THOMAS A. ARMSTRONG, one of the pioneers of Howard County and one who has assisted by energy and means in advancing the city of Kokomo to its present prosperity, was born in Bucks County, Penn., February 14,1795. His parents, Abraham and Nancy A. (Geary) Armstrong, were also natives of Pennsylvania, and moved to Pittsburgh when he was in his infancy. He was reared and attended school in the latter city until he was sixteen years of age. He then went to Philadelphia and entered the law offce of an uncle, Thomas Armstrong, with whom he remained four years. In 1814, he was admitted to the bar and practiced his profession in Philadelphia until 1820. He then located in Pittsburgh, where he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Courts, and remained engaged in the active duties of his profession for a short time only. He then emigrated to Ohio and located in Clinton County, where, for a number of years, he resided, engaged in the practice of his profession, subsequently returning to Pennsylvania, where he resided for three years. Mr. Armstrong, in 1851, came to Kokomo and purchased forty acres of land, upon which part of the city is now located. At this period, there were but few inhabitants, and the land purchased by him worth only about $15 per acre. Here he has since resided, he practiced law for a few years and was interested in general merchandising, which business was conducted by his sons for several years. He then abandoned active business life, his son, Thomas S. Armstrong, taking the goods to Tipton, where he is still engaged and conducting a successful business. After abandoning mercantile pursuits, Mr. Arrnstrong was elected Justice of the Peace, the duties of which office he satisfactorily administered for four years. Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage in Clinton County, Ohio, July 1, 1824, to Miss Sallie E. Grant, a native of Virginia. They have reared a family of eight children, seven boys and one girl - Thomas S., a resident of Tipton, Edward A., Horace A. (deceased), Charles G., Addison F., Alexander C., Walter S. and Lizzie A. Of this family they have every reason to be proud, of the sons, each has attained high standing in professional, mercantile, political and social spheres, and are men of unblemished reputations. Thomas A. Armstrong is now living with his faithful wife in retirement at his pleasant home in the northwestern portion of the city, and although well advanced in the "sere and yellow leaf," his eighty-eight years sit lightly upon him. His wife, now eighty-three years of age, is also bright and active. Mr. Armstrong has been a faithful member of the Christian Church for over forty years, and has been an Elder for many years. All the members of his family are also connected with this church ; they have a11 been liberal in their support and active and faithful workers in upholding this faith in Howard County.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton", IN published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


E. A. ARMSTRONG, M. D., one of the old and successful practitioners of Howard County, is a native of Clinton County, Ohio, where he was born December 25, 1827. He received the education such as the common schools of that period afforded until he was qualified to teach, this he followed at intervals, assisting upon the farm until he was about twenty-three years of age. He then decided upon the medical profession as his life work, and went to Pittsburgh, where, under the tutelage of an uncle, Dr. Charles Armstrong, he remained about three years. In 1851, he came with his parents to Howard county, and the following year he entered the Rush Medical College of Chicago, attending lectures one term. He then commenced the practice of his profession at Russiaville, where he remained ten years, engaged in active and successful practice. In 1857, he attended the Ohio Medical College, located at Cincinnati, and graduated from that institution in 1858. In 1865, he removed to Kokomo, and soon after formed a partnership with Drs. Johnson & Cooper. In 1875, he formed his present professional partnership by admitting Dr. J. McLean Moulder, who had been a student with him for a number of years. Dr. Armstrong has been in continuous practice in Howard County for over thirty years, and has established a remunerative business. He is well read and keeps up with the advancement of the times, in all matters, as well as in his profession. In the field of surgery, Dr. Armstrong ranks high among the operative surgeons of Indiana. His long experience and especial study of this most important branch eminently qualify him, and the remarkable success attending his operations has given him the lead over all his professional brethren in this work. Dr. Armstrong is a member of the State and County Medical Societies, and of the Kokomo Academy of Medicine. Of the county society and academy, he has served as President. Dr. Armstrong is also a member of the hardware firm of Armstrong, Pickett & Co., one of the largest mercantile houses in the county, and is interested in considerable farming land in Howard and Tipton Counties. He was united in marriage, in 1861, to Miss Sarah J. Ratcliff, of Russiaville. She died in 1863. Dr. Armstrong is an influential member of the Christian Church, and has taken a leading interest and aided largely in the construction of the new church edifice. He is a progressive member of the Democratic party and one of the most respected citizens of Kokomo.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


DR. HORACE A. ARMSTRONG (deceased) was born in Clinton County, Ohio, December 25, 1829, and was reared on a farm, receiving a good common school education of that day. In 1849, he removed with his father's family to Pittsburgh, Penn., where he commenced the study of medicine with his uncle, Charles L. Armstrong, M. D. In 1851, he removed to Kokomo, Ind., and engaged in farming, teaching and preparing for his chosen profession. In 1856, he formed a partnership with Dr. J. A. James, both in the practice of medicine and in the hardware trade, and continued a. member of the hardware firm of James, Armstrong & Co. (now the firm of Armstrong, Pickett & Co.), for ten years, but gave his time and attention to the practice of medicine, having graduated in 1558, at the Medical College of Ohio, with the highest honors of his class. During his practice in Howard County, he stood at the head of his profession. Dr. Armstrong died in 1868, having led a consistent life in the Christian Church, leaving an example well worthy of imitation. In February, 1861, Dr. Armstrong was married to Ella C. Mathers, of Meadville, Penn., who, previous to her marriage, was a teacher of elocution in the Allegheny City College. She was a woman of rare intellectual ability, and a prominent member of the Christian Church. Mr. Armstrong left two children, A. Buell and E. Armor, both young at the time of their father's death.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


