columbia, S. C., and while they were here the surrender of Richmond took place; Sherman then went to Washington, where he disbanded. Mr. Simpson s turned to Indianapolis, and received his discharge in July, 1865, having served in the army three years. He returned home and the following fall was married to Sarah A. Walker, born April 26, 1847, and daughter of John and Clara (Sales) Walker, natives of North Carolina and of English descent. Shortly after this marriage, he came to Howard County, and began farming with his father in Union Township, and he has since followed agricultural pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have had five children - Emma J., born August 17, 1867; Clara L., born July 13, 1870; Mary C., born May 18, 1872; Guv O., born April 17, 1875; and Mamie L., born October 13, 1880. Mr. Simpaon is an active politician in the Republican ranks, having cast his first vote for President Lincoln in 1860; and Mrs. Simpson is a prominent member of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


FRANCIS MARION SIMPSON was born September 15, 1840, and is the son of William Simpson, a native of Carolina and of English descent. William Simpson was a farmer who came to Fayette County, about the year 1809, and settled on Simpson Creek, which stream was named after his father, Thomas Simpson. Here William Simpson has since lived, and was married in 1822 to Sarah Turner, daughter of Amos and Sarah Turner, of German descent. Shortly after his marriage, he purchased 200 acres, and has since sold eighty acres, leaving him yet 120. William and Sarah Simpson had seven children - John, William J., Benjamin T., Thomas M. (died from disease contracted in army), Elizabeth, George W. (died from disease contracted in army) and Francis M., three of whom are living. In 1844, Mrs. Simpson died, and Mr. Simpson was next married to Adia Gabia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gabia, of German descent. To this union were added seven children - Henry, Joshua T., Jane, Sarah E., Daniel, Nancy and Morton, six of whom are now living. Mr. Simpson was formerly a Whig, and in later years a Republican, and a member of the Union League during the war, being now eighty-three years old. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, but, owing to necessity of work, received but a limited education. When he arrived at his majority, he worked as a farm hand for his brother, William J., at $18 per month. After three months, he went to Rush County and engaged to John McMillan at $26, and while there he enlisted, in 1863, in Company B, Thirty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Johnson; he was discharged the same year, returned home and engaged as a farm hand until November 15, 1866, when he was married to Lydia E. Walker, daughter of John and Clarcy (Sales) Walker, natives of North Carolina, and of English descent. Shortly after his marriage, he rented a farm in Fayette County for one year, when he removed to Rush County, and lived four years on a rented farm; he then moved to Hancock County, where he remained three years, after which he lived two years in Tipton County. In 1875, he came to Howard County, locating in Union Township, where he purchased sixty acres of land. By industry and economy, he has since added thirty acres more, and now has a beautifu1home. Mr. and Mrs. Simpson have five children - Sarah A., Clara E., Ollie M., Katie F. and Jesse F. Mr. Simpson is an active worker in the Republican party, and cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1860. He was a prominent member of the Union League during the war, and was an active member of the Grange movement.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


JAMES M. SWOPE is the youngest of eleven children born to Joseph and Margaret (Miller) Swope, natives of Virginia, and of German and Irish descent. Joseph Swope (whose father was the first white child born in Monroe County, Va.) came to Franklin County, Ind., in 1818, but soon removed to Decatur, where he remained until his death in 1828. He and wife were prominent members of the Baptist Church. James was born April 15, 1827, and was reared upon a farm, receiving but a limited education. At the age of twenty, he was married to Sarah A. Fulwider, born August 1, 1823, daughter of George and Hannah (Fix) Fulwider, of Bartholomew County, Ind., and natives of Augusta County, Va. After his marriage, he came to Howard County, and in December, 1847, pre-empted 160 acres in Liberty Township, and April 17, 1848, entered the same farm and remained upon this until 1851, when he sold, and purchased 160 acres in Union Township. He has since added to this until now he has 373 acres of fine farm land, near Jerome. Mr. and Mrs. Swope have had seven children - Serilda C., born March 16, 1848, died November 9, 1869; Corinthia, born August 12, 1851; Joseph, born April 3, 1854; George R., born December 14, 1857; Arthur L., born July 11, 1860, died February 27th, 1878; John M., born March 27, 1863, and one infant. Mr. Swope is an earnest supporter of Republican principles, and he and wife are identified with the Separate Baptist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


C. M. WARE, M. D., was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1844, and is the son of William P. Ware, of German descent, and a native of Darke County, Ohio. W. P. Ware was reared on a farm, and in early life came to Henry County, Ind., with his father. In 1842, he was married to Lucinda Main, which union was blessed with eight children - Christopher M., Caroline, Luther S., John W., Lewis A., Henry J., Lucinda S. and Mary M. Mr. Ware located in this county in 1848, settling on the banks of the Wild Cat, where he erected a log cabin and began to clear his land. He lived on several different farms in Howard County, until the fall of 1864, when he purchased 160 acres joining West Liberty, on which he lived until his death. He was an active member of the Union League during the war, and held a prominent position with the Good Templars and the Grange movement. Both he and his wife were members of the Christian Church. C. M. Ware was reared on a farm and received a good common school education. In October, 1865, he began the study of medicine in the office of Smith & Scott Bros., at Greentown; the following year, attended the Rush Medical College at Chicago; he then returned to West Liberty, where he practiced unti1 the fall of 1870, when he entered the Indiana Medical College, graduating in February, 1871; he then renewed his practice in West Liberty, where he has since remained. Mr. Ware was married in January, 1870, to Angeline Conway, daughter of Richard and Cynthia (Ray) Conway. This union was blessed with one child, Aletta (deceased). Mr. Ware, soon after his marriage, purchased property in West Liberty, and has since, by his practice, been enabled to purchase 160 acres of land near the village. Mr. Ware has been a member of the Masonic order since 1871. He is a member of the Democratic party, but votes for the man rather than for the party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Union Township


Deb Murray