REV. RAPHAEL FRANCIS DONNELLY. Among the many advantages that make Gary a pleasant place to have a home are its fine school facilities and its numerous church organizations, learning and religion permeating its business, civic and social life. Saint Luke's Catholic Church, with a large and devout congregation, is an example of church influence and is in a very prosperous condition under the pastorate of Rev. Raphael F. Donnelly, whose sound church doctrine is very acceptable to his parishioners. Reverend Donnelly is a man of broad mind, great humanitarianism, much learning and unusual organizing ability, and, perhaps due to the last-named gift, his field of active church service has been one of wider experience than often comes into the life of a priest in a similar space of time in regard to change of location and effective work done.

Father Donnelly was born in Huntington County, Indiana, February 24, 1889, and is a son of John and Mary (Moran) Donnelly, the former a native of Wooster, Ohio, and the latter of Birmingham, England. His maternal grandparents were Dominick and Catherine (O'Malley) Moran, natives of County Mayo, Ireland, who spent a short time in England then came to the United States in 1881, settling in Ohio. The paternal grandparents of Father Donnelly were Ambrose and Bridget (McDermott) Donnelly, natives of County Langford, Ireland, who settled in Ohio in 1850.

Father Donnelly studied. at Saint Patrick's parochial school at Fort Wayne, and afterward entered Saint Joseph's College, Rensselaer, Indiana, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, June 17, 1908. Having decided to devote his life to the Catholic priesthood, he became a student at Mount Saint Mary's Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, where he completed his theological course as a member of the class of 1913. On November 18 of the same year he was ordained a Catholic priest by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Herman Joseph Alerding, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Fort Wayne, and his first charge was as assistant to Father E. F. Barrett, at All Saint Church, Hammond. He remained there for three years, and his next service was at Anderson, Indiana, as assistant to the Rev. Thomas Mungovan, of Saint Mary's parish, until December 13, 1919. Failing in health, due to too close attention to his ministerial work, he spent the next year and one-half at Tucson, Arizona, and San Antonio, Texas. On June 15, 1921, he assumed the pastorate of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, at Ege, Noble County, Indiana, remaining there until August 24, 1925, when he became resident pastor of Saint Luke's parish at Gary, which pastorate he has since held.

Father Donnelly has dedicated himself to his duties in association with this parish to the end that it has been constantly gaining in size, his work in spiritual ministry having borne much fruit. He is also a business advisor of his people, as well as guide and friend, and no man at Gary is held in greater respect or esteem. Father Donnelly is a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus and belongs to the Catholic Order of Forresters and the B. P. O. Elks.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM MILTON GILMORE. Of the men of energy, perseverance and good judgment who have contributed to the advancement and development of Clark County, few have made more rapid strides or contributed more valuable services than William Milton Gilmore, who is engaged in the successful management of a prosperous real estate and insurance business at Jeffersonville. Although he is still to be numbered among the younger generation of men engaged in this prolific field, he has already been the medium through whom large transactions have been carried through to a successful and satisfying conclusion, and has likewise been the promulgator of movements or a development character that have added to his community's growth and population.

Mr. Gilmore was born December 27, 1894, on a farm in Clark County, Indiana, and is a son of Marryman and Carrie L.. (Raymond) Gilmore. The Gilmore family is of Scotch and Irish extraction and were Colonial settlers who took part in the Revolutionary war and later in the War of 1812. The great-grandfather of William Milton Gilmore was John Gilmore, who was born in Virginia and in young manhood accompanied the first settlers into the new Kentucky country. After residing there for a few years, in 1802 he penetrated the Wilderness of the Northwest Territory, settling on an unimproved farm in Indiana prior to statehood. There he worked industriously until he had prepared a good home and productive farm, and eventually became one of the substantial men of the community.

William Milton Gilmore, the grandfather of William Milton Gilmore of this review, was born in Clark County, where he followed farming and the raising of live stock and was one of the locality's constructive citizens. He married Elizabeth Marryman, who was also born in Clark County, and they reared a large family to honorable man and womanhood.

Marryman. Gilmore was reared in Clark County, where he received a subscription school education, and in young manhood began farming. In his later years he turned his attention to merchandising, and for many years was the successful and energetic proprietor of a general store at Jeffersonville, where he built up a large and loyal patronage. He was never a man to seek office, but took an interest in public matters and gave his support to worth-while movements. Mr. Gilmore married Miss Carrie L. Raymond, a native of Kentucky, and they became the parents of four children: Raymond L., John M., William M. and Gordon.

