ROBERT T. ALYEA, son of John R. and Susan (Thompson) Alyea, was born in Butler County, Ohio, in 1833; was reared on a farm in Porter and Decatur Counties. In August. 1861, he enlisted in the Seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was mustered in at Indianapolis, and went from there to Elk Water, Va., where he went into camp. They were in the battle of Cheat Mountain, Winchester, Ft. Republic, Bull Run, Gettysburg, and in front of Petersburg, battle of the Wilderness, Fredericksburg, Weldon R. R., Spottsylvania Court House, Manassas Junction, Harper's Ferry, Slaughter Mountains, Crab Apple Grove and many others. His regiment had 1,040 men when they started out under Col. Durnont, and when they returned there were only 250. At Ft. Republic they lost 118 men in one hour, the rebels numbering three to one of them, but still they held the enemy in check. Mr. Alyea was shot through the sleeve, bruising his arm, but not cutting it. Mr. Alyea is a prominent farmer in Jackson Township and has spent all his life clearing and improving land. He was married, in. 1864, to Miss Ruth Cheek, of Decatur County; her parents were natives of Indiana, and among the early settlers of Decatur County. Six children have blessed this union - Ira G., Ina B., Edgar L., Lily May, Albert O. and Elmer C.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JESSE A. CATE, son of John and Rachel (Pierce) Cate, was born in Tennessee in 1831. His parents came to Howard County in 1854, with eleven children, in a covered wagon, and located on a farm in its native condition. His father cleared this land with the assistance of Jesse A. and his other sons. The subject of this sketch was one of the early teachers in Jackson Township, teaching and farming until he went into the army; he enlisted in 1863; helped raise a company of cavalry and was elected Second Lieutenant; he was mustered in at Kokomo by H. K. Thatcher, U. S. A.; he was in the battles of Nashville and Franklin, Tenn., and all the battles of the central army with Gen. Sherman; he was detailed at Mud Creek, Ala., and was taken sick and lay in hospital six weeks. He was advanced from Second Lieutenant to a Captaincy, and commanded a battalion in Kansas, standing a good chance of becoming Major when the war closed. Mr. Cate was married, in 1867, to Miss Jennie Lindley, of Howard County. He has had three children Louie M., Harry L. and Gracie B. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F. and is now in the stock and produce business in the eastern portion of the county.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


CLARKSON L. CATE, son of John and Rachel (Pierce) Cate, was born in Wayne County, Ind., December 31, 1853; his parents were natives of Tennessee, and came to Howard County in October, 1854; his father located in Jackson Township, purchased a farm in its native state, and began, with the assistance of his sons, to clear the land. Clarkson commenced teaching school in 1872, and has engaged in this occupation ever since. He made his start by farming, and in the fall of 1877 purchased his first piece of land. He has since added two other tracts and now owns 120 acres of good farm land, on which he has built a fine house, in which he resides. Mr. Cates' youthful experience at home in clearing and cultivating the farm has been greatly advantageous to him; he has taught seven terms in the schoolhouse where he received his education, and has been elected Township Assessor for three terms in succession. He was married, in 1877, to Miss Mary Alice Gentry. They have had two children, Nora and Maud (deceased October 5, 1880). Mr. Cate had three brothers in the late war, the eldest of whom was shot in the head and killed while with Gen. Sherman.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOHN CLELLAN, an early settler and pioneer of Howard County, was born in West Virginia in 1809; his parents, James and Massie (Wilson) Clellan, were early settlers of Virginia, and came to Union County, Ind., in 1831. John lived for three years in that county, and was united in marriage, in 1833, to Miss Lucinda Gardner , and the following year moved to Henry County. This union was blessed with three children - Louisa, Sarah M. and James W., all of whom are dead. James W. was in the army, and was killed at the battle of Cain Hill, Ark. Mr. Clellan was next married, in 1842, to Mrs. Emily Ridgway, of Henry County, Ind. They have had nine children, six of whom are living - Mary A., Murphy, Ira M., Emily J., Wilson T. and Arminta J. Disbro. The subject of this sketch came to Howard County in August, 1819, entered 130 acres of land, built a log cabin, and began to clear his farm; he started in the green woods, where there were 110 roads, only the Indian trail from Marion to Kokomo. Wolves, deer and wild game were in abundance, and it was so lonely they were glad to see the cows come home at night for company. Mr. Clellan and his wife are members of the Old School Baptist Church in good standing.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOSEPH CLEVENGER was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1840, and is the son of Squire and Clara (Gossett) Clevenger. Our subject was reared on a farm, and has followed agricultural pursuits mostly through life; he came to this county with his parents when he was but twelve years of age, in the year 1853. They settled in the forest and began clearing the farm. Joseph stayed with his father until after he was twenty-one, working on the place. When he became of age he went to work for himself, and on the 28th of April, 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. Hinkle, of Liberty Township, this county. They have eight children - Sarah E., Charles H., Walter A., Louisa M., Leoda E., Isaac A., John William and Alice. In 1861, Mr. Clevenger enlisted in Thirty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; he was a veteran, staying till the close of the war, and was discharged in 1865 at Indianapolis, and was mustered out in North Carolina; he was in all the battles of the Central Army. Mr. C. has cleared two farms, and now has a fine large farm, in good condition, well improved, and with a convenient house.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


PETER V. COLE was born in Henry County, Ind., August 20, 1834, and is the son of Ehram M. and Elizabeth (Vanmatre) Cole, of Irish and German descent. Peter V. Cole lived in the village of Middletown, Henry County, until he was fourteen years of age, when he removed with his parents on a farm five miles north of Middletown. After remaining here five years, he lived one year in Madison County, and December 2, 1853, started for Howard County, a distance of fifty miles, in a two-horse covered wagon, arriving at Jerome on the fifth day. Mr. Cole was married, February 14, 1861, to Miss Nancy J. Cate. They have had twelve children - Ela (deceased), Laura J. (deceased), Cora (deceased), Osca A., Viola L., Margaret E., John A., William Henry, George L., Julia A., Mary L. and Perry V. Mr. Cole obeyed his country's call, enlisting December 19, 1864, in the Forty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Wabash, Ind. He went with his regiment to Indianapolis, thence to New York, and started to Georgia, but were detained at Buford Island on the Savannah River, on account of high waters. After drawing rations, they started with Sherman on his raid through the Carolinas. He was with his regiment until he was mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 25, 1865, and was discharged at Indianapolis July 21. The following day he returned home, and has ever since been busily engaged in agricultural pursuits.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


MOSES CRANOR, son of Joshua and Susana (Johnson) Cranor, was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1832; his parents, who were natives of North Carolina, and of English and Irish descent, were among the first settlers of Wayne County. Our subject was reared on a farm, and assisted his father until he was twenty years of age. In 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Cate, in Wayne County, Ind. She is a native of Tennessee. They had eight children - Leroy, Charles F., Martha E., Susan F., Ellsworth, James, Florinda J. (deceased), and Clara Belle (deceased). Mr. Cranor, immediately after he was married, began farming in Wayne County, and in August, 1860, came to Howard County and located on his present farm in Jackson Township; he has 400 acres of fine farm land, which he has improved and cultivated until it is now one of the best farms in the township, with a comfortable and convenient residence. Mr. Cranor's father was granted a land warrant from the war of 1812; he was what they called at that time a ranger, and assisted in building block-houses in the early settlement of Wayne County, as a defense from the Indians. Mr. Cranor has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1864, and in politics is a stanch Democrat; he has held the office of Township Assessor in his township, giving entire satisfaction to the citizens.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


WILLIAM DETAMORE was born May 21, 1807, in Augusta County, Va., and is the son of Jacob and Sophia (Loutz) Detamore, of German descent; his grandfather, Christopher Detamore, was in the Revolutionary war, and his father was in the wax of 1812. The subject of this sketch was married in Virginia to Miss Margaret Shull. They had eleven children, one dying in infancy. Mr. Detamore came to Howard County in tlie fall of 1850, and entered the farm on which he now lives, when it was in its native state; his wife died in 1863, and the following year he married to Mrs. Zelah J. Lilly, who came to this county in 1847. They have one child. Mr. Detamore was a wagonmaker by trade, and was bound out for three years, hence he had little opportunity for an early education; he has been a church member for fifty-five years, and is now a member of the United Brethren Church; he was a Jackson Democrat, but in 1856 voted for John C. Fremont; he has since voted the Republican ticket, and has held some of the minor offices in the township; he is a liberal citizen, and has taken an active part in the public and benevolent enterprises of the county.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOHN M. ERLOUGHER, a pioneer of Howard County, was born July 6, 1817, in Greene County, Ohio; his parents, Jacob and Elizabeth (Newton) Erlougher, were of English and German descent. His father was born in Maryland, and his mother was a native of New Jersey; his father was a carder and spinner in that early day. John M. taught school for ten years, and thereby earned money to put himself through college; he commenced the study of medicine about 1846, with Dr. Curtis, of Dublin, Wayne County, Ind., and afterward graduated at the Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio. He commenced the practice of medicine in Harrisburg, Ohio, and came to Howard County in May, 1854; he was an early practitioner of this county, and helped to organize the first medical society in it; he was always considered successful in his profession, traveling in four different counties. About ten years ago, he retired from practice, and now has eighty acres of well-cultivated land, which he cleared and improved himself; he was married, in 1847, to Miss Mary D. Leetrick, a native of Pennsylvania. They have had six children - Emma E., Harmon, Charles N. (deceased), Anna M. Powell, John O. (deceased), William M. and Frank L. Mr. Erlougher has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty -four years, and has been Assessor of Jackson Township. He at one time bought out the school of the Dublin Academy, where he taught for five years, his wife assisting him as one of the teachers.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


MOORE GALWAY was born in Philadelphia, Penn., in 1826, and is the son of Moore and Mary (Edgely) Galway. His parents were natives of England, and moved to Washington, D. C., where his father was reporter for two sessions in the House of Representatives, at the time of Jackson's administration. His father was a printer, and was book-keeper for Chapman & Bros., when they edited the Indianapolis Sentinel. He was editor of a paper in Liverpool, Eng., called the Liverpool Mercury. Failing in that business, he started a book and stationery store in the same city. The subject of this sketch worked as a roller boy in the printing office, and later in a bindery in Indianapolis. He was apprenticed to learn the tanner's trade, and continued in this business for ten years. In 1854, he removed to Howard County, and he and his brother started a tannery in Jerome. They remained there two years, and January 1, 1856, our subject was married to Miss Mary Hodson, of Grant County, Ind. This union has been blessed with eight children. After his marriage, he moved on his own farm in Union Township, and has since spent his life in agricultural pursuits. March 5, 1872, he moved to Kansas, but was driven home in four weeks by the sickness of his children. Mr. Galway enlisted in March 1862, in the Fifty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer infantry, and remained two years. He was wounded in the hand, and again in the breast, at the battle of Stone River. He was in the battle at Shiloh and Corinth, Miss.; was on Buell's retreat to Louisville; followed Bragg to Perryville, where they had an engagement; thence they went to Cumberland Gap, where they drew no rations for several days. He was discharged June 21, 1863. Mr. Galway has a farm of seventy acres in Jackson Township, well improved. He has held some of the minor offices of his township; is a member of the Society of Friends, and formerly belonged to the Masonic order.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOHN GOSSETT was born in Union County, Ind., August 1, 1824, and is the son of Joseph and Rebecca (Warnock) Gossett, of German and Irish descent. In 1880, his parents moved into Henry County and were among the first settlers. Joseph Gossett entered land, built a log cabin, and not having time to split out their puncheon flooring, or to build a chimney before winter set in, they built their fire in the middle of the room. Joseph Gossett is said to have been the first Justice of the Peace of Henry County, holding the office continually for thirty-two years, with the exception of one term, and was holding the office at the time of his death. He was considered as good a scholar in the common branches as there was in the county. The subject of this sketch has led a farmer's life, and lived at home until he was twenty-two years of age. He was married in Henry County, in 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Fadely, of Virginia. They have had eight children, three of whom are living - Rebecca C., Elizabeth A. and Nancy J. Mr. Gossett lived on the home farm until the death of his father, when he sold out and came to Howard County in 1861, and purchased the place where he is now living. He is the present Township Trustee, now serving his third term. He has been a member of the United Brethren Church since his sixteenth year. His wife is also s member of the same church. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. After serving his first term, he enlisted a second time and received a land warrant of 160 acres. John Gossett has held several of the minor offices in the township. In an early day he was a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has always voted that ticket.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


WILLIAM C. HARPER, son of James and Mary (Loughery) Harper, was born in North Carolina in 1820. His parents were natives of North Carolina, and moved to Tennessee, where William Harper was married to Miss Percila Cate, born July 30, 1826. Five children blessed this union - Richard, James M., Mary E., John L. and William Andrew. Mrs. Harper died December 3, 1867, and Mr. Harper, February 19, 1870, was married to Miss Sarah J. Willis. They have one child - Leonia H. In 1856, Mr. Harper moved from Tennessee to Wayne County, Ind., where he lived about eleven years, when he moved to Howard County. He located on his farm when it was in its native state, building a log cabin and clearing his land. He now has a finely cultivated farm well improved, with fine residence and good barn. He has held some of the minor offices of the township. He was formerly a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has voted that ticket.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


WILLIAM A. HARPER is a native of Tennessee, was born in March, 1844, and is the son of John M. and Elizabeth (Cate) Harper. Our subject came to Howard County in 1865, and has followed agricultural pursuits all his life. He was married, in 1865, to Miss Rebecca Powell, of Jackson Township. This union has been blessed with seven children - Sarah E. (deceased), Adaline (deceased), John (deceased), Charles L. (deceased), Lovicy A,, Minnie B. and Earl. Mr. Harper has held some of the minor offices in the township. He has cleared about forty acres of land in the county, and when he bought his first forty acres he paid only $75 down, and made the balance himself. He is one of the self-made men of the township; is a worthy farmer and leading citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOSEPH HATFIELD is a native of Howard County, and was born in Jackson Township in the year 1853. His parents, William and Mary E. (Jones) Hatfield, were very early settlers in the county. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and lived on his father's place until 1878, when he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Julow, of Union Township. Two children have blessed this union, the first dying in infancy, the second being Bertha J. Mr. Hatfield dealt in stock and followed agricultural pursuits for about eight years, when, in the winter of 1882, he went into the drug business in Sycamore. H is now conducting the only drug store in the village. He is also about to start a hotel, the only one in the town. Mr. Hatfield is a successful business man and a worthy citizen in the community in which he lives.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


SAMUEL HAWKINS, son of Philip H. and Elizabeth (Martin) Hawkins, was born in Greene County, Ohio, December 9,1838. His parents moved to this county in 1846, and entered land in Union Township, near Jerome, settling in the green woods. Philip Hawkins died when his son was twenty-four years of age, and May 16, 1861, our subject enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Indianapolis; he had volunteered twice before, but as the companies were never made up he did not go out; was mustered out at Indianapolis in November, the same year. Mr. Hawkins was married, March 1, 1865, to Miss Terressa Hatfield, whose parents were among the first settlers of Union Township. This union has been blessed with eight children - Rolland A. (deceased), Ollie E. (deceased), Ora A. (deceased), Clinton A., Sarah E. (deceased), Ella B., Estella and Reason E. In 1879, he bought fifty-three acres of land, and moved on it the next spring. He now has it well cultivated and improved, with convenient dwelling and good outbuildings. Mr. Hawkins is a harness-maker by trade, and ran a shop in Jerome for about twelve years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOHN W. HURLY, son of D. C. and Mary A. (Whitson) Hurly, was born in 1841 in Clinton County, Ohio. His parents moved to Hamilton County, Ind., and in 1849 located in Howard County. Our subject worked on a farm until he went in the army, enlisting in June, 1861, in the Thirteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Indianapolis. He was in battle at Suffolk, Va., Blackwater, and in front of Richmond. He was also at Fort Fisher, the siege of Fort Sumter, and in the twenty-one days' fight at Suffolk. He was sick with typhoid fever at Wilmington, N. C. December, 1863, he veteranized at Folly Island, and remained until the close of the war. Mr. Hurly was wounded at Bermuda Hundred in his right hip, May, 1864. On coming out of the army, he was so disabled by exposure, fever and wounds that he has been able to work very little since, and has been using crutches and is still disabled. Mr. Hurly was married, June 30, 1864, to Miss Mary J. Barkdull, of Howard County. They have had two children, Olive A. and William L. (deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Hurly are active members of the Society of Friends.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOSEPH A. KELLAR was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1842, and in 1859 came to Howard County. He was reared to farming, and has always followed that occupation, excepting the time he was in the war. In 1861, he enlisted in Company K, Thirty-fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was discharged in December, 1864, and re-enlisted for three years more. The first three years he was with Grant, and was through his campaign of Vicksburg. After his re-enlistment, he was in the Texas campaign, and fought in the battle of Palmetto Ranch on May 19, 1865, under Col. Barrett, after peace was declared in the East. His regiment turned out more veterans than any other regiment in the war. Mr. Kellar was married, in 1864, to Miss Laurinda F. Wethrow, of Grant County. She died in 1868, and in 1870 Mr. Kellar married Miss Margaret X. Windsor, who died in 1877, and the following year he married Miss Maria Allison. Mr. Kellzr cleared up his farm from the forest, and now has a home of fifty-five acres, well improved. He has held some of the minor offices of the township, and has always been an active member of the Republican party.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


J. F. LAWSHE, M. D., was born in Somerset, Wabash Co., Ind., a January 18, 1859, and is the son of Henry D. and Hester Ann (Richmond) Lawshe. Our subject earned his first money on a farm, and taking this, together with what he saved by teaching school, he worked his way through college. He commenced the study of medicine in the summer of 1878, and afterward attended two courses of lectures at Louisville, Ky., at the Kentucky School of Medicine, one of the best schools of the West. Mr. Lawshe was a member of a class of 110 students, and stood the fifth best in his class. He commenced his studies with Dr. O'Neal, of Somerset, and graduated in June, 1881. He came to Sycamore, the 1st of August, 1881, and commenced the practice of medicine, where he has since been in active practice, with fine success. He was married in Wabash County, November 17, 1881, to Sarah F. McConn, daughter of T. C. McConn, an early settler and prominent citizen in that county. By this union they have one child - Gertie May. Dr. Lawshe is a member of the German Baptist Church, in good standing, and is a worthy citizen in the community in which he lives.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


GURNEY LINDLEY, son of Osmond L, and Achsa (Wilson) Lindley, was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1860. He was reared on a farm, but cornmenced teaching school at the age of seventeen. He was then called a boy-teacher, but was so successful with his school that the patrons were anxious to employ him the following term. Mr. Lindley has been a teacher and farmer all his life. He went from Henry County to Illinois, thence to Kansas, teaching and farming all the time. In the year 1881, he came from Kansas to Howard County, Ind., and August 11, 1881, was married to Emily J. Johnson, of Hancock County, Ind. One child - Florence O., blessed this union. Mr. Lindley is a member of the Society of Friends, is a well educated young man, a good teacher, and worthy citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


BENJAMIN R. MAPLE was born in Franklin County, Ind., in 1830, and is the son of Benjamin G. and Mary (Freeman) Maple. He was reared on a farm, and lived with his father until he was twenty-one years of age. In an early day, he taught school in Jackson Township, at 75 cents per day. He enlisted on Christmas Eve, 1864, in the Eleventh Regiment Indiana Volunteer Cavalry, and was mustered in at Louisville, Ky. He was in the battle of Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Maple was married, in 1855, to Miss Sophia Jesiop, of Jackson Township, whose parents were among the early settlers of Howard County. Mr. and Mrs. Maple have had eleven children, ten of whom are living - Seneca S., Frank S., Ellen B., Emma, J., Charles H., William, Anna H., Ida J., Isaac T. and Sullie. Mr. Maple has been a Trustee of the township, and also Constable for two years. In politics, he is a Republican, and he and his wife are prominent members of the Methodist Protestant Church. Mr. Maple is a pioneer farmer, having come to Howard County when the wolves howled around the cabins, and when all was a wilderness.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


ELIJAH G. MAPLE was born in Fayette County, Ind., in 1834, and is the son of Mentilla H. and Elizabeth Maple. In the fall of 1851, he moved with his father to Howard County, where the latter entered part of the land on which he now lives. The land was in its native state, and they at once went to work to clear the farm; built a log cabin and split out their boards for the cabin floor and doors. The subject of this sketch, excepting the time he was in the army, and a few years he was in a store when a boy, has always followed the occupation of farming. In 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Ninety-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in the army about three years. He was with Sherman from Atlanta on to the sea. His first engagement was at Jackson, Miss. He was promoted Corporal in 1864, on account of his vigilance while on post duty. He was married, January 1, 1862, to Miss Sarah E. Friermood, of Grant County, Ind. They hare had nine children, eight of whom are living, viz.: Francis M., Era C., Mary M., Letitia, Jacob W., Ira T., Elizabeth G. and Glenna F. Mr. Maple has held some of the minor offices of the township; is a member of the Republican party; he and wife have been active members of the Methodist Protestant Church for fifteen years, and are valuable members of the society in which they move.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


HENRY L. MARSHALL was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1845. His parents, James and Rachel (Leeson) Marshall, were of German and Irish descent. Henry L. moved to this county with his parents in 1849, and landed where the town of Sycamore now stands. His father entered 160 acres of land in Liberty Township, about three miles north of where Greentown now stands. Our subject has spent his whole life in clearing and improving land. He lived at home with his father until he was about twenty-four years of age, and was married in 1869 to Miss Elizabeth Powell, of Jackson Township. Her parents were among the pioneers and early settlers of the county, corning in when all was a wilderness. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall have had seven children - Lewis E., Rosella M., James L., Arsetta A. (deceased), Ora E., Melven E. and Chancy H. Our subject purchased eighty acres of good land in Jackson Township, in 1882, and now has a good farm, well cultivated and improved. Mr. Marshall's grandfather, Samuel Marshal1, was a soldier in the war of 1812.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JAMES R. NATION was born in Delaware County, Ind., in 1837. His father, Enoch Nation, was born in Tennessee, in 1504, and his mother, Sophia (Thompson) Nation, was a native of Virginia; both were of English descent, and mere among the early settlers in Delaware County. Enoch Nation collected the first taxes in this county and carried the money on horseback to Indianapolis; he was elected County Commissioner, and later Probate Judge, serving in the latter capacity for eight years, when he moved out of the county. James R. Nation was married, in 1859, to Miss Rebecca J. Paul. They have one child - Effie Curry. He remained in Delaware County until 1861, when he enlisted in the Eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was appointed Sergeant; he was discharged in September, 1862, after which he went on a farm for one year, when he recruited a company and was elected Captain; he went into camp at Camp Wayne, Richmond, Ind., moved to Camp Carrington, Indianapolis, thence to Camp Shanks, and on the 2lst of January, 1864, ninety-three of the company were mustered into the United States service at Indianapolis. Mr. Nation was in battle at Linnville, Tenn., Laurenceburg and Florence, Ala. He was captured at Sulphur Branch September 25, 1864; was held prisoner at Meridian, Miss., paroled and passed through the rebel lines November 14, 1864. He went to Camp Benton, St. Louis, thence to Camp Chase, Ohio, and was exchanged there January 17, 1865; he joined his regiment at Gravely Springs, Ala., and went to Vicksburg, thence to New Orleans, after which he returned to Vicksburg and was mustered out there. He held four commissions during his service, the last being that of Major. He then returned home and in January, 1866, moved to Howard County, where he purchased eighty acres of land. Mrs. Rebecca Nation died December 21, 1869, and Mr. Nation was afterward married to Miss Mary A. Clevenger, of English and German descent. They have had four children, two of whom are living - Gertie and Lloyd. Mr. Nation is now living a comparatively retired life on forty acres of his land in Jackson Township, doing a broker's business; he also owns thirty-three acres in the same township, besides property in Sycamore; he is a Republican, and has always taken an active part in the politics of his county, having served on the Central Committee for a number of years. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity for about ten years, and is a man highly respected in his community.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JAMES B. POWELL was born in Herefordshire, England, February 7, 1816, and lived there until he was nine years of age; his parents having preceded him, he made the trip alone to Calais, France, a distance of 400 miles. His parents, John H. and Ann (Bub) Powell, were manufacturers of lace, and James B. worked at the same business. They lived in France nine years; were there during the Revolution of 1830, and during the time of the cholera. In 1884, his parents shipped from Calais to London, thence to New York. They were eight weeks and four days in crossing, being becalmed nine days; running short of provision, and there being other boats in sight, and being short of hands, the Captain called the passengers to draw lots to go in the small boats for provisions. Our subject refused to draw, but volunteered and made a successful trip. They arrived in New York July 24, 1834, and soon after located in Evansburg, Ohio, where they remained until 1854, and there followed farming. Mr. P. well became an Abolitionist during his stay in Ohio. He was a member of the underground railway and took a very prominent part in helping the slaves to get away, often secreting them about the house. Mr. Powell was married, August 31, 1839, to Miss Jane Boyd, of Coshocton County. They had nine children, six of whom are living - Florida, John Thomas, Ann, Henrietta, William (deceased), Caroline (deceased), Nimcy J. (deceased), William, Henry and Lyman B. Mr. Powell came to Howard County in the year 1854 and located on his present place in Jackson Township. He is an industrious man and worthy citizen, and he and wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for thirty-nine years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


L. U. POWELL was born in Boone County, Ind., in 1835, and located in Howard County in 1844. His father, Lemuel Powell, was a native of Virginia, born 1808, and his mother, Sarah (Miller) Powell, was born in Ohio, 1807. L. U. Powell was reared on a farm, and received very little education in his youth. In September, 1857, he was married to Miss Sarah A. Larrison, of Howard County. They had one child - Hiram A. His wife died and Mr. Powell was again married February 25, 1862. He had eight children by his second marriage - Cintha E., William H., Vola,, Charles (deceased), Lemuel W., Eddie (deceased), Eva and Lowell. Mr. Powell enlisted August 12, 1862, and went into camp at South Bend. He was enrolled at Indianapolis in the Ninety-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private. He came back as First Lieutenant, and had charge of his company on the march to the sea. He engaged in battle at Jackson, Miss., Mission Ridge, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain; was at the siege of Atlanta, where he received a wound in the hand; on the march to the sea; at the surrender of Vicksburg and the burning of Columbia. He was mustered out at Washington, and received his discharge at Indianapolis, after which he came home and went on his farm. He now has his farm under good cultivation, with convenient house, and is now building a fine barn. He is a charter member of the G. A. R. Post at Xenia, and has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1861.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JORDON SHAW is a native of Henry County, Ind., and was born in 1843. His father, John Shaw, is a native of North Carolina, and his mother, Sally (Miller) Shaw, was born in Indiana. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and stayed at home until he was seventeen years of age. His mother died when he was about two years of age. Mr. Shaw was married, July 23, 1864, to Miss Sarah C. Shockly. This union has been blessed by nine children - Laura, Perry, Lut, Rolly (deceased), Albedy, Marion, Arabell, Howard E. and John B. Mr. Shaw came to Howard County in 1873 and bought his farm in the native state, and now has it well improved and under good cultivation. He is a worthy citizen, laborious farmer and well respected man in his community.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


M. C. SPURGEON, son of Samuel and Sarah A. (Lark) Spurgeon, was born in Henry County, Va., in 1839. His parents moved from Virginia to Miami in 1843, and lived there three years, when they moved to the Indian reserve soon after the land came into market. The Government did not survey the land until after they had lived there two years. Mr. Spurgeon lived with his father until he was twenty-one, after which he was in Illinois at intervals until he went into the army. He enlisted and was enrolled, August 20, 1862, in the Ninety-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; served until the expiration of his term, and was discharged, June 5, 1865, near Washington, D. C. He was with the central army in all their battles, and with Sherman on his march to the sea. Mr. Spurgeon was married, July 13, 1867, to Miss Behethlan Prior. This union was blessed with seven children, five of whom are living - William N., Franklin S., Florence O., Sarah E., and Minnie M. Mrs. Spurgeon died in April, 1879, and Mr. Spurgeon was afterward married, September 20, 1880, at Kokomo, to Miss Josephine E. Prior, whose parents were old settlers in the Indian Reserve in Miami County. In February, 1866, Mr. Spurgeon purchased forty acres of land in Jackson Township, and has been adding to it until now he owns 127 acres of good land, well ditched and under good cultivation. He is an industrious, hard working farmer, has cleared a great number of acres of land, and in the winter of 1865 made 18,500 rails. He is a member of the G. A. R. Post at Xenia.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


M. STONE & BRO., two enterprising young business men of Sycamore Corners, are natives of Rush County, Ind. They started a grocery, dry goods and general stock store in the town of Sycamore in April, 1882. They have been uncommonly successful, and have done a business far beyond their expectation. Starting with a $3,000 stock, the first year they did s business of $50,000. They are now preparing to add an addition to their store. They anticipate putting in a stock of agricultural implements and hardware in their present business room, and expect to put up a two-story building opposite their present site. This will be 100 feet in length, and will be used for their present business. They anticipate increasing their stock with an addition of $82,000, and will expect to do a larger and more extensive business. M. Stone & Bro. are accommodating and energetic merchants, and in every way worthy of the patronage so liberally bestowed upon them. Their parents, Solomon and Mary A. (Hatfield) Stone, were natives of Virginia and of German descent.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


TURNER SULLIVAN, the oldest citizen now living in Jackson Township, was born in 1800 in North Carolina; his parents, Jacob and Nancy (Harris) Sullivan, moved to Tennessee when our subject was but a small child; his father was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church. Turner learned the tanner's trade; he was married in Tennessee to Miss Maria Chandler; this union was blessed with four children, one of whom is living. Mr. Sullivan lost his wife in 1845, and in 1849 he married Miss Angeline Brant; they have had nine children, seven of whom are living. Mr. Sullivan came to Howard County in 1847, and the following year entered the land upon which he now lives; he started in the woods, built a log cabin and began to clear up his farm; he was the first Trustee in the township, and built the first schoolhouse in the township; he attended the first election, and has always voted the Republican ticket since the organization of that party; he cast his first vote for Gen. Jackson; his son, Jefferson S., was in the Ninety-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was taken with brain fever and died in a Southern land. Mr. Sullivan has always taken an active part in public and benevolent enterprises, and lives a conscientious Christian life; he and wife are active members of the United Brethren Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


JOHN E. WASKEY was born in 1837 in the State of Maryland; his parents, John and Margaret (Thomas) Waskey, were of German descent. Our subject was reared on a farm, but began doing business for himself at the age of sixteen. He is a carpenter, and worked at his trade, together with farming, until he came to Howard County in March, 1882; he was married to Cordelia A. Shawen, of Maryland, April 7, 1864. They have had eight children - Mary L., Laura J., Eli (deceased), Charles (deceased), Margaret, Rosella C., Frank E., and one that died in infancy. Mr. Waskey enlisted, in 1865, in the Fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and was mustered in at Edgeville, near Nashville, Tenn.; served until the close of the war, and was discharged at Edgeville, Tenn.; he had been a member of the Home Guards of Ohio, and received an honorable discharge when he enlisted; he and his wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Waskey is now living on a farm in Jackson Township, and is following agricultural pursuits.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


THOMAS A. WINDSOR was born in Henry County, Ind., in 1846; his parents, David E. and Elizabeth (Spell) Windsor, were early settlers of Henry and Delaware Counties. Our subject was born and reared on a farm, and at the age of eighteen enlisted in the Fortieth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in at Kokomo, November 11, 1864. At the battle of Nashville, Tenn., he lost his right arm, about noon, on the 16th of December, it was struck, as he supposes, by a piece of shelf, which left it hanging only by the flesh; he was taken to the field hospital at night, and about 12 o'clock, midnight, had it amputated; he was immediately removed to the hospital at Nashville, where he lay fourteen days, when he was removed to Jeffersonville, Ind.; he remained there until the 25th of July, when he received his discharge. In the fall of 1861, he had located in Howard County, and as soon as he was discharged he came home to the farm; he now owns eighty acres of rich land, well cultivated, and having good improvements; he was married October 7, 1869, to Miss Clare E. Maxwell, whose parents were early settlers in this county. They have two children, Elnora and Thomas E. Mr. Windsor is a well respected man and a worthy citizen.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


EPHRAIM S. ZAHN, son of John and Mariah M. (Weitzell) Zahn, was born in Rockingham County, Va., in 1831, and lived there until he was nineteen years of age; his father was a wagon-maker by trade, and a minister in the Christian Church. E. S. Zahn worked for his father until 1854, when he commenced business for himself; he located in Marion, Grant County, Ind., and there began the mamufacture of wagons and carriages. November 4, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann M. Barley. This union was blessed with four children -Thomas E. (deceased), William (deceased), Mary K. Brunk, and Henrietta I. Mr. Zahn carried on his business in Marion until November, 1872, when he purchased a farm of 120 acres in Howard County, two miles north of Sycamore, on which he lived until October, 1881; he then started at Sycamore a store of dry goods, groceries and general stock, at the same time dealing in all kinds of grain; he is one of the first merchants in Sycamore, and has done a prosperous business; he has held the office of Township Trustee, and has been a member of the I. O. O. F. since 1855, being a Past Representative in the Grand Lodge; he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since he was nineteen years old, and his wife is also a member of the same church. Mr. Zahn was the first Postmaster in Jackson Township, having charge of the office at Energy.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
Jackson Township


Deb Murray