A. F. ARMSTRONG, one of the representative business men of Indiana, is a native of Clinton County, Ohio, where he was born April 1, 1835, and where he received a common school education. In 1849, he came to Kokomo, and has made it his home up to the present time. In 1856, he, with Dr. J. A. James and H. A. Armstrong, founded the present business house of which he is still the head, and the remarkable success of which is due, in a great measure, to his skillful management and able financiering. For about thirty years, Mr. Armstrong has been actively engaged in the mercantile business, persistently carrying out the fixed purpose of his life. His career has been one of continuous prosperity, the result of industry, integrity, and fair, honorable dealing. Mr. Armstrong helped to organize the city of Kokomo, and was a member of the first Council, in which capacity he served eight consecutive years. He has assisted all progressive measures for the improvement and advancement of the material wealth of Howard County, and in all works of charity and benevolent societies he is s liberal supporter. In politics, Mr. Armstrong has always been an ardent and influential Democrat. He was elected to the State Senate in 1870, and held that position until 1874, serving three terms, and through the special session of 1872. His genial and gentlemanly deportment has always made him popular in his district, and in 1876, when candidate for Congress from the Eleventh District, he reduced the Republican majority from 3,100 to 1,400. In 1878, when a candidate for the nomination as State Auditor, he received nearly as large a vote as the numerous candidates combined, with the exception of Gen. Manson, who received the nomination. He has held various minor offices in the county; all of which have been discharged with fidelity and honor. In educational matters, Mr. Armstrong has always taken a progressive interest, and has served upon the School Board of Kokomo. In June, 1863, Mr. Armstrong was united in marriage with Miss Mary S. Brandon, daughter of Montgomery and Martha Brandon, of Kentucky, who were pioneer settlers of Indiana, settling in this State in 1834. Mr. B. died in Kokomo in 1880, surviving his beloved wife only a few months. Mr. Brandon was for many years prominently identified with the progress of the State, and a respected citizen. Mrs. Armstrong is foremost in all good deeds, and has given much attention to public and charitable works, such as President of the Orphans' Home, of the Suffrage Club, and the Ladies' Lecture Association, besides taking an active interest in the cause of temperance and all good works. They have been blessed with two children, Jennie and Sherman, who died in infancy. In religion, Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong are influential and leading members of the Christian Church, being members for many years. Mr. Armstrong has aided largely and been instrumental in clearing off the church debt, and in giving freely his time, means and energy to the upbuilding of the same. He helped to organize the first church of this faith in Howard County, and assisted in rearing its first edifice. In all of his business, social and political relations, Mr. Armstrong has always pursued an honorable and conscientious course, and is universally regarded as one of the citizens of whom Howard County is justly proud.

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"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


W. S. ARMSTRONG, Mayor of Kokomo, is a native of Clinton County, Ohio, where he was born in 1838. At the age of thirteen, his parents moved to Howard County, Ind. Here he was reared and educated, receiving good educational advantages. In 1862, he removed to Tipton and engaged in the hardware trade with his brother, remaining in that business four years. In 1866, he was appointed Auditor of Tipton County, and later in the same year was elected to that office. At the expiration of his term, he was re-elected in 1870, serving two terms, honorably and faithfully. He then removed to his farm adjoining Tipton, upon which he resided four years, engaged in stock-dealing and farming. In 1878, he returned to Kokomo, where he has since resided. Upon coming to Kokomo, he engaged with his brothers in the hardware business, continuing with them until the fall of 1880, when he was elected Mayor of Kokomo, to succeed Dr. Cole, deceased. This office, Mr. Armstrong is still administering. He served two terms as member of the Common Council, resigning while serving the last term, to accept the office of Mayor. In politics, Mr. Armstrong has always affiliated with the Democratic party, but is not a partisan in his views, being conservative and liberal. He is one of the leaders of his party in the county. Mr. Armstrong is progressive in his ideas and advocates all measures of improvement. He is a liberal supporter of all works of charity and benevolent associations, and ranks as a citizen of worth. In the discharge of the duties of the office in which he is now serving, Mr. Armstrong has been wise and judicious, and meets the approval of his fellow-citizens. He is a member of the A., F. & A. &I., I. 0. 0. F. and the K. of P. Mr. Armstrong was married in 1869 to Miss Mattie Winfield, a native of Ohio. They have four children - Walter Winfield, Horace Howard, Jessie and Merle. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong are members of the Christian Church of Kokomo. He was re-elected Mayor of the city of Kokomo on the 1st day of May, 1883, for the period of two years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


A. B. ARMSTRONG, son of Dr. Horace A. Armstrong, is a native of Howard County and was born in Kokomo December 31, 1861. He was educated in Kokomo, graduating from the schools of that city in 1881. He also is a graduate of Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College of Indianapolis. After finishing his education, he entered the hardware store of Armstrong, Pickett & Co., of Kokomo, and was for some time an active and efficient assistant. He still retains an interest in this firm. He is now engaged in the boot and shoe trade, his location being upon the east side of the public square. Mr. Armstrong carries a large and elegant stock of goods and has established a good trade. As a business man, he possesses superior qualifications, and he bids fair to become one of the leading merchants of the city. He was married in Kokomo, February 7, 1583, to Miss Dora McBride, of Michigan City, Ind.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


ARMSTRONG, PICKETT & CO., the leading mercantile house of Howard County, wholesale and retail dealers in hardware, implements, stoves, etc. In the spring of 1856, Messrs. J. A. James, H. A. Armstrong and A. F. Armstrong commenced business in the village of Kokomo, in a building on the east side of the public square. They occupied this place two years, when they found their business assuming such proportions as compelled them to seek more commodious quarters. Accordingly, they removed to the Bohan & Ashley corner, into a room 16x80 feet, at that time the second largest room in the village. In 1862, their business demanding more room, they purchased a lot on the east side of the square and commenced the erection of a three-story structure; but before it was completed, it was destroyed by a tornado, and in the downfall, carried with it the store occupied by the firm. The firm, however, immediately began to rebuild, completing the new building the same year. In 1867, their block was destroyed by fire, and the same year rebuilt, with only s two-story structure. In 1867, Dr. James retired from business and was succeeded by Mr. Josiah Beeson, the firm name being Armstrong, Beeson & Co. The following year, Dr. H. A. Armstrong died, and his interest was purchased by Dr. E. A. Armstrong. Two years later, Mr. Beeson sold his interest to Messrs. Zimri Nixon and Isaac Ellis, when the firm became Armstrong, Nixon & Co. In 1873, Mr. Nathan Pickett purchased the interest of Isaac Ellis, the firm name remaining the same. In 1874, another change was produced in the firm by the death of Mr. Nixon. The members composing the new firm were A. F. Armstrong, E. A. Armstrong, Nathan Pickett and George W. Landon, under the firm title of Armstrong, Pickett & Co. In 1875, the new firm, to accommodate their increasing business, began the construction of a block on the southeast corner of the public square. It is four stories and basement, 44x132 feet, is complete in all its appointments, and fire-proof. The basement is used for storing bulky goods, and the first floor, which is sixteen feet between joists, is the general salesroom. Upon the west side is a platform, 16xl00 feet, suspended from the ceiling, used for storing woodenware. In the front of the room between the doors is the .office, elevated and surrounded by plate-glass, and is convenient and commodious. The second floor in front is divided into offices, and is now occupied by I. E. Kirk, attorney at law ; S. T. Kirk, dentist; Armstrong & Moulder, physicians. Back of these are the stove and tinware rooms. The third floor contains the general stock - stoves, plows, cultivators, grain drills, etc. Over the west side is another suspended platform, where doors, sash and blinds are kept, and in the rear of the room is the stove-fitting department and tinshop. In the loft are stored spokes, hubs, hand-rakes, shovels, etc. Fine broad stairways give access to all the floors, while there is also an elevator in the rear of the building. Their block is lighted by gas, and a cistern, containing 500 barrels, is constructed within the building, to be used in case of fire. The building is of brick, upon stone foundation; the walls are eighteen inches thick, and altogether it is one of the finest buildings in Northern Indiana. The members of the firm are live, energetic business men, gentlemanly and accommodating, and well worthy of the patronage they have so meritoriously received from Howard and adjoining counties, and the business house which they have established is one of the most reliable and prosperous in the State. In 1876, Nathan Pickett transferred his interest to his son, J. C. Pickett, who has since taken an active interest in the business, the firm name remaining the same.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


PROF. JOHN W. BARNES, Superintendent of Schools of Howard County, is a native of Highland County, Ohio, born in 1847. He is the son of William W. and Eliza J. (Littler) Barnes, natives respectively of Connecticut and Ohio. John W. received a good education, attending the common schools until 1864, when, a youth of sixteen, he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, and served as a private four months, when he received an honorable discharge. With his regiment he participated in the battle of Monocacy Junction, Md. In the fall of 1864, his parents removed to Howard County, settling in a log cabin in Howard Township. Here, for two years, he was an assistant of his father in the saw mill and lumber business. He commenced teaching in Howard County in a log schoolhouse in Howard Township, and followed this occupation until the spring of 1869, when he entered Asbury University, located at Greencastle, graduating in the classical department in 1874. Upon his return to his home, his health being impaired, he assumed the management of his father's farm, conducting it two years. He then resumed teaching, having charge of a school in Ervin Township one term, subsequently becoming Principal of the High School of Greentown. In May, 1878, he was elected Superintendent of Schools of the county, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Milton Garrigus, who had been elected to the State Senate, and this position he has retained since, filling the office with ability and to the satisfaction of the people. During his term of service, he has elevated the schools of the county to s superior grade, has adopted the system of paying teachers according to the general average of the grade of license, and has established a system of according diplomas of merit to proficient teachers. Prof. Barnes is one of the leading Republicans of the county, and has served as Chairman of the County Central Committee. He was one of the Board of Examiners, held at Marion, to select a cadet, for the cadetship at West Point. He is a Mason, and belongs to Uniform Rank, No. 6, K. of P. Prof. Barnes was united in marriage, January 10, 1879, with Miss Wyoma A. Brandon, daughter of C. C. and Nancy (Woods) Brandon, of Kokomo. Mrs. Barnes is a highly accomplished lady, and prior to her marriage was a teacher in the public schools of Kokomo.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JOHN BATEMAN, a native of Washington County, Penn., was born February 26, 1811, and at the age of seven moved with his parents to Muskingum County, Ohio, where two years later his father died. The following year he worked for a farmer, after which he served an apprenticeship at the tanner's trade for three years, then he began boating, first on the Ohio, and later on the Mississippi River. He then served as Captain for fifteen years on the Ohio Canal, and the most of the time was owner of his boat. For the next five years, he was contractor and builder on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, between Zanesville and Cambridge, Ohio. In 1833, he began to manufacture salt on the Muskingum River, continuing three years, after which he engaged again in boating on the Ohio Canal. During the same time, he erected a water-power saw mill, which he ran for twelve years. In 1852, he bought 180 acres, which he farmed for twelve years, when he sold it at $60 per acre, in the spring of 1865, and came West, locating near Indianapolis, Ind. The following September, he bought a farm in Carroll County, Ind., on which he lived until 1874, when he sold out and located in Kokomo, where he is enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life. He started in life penniless, and only through industry and economy has he been successful, having accumulated property worth about $30,000. During his youth, his education was neglected, but through his own efforts he has acquired a good practical education. He has filled the office of Justice of Peace for six years in Ohio, and six in Carroll County, Ind. In 1832, he cast his first vote for Henry Clay, and voted with the Whig party until the Republican party was organized. He was married, January 35, 1835, to Miss Ann Maria Grosh, who was born of German parents in Washington County, Md., in 1813. She became the mother of nine children, four of whom still live - Samuel, in the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, at Zanesville, Ohio ; Sarah, the wife of William Bowers, of Kokomo; Ann, the wife of Henry White, of Howard County, farmer ; and John G., an engineer and sawyer in Kokomo. Samuel was a soldier two years in the late war, joining the Seventy-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; John G. was in the 100-day service. Mrs. Bateman, after having been a true, faithful wife and devoted mother for forty-seven years, died at the age of sixty-nine, a devout member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Bateman, since 1840, has been a member of the Baptist Church, and he is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He is the son of John and Mary Bateman. His mother lived with him the last thirty years of her life, dying in 1872, at the age of ninety and one-half years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


MILTON BELL was born in Clinton County, Ind., February 13, 1835. His mother, Nancy (Endicott) Bell, was n native of Pennsylvania. His father, Nathaniel Bell, a former citizen of Kokomo (now deceased), was born in Ohio, and was a pioneer of Clinton County, Ind. The educational facilities afforded Milton Bell in early life were at first meager, and ill health afterward thwarted his plans; yet despite all, he moved steadily on to success. Having gained a knowledge of the common English branches in the district schools, by attendance only during the winter terms, he entered Antioch College in 1854, at the founding of that institution. Remaining but one year, because of failing health, he returned home, and became a salesman in his father's store in Clinton County, and also engaged in teaching a district school. In the fall of 1856, his father removed to Cincinnati, and became a member of the silk and millinery firm of Doherty, Franklin & Bell, and Mil ton was employed as one of their salesmen. There he remained some two years, and in 1860 returned to Clinton County, Ind., and entered into partnership with his father in the mercantile business. In this he was successfully engaged until August, 1862, when he raised a company and joined the Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteers. This regiment went into camp at La Fayette, and was sent to the Army of the Cumberland. After taking part in the pursuit of Bragg and the battle of Stone River, Capt. Bell was compelled to resign, because exposure had brought on his old malady, hemoptysis, thus unfitting him for service. While teaching school, he had purchased a number of lega1 works, and some time after his return from the army he entered the office of McDonald & Roach, Indianapolis, as a student of law. On being admitted to the bar (in 1865), he commenced practicing in Kokomo. Events soon showed that he had found his true calling. Recognized as a promising young lawyer, he was, in 1867, elected City Attorney, and served in that capacity two years. Hard study and native talent wrought their unfailing results in an increase of clients and important cases. In 1873, in partnership with his brother, Arthur S. Bell (now deceased), H. H. Winslon, and J. F. Henderson, he built Opera Hall, a fine structure costing $40,000. Mr. Bell cast his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas, and has ever since been connected with the Democratic party. With respect to his religious affiliations, he joined, in boyhood, the old Christian Church, but his theological views are somewhat liberal, and he attends the various churches in Kokomo, without distinction of creed. He was married, February 26, 1867, to Miss Belle Purdum, daughter of the late Nelson Purdum, a prominent lawyer of Kokomo, and the first Mayor of that city. Their only child, May, was born January 5, 1868. His success as a lawyer is due in great measure to his candor with clients. He has ever made it an invariable rule never to tell a man he has a case, and lead him into litigation, unless the facts warrant such an action. He excels as a counselor, and in general is deemed one of the best attorneys in Howard County. He also has superior business abilities, as shown by the result of his investments. There is much in his character worthy of commendation, and he has attained a high place in the popular regard.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JOSIAH BEESON was born in Guilford County, N. C., January 28, 1818. His parents, Hezekiah and Merab (Reynolds) Beeson, also natives of North Carolina, moved to Wayne Counyy, Ind., about 1823, and there Josiah was reared and there learned the saddler's trade. He worked as a journeyman at Economy and Hagerstown a few years, and then bought a house and lot at Economy and there worked at his trade three years, and then moved to Williamstown and manufactured on his own account for eight or nine years. In 1852, he came to Howard County and purchased 200 acres of wild land near Greentown, which he improved and worked thirteen years, and then came to Kokomo and engaged in the hardware trade, under the firm name of Armstrong, Beeson & Co. In 1866, the firm were burned out, when Mr. B. sold his interest and purchased a farm in Monroe Township, which he worked until 1876, when he returned to Kokomo, purchased an interest in the planing mill and lumber trade of Hunt Bros. & Co., which he retained two years, and then started his present business as dealer in furniture, etc., of which he carries a mammoth stock ; he is also prepared to do custom work and to fill orders for anything in his line. He was married, in Henry County, Ind., to Elizabeth Lamb, a native of North Carolina, who died in 1854; subsequently he married a native of this county, Charity Lamb, his present wife, who has borne him three children - Norvill, Luella and May. Mr. Beeson is a Freemason and votes the Republican ticket.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JOHN BOHAN was born October 26, 1820, in Ireland, and was the elder of two children born to Patrick and Elizabeth (McGinnis) Bohan. They emigrated to America in 1823, locating in Westmoreland County, Penn., where they forged from the forest a good home, and reared their family. John Bohan was left an orphan at twelve, and consequently received less than three months' schooling, but through his own industry he has acquired a good practical education. In 1836, he came West to Madison, Ind., where he began as a common laborer on a railroad; but he soon went to Indianapolis, where he was a stage-driver for three years. He then moved to Anderson, and in 1844 he moved to Kokomo, when the town consisted of three or four log cabins. He brought with him $300 worth of general merchandise, the first stock brought to the town, and continued in business with success until 1861, when he sold out and enlisted in the United States service. He was Quartermaster of the Thirty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but this regiment was re-organized into the Eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Cavalry. One year after, he was placed on detached duty, serving as Quartermaster for Gen. R. W. Johnson, as one of the main staff, until he was honorably discharged in October, 1864. This regiment belonged to the First Division of the Fourteenth Army Corps. At the battle of Perryville, Ky., Mr. Bohan was taken prisoner, and was held about two hours, when he took shelter under an old mill, and when the army moved on, he came from his hiding place and made a rapid retreat. He had charge of the ammunition train at the battle of Chickamauga, where he was ordered to bring fifteen wagons of ammunition to the front. He acted promptly and here he was wounded in both hands in less than five minutes, but during his affliction he was not off of duty a single day. In the fall of 1864, he returned home and a engaged in the grocery business until 1876, when he sold out and retired from active business. Mr. Bohan served as County Auditor from 1845 to 1856. In 1880, he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he is now filling. He cast his first Presidential vote for Gen. Harrison in 1840, and has been a stanch supporter of Republican principles ever since. Mr. Bohan was married, in 1845, to Miss Mary E. Myers, of Madison County, Ind. She was born in 1828 in Ohio. Three children have blessed their union - Julia E., the wife of Stephen E. Ludlow; Patrick H., a carriage trimmer and painter; and Mary E., the wife of E. S. Long. Mrs. Bohan is a member of the Christian Church, and Mr. Bohan is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He has always been in the advance upon all public matters tending to the improvement of the county, and has aided all measures of charity and benevolence.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JUDGE H. A. BROUSE, a native of Stark County, Ohio, was born January 1, 1820. He assisted his father on the farm until he was seventeen years old, when he began clerking in a dry goods store in Lewisburg, Preble County, where he attended night school. At twenty, he read law under Judge Crane for two years, when he removed to Wayne County, Ind., where, in 1845, he was admitted to the bar, subsequently, in 1847, he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court. He practiced in Centreville until September, 1848, when he located in Howard County, one mile south of Kokomo where he lived two years. In 1849, he opened a law office in Kokomo, where he has been practicing ever since. He is a member of and assisted to organize the Republican party in this county. In 1866, he was appointed Circuit Judge of this district, comprising Madison, Hamilton, Howard and Tipton Counties. He served three years, and then he resumed his practice of law. When Kokomo became a city, he was elected Town Councilman, and has served a number of terms in the City Council since. Mr. Brouse is a public-spirited man; he took a large share of stock in the Kokomo Normal School building, and canvassed the county in its behalf, and has always taken an active part in all public enterprises. He was married, in 1844, to Miss Elizabeth Leopold, of Montgomery County, Ohio. She is of French descent, and was born in February, 1825. This marriage has been blessed with nine children, seven of whom are still living - Rilla, wife of C. J. Becktel, of Muncie, Ind.; Laura L., wife of A. B. Southard, of Chicago; Emma; Lucy, wife of W. H. Davis, of Kokomo; Dora D., William O. and Macy A. George C. and Charles P. are deceased. Judge Brouse and wife are now enjoying the fruits of a well-spent life.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


SAUL T. BUTCHER was born March 28, 1835, in Decatur, Ind., and is the sixth of thirteen children born to William Butcher, a native of Virginia, and of German descent, and Sarah (Love) Butcher, a native of Scotland. He and his father came to this county in the fall of 1853, and located in Ervin Township, in the forest. Mr. Butcher assisted his father on the $arm until he was twenty years of age, and received a good education. His father rewarded him for his labors with eighty acres of land. He sold this some time since, and engaged in the general grocery business in Kokomo, where he has a trade of $6,000 annually. Re- enlisted in the service of his country in the fall of 1861, under Col. Steele, and was in the following hard-fought battles: Siege of New Madrid, siege of Island No. 10, siege of Vicksburg, and the battles of Champion Hills, and Jackson, Miss., and was mustered out in the fall of 1864. Mr. Butcher was married, February 15, 1855, to Miss Dorothy Shoemaker, a native of Indiana, and the eldest of three children born to Elias and Elizabeth (Pruitt) Shoemaker, of German and Anglo-Saxon descent. Four children crowned this union - Ellis A. (deceased), born February 20, 1858; Frank D., born March 16, 1860; Nola M., born September 9, 1871, and one infant (deceased). Mr. Butcher has always voted the Republican ticket, and is one of its stanch advocates. Be is an energetic, wide-awake business man; is a member of the United Order of Honor, and the Masonic fraternity.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JOHN W. COOPER, Clerk of the Circuit Court, was born in Rush County, Ind., July 18, 1837. He is the son of Stanley and Lucinda (Ward) Cooper, both natives of Kentucky. They are still residents of Rush county, living on the same farm. John W. was reared on the farm, and received a fair education in the common schools. He also studied three terms at an academy. When he left the farm, he read law with J. C. Green, of Shelbyville, Ind., for one year, and in 1859 he was admitted to the bar. The following year he remained at home and pursued the study of law. November 6, 1859, he was married to Miss Fannie M. Simmons, born October 14, 1840, daughter of Augustus Simmons, of Rush County. The result of this union has been one son - Horace M.; and two daughters - Flora H. and Linea A. Mr. Cooper began the practice of law in Howard County, in October, 1860, and continued in active practice until 1875, when he took the office of Clerk of the Circuit Court, having been elected on the Republican ticket in 1874. He was re-elected in 1878, and has served nearly eight years. He was Mayor of the city of Kokomo four years -from 1869 to 1873. He has been an active politician all his life, and has been Deputy Internal Revenue Collector. He came here with limited means, but, through strict attention to his profession, he has accumulated good city property, and is in good circumstances. He is a leader in all public enterprises and improvements, and belongs to the Masonic and I. 0. 0. F. fraternities.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


WILLIAM COOPER, M. D., is a son of James and Delilah (Baker) Cooper, who were both natives of Virginia, and pioneer settlers of Ohio. The subject of this sketch was born in Preble County, Ohio, August 21, 1839. When fifteen years of age, his parents removed to Cass County, Ind. Mr. Cooper received a good education, and was a teacher for nearly four years in Cass and Miami Counties. Deciding upon the medical profession as his life work, he entered the office of his brother, Dr. John Cooper, and began the study of this most important science, under the tutelage and instruction of his brother, he remained nearly four years. He then entered the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati in 1866, and, in 1567, graduated from that institution. At Burlington, Ind., he commenced business, and remained in active and successful practice ten years, extending his labors in the counties of Cass, Howard, Carroll and Clinton. In 1876, Dr. Cooper removed to Kokomo, intending to retire from practice, but the eminent reputation attained by him has forced him to continue, and he is now attending to a large and lucrative patronage. As a physician, Dr. Cooper keeps up with the advancement of his profession; as a citizen, he is liberal minded and public spirited; and socially is a cultivated and genial gentleman. He is a member of the A., F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and a member of the Board of Health. Dr. Cooper was united in marriage with bliss Eliza A. Newcomb, daughter of John and Emily (Braden) Newcomb. Mrs. Cooper is a native of Ohio, born in Darke County in 1845. By this union there are four children - Sarah F., wife of Dr. Lovell, Anna L., Armintie A. and Ronoldes M.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


E. W. CONWELL, book-keeper for L. Snider, was born in Wayne County, Ind., April 20, 1857, and is the son of J. B. and Mary C. (Tharp) Conwell, both natives of Indiana. J. B. Conwell moved from Wayne County, Ind., just after the war, and lived in Indianapolis two years, when he came to Kokomo, where he still lives, and where Mrs. Conwell died in 1880. He has been making his home with his son, his only child, ever since. E. W. Conwell attended the common schools until he came to Kokomo with his parents, when he entered the high school, graduating in the class of 1877. He taught school the following winter, and afterward clerked in a book store. July 1, 1880, he entered the office of L. Snider as book-keeper, where he has faithfully discharged his duty ever since. He was married, September 2, 1880, to Miss Ella H. Bowers, of Kokomo, she was born October 30, 1558, and is the daughter of William and Sarah Bowers, both natives of Ohio. Mr. Conwell is a member of the Congregational Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


SHERIDAN COX, A. M., Superintendent of city schools at Kokomo, was born in Harrison County, Ohio, December 20, 1833. He is the son of Elijah and Christina (Shepler) Cox, who were natives respectively of Maryland and Ohio. Elijah Cox was a millwright, but spent the latter part of his life upon a farm. Sheridan Cox, when quite young, was taken by his parents to Coshocton County, Ohio, where he worked on the farm during the summer and attended the district schools in the winter, he commenced teaching in 1854, taught district schools four winters, attending preparatory schools during the summers, two of which were spent at the McNuley Normal School of Ohio. He entered the Ohio Wesleyan University in 1858, from which he graduated in 1862. He was distinguished while in college for proficiency in mathematics, receiving the degree of A. M. in 1865. He removed to Illinois in 1862, where he taught Latin and Greek one year in Marshall College; in 1863, he returned to Ohio and superintended the Roscoe Graded Schools; in 1864, he superintended the Canal Dover Union Schools; he removed to Indiana in 1865, and taught the Winchester Seminary one year; was Principal of the Logansport High Schools in 1866; in 1867, he was made Superintendent of all the Logansport Public Schools, which he organized and graded, and remained there seven years, during which period the number of teachers increased from eleven to twenty-three, and the number of pupils from 500 to 1,600; in 1873, he took charge of the Kokomo Public Schools, where he is still meeting with eminent success. He was married at New Philadelphia, Ohio, October 11, 1866, to Miss Bessie Goodbarn.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


O. V. DARBY, merchant, has a complete line of dry goods and carpets, doing a good business of $45,000 to $50,000 per year, and is now one among the leading merchants of Kokomo. E. V. Darby was born in Jackson Township, Howard County, January 3, 1853, and assisted his father upon the farm until he was sixteen years of age, when his father died. Soon after, he entered Wabash College at Crawfordville, Ind., for one year. He then returned home and assisted his elder brother, J. K., on the farm for one year. Mr. Darby then entered a dry goods store in Logansport as a clerk, at a salary of $3 per week. This was shortly increased to $10. In eighteen months, he changed to the Bee-hive Store, where he remained four years. He then took charge of a stock of goods owned by William Dolan, of Logansport, for three years. Mr. Dolan then began business in Kokomo with a branch stock with Mr. Darby in charge. Three months later, Mr. Darby and his brother, J. K., purchased this stock of dry goods and groceries, occupying two rooms on Main street, where they did an extensive business under the firm name of O. V. Darby & Brother, until August 1, 1882, when J. K. Darby retired and O. V. Darby became successor to the firm, and is now conducting a large and successful dry goods and carpet trade. Mr. Darby started in life a poor boy, being left an orphan when but seventeen years of age, but by being industrious and economical, starting on $3 per week, he has accumulated a fair competency and is now receiving a good income. He was married, in 1879, to Miss Eveline Vinnedge, of Kokomo. One daughter, Anna E., blesses this union. Mrs. Darby is member of the Congregational Church. Mr. Darby is a member of the I. O. O. F. and one of the enterprising public-spirited business men of Kokomo.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


DR. JAMES M. DARNALL, President and book-keeper of the Kokomo Milling Company, was born in Jessamine County, Ky., June 28, 1817. He was the eldest of eight children born to Zenas and Agnes (Bridges) Darnall, both of English descent. His parents were reared in Kentucky, and were married in 1816. In 1822, they moved North to Decatur County, Ind., where his father bought a partially improved farm. Here he lived a few years, when he sold his land and bought 160 acres near by. He afterward sold this and moved into Shelby County, thence into Boone County in 1854, where he purchased a farm, on which he lived until his death in 1857, at the age of sixty-nine years. His wife died in Decatur County, aged fifty-four years. Both were prominent members of the Christian Church. Dr. Darnall assisted his father on the farm until he was twenty years old, when he entered Hanover College, which he attended at intervals for three years. He also taught school part of the time, after which he studied medicine for two years at Connersville, Ind., with Dr. Brown, teaching in the meantime. In the spring of 1842, he located at Burlington, Carroll County, where he began to practice medicine with Dr. Anderson. Dr. Darnall remained at Burlington twenty-two years, twenty of which he had been practicing for himself. He met with good success, having a large practice. His health failed him and he was induced to come to Kokomo in 1864. He practiced here two years, when he entered the drug business with his brother and J. M. Scotton. The firm of Darnall, Scotton & Co. continued in business until 1873, when Simpson B. Darnall died, and the firm of Darnall & Scotton became successors, continuing five years, when our subject retired from the drug trade, and soon after became owner of one-third of the stock in the Kokomo Milling Company, and has been superintending since. He has been a lively, energetic business man, and has been eminently successful through life. Mr. Darnall was married, in 1845, to Miss Mary Gwinn, of Carroll County, Ind. She was the daughter of Samuel and Magdalene Gwinn, and was born in December, 1823. They have one adopted daughter, Mary E. Mr. Darnall was in early life a Whig, and later a Republican. He has been City Councilman and Mayor. In 1874, he was elected as Representative of Howard County. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and he and wife are both members of the Christian Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


DR. HENRY DAVIS is a native of Miami County, Ohio, and was born August 18, 1811. His father, John Davis, was a native of Georgia, and his mother, Lydia (Coate), was born in South Carolina. These were married in Ohio, and they reared a family of four sons and one daughter, the mother dying in 1826, and the father in 1852. Dr. Davis was reared on the farm and went three miles to the common school. He taught some during his youth, and upon reaching manhood began the study of medicine, after which he practiced for about eighteen years, when he became disgusted with his profession, and leaving a good practice, he engaged in the mercantile business in West Milton, until January, 1868, when he removed his stock of goods to Kokomo, where he, together with his sons, was among the leading merchants, doing a business of from $75,000 to $150,000 per year. In 1875, he sold out to his sons and has since lived a retired life, except superintending a well-stocked farm near town. He is a strong temperance man and a member of the Republican party. In 1876, he was elected Township Trustee of Centre Township. He cast his first Presidential vote for Henry Clay, in 1832. He was married, December 11, 1838, to Miss Eve H. Newman, of Muncie, Ind. She was born August 10, 1816. They had four sons - Orlando M., Theodore A., Edwin L. and Omar N. Mrs. Davis was a true mother and loving companion. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church from childhood, and was one of the prominent workers in the Orphans' Home Association, of which she was President for a number of years. She died January 3, 1883, aged sixty-six years.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


SAMUEL DAVIS, of the firm of S. Davis & Sons, was born August 2, 1813, in Miami County, Ohio. At the age of thirteen, being left an orphan, he began the battle of life for himself. He worked at whatever his hands found to do until 1829, when he secured a clerkship in a general store, working six months at $6 per month, after which he worked on the farm for a year, when he learned the blacksmith trade. He worked at this eighteen months at $6.50 per month, saving from his labors $102.50. With this money, he walked eighty miles, and made an entry of eighty acres of mild land in Miami County, Ohio, having but 18 cents left on his return. Soon after, he commenced clerking in a dry goods store. Shortly after he traded his land, which was valued at $200, and gave bond for a deed when he became of age. He then clerked in Richmond one year, and in the spring of 1834 became a partner in a dry goods house, owning a one-third interest. He made numerous changes until 1839, when he began the study of law. In January 1840, he was married to Miss Sarah McConnell, of Hamilton, Ohio, daughter of Jesse McConnell. Six children have blessed this union, the four oldest dying young (one daughter and three sons). Two sons Henry C. and Walter H. - are still living. Mr. Davis taught school six months at $16 per month, and kept hotel in Milton, Ohio, for eighteen months. In 1844, he began the mercantile business again, continuing for a number of years. In 1857-58, he built and took a one-third interest in a distillery, which he sold the same year, clearing $5,000 during this year's business. He was always enterprising and bought anything that came into market that he could handle, and in 1860 he was worth about $20,000. He removed to Tippecanoe City, Ohio, where he was elected Probate Judge of Miami County in 1860. The same year he located at Troy, where he took his seat in 1861. He was re-elected in 1863, and served six years. During his official life, he had a half-interest in the largest dry goods house of Troy, a half-interest in a boot and shoe store and a two-thirds interest in a warehouse. He was worth $75,000 when he came to Kokomo in 1872, and started a dry goods store. He has been an active merchant ever since, but the last few years he has depended upon his sons, Henry M. and Walter C., to conduct the business. Mr. Davis is one of the largest real estate owners in Kokomo, and is a stockholder in the Howard National Bank, of which he is one of the Directors. He was admitted to the bar in 1843, in Adams County, Ind., but he never practiced law. He is a Master Mason, and has occupied all the chairs in the I. O. O. F. Mrs. Davis is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Davis is a liberal supporter of all benevolent and business enterprises, and the firm of S. Davis & Sons is one of the leading business firms of Kokomo, and is represented by a capital of about $100,000.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


A. F. DAYHUFF, M. D., was born in Orange County, Ind., in 1827. He is the son of Daniel and Rachel (Smith) Dayhuff, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania. His father was one of the pioneers of Indiana, and settled in an early day in Paoli, Orange County, where he remained until his death, which occurred January 27, 1863. His mother died in 1839, and subsequently his father married the second time. Daniel Dayhuff served as Sheriff of that county for twenty-one years, after which he kept a hotel. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. The subject of this sketch was the second of a family of six children, and received a good common school education, after which he attended the State University at Bloomington, Ind. He then clerked in a mercantile store in New Albany nearly a year, but on account of his health, returned home. He began reading medicine with Dr. William Sherrod, of Paoli, remaining with him four years. Subsequently he went to Chicago and took a full course of medicine and surgery in the Rush Medical College. In May, 1853, he came to Kokomo to obtain rest, was induced to begin practice here, and formed a partnership with Dr. James, with whom he remained about three years. He has been in active practice ever since, and has been in partnership with Drs. Savill, Richmond and Martin. He has always had a very extensive practice in the city and county; has also been one of the most extensive real estate dealers in the city, and was the originator of the Dayhuff, Sharp & Armstrong Block. He has owned valuable farming lands, but through the panic he lost a large fortune which had been accumulated by years of labor. Dr. Dayhuff is a member of the State and County Medical Societies, and of the Kokomo Academy of Medicine. He was married, November 1, 1855, to Miss Addie Frazier, of New Albany, Ind., born in Lawrence County, Ind., January 26, 1834. This union has been blessed with six children - Sallie, wife of Byron Haskett; Daniel F., now in the Pension Office at Washington, D. C.; Jessie F., Mollie P., Mattie (deceased), and Julia (deceased). Dr. Dayhuff is an active politician in the Republican ranks, and was appointed by the Government as Pension Examiner in March, 1851, in which position he is still serving. He ranks high among the enterprising and public-spirited citizens of Howard County, and is an esteemed and honored gentleman.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


JAMES W. DeHAVEN was born in Greene County, Ohio, March 17, 1833, and is the second of the nine children born to John and Athaliah DeHaven, natives of Virginia, who, about 1809 settled in Greene County, where the father followed milling for about twenty-five years. James W. learned the business of his father and at the age of eighteen years found ready employment at various points in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. October 19, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Seventy-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was soon appointed Sergeant; in the fall of 1862, he was discharged, and the following spring was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the State militia, which commission he resigned in July, 1863, and settled in Howard Township, this county, farming for two years; for the ten years following, he was engaged at milling in various parts of the county. He next held the position of Tollmaster on the Kokomo, Greentown & Jerome pike, and in 1880 was elected Sheriff of the county, which office he held one term. In Greene County, Ohio, April 17, 1863, he married Miss Mary V. Grouse, a native of Berkeley County, Va., died July 8, 1880, the mother of four children - Charles A., Nora, John F. and Addie (the last deceased). During his shrievalty he was very unfortunate, losing his wife and child and considerable property. He is a Freemason, and a member of the G. A. R., and a Republican, and for twenty-five years has been a member of the Methodist Church.

"Counties of Howard and Tipton, IN" published in 1883 by F.A. Battey & Co., Chicago, IL
City of Kokomo


Deb Murray