William Milton Gilmore attended the public schools of Jeffersonville, following which he took a course at a local business college. He was twenty years of age when he embarked upon his independent career and was engaged in clerical work until September, 1917, at which time he joined the United States Marines, for service during the World war, and after going through a training period was assigned as drill instructor at Paris Island, South Carolina, where he remained for six months. He was next transferred to Cuba, where he remained four months, being connected with the coast defense, and finally went to France, where his contingent remained until after the signing of the armistice. He returned to Jeffersonville about one year after the close of the war and for something more than seven years was engaged in farming in Clark County. In 1927 he established his present business, which is conducted as William M. Gilmore, with offices located at 136 East Court Avenue. Mr. Gilmore is an excellent judge of realty values in this part of the country, where he has passed his entire career, and is known as a clever and persuasive operator who has a record for straightforward dealing and honorable accomplishment. In addition to his real estate interests he carries a line of general insurance, representing a number of the well-known old-line companies.

Mr. Gilmore is an active and constructive member of the Chamber of Commerce of Jeffersonville, and belongs to the Masons, Knights of Pythias and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is commander of Lawrence Capehart Post No. 135 of the American Legion.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ARTHUR ROSS MEAD, M. D. Aside from any distinction which may attach to being a member of one of the oldest and most highly respected families in Indiana, Arthur R. Mead, M. D., of Jeffersonville, is known for his high professional character and ability and for the success that has attended his labors in one of the most difficult of sciences. It is indicative of his ability and the confidence in which he is held that he has been a successful private physician and surgeon, has been active in the work of medical organizations, and is now attached to the staff of the Clark County Memorial Hospital.

Doctor Mead was born at Pekin, Washington County, Indiana, January 26, 1887, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Harriet Elizabeth (Diehl) Mead. The American ancestor of this family settled in North Carolina, where members distinguished themselves in the Colonial wars as well as civilians, and later generations moved to Kentucky, in which state was born David Mead, the great-grandfather of Doctor Mead. In young manhood David Mead came to the then wilderness of Indiana, where he hewed a farm and labored during the rest of his life in tilling the soil and in supplying the family larder with game through his skill as a hunter and trapper. Ben Mead, the grandfather of Doctor Mead, settled in Washington County, this state, about 1830, and passed his entire life there in agricultural operations. He was a man of high and sturdy character and one who commanded the respect and esteem of the entire community. Benjamin F. Mead, the father of Dr. Arthur R. Mead, was born in Washington County, Indiana, and acquired a common school education in the rural districts. Reared on a farm and belonging to an agricultural family, it was natural for him to take up the tilling of the soil as his life work, and during his active years he developed a fertile and well-developed farm. He is now living in comfortable retirement, having reached the ripe age of seventy-eight years. Mr. Mead married Harriet Elizabeth Diehl, also of Washington County and a member of an old and respected family of this state, and they became the parents of four children: Flora, Albert O., Mary and Arthur R.

Arthur R. Mead attended the grade school at Pekin, Washington County and the Central Normal Teachers' College at Danville, this state, following which he entered the medical department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky. He was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine as a member of the class of 1911, following which he had two years of clinical work in the City Hospital, Louisville, and started practice at Pleasant Lake, Indiana. In 1913 he came to Jeffersonville, and here has been successful in the development of a large and lucrative practice, his well-equipped offices being located at 437 Spring Street. From the time of his arrival Doctor Mead impressed himself upon his adopted community as a man of personal reliability and proficiency in his profession, and attracted to himself the patronage of some of the leading families of the community. Later he was invited to become a member of the staff of the Clark County Memorial Hospital, and still retains this post. Being equally familiar with all departments of his calling, he has specialized in none. He belongs to the Clark County Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical Society, in both of which organizations he takes a prominent part, and is a tireless student and investigator. Fraternally he is a Mason and Knight Templar.

At Jeffersonville, Doctor Mead was united in marriage with Miss Pearl Bruner, who was born in Arkansas, a daughter of Dr. E. W. and Joetta (Brentlinger) Bruner. Her grandfather, Dr. Jacob Bruner, a physician and surgeon and an accredited minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, came to Indiana about 1830 and spent the rest of his life in practicing medicine and preaching the Gospel at Bedford, Utica and elsewhere. Dr. E. W. Bruner, the father of Mrs. Mead, was also a prominent physician and surgeon of Jefferson County. During the war between the states he served as a commissioned officer, and later, for five years, was employed by the Government as visiting physician to the surviving Creek and Cherokee Indians in the South. He returned then to Jeffersonville, Indiana, where he passed away after sixty years of medical practice. He married Joetta Brentlinger, and they became the parents of six children. One of these, Mrs. Meadís brother, is Dr. Ralph W. Bruner, a well-known physician and surgeon of Jeffersonville, a sketch of whose career will be found elsewhere in this work. Doctor and Mrs. Mead are the parents of two daughters, Gladah Elizabeth and Marjorie Ann, both attending school, and the members of the family reside in a pleasanat and attractive home located at 911 East Court Street, Jeffersonville.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN COURTLAND WORRALL. The entire career of John C. Worrall may be said to have been identified with the matter of transportation, for after twenty years of experience in railroading in the West during his younger years he returned to his native State of Indiana to become proprietor of an automobile business, the Worrall Motor Sales Company of Jeffersonville, exclusive dealers in Hudson and Essex cars. From a modest beginning, through industry and good judgment Mr. Worrall has built up a prosperous business, and now has a large and modern salesroom and repair plant, where he has installed every up-to-date contrivance for the care and repair of these makes of automobiles.

Mr. Worrall was born on a farm in Clark County, Indiana, December 25, 1888, and is a son of Oliver T. and Annie E. (Espy) Worrall. The Worrall family originated in Ireland, whence three brothers, Thomas, John T. And William Worrall, came to America on a sailing vessel and landed on the eastern coast. Seeking their fortunes further to the West, about 1795 they started on their long and perilous journey, coming down the Ohio River until they reached Harrodís Creek, Kentucky, where Thomas and John T. remained. William, however, pushed on further and finally reached Southern California, where his descendants are now the famous Worrall fruit-growing family. After a few years in Kentucky, Thomas Worrall went on to Iowa, where all trace of him was lost. In 1805 John T. Worrall established the first ferry across the Ohio River, from Harrodís Creek to Utica, Indiana, and operated it with success for many years. In 1817 he crossed over into Indiana, and spent the remaining years of his life as a farmer.

Curtis Worrall, son of John T. Worrall, and grandfather of John C. Worrall, was born in Indiana, where he attended the subscription schools and was reared on his fatherís farm. His entire life was devoted to the tilling of the soil and the breaking of new land for the production of produce, with the exception of the Civil war period, when he served as a soldier of the Union and was active in repelling the raids of Morgan. He was a man of reliability and high character and one who held the esteem and respect of the community.

Oliver T. Worrall was born in Clark County, Indiana, and spent the active years of his career as a gardener. He never held office, but was accounted one of the reliable and constructive citizens of his community, noted for his fair dealing and personal probity. He married Annie E. Espy, a native of Chester, Illinois, who was a descendant of General Bartholomew, after whom Bartholomew County, Indiana, was named. Mr. and Mrs. Worrall became the parents of six children.

John C. Worrall attended the public schools of Clark County until he reached the age of fourteen years, in the meantime assisting his father in his work on the home place. Like many country boys of his day, he became attracted by the romantic life of railroading, and, leaving home, secured employment with the Pennsylvania Railroad. After twenty years of work as an engineer with this and other roads he resigned and returned to Jeffersonville, where he organized the Worrall Motor Sales Company, in February, 1928, taking over the franchise as exclusive dealer in his community of Hudson and Essex cars. He has a large and well-equipped showroom and warehouse at 430 Wall Street, which is so arranged as to do any kind of work on these cars, and during his first year of business put 110 cares in the hands of purchasers. Mr. Worrall is a business man of ability and one who has readily accustomed himself to the particulars of his present business. He has made and held many friends and patrons, and his excellent workmanship and fair dealing have combined to bring him into the confidence of the general public. He has a number of civic connections and belongs to Jeffersonville Blue Lodge, A. F. and A. M.

Mr. Worrall married Miss Maud Applegate, a native of Indiana, and they are the parents of three children: Miss Joyce Emmaly, Darcy Anderson and John David, all of whom are attending schools at Jeffersonville. The pleasant and attractive Worrall home is situated at 430 Watt Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EDGAR HINTON HUGHES. A prosperous business enterprise at Jeffersonville, Indiana, is the E. H. Hughes Company, the proprietor of which is Edgar Hinton Hughes, an experienced, qualified machinist, a military aviator and an overseas veteran of the World war. He comes from an old Welsh family of Colonial settlement in Virginia about the time of the Revolutionary war, where, like their kindred, the Buckners of Kentucky, they long maintained an almost feudal style of living on their great plantations. Prior to the changes brought about by the war between the states these families and many others of their class and sections were recognized people of wealth and social importance, as are many of these today with perhaps slightly changed standards. Jeffersonville has been Mr. Hughes' home all his life and since his youth he has been interested in mechanics, more especially in connection with the automobile industry and aviation.

Edgar Hinton Hughes was born at Jeffersonville, March 8, 1896, and is a son of George R. and Elizabeth (Rose) Hughes. George R. Hughes was born in Kentucky, and at the outbreak of the war between the states enlisted in the Confederate army and was with Morgan's men in their spectacular raids through Southern Indiana, Missouri and Illinois. At the close of the war he enlisted in the regular United States Army, with which he served for eight years, and then settled in Clark County, where he entered the building construction business, and during his career in that line of industry erected some of the finest buildings in this part of the state. He was known for his high character and personal and business integrity, and held the respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens in full degree. Mr. Hughes married Miss Elizabeth Rose, a native of Kentucky, whose father, Andrew Rose, was the first of the family to come to Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Hughes there were born eleven children.

The public schools of Jeffersonville furnished Edgar Hinton Hughes with his early education, and after he had graduated from high school he entered Purdue University. He left this institution to become identified with the automobile industry as a mechanic, and in the years that followed worked his way through all the branches of automobile building. In 1917 he enlisted in the United States Navy Aviation Corps, and was in active service for two years in France, receiving his honorable discharge in 1920, with the rank of warrant machinist and a splendid record for fidelity and gallant service. Returning to Jeffersonville, he entered the employ of the Chevrolet Sales & Service Company, with which he was identified for six years and then, in October, 1926, organized the E. H. Hughes Company, of which he has since been the proprietor. This at first was a service station and repair shop, handling General Motors trucks and the Durant line of cars. On January 1, 1927, he took over the Chrysler and Plymouth lines, and these he represents at present. Mr. Hughes' success may be judged by the fact that in 1928 he placed 194 cars, with the expectation of doubling this number in 1929. The show room, storage and shop cover 15,000 square feet of floor space, and ten skilled men are employed, able to do all kinds of work on these two makes of cars. Mr. Hughes carries a full line of accessories and tires, and in addition to his headquarters has established three agencies. Mr. Hughes is a member of the American Legion. Primarily a business man, he has always taken an interest in civic affairs and has served as committeeman on the election board and been a nominee for the office of councilman-at-large.

Mr. Hughes married Miss Avalina Nahstoll, of Clark County, a member of an old and prominent agricultural family of Indiana, and they are the parents of three children: George Edgar, Joan and James Bertram. The pleasant family home is located at 902 East Court Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM HENRY LANG. One of the oldest and most reliable business concerns in the entire State of Indiana is that of George S. Anderson & Company, of Jeffersonville. Founded in a modest way in 1832, as a foundry and machine shop, during the years that have followed the company has undergone a number of changes in both name and ownership, but has never changed its policy of the highest grade of work and the strictest of integrity in its dealings. The guiding head of this large enterprise is now William Henry Lang, who is secretary and treasurer and leading owner, and who has been connected with the concern all of his life, starting as an apprentice machinist. Mr. Lang has been the architect of his own fortune and is now one of the most substantial business men of Jeffersonville, where he has been active in civic and public affairs.

Mr. Lang was born at Jeffersonville, Indiana, March 21, 1864, and is a son of Henry and Frances (Shoemaker) Lang. Henry Lang was born in Germany, and when he came to the United States, in 1836, was first a ship carpenter and later a brewer. Miss Shoemaker was his second wife and William Henry was one of their seven children. The parents were highly esteemed people of their community, and both died at Jeffersonville.

The public schools of his native place furnished William Henry Lang with his educational training, and at the age of sixteen years he became an apprentice machinist in the foundry and machine shop of C. C. Anderson. This had been founded by Mr. Anderson in 1832 and originally was located near Howard's Ship Yards, later moving to near Maple and Spring streets, and finally to its present location at 425 Watt Street. A short time later, in 1890, the firm name was changed to George S. Anderson & Brothers, and in 1899 to George S. Anderson & Brothers Company. In 1906 the firm was incorporated as George S. Anderson & Company, its present title, and at that time largely increased its capacity as founders and machinists, enabling the factory to do all kinds of work.

Upon completing his apprenticeship Mr. Lang began to exercise the most rigid economy and in 1899 was able to buy a one-fourth interest in the concern, and subsequently purchased another quarter. In 1918 he became full owner of the concern, but in 1921 sold a one-third interest to his son-in-law, T. M. Marra, who is his present partner. Mr. Lang has relied completely upon his own resources and ability in the working out of a successful and highly honorable career. He is known as a shrewd and capable business man of the highest character and as a citizen who commands the highest respect. He has served constructively and efficiently as a member of the City Council of Jeffersonville and in other capacities, and during the World war was very active in all drives for securing loans for the Government.

Mr. Lang married Miss Alice G. Howard, of Clark County, Indiana, and to this union there have been born two daughters: Mrs. Frances M. Yarber and Mrs. Cora G. Marra, the latter of whom died December 19, 1929. Mrs. Yarber resides at Jeffersonville. Mrs. Lang died April 1, 1928.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN ALOYSIUS COSTELLO. Few Catholic priests of1ndiana have their time more fully occupied or are engaged in more extended and beneficial activities than Rev. John A. Costello, of Gary. For fifteen years past his missionary work has taken him all over the United States, for three years he has had charge of the propagation of the faith in the Diocese of Fort Wayne, and recently he added to his labors the management of the Judge Gary-Bishop Alerding Settlement House. His work has been uniformly successful and constructive and he is accounted one of the most vigorous and constructive priests of the church.

Father Costello was born at Anderson, Indiana, July 23, 1888, and is a son of John and Ann (Heenan) Costello. His paternal grandfather, John Costello the elder, was born in Ireland, whence he brought his family to the United States and became a pioneer resident of Anderson, where he passed the remainder of his life and was regarded as a good citizen and man of reliable character. He and his worthy wife are buried in the Catholic cemetery at Indianapolis. John Costello, the younger, was born in Ireland and was a lad when brought by his parents to Anderson, where he received his education in the public schools. In young manhood he engaged in work upon a farm and eventually, through industry and steady application, became the owner of a property of his own, upon which he raised the standard crops and also grew live stock. He was highly esteemed in his community and was held in confidence by his fellow-citizens, who elected him county commissioner for a number of years. His death occurred in 1896, when he was buried in Saint Maryís Cemetery at Anderson. Mr. Costello married Miss Ann Heenan, who was born in Ireland and as a child was brought by her parents, Patrick and Mary Heenan, to Rochester, New York. Patrick Heenan engaged in railroad work, first at Rochester, New York, and later at Logansport, Indiana, where, at the time of his death, he was superintendent of tracks of the Logansport Division of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. Mrs. Costello was educated in the schools of Rochester, New York, and Logansport, Indiana, and prior to her marriage was engaged in social service work at Logansport. Following her marriage she gave a good deal of her time to this service and was always active in the Catholic Church, in addition to rearing a family of nine children. The death of this worthy woman occurred January 21, 1930, and she was laid to rest at the side of her husband in Saint Mary's Cemetery, Anderson. Of the nine children one died in infancy, the others being: Mary, Margaret, Anna, Josephine, James, of the Costello chain stores, Jeremiah, Rev. John A., of this review, and Patricia.

John A. Costello attended the public schools of Anderson and graduated from Dayton (Ohio) University as a member of the class of 1908. He then entered Cincinnati Seminary, where he pursued courses in theology and philosophy, and was graduated in 1913, in which same year he was ordained to the Catholic priesthood. For the next four years Father Costello was stationed at Muncie, this state as assistant to Father Schmidt, being then transferred to the Catholic University at Washington, D. C., where he took a graduate course as well as a missionary course. In 1918 he began his regular missionary work, in which he is still engaged, and which has made him a familiar figure in many parts of the United States. In 1927 Father Costello took charge of the propagation work in the Diocese of Fort Wayne, and this he has also carried on without interruption. In 1930, when Father John B. deVille, who was in charge of the Judge Gary-Bishop Alerding Settlement House, lost his health and was compelled to take a trip to Europe, Father Costello was asked to take over his labors. He has filled this assignment with the greatest of ability and is accomplishing a great and good work, in addition to his other manifold and arduous duties. A man of untiring energy, enduring faith and much executive capacity, he is one of the most highly considered priests of the Church of Indiana. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray