FRANK HERBERT HUBBARD, who owns and conducts one of the leading retail drug stores in the City of Auburn, judicial center of DeKalb County, has his establishment located at 111 North Main Street and its excellent service has retained to it a substantial and representative patronage during the course of many years, Mr. Hubbard now having standing as one of the veteran business men and loyal and honored citizens of this community.

Though he has passed the greater part of his life thus far in Indiana, Mr. Hubbard is able to claim Colorado as the place of his birth and its date connotes a measure of pioneer prestige there gained by his parents. He was born at Boulder, Colorado, August 2, 1867, and is a son of Dr. Horace W. and Jane Elizabeth (Miller) Hubbard, the former of whom was born in Connecticut and the latter near Peru, Miami County, Indiana. Dr. Horace W. Hubbard, an able physician and surgeon, was a resident of Little Rock, Arkansas, at the time of his death, in 1877, and his widow passed the closing years of her life in her native county, her death having occurred at Peru, Indiana. Horace B., eldest of the children, was born at Lewisburg, Cass County, Indiana, in 1863, and is now living retired in Kokomo, this state; Ross, who was born at Boulder, Colorado, in 1865, is deceased; Frank H., of this review, was next in order of birth and was about ten years of age at the time of his father's death; Jennie, who is deceased, was born at Peru, Indiana, in 1869; and Fernando was born at Peru, this state, about 1872, and died in infancy.

Frank H. Hubbard came to Indiana in 1877, and here he was reared and educated. His vocation has been that of druggist during the greater part of his active life and he has been established in the drug business at Auburn fully fifteen years.

Mr. Hubbard is a Democrat in politics, he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, including the Order of the Eastern Star, in which Mrs. Hubbard likewise has membership, and his further fraternal relations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In his home City he is an active member of the Commercial Club and the Lions Club.

May 26, 1897, was marked by the marriage of Mr. Hubbard to Miss Helen F. Cargill, who was born at North Valley, New York, May 28, 1876, and whose parents, William and Adaline (Graves) Cargill, there continued their residence until their death, Mr. Cargill having been born in Massachusetts and having long been engaged in the furniture and undertaking business at North Valley, New York. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard is Jane Adaline, who was born and reared at Kokomo, May 13, 1906, and who resides in Auburn, her marriage to Glen E. Youquelet having been solemnized June 4, 1929.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


RICHARD VANDERVEER. No lawyer practicing at the bar of Northern Indiana controls a more representative practice or is held in higher public confidence and esteem than Richard Vanderveer, who since 1906 has applied himself assiduously to his calling and now maintains offices at Milford and Goshen, the former community being his home. A self-made and self-educated man, he has fought his own way to prominence and recognition, largely in the field of the administration of estates, and it is said that no man in his part of Indiana excels him as an advocate before judge and jury.

Mr. Vanderveer was born at Balk, province of Friesland, Holland, January 26, 1867, and was brought to the United States at the age of four years by his parents, the family settling in Union Township, Elkhart County, Indiana, where his mother died two years later. His father, who was a day laborer at the time, managed to rear the three children without other aid, and often helped to fill the family larder by his skill as a hunter. Later the father became a substantial citizen of his community, where he was highly esteemed.

Richard Vanderveer attended public school in the country and set out to attend Valparaiso (Indiana) University with the sum of twenty-five dollars in his pocket. In order to assist in paying his tuition he accepted such honorable employment as he could find and thus passed through two terms. After teaching country schools in Elkhart County he went back to college, and then taught at Nappanee. In 1892 he located at Milford, where he taught from 1892 until 1906, in the meanwhile becoming superintendent of schools, and while thus engaged prepared himself for the law by reading, home study, attending lectures and applying himself to text books distributed by the University of Michigan. He was admitted to the bar in 1904, but did not settle down to practice until 1906, since which time he has built up a large and prosperous practice at Milford and also maintains an office at; Goshen, having as a partner his son, Donald. As an idea of the extent of his professional business it may be stated that during his career Mr. Vanderveer has at one time been the attorney for sixty different estates. He is at his best as an advocate before judge and jury, and has at his finger-tips every phase of legal procedure, principles and precedents. He is a member of Kosciusko County Bar Association, the Indiana State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. In addition to his law practice he has other large interests and is a large stockholder in the Farmers & Traders Bank of Nappanee, of which he was president from 1914 until 1916. In 1920 he was the candidate of the Democratic party for the office of county judge and subsequently was candidate for the position of state superintendent of public instruction. As a fraternalist he belongs to the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Eastern Star at Milford, and to Warsaw Commandery, K. T., of Masonry, and was record-keeper for the Knights of the Maccabees for twenty-five years.

In 1891 Mr. Vanderveer was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Frazier, of Scotch-Irish descent, and to this union there have been born two children. The son, Donald, was born September 13, 1892, and after graduating from the high school at Milford, entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and was graduated therefrom in 1914 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He was admitted to the bar in the same year and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession in association with his father. He belongs to the Blue Lodge of Masonry at Milford, the Royal Arch Chapter at Syracuse, Indiana, and the Commandery at Warsaw, and has been patron of the Order of the Eastern Star at Warsaw for fifteen years. He was elected in 1930, on the Democratic ticket, as a member of the State Legislature. In 1918 he married Miss Hazel Searfoss, and to them there have been born three children: Elizabeth, May 12, 1919; Margaret, March 3, 1921; and Richard, May 30, 1928. The daughter, Helen, gradated from the Milford High School and from the University of Michigan with the class of and ever since her graduation has been instructor in modern languages at the Goshen High School.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WALTON PUBLIC LIBRARY constitutes one of the admirable and valued communal assets of the attractive little City of Walton, Cass County, and a brief review of its inception and development is consistently entered in this publication, the data required having been loyally supplied by the efficient and popular president of the library board, Mrs. Maud Orr.

Early in the twentieth century a club, designated as the Woman's Literary Society of Walton, felt the need for a public library in the community, and the members showed their deep interest and civic loyalty by donating books that should constitute the nucleus for such a library, with its headquarters in the public school building of the town. During the ensuing summer this library was open to the public on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons, for the acquiring and exchange of books. In the Winter season, when school was in session, the keys to the library were turned over to the teachers, who functioned in turn as virtual librarians.

About the year 1914 Mrs. G. W. Bishop, a prominent member of the literary society that had fostered the establishing of the library, was accidentally thrown into the company of the Indiana State librarian, who gave her information relative to procedure to be followed in gaining a Carnegie library for Tipton Township. Mrs. Bishop at once began to infuse and stimulate interest in this work. The Woman's Literary Society awoke to and appreciated the opportunity, and immediately steps were taken to meet the stipulated conditions prescribed by the great donor of so many of the splendid libraries of the nation, the late Andrew Carnegie.

To Mrs. Bishop and Mrs. L. A. Dutchess is chiefly due credit for initiating and carrying forward the movement that gained to Walton its present fine library building and its service. Through their untiring efforts and their enlistment of the aid of some of their loyal and equally progressive townsfolk, the required conditions were met, and the Carnegie contribution was obtained.

With appropriate ceremonies the corner stone for the new building was laid, on June 12, 1915. Professor A. H. Douglass, superintendent of the public schools of Logansport, judicial center of the county, and Sanford Keltner, a representative attorney at Anderson, were the speakers on this occasion, and their appearance as such was the more consonant by reason of the fact that both had formerly been teachers in the Walton public schools. The piles of sand and stone gradually took shape and architectural substance, and on the 8th of December, 1915, the beautiful library building was dedicated. Sanford Keltner, of Anderson, was again called upon to become one of the speakers, as was also Warren Kepner, of Walton, who had here made splendid record as a teacher in the public schools. The children have proved the library a real help in their school work, and the community in general has not proved other than loyal and appreciative in availing itself of the cultural privileges of the library. The Woman's Literary Society has every reason to take pride in the splendid results that attended its earnest campaign for the obtaining of the present beautiful library building, and for promoting the cultural and refining service that the library itself affords to the community.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE MELVIN DIEHL became in his youth a skilled mechanic his advancement has been gained through his own ability and efforts, and he now has standing as one of the representative figures in the industrial and commercial affairs of the City of Wabash, where he is owner and executive head of the important business conducted under the title of G. M. Diehl Machine Works, the modern plant being established at the corner of Wabash and Columbus streets, and the concern being one of no minor importance as touching the prestige of Wabash as an industrial center.

Mr. Diehl is able to revert to the Badger State as the place of his nativity, he having been born on the parental home farm in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin November 1 1870, and being a son of the late Casper and Jane (O'Dell) Diehl, who gained no little of pioneer prestige in Sheboygan County and who continued their residence in Wisconsin until their death, the father having given his active life mainly to farm industry.

George M, Diehl was reared to the discipline of the farm, and while his early educational advantages were limited to a somewhat irregular attendance in the public schools of his native county, his alert and receptive mind and his ambition enabled him to gain much through private reading and study after he left school. He early gave evidence of exceptional mechanical talent, and he read and studied much along mechanical lines. When he was but sixteen years of age he was serving as foreman in a furniture factory at Sheboygan, where he had charge of the work of a corps varying from seventy-five to one hundred men in the production department. He realized that a broader knowledge was essential to his further advancement, and he thus applied himself earnestly to the study of such books as he could procure relative to mechanics. At the age of eighteen years he initiated his work as a blacksmith, and he was thus engaged two years, he having met with an accident that severely injured his back and having been unable to work for some time. He then gave up work as a blacksmith and entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of machinist, at New Holstein, Calumet County, Wisconsin. He later returned to Sheboygan, at the age of twenty-four years, and there he was employed eight years in the plant of the Jenkins Machine Company. He then assumed charge of experimental work in the construction of an adding machine for the Mallman Addograph Company of Sheboygan, and when the plant of the company was removed to Chicago, in 1902, he was given full charge of the same. In 1906 the company removed its headquarters to Peru, Indiana, and Mr. Diehl resigned his executive position shortly after the company sold its business to the Standard Adding Machine Company of St. Louis, Missouri, in 1907. It was at this juncture that Mr. Diehl initiated his independent activities as a machinist and manufacturer. On the 15th of January, 1908, he established at Peru the G. M. Diehl Machine Works, to do a general machine business. That year was one of marked financial depression, but he started his new enterprise with a capital of only $127. He rented a room of 4,800 square feet, and there initiated his business with but two employes. In 1909 Mr. Charles Latchem was instrumental in bringing about the removal of the business to Wabash, the city having agreed to construct a suitable building for his establishment. This building as completed afforded a floor space of 16,000 square feet, and in it the G. M. Diehl Machine Works were installed February 1, 1910. For three years Mr. Latchem was a stockholder in the company. The substantial growth and expansion of the business brought requirement for larger quarters, and in 1926 the building was enlarged by an addition that affords an extra area of 12,800 square feet of floor space. The plant is thus one of no meager physical proportions, and its equipment throughout has been brought to the best modern standard, the total force of employes being now in excess of thirty. The works do all manner of repair work and here are manufactured ripsaws, cutters, glue jointers and varied other products of superior order. In the World war period Mr. Diehl gave his plant to 100% production in connection with Government war activities, and in this connection he did all brass work for the Ford Eagle Boats. This Wabash concern has made a splendid record of productive service under the able and resourceful management of its owner, and the output measures up to that of many establishments of much larger size. In periods of business depression, such as that of 1930, Mr. Diehl refuses to cut down his working force, but meets the crisis by reducing the time service of the various employes, so that none may be denied a living revenue. The plant of the concern has facilities for prompt and effective productive work at all times, and products are shipped to all parts of the United States, besides which a substantial export trade has been developed.

Mr. Diehl has entered fully into the loyal spirit that marks the citizens of Wabash, and is ever ready to lend his influence and cooperation in support of measures and enterprises tending to advance the communal welfare, along both civic and material lines. He is a valued member of the Wabash Chamber of Commerce, of which he was president in 1922, and he is a member also of the local Rotary Club, of which he was a director several years. He is treasurer of the Woodworking Machine Manufacturers of the United States, and is an active member of the Indiana Manufacturers Association. He is a member and chairman of the Board of Charities in his home city, and the year finds him serving as president of the Wabash Country Club. He is a director of Vonnegut Moulder Corporation of Indianapolis, and secretary and treasurer of the Rock Wool Products Company of Wabash. He built, in 1930, the Ideal Park and swimming pool at Wabash. The basic Masonic affiliation of Mr. Diehl is with Hannah Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and he has membership also in the local Chapter and Council of the York Rite, besides being affiliated with Scottish Rite bodies and with Mizpah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, in the City of Fort Wayne. He is a trustee of Wabash Lodge, B. P. O. E.

On September 30, 1.897, Mr. Diehl was united in marriage with Miss Clara Wagner, of Greenbush, Wisconsin.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


MISS LUCILLE BROWN is librarian of the Otterbein library, a township library, which was organized in 1917.

The board of trustees of the Otterbein brary comprise D. E. Harrington, president, Harry Kretschman, vice president, Mrs. Katherine Bolt, secretary, Mrs. Ralph Pierce, Mrs. Ella Maddox, George Holder and Mrs. Sheetz.

Miss Brown, who has been librarian since 1926, was born in Martinsville, Indiana. Her parents, L. O. and Pearl (Ennis) Brown, moved from Martinsville to Otterbein in 1918. She was educated in grade and high schools, spent one year in the Indiana State Normal at Terre Haute, and completed her course of library training in the Indianapolis Library School.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


MRS. GERTRUDE ROGERS is an Indiana business woman, one of capable representatives of the hotel owners and managers in the state. In 1929 Mrs. Rogers bought the Warren Hotel at Williamsport, and has made the hotel reflect her personality and her standards of hospitality, and has given it a patronage that rank it as one of the best hostelries in this section of the state.

Mrs. Rogers was born in Missouri. Her father, Malatus Young, was a native of Virginia, member of an old and prominent family there. He was a land owner and slave holder and when the war broke out between the states entered the Confederate army, serving with the rank of captain. The war over, he moved west to Missouri. Mrs. Rogers' mother was Mary Butler, a native of Kentucky.

Mrs. Rogers was the youngest in a large family of thirteen children. She was educated in grade and high schools in Missouri and as a young woman was married to Mr. Fred E. Rogers. Mr. Rogers passed away, leaving a daughter, Viva M. Viva is the wife of Val E. Pointer, of Danville, Illinois, and they have one child, Virginia, born in 1918.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM R. WARD is a physician and surgeon practicing at La Fayette and doing work that gives high promise of a brilliant and useful career in his chosen vocation.

Doctor Ward was born in White County, Indiana, June 22, 1903. Three generations of the family have lived in White County. His grandfather was Miller Ward, a native of Indiana and a farmer. Charles G. Ward, father of Doctor Ward, was born in White County, became farmer and stock raiser and married Flora McBee, a native of Monon, White County.

William R. Ward, one of seven children, attended grade schools in White County, and graduated from the La Fayette High School in 1921. He then entered Indiana University, taking his Bachelor of Science degree in 1925, and in 1927 was graduated from the School of Medicine. After an interne experience in Saint Elizabeth Hospital at La Fayette he began private practice in the fall of 1928. His offices are in the La Fayette Building. Doctor Ward is a man of pleasing professional manners, quick and thorough in handling his routine work, and is a member of the Tippecanoe County and Indiana State Medical Associations. He belongs to the Phi Chi medical fraternity, is a Republican and attends the Baptist Church.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM GEORGE MILLER was born at Peru, Miami County, October 25, 1874, and the line of business with which his mature years have been chiefly identified is the floral and greenhouse industry. He is owner of the plant and business of W. G. Miller, florist, and the success that has attended his efforts is a result of many years of close attention to and a complete mastery of. all the details involved in the growing and cultivation of floral and decorative plants.

Mr. Miller is a son of Henry J. and Matilda D. (Conradt) Miller, both natives of Germany. His father came to Indiana about 1858 and for many years was a merchant at Peru. The Conradt family had the original tanning business in Miami County.

William G. Miller was one of seven children. He was five days old when his father died, and at the age of fourteen he left school to go to work. He secured employment as a floristís helper, and thus at an early age laid the foundation of experience in the business which he subsequently adopted as his life work. However, for twelve years he was employed in the building contracting business. Then he returned to the floral firm where he had first worked and in 1906 this business was sold to him. At that time the plant included about 7,000 square feet under glass. He has developed his plant to meet the growing demands upon its output and now has 15, 000 square feet under glass and employs four people in the business of producing cut flowers and potted plants, chiefly for the local trade.

Mr. Miller is a member of the Peru Chamber of Commerce, the Society of American Florists, is a Rotarian, and during the World war acted as local assistant fuel administrator and was on the committees promoting the success of the bond and stamp sales and the raising of funds for the Red Cross.

He married Miss Margaret L. Conradt, a native of Peru, and has two children, Margaret Louise and Matilda Ann, both students in the Peru High School.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


RAYMOND CLAUDE STONEBRAKER is one of the active young business men of the City of Fort Wayne, an automobile dealer, distributor of the De Soto automobiles.

Mr. Stonebraker was born near Lafayette, Indiana, July 2, 1902, son of Charles C. and Dora (Moyer) Stonebraker. His parents were also natives of Indiana, and of their four children Raymond C. was the second.

Mr.. Stonebraker after attending Lafayette public schools came to Fort Wayne, in 1916, and was an employee in the Fort Wayne office of the General Electric Company until 1919. For the past ten years he has had some active connection with the automobile trade. For two years he owned and operated a used car business. From 1921 to 1929 he was associated with the Randall Investment Company, but in 1923 he started another used car business. Subsequently he joined the Rousseau Brothers in constituting the firm of Rousseau Brothers & Stonebraker, and owned a third interest in that prosperous local agency. The firm operated garages and show rooms at the corner of Fifth and Harrison streets and at 207 East Superior Street. On January 1, 1930, Mr. Stonebraker engaged in business for himself. He is owner and manager of the business on East Superior Street.

He married, in 1924, Miss Edith Short, who was born near Huntington, Indiana. They have two children, Violet Marie and Joy Ann.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PETER NEMETH has been a resident of South Bend since 1902, and for over nineteen years has been an undertaker and funeral director of that city. He has a well appointed establishment and service at 744 West Washington Street.

Mr. Nemeth was born in Hungary, April 16,1882, and is one of the prominent leaders among his fellow countrymen at South Bend. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nemeth, spent all their lives in Hungary, where his father died in August, 1929, at the age of eighty-three, and his mother passed away in February, 1926, aged seventy-eight.

Peter Nemeth was reared and educated in his native country and was twenty years of age when he and his brother Frank came to America. For a few months he was in Canada, and in June, 1902, arrived at South Bend. During the following eight years he worked at his trade as a blacksmith in the shop of the Studebaker Corporation. Mr. Nemeth in 1910 began study and training for the profession of undertaker and in 1912 was graduated from the Askin School of Embalming at Indianapolis. Since that date he has been practicing his profession in South Bend and has built up a service that is patronized by all classes of people and is the leading establishment among the many Hungarians who live in and around South Bend.

Mr. Nemeth is treasurer of the Hungarian Young Men's Club is a member of the Hungarian Business Men's Club, and has devoted himself to social and welfare work among people of his nationality. He is a member of St. Stephen's Magyar Church.

He married, June 3, 1913, Miss Goldie Grundtner, who was also born in Hungary and came to South Bend when twenty-one years of age with her brother. Her father, Charles, died in August, 1930, and her mother, Mary (Weiss) Grundtner, still lives in Hungary. Mr. and Mrs. Nemeth have two children, Peter Frank and Joseph Louis.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray