JAMES WHITCOMB BURNS. The legal profession of Lake County contains its full quota of brilliant members of the profession, who have devoted their lives to the law and its interpretation and have lent charm and dignity to a somewhat dry and often tiring calling. Prominent among this class is found James W. Burns, who has been engaged in a constantly growing practice at Gary for nearly two decades, and who as a lawyer and citizen has developed his abilities and activities until he has become a prominent figure for great usefulness.

Mr. Burns was born at Fremont, Sanilac County, Michigan, May 16, 1874, and is a son of Moses and Bridget (O'Connor) Burns. His parents, natives of County Wexford, Ireland, accompanied their respective parents to the United States, and here grew to manhood and womanhood and were educated in the public schools of Michigan, where they were married. For many years Mr. Burns carried on farming and stock raising in Fremont Township, Sanilac County, also serving capably as state agent and as superintendent of the poor farm, capacities in which he showed himself capable, active and humane. One of the foremost Republicans of his locality, his home was the meeting-place for governors, senators and other high officials, and at all times he himself was active in public and civic affairs. Mr. Burns was a faithful member of the Roman Catholic Church. He was fond of travel, and in 1907 made a trip back to his old home in Erin, making the journey with his son James W. He died in 1912 and was buried in the cemetery at Croswell, Michigan, and his worthy wife, who followed him to the Great Beyond in 1925, rests at his side. They were the parents of seven children: W. E., a retired business man of Croswell, Michigan, who died in April, 1931; John V., deceased; Anna, the widow of Bartley McNulty; Moses, who is deceased; Thomas, who is deceased; Lawrence, of Detroit, Michigan; and James W.

James W. Burns acquired his education in the public schools of Michigan and Illinois, where he attended the township schools of Fremont Township and Bryant and Stratton's Business College. He likewise took a special course in English at Chicago and then entered the law department of Georgetown University, Washington, D. C., from which he was duly graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws as a member of the class of 1908. Two years later the degree of Master of Laws was conferred upon him by the same institution. Admitted to the bar in Chicago in 1911, he moved to Gary in the same year and has been engaged constantly in practice of the highest and best kind, having been admitted to the Supreme Court in 1913. He belongs to the American Bar Association, the Indiana State Bar Association, the District Bar Association and the Gary Bar Association and is accounted one of the most learned, alert and shrewd lawyers engaged in general practice at Gary, where he has well-appointed and commodious offices at 738 Broadway. Mr. Burns' practice has carried him into all the courts, in which he has been identified with some very important litigation. A leading member of the Knights of Columbus, he is president of the Knights of Columbus Noonday Club, and likewise belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Harrison Republican Club, the Kiwanis Club and the Press Club of Lake County. His religious affiliation is with Holy Angels Catholic Church.

Mr. Burns is single. He is active in civic affairs and was deputy prosecuting attorney for four years, from 1916 to 1920. He was assistant city attorney for five years, under Mayor R. O. Johnson's second and third terms, and in 1920 was originally a candidate for the office of prosecuting attorney, but withdrew from the race. During the World war he was active in all the drives, Red Cross, Liberty, etc., and did his full duty as a patriotic citizen.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JAMES LEWIS BOTTORFF. While the bar at Jeffersonville, Indiana, perhaps lays no claim to being made up entirely of John Marshall's, it is able to point with pride to a membership far beyond the ordinary equipment in legal matters, and one of its able and valued members is James L. Bottorff, twice prosecuting attorney of Clark County. Mr. Bottorff comes from an old and patriotic family of America, one of his ancestors, Henry Bottorff, fighting at Bunker Hill, Brandywine and Germantown during the war of the American Revolution, enduring the rigors of Valley Forge with General Washington, and who penetrated into the Indiana wilderness in 1785 and met his death from wild animals or savage Indians. Another, Henry Bottorff, Jr., stood side by side of William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. Mr. Bottorff is a native of Indiana, has mainly passed his life here, and Jeffersonville has been his home for many years. In addition to handling the responsibilities of a large and remunerative law practice he takes an active part in civic matters, is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and during the World war was food administrator for Clark County and served in many other important capacities.

James L. Bottorff was born January 6, 1886, on a farm in Clark County, Indiana, and is a son of Moses E. and Amanda (Hill) Bottorff. He comes of a family which was founded in America in its early Colonial history by Adam Bottorff, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of James L. Bottorff. The latter's great-great-great-grandfather was Martin Bottorff, who lived for some years in Pennsylvania, where was born Rev. John Henry Bottorff, the great-great-grandfather of James L. Bottorff. Rev. John Henry Bottorff was a minister of the Reformed Church and came as an early pioneer to what was then the wilderness of the Northwest, making a home in Jefferson County in 1785. There he passed the remaining years of his life tilling the soil and preaching among the early settlers and endeavoring to make Indian converts. He met a martyr's death in 1805, being killed either by wild animals or the red savages.

Henry Bottorff, the great-grandfather of James L. Bottorff, was born in Indiana, and became one of the early millers of the state. In 1811 he joined the forces of William Henry Harrison and took part in the famous battle of Tippecanoe, in which the white frontiersmen defeated decisively a much larger number of Indians. He came by his military courage naturally, as his father had been a soldier under Washington at Bunker Hill, Brandywine and Germantown. Lewis Bottorff, the grandfather of James L. Bottorff, was born in Indiana, where he was engaged in farming throughout his life, and also took part in flatboat trading prior to the war between the states. He married Mary C. Congleton, of Roanoke County, Virginia, and among their children was Moses E. Bottorff, who was born in Indiana and spent his entire life in agricultural operations in Clark County. He married Amanda Hill, and they became the parents of five children.

James L. Bottorff attended the public schools of Clark County, including the high school at Utica, and pursued his law education at the Jefferson School of Law, Louisville, Kentucky, from which he was graduated in 1910 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Prior to this, in order to earn the money for his professional tuition, he had served as a telegraph operator for the Baltimore &Ohio Railway, at Watson, Indiana. Although he had been admitted to the bar May 18, 1909, prior to his graduation, he did not settle down permanently to practice at Jeffersonville until January 1, 1912, but since then has built up a large and important clientele, with well-appointed offices in the Beck Building. He is recognized as a thorough and capable legist, and in 1920 and again in 1922 was elected to the office of prosecuting attorney of Clark County. He is attorney for the Clark County State Bank, local attorney for the Baltimore & Ohio Railway, town attorney for the town of Clarksville and a member of the Clark County Bar Association and the Indiana State Bar Association. He is a Mason and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. As a member of one of the old and honored families of the state he takes a great interest in the affairs of the Indiana Historical Association, to which he also belongs. He is also a member of the Indiana Pioneer Association. Mr. Bottorff is also eligible to membership in the Sons of the American Revolution, being able to trace his ancestry back in a straight line to Ensign Henry Bottorff, who in 1780 was a member of Capt. Michael Wolf's Company of Berks County (Pennsylvania) Militia. During the World war he served as food administrator for Clark County and chairman of the War Savings campaigns in Jefferson and other townships.

On November 28, 1912, Mr. Bottorff was united in marriage with Miss Edna Lewis, daughter of Doctor Lewis, a native of Clark County, and to this union there were born two children: James Montgomery, born February 25, 1915, and Robert Graham, born July 18, 1917, both of whom are attending school. Mr. Bottorff is a member of the Christian Church.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOSEPH M. WALTERMANN is a member of the firm Unser & Waltermann, funeral directors at Richmond, Indiana, and it was in that city that he was born and reared. His people were among the pioneer Catholic citizens of Wayne County.

Mr. Waltermann was born at Richmond March 24, 1884, son of Henry A. and Gertrude (Theobold) Waltermann. His father was born at Richmond, Indiana, while his mother was a native of Mount Morris, New York. The paternal grandparents were Frederick and Johanna (Brockamp) Waltermann, natives of Germany, Johanna being a daughter of Joseph Brockamp. In 1841 the Brockamp family settled at Richmond, Indiana, and Joseph Brockamp built the house on South Fourth Street in which mass was first said for Catholic services in this community. Frederick Waltermann came to this country in 1852 from Germany. The maternal grandparents of Mr. Waltermann were George and Genevieve (Rist) Theobold, also natives of Germany, who settled at Mount Morris, New York. George Theobold was a stock buyer, and after moving to Saint Louis, Missouri, enlisted in the Union army. After the war he came to Wayne County, Indiana, and lived at Richmond until his death. One sister, Mrs. Helen van Nuys, also lives in Richmond.

Henry A. Waltermann after his marriage in Richmond followed the trade of casket varnisher for the J. M. Hutton Casket Company until appointed market master in 1907. At the time of his death in 1909 he was city market master. He was survived by his widow, who makes her home with her son.

Joseph M. Waltermann, who has never married, grew up in Richmond, attended Saint Andrews parochial school and the Finley public school. At the age of seventeen he learned the trade of casket trimmer. After the death of his father he filled out the unexpired term of market master for one year, returning to the casket company and remaining until 1915. Mr. Waltermann has been in the undertaking business since 1915, at first as a member of the firm of Jordan, McManus, Hunt & Waltermann, and now as Unser & Waltermann. Their establishment, at 32 South Eleventh Street, represents a complete home for funerals, with display room and room for visitors. It is beautified with 1arge colonial columns, the finest in the city, and funeral services are held in the spacious rooms. Mr. Waltermann is a member of Saint Andrew's Catholic Church and has been sacristan of the church since 1899. In 1913 he was elected a member of the City Council from the First Ward and has been the representative of the First Ward's interests in the city legislative department consecutively to the present time. Mr. Waltermann is a Democrat, and a member of the B. P. O. Elks, Fraternal Order of Eagles, German Beneficial Union, Knights of Columbus, Knights of Saint John, is president of the Young Men's Institute, and a member of Saint Joseph's Benevolent Association.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


NEWTON AUGUST GREENE is expressing in his administration as mayor of New Albany, the fine little city that is the judicial center of Floyd County, the same vital and resourceful loyalty that has marked his achievement in connection with business affairs. He has been a resident of New Albany since his boyhood and when he was a lad of ten years he aided in the support of the family by daily service in making deliveries on a local newspaper route. That the former newsboy of New Albany has become mayor of this city indicates how well he has wrought out his career of usefulness in the passing years and also determines the high estimate placed upon him in the community in which he is best known.

Though he is a scion of one of the pioneer families of Indiana, Mr. Greene reverts to the old Bluegrass State as the place of his nativity. He was born at Hawesville, Hancock County, Kentucky, July 24, 1866, and is a son of Prof. George K. and Molly (Lewis) Greene. Prof. George K. Greene was a man of remarkable intellectuality and high scientific attainments, as is evidenced by the fact that he was credited as being one of the twelve foremost geologists of the world. The Professor was born in Clark County, Indiana, a son of George and Eunice M. (Parker) Greene, the former a native of England and the latter of Scotland. George Greene became a pioneer shipbuilder at Jeffersonville, Indiana, on the Ohio River, he having there settled in 1818, and having become one of the influential citizens of the community, as attested by his having been one of the early mayors of that city.

Prof. George K. Greene acquired his advanced scientific education almost entirely by self-application to reading, study and research, and he gained wide reputation in the domain of geology and paleontology, in which he became an authority. He wrote twenty volumes on paleontology and geology, served as a collegiate professor along these lines, and in the period of the '70s held the office of state geologist of Indiana, a position that he retained about ten years, besides being a teacher of geology at Corydon, the pioneer capital City of Indiana. He received high recognition by the English Society for the Advancement of Science, as well as by the great British Museum and by leading scientific societies in other countries, including the United States. Both he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in their native state of Indiana, their children having been eight in number. Like many others who have devoted their lives to science and to educational work of enduring value Professor Greene never achieved more than limited financial success, but his success was greater than this, for he gave much to the store of human knowledge and to the advancement of science.

Newton A. Greene was six years of age when his parents returned from Kentucky to their native State of Indiana, where they finally established the family home at New Albany. Here he profited by the advantages of the public schools, including the high school, while his was the further privilege of being reared in a home of distinctive culture. It has already been noted that he early assumed his share of individual responsibility in aiding in the support of the family, and when he was sixteen years of age he here engaged in the produce business on a most modest scale. Two years later, when he was but eighteen years of age, he amplified his enterprise into one of wholesale order, and he continued a leading representative of this line of business at New Albany during the long period of twenty-six years.

Mr. Greene proved progressive and resourceful not only as a business man but also as a public-spirited citizen, and he has ever been a stalwart in the local ranks of the Democratic party. He gave effective administration as mayor of New Albany during the period of 1910-14, and the people of the community were mindful of this when he was again made candidate for and elected to this office in 1926, his present term as mayor expiring in December; 1929. During his membership in the City Council Mayor Greene represented the Fifth Ward -1907-08- besides having previously served one term. As mayor he is ex-officio judge of the municipal Police Court, and as a jurist he is called upon also to try cases pertaining to violations of the Federal prohibition laws. In the Masonic fraternity he is affiliated with the four York Rite bodies, including the local Commandery of Knights of Templar, besides being a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He has been active in politics in this section of Indiana and has served as a member of the Democratic committee of Floyd County. His wife, whose maiden name was Lesa Taylor, was born in the State of Arkansas, her father and one of her brothers having become clergymen of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and her father having received the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity. Lesa, only child of Mr. and Mrs. Greene, died at the age of nine years.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


MARION BURCH, county treasurer of Monroe County, is a member of a family that has been in this section of Indiana for nearly a century. The farm on which Mr. Burch was born was taken up by his grandfather as a Government claim.

Mr. Burch was born August 13, 1866, in Indian Creek Township, son of Hiram and Nancy H. (Sparks) Burch and grandson of Joel and Matilda (Burch) Burch. His grand parents were of the same name but their families were not related. Joel Burch came from North Carolina to Indiana in 1836 and entered the land which has been in the possession of his descendants for nearly a century. Both Hiram and Nancy Burch are still living, having reached very advanced years. Hiram was born on the old homestead October 22, 1840, and his wife was born in 1838. Hiram Burch grew up under pioneer conditions, had a limited education, but made a success of life and developed a well-improved farm of 200 acres. The old log cabin is still standing on the farm.

Marion Burch attended the Big Springs School in Indian Creek Township and the Yo Ho School, where he completed his education. All the time he was in school he had a regular routine of duties on his fatherís farm. After he was twenty-two he began working out among neighboring farmers and when he was twenty-six he engaged in the mercantile business at Sanford. He was there two years and in 1901 came to Bloomington. In 1903 he went with the Neeld Hardware Company and was with that business twenty-two years, its manager for twelve years of this time.

Mr. Burch in May, 1928, accepted the Democratic nomination for the office of county treasurer and was elected in the following November. By appointment he served as a member of the first County Council of Monroe County. He was also appointed and served four years as a member of the Bloomington police force. He has been very active in the Baptist Church, of which he is a deacon, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias.

Mr. Burch married, September 29, 1892, Miss Lillian H. Pofford, daughter of S. E. and Mary (Hostetter) Pofford. Her mother is deceased and her father still lives on his farm a mile east of Sanford in Van Buren Township. Mr. and Mrs. Burch have four children and several grandchildren: Irene is the wife of John R. East, and their children are John E., Robert G. And Frederick B.; Clifford married Mayme Skelton; Cledith is the wife of W. W. Franklin and has two children, William D. and Hannah Sue; and Miss Bernice, a graduate of Indiana University, is now teaching at Knightstown, Indiana.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ROBERT NORRIS WIMMER, M. D. The medical fraternity of Gary has in the person of Robert Norris Wimmer, M. D., an able representative and one who has gained his present prominent position through none of the arts of the charlatan, but by reason of native and acquired talent, deep study and thorough keeping abreast of the advancements made in modern medicine and surgery. His career has been a useful one, including service in the Medical Reserve Corps during the World war, and his professional standing and personal reputation are high.

Doctor Wimmer was born at Lamar, Missouri, December 20, 1886, and is a son of Dr James Monroe and Carrie (Norris) Wimmer. His paternal grandparents, James and Mathilda Wimmer, natives of New York State, came as a young married couple to Grant County, Indiana; where James Wimmer was engaged in farming for some years, subsequently moving to Marion County, this state, and eventually to Lamar, Missouri, where he rounded out a successful and honorable career. He and his wife were the parents of five sons and one daughter: Dr. James Monroe, William, Glenn, Scott, Newton and Adeline.

James Monroe Wimmer was born on his fatherís farm at Lamar Missouri where he attended the public schools, subsequently becoming a student at Hobart University, Washington, D. C., where he graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. With the exception of a short time at Lamar, Missouri, his entire professional career was passed at Marion, Indiana, where he built up a large and profitable practice and won the confidence and esteem of the people of the community. He was a member of the various organizations of his profession, had several social and fraternal connections, and was known for his public-spirited identification with and support of numerous measures for the public benefit. His death in 1900 removed one of his communityís sterling citizens. In 1859, in Cass County, Indiana, Doctor Wimmer was united in marriage with Miss Carrie Norris, who was born near Logansport, Indiana, a daughter of William Norris and his wife, natives of Pennsylvania, who, migrated to Cass County during the pioneer history of that locality and there passed the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of four children, of whom Carrie was reared and educated at Logansport. She still survives her husband as a resident of Gary and is active in the work of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She and her husband became the parents of three children: Nell, teacher of mathematics at Emerson High School, Gary; Harry, who died at the age of eighteen years; and Dr. Robert Norris, of this review.

Robert Norris Wimmer acquired his early education in the public schools of Marion, graduating from high school as a member of the class of 1904. At that time he took a position as chemist in the soap department of Swift & Company, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, remaining two years, following which he entered the employ of the Bell Telephone Company, Chicago, and worked as an auditor three years. Feeling that he was not making satisfactory progress, Doctor Wimmer then entered the preparatory college of the Young Men's Christian Association, at Chicago, and graduated from the University of Chicago with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1918. In the meantime, in 1917, he had enlisted in the Medical Reserve Corps, and when he was honorably discharged, a few days after the armistice, he had gained much knowledge and information that were greatly to help him in his professional career. His medical education was completed at Rush Medical College, from which famous institution he was graduated in 1920 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, but he continued his work and studies for two years at the Presbyterian Hospital, then serving an eighteen months interneship at Michael Reese Hospital, also of Chicago. In 1923 he took up his permanent residence at Gary, where he has since built up a large and lucrative general practice in medicine and surgery, with well-appointed offices at 600 Broadway. Doctor Wimmer is acknowledged to be an expert diagnostician, an able practitioner and a skilled and steady- handed surgeon and has gained an enviable standing in his calling for high professional ability and ethics. He belongs to the Lake County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Fraternally he is affiliated with Cornerstone Lodge No. 875, A. F. and A. M., of Chicago, and likewise holds membership in the Gary Country Club and the Commercial Club and Chamber of Commerce. In his political faith he remains independent, voting for the man and measure rather than for the party. His religious connection is with the First Methodist Episcopal Church.

At Crown Point, Indiana, February 21, 1925, Doctor Wimmer was united in marriage with Miss Marguerite Zeitsch, a daughter of Julius and Sophia (Knorr) Zeitsch, of 2809 Logan Boulevard, Chicago, natives of Germany. Mr. Zeitsch taught a boys' school in London, England, for some years. Mrs. Zeitsch came to the United States as a child with her parents and received her education in Chicago, where she had resided for the past fifty-seven years. After settling in Chicago Mr. Zeitsch embarked in the mercantile business, and is now engaged with a large wholesale house and is a prominent resident of the Windy City. He is very active in the Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and a citizen of public spirit and civic pride. Mrs. Wimmer enjoyed unusual educational advantages, and after graduating from high school specialized in music at the Chicago Conservatory of Music. She is active in musical circles of Gary, where she taught music for several years, as she did also at Chicago, and is popular in club affairs. Showing her versatility is the fact that for several years she was private secretary to the president of the Universal Portland Cement Company. To Doctor and Mrs. Wimmer there have been born two children: Barbara Jean and James Robert. As has been before noted, Doctor Wimmer has been prominent in various civic affairs. When he can spare the time from his professional and other duties he enjoys a game or two of golf, but probably is more greatly interested in fishing and is an enthusiastic member of the Izaak Walton League of America. He is an alumnus of Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, belongs to the Phi Chi medical fraternity, and is active in the Gary Country Club.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray