WILLIAM P. KENNEDY. The Citizens Bank of Liberty, Indiana, is fortunate in having a man of the caliber of William P. Kennedy as its cashier, for his experience along diverging lines has been a broad and valuable one, and his pleasing personality adds to the volume of business of his banking house. He was born at Liberty, Indiana, March 30, 1866, a son of James P. and Lavinia W. (Dunbar) Kennedy, he born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1826, and she in Union County, Indiana, January 13, 1834. The paternal grandparents, John and Nancy Kennedy, natives of Ireland, and members of the same clan as Robert Emmett, took passage on the sailing vessel Venturn, bound for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On the voyage they became acquainted, and after landing were married. After several years spent in Pennsylvania they migrated to Franklin County, Indiana, arriving in the state in 1830.

James P. Kennedy's first work in Indiana was that of splitting rails, and he was paid sixteen and one-half cents per 100. Later he clerked in the Bevins Hotel at Cincinnati, Ohio, but was taken violently ill, and the young lady who was his nurse became his wife September 1, 1857. They lived for a short time at Oxford, Ohio, but went from there to College Corner and he worked for Jonathan Ridenhour, president of the old Junction Railroad, doing any kind of labor, and receiving but a nominal salary. Three years later, with Dr. Andrew Hawley, he bought this railroad, but when they were refused switching privileges Mr. Kennedy came to Liberty, Indiana, arriving here in the latter part of 1862, and embarked in a mercantile business that he continued until 1871, when he sold it, and organized the First National Bank, in connection with Joseph Corrington, Michael J. Witt and others. Mr. Kennedy remained with this bank until his death, which occurred May 11, 1900. In addition to his other activities he had taught school in Franklin County, so that he had a varied experience. The maternal grandparents of William P. Kennedy were Andrew and Sarah (Stover) Dunbar, he born in Pennsylvania and she in Carter County, Tennessee. In 1811 they started for Indiana with two big wagons drawn by mules. On their journey they were ferried across the Ohio River, the ferry being drawn by twenty-four horses. At the place they landed there was a large two-story house, painted red, that was called the blockhouse, and was used as a refuge for the pioneers when attacked by the still hostile Indians. The site of that old blockhouse is now covered by the City of Cincinnati, Ohio. From there the Dunbars came on to Union County, Indiana, and settled on Whitewater River. Mrs. Dunbar's maternal grandfather, John Miller, died in 1814, and his wife, Mary, died in 1822. She, Mrs. Dunbar, told William P. Kennedy that John Miller had accompanied Lewis and Clark on their expedition into the "Northwest Territory," and that at the age of eighty-five years he could pick a squirrel from the tallest tree without using his glasses. He was three times married, reared twenty-seven children, and at one time took eighteen sons and went out against the Indians. Mr. Kennedy is proud of the fact that his grandmother thought he was like this sturdy old pioneer. He, himself, is one of six children, namely: Jinevra, who was a landscape artist, died at the age of sixty-nine years, April 1, 1927; L. M., who died January 30, 1927, married Flora Davis, was a tailor and manufacturer of Liberty, Indiana; Allevia, who married Saul Lambert of Liberty, was cashier of the First National Bank of Liberty for forty years, died March 15, 1928; William P., whose name heads this review; Adelaide, who is the wife of Franklin T. DuBois, of Liberty; and Emmazetta, who married Henry G. Bonnelle, was leading lady in Brady's productions.

William P. Kennedy was graduated from high school at the early age of sixteen years, and entered a bank at Hope, Indiana, that his father had helped to organize, and was its cashier until 1899, when he disposed of his interests there to come to Liberty as the cashier of the Citizens Bank of this city, and he is still serving in this capacity.

On April 5, 1899, Mr. Kennedy was married to Miss Alice K. Vogler, who was born at Hope, Indiana, a daughter of Louis and Roseltha (Lee) Vogler, natives of Hope, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have no children. She has always been very active in the Eastern Star, and in 1924 had the great honor of being grand matron of the Grand Chapter of Indiana. She has been trustee of the Masonic Home, and trustee and president of the board of Easthaven Hospital, Richmond, Indiana. In addition to these connections she belongs to various clubs and societies, and to the Moravian Church. Mr. Kennedy is a Republican. He is a thirty-second degree and Shriner Mason, and he also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Eastern Star. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy are deservedly popular, and have a host of warm personal friends allover this part of Indiana.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


STEPHEN THOMAS MARTIN has direct and important connection with the industrial and commercial interests of the City of Gary through his service as secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Clover Leaf Dairy Company, one of the leading concerns of this kind in Lake County.

Mr. Martin was born in Serbia, February 14, 1897, and is a son of Thomas and Gladys (Martin) Martin, who were born, reared and educated in Serbia, where their marriage was solemnized and whence they came to the United States in 1900. After passing a few years in Iowa the parents removed to the State of Washington, within whose borders they continued their residence until 1910. They then established the family home in the City of Chicago, there Thomas Martin was engaged in the retail grocery business a few years, and he then returned to Washington, in which state his attention was given to farm enterprise until 1915, since which year he and his wife have maintained their home in Gary, Indiana, where he is living virtually retired. Of the ten children three died in infancy; Mrs. Jennie Jankovic is a resident of Gary; Nicholas is a civil engineer in Serbia, native land of his parents; Mrs. Amelia Nickolich resides in Gary, as does also Robert, next younger of the children; Dorothy is a resident of Serbia; Stephen T. is the immediate subject of this review; and Miss Helen remains at the parental home in Gary.

In the public schools of Chicago Stephen T. Martin continued his studies until he had profited by the advantages of the high school, and he, was not yet sixteen years of age when he came to Gary and entered the employ of the Illinois Steel Company. With this great industrial corporation he was connected three years, and he then became an employe of the Gary Sanitary Grocery Company, with which he remained one year in its establishment at Gary and the next year in that at Indiana Harbor. It was in the year 1917 that he identified himself with the Clover Leaf Dairy Company, the following year marked his advancement to the position of sales manager, in 1921 he assumed the office of secretary of the company, and since 1929 he has functioned as secretary, treasurer and manager, besides being a director of the company. He is a director likewise of the Printcraft Service Company and is treasurer and a director of the Milk Dealers Bottle Exchange of Northern Indiana. Mr. Martin has made the passing years count in worthy achievement and has gained secure place as one of the substantial and progressive business men of Gary. He here has membership in the Chamber of Commerce and Commercial Club, as well as the Lions Club.

The political views of Mr. Martin place him loyally in the ranks of the Republican party, his basic Masonic affiliation is with Gary Lodge, No. 677, A. F. and A. M., and he has membership also in a local chapter of Royal Arch Masons, in the Gary Commandery of Knights Templar and in Orak Temple of the Mystic Shrine, in the City of Hammond. He has membership also in the representative social organization known as the Sand Fleas. He retains the religious faith in which he was reared, that of the Serbian Church, his name is still enrolled on the roster of eligible young bachelors in the Steel City, and one of his chief diversions is found through the medium of occasional hunting trips.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ELBERT C. COOK, M. D. Of the medical men of Jefferson County who have gained recognition and position in their profession solely through the medium of their abilities and learning, Elbert C. Cook, of Madison, is an excellent example. He has gained broad information through varied experiences, has fought his own way to prominence, and the honors that have come to him have been deservedly won. In the various official capacities in which he has acted he has discharged faithfully the responsibilities which have attached to his offices, and in the meantime has won esteem with honor and without rancor.

Doctor Cook was born in 1877, on a farm in Athens County, Ohio, and is a son of W. I. and Polly (Beebe) Cook. His father, who followed farming and milling, was one of the highly respected residents and public-spirited citizens of Athens County, where he and his wife passed their entire lives and both were noted for their sterling qualities of mind and heart. Elbert C. Cook attended the public schools of Athens County and the high school at Stewart, Ohio, following which he entered the Kentucky School of Medicine and was graduated with the degree or Doctor of Medicine as a member of the class of 1906. He served his interneship at Rosalia Maternity Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in 1907 settled permanently at Madison, where he has since been engaged in a constantly increasing general practice. Doctor Cook has a fine presence in the sick room, having been specially prepared for this by his early training. At the time that he graduated from high school his financial circumstances did not allow him to enter medical college at once, and he therefore took a course in professional nursing at Bellevue Hospital, New York City. After he left that institution he was employed for some years as a professional nurse, and thus had the opportunity of gaining invaluable experience .in the care and handling of patients. To this early training he attributed much of the success that has come to him. He is now accounted one of the most capable and thorough general practitioners in Jefferson County. He maintains well-appointed offices at the corner of West and Third streets, where he has every known appliance of the modern physician and surgeon. During the World war he was appointed Government referee of the draft board, and before the war had closed had his application in to join the Navy Medical Corps. He has since been designated as physician for the United States Bureau of Compensation, and has also served as secretary of the city health board of Madison. He is a member of the Jefferson County Medical Society, of which he was president in 1927; the Fourth District Medical Society and the Indiana State Medical Society, and fraternally is identified with Madison Lodge No.2, A. F. and A. M., and the Knights of Pythias. Doctor Cook now owns and resides on the old "Vawter Homestead," one of the show places and landmarks of this section of the state. This comprises about sixty acres of the original land grant, and the home, built in 1804, is one of the oldest in Indiana, but is still in an excellent state of preservation. Doctor Cook is a busy physician, but has always found time to devote to civic interests and has won the right to be considered one of the most public-spirited men of Madison.

Doctor Cook married Miss Myrtle Baer, daughter of ex-Judge Baer, a well-known lawyer and jurist of Indiana, and to this union there have been born two children: Norma, who married Russell Kloepfer and has one child, Zonia Lee; and Rosamond, the wife of Don Hudson.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


HARVEY C. SULLIVAN. For many years the virtue of the springs of West Baden, Indiana, have brought to this resort people from all parts of this and other countries, and have made necessary, in order to maintain the prestige thus gained, the operation of first-class hotels to entertain the many who seek relaxation and look for relief from disease. One of these hostelries whose fame is being carried to other lands is the Sullivan Hotel, formerly the Terrace Hotel, owned and operated by the late Harvey C. Sullivan, and now under the direction of Mrs. Sullivan. The slogan in this hotel is "service with a smile at pre-war prices.Ē Mr. Sullivan passed away, after brief illness, on October 6, 1930.

Harvey C. Sullivan was born in Washington County, within two miles of Salem, Indiana, November 10, 1872, a son of James and Nancy Jane (Simpson) Sullivan, the latter of whom was born in Greene County, Indiana and is still living at the age of ninety-one, but the former died June 10, 1925. He was born in Greene County, and was a farmer of Washington County. During the war between the states he served in the Union army and was a brave and gallant soldier. The parents had fourteen children, namely: Mary who died in infancy, William L., James, Martha J., Charles C., George W., Laura L., Harvey C., Minnie, Robert L., Nannie J., Frank, Fred and Daisy.

The public schools educated Harvey C. Sullivan, and he remained in Washington County for some years. His first venture was farming, his second merchandising, and he conducted a store at Greenville, Indiana, in partnership with his brother William from 1894 to 1908, when on March 26, the store burned down and they moved their business to Pekin, Indiana, where they operated one of the best stores in that locality. Harvey C. Sullivan purchased his brother's interest soon after establishing at Pekin and continued as sole owner until 1919, when once more he sold, making money in the transaction.

While he was thus engaged Mr. Sullivan began to be interested in handling real estate, and was so successful in his first ventures that he decided to enter the field, with the object of handling hotel and apartment properties. At the same time he invested in some very valuable pieces of property, and in July, 1929, bought the Terrace Hotel at West Baden. Immediately thereafter he made some improvements, changed the name to the Sullivan Hotel, and infused every department with his characteristic energy and wholesome spirit of enterprise, and the effect has filled his house with contented guests who feel that in it they have home surroundings and food together with a perfect service no private home can achieve. Probably Mr. Sullivan was one of the most popular men in Orange County. and he knew people from allover the world.

On October 3, 1902, Mr. Sullivan was married to Miss Annice Gertrude Templeton, daughter of Robert P. and Sarah Ellen (Ransom) Templeton, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter a native of Bradford, Indiana, where they were married. Mrs. Sullivan has one sister, Mrs. Ora Smith, of Salem, Indiana, and one brother by a later marriage of her mother, Leyden Steele, of Bedford. Mrs. Sullivan was born at Floyd Knobs, Indiana, December 17, 1879. Mrs. Sullivan is now the friendly hostess who greets the guests at Sullivan Hotel and makes them feel at home. One child has been born to them, James Templeton, April 5, 1904. This young man attended the Scottsburg High School, where he specialized in agriculture. When he first left school he worked for his father in the store, later spent two years with the Francoise Products Company, Baltimore, Maryland, then operated the White River Casino, near Seymour, Indiana, for two years and in 1931 built his own modern oil station and lunch room near the same location, known as Sullivan Cafe, where he is enjoying a splendid business. In July, 1925, he was married to Miss Laura Betty Yanaway, of Casey, Illinois. They have no children.

Mr. Sullivan of this review was a Democrat, as was his father before him, and as is his son after him. For many years he was a strong supporter of the Methodist Church and other institutions for the public good. Fraternally he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, to which he belonged twenty-five years and the Improved Order of Red Men.

Mr. Sullivan's death was a distinct loss to the whole community, he having been characterized by an editor who knew him as "one of the best known business men of Southern Indiana." His cheery smile and inexhaustible good will and energy are much missed by the regular guests of the hotel. The funeral was held at his mother's home near Salem, Indiana, and he was buried in Crown Hill Cemetery at Salem.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM E. CARR. Prior to his election, in 1929, to the office of county treasurer of Jefferson County, William E. Carr had been known principally to the people of this community as a practical, progressive and successful agriculturist and raiser of live stock, and as a straightforward and public-spirited citizen of enlightened views and modern tendencies. During his short incumbency of the office, however, they have learned that he possesses also those qualities which make for capable and expeditious service in offices of public responsibility and trust, and in demonstrating these he has strengthened in no small degree his hold upon public confidence.

Mr. Carr was born on a farm in Jefferson County, Indiana, February 9,1873, and is a son of James H. and Mary A. (Kessler) Carr. His paternal grandfather, John Carr, was born in Ireland, and immigrated to the United States in young manhood, settling on a Jefferson County farm during the early '40s. He became an ardent abolitionist in the years prior to the outbreak of the Civil war, and made his home a station of the "Underground Railway," that famous organization which, under cover of darkness, enabled thousands of fugitive slaves to escape to Canada. Mr. Carr became one of the substantial citizens of his community, where he spent the remainder of his life in farming, and died respected and esteemed. He married Miss Perminta Ryker, a native of England.

James H. Carr, father of William E. Carr, was born in Jefferson County, where he received a rural school education and was reared in the atmosphere of the farm. Brought up in a home where the mere thought of slavery was an outrage, it was but natural that he should enlist in the Union army at the outbreak of the war between the states, in which he saw three years of hard and valiant service as a private in an Indiana volunteer infantry regiment. Following the war he returned to the farm, where he spent the remainder of a long and useful career, and in his death left behind him a record of unsullied citizenship. He married Miss Mary A. Kessler, who was also born in Indiana, and they became the parents of eight children, of whom William E. was the fifth in order of birth.

William E. Carr attended the country schools of Jefferson County, but when sixteen years of age was compelled to give up his studies. The family was large and it was necessary for him to take his place as a contributor to the general income, which he did as an associate of his father, with whom he farmed until 1900. In that year he began farming on his own account, and through industry and the use of modern methods and machinery became, as he is today, one of the leading growers of corn and wheat and raisers of fine cattle in the county. Always a stanch and active Republican, in 1928 he became the candidate of his party for the county treasurership, to which he was elected, taking over the reins of office in 1929. Since he has assumed his official responsibilities he has shown himself competent, energetic and conscientious in the performance of his duties, leading the people to a confident belief that the finances of Jefferson County are in safe and capable hands.

Mr. Carr was united in marriage with Miss Mabel L. Ryker, who was born in Jefferson County, Indiana, where her father, an agriculturist by vocation, was also a toll-road operator during the greater part of his life. Mr. and Mrs. Carr are well and favorably known in social circles of Madison, where they are also active in church work. They are the parents of one daughter, Miss Mary Stella.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EUSEBIUS PHINEAS TRAPP. The business of banking at Vernon, like the art itself, has been a development springing out of the needs of accumulating wealth and diversified commerce. The bank does not come to an embryo town perfectly organized and fully capitalized. It does not come on the first boat nor build up its solid walls in a settlement of tents and camps. There must precede it some degree of maturity in business, some accumulation of wealth and an active commerce with distant regions. As the business of banking is the outcome of the need of its facilities, so the men who assume control of its operations are usually those as happen, by reason of natural aptitude and the circumstances surrounding them, to be drawn into the vocation. Thus the first bankers in a community are usually drawn from other callings, teachers, merchants, lawyers and men of versatility and ready adaptation. Such has been the case with E. P. Trapp, who was engaged in educational labors until 1895, at which time he became assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Vernon, of which he has been cashier since 1900.

Mr. Trapp has born in Jennings County, Indiana, October 29, 1871, and is a son of John H. Trapp. His paternal grandparents, John and Marguerite Trapp, were born in Germany, whence they came as young people to the United States, and for some years lived in Missouri. From that state they moved to Jennings County, Indiana, where John Trapp, who had been a bailiff in Missouri, spent the rest of his life in agricultural pursuits.

John H. Trapp was born in Jennings County, where he received a common school education, and was reared on his fatherís farm. He was thus engaged at the outbreak of the war between the states, during which he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Shortly after the war Mr. Trapp became interested in the business of brickmaking, and this he continued to follow, in connection with agricultural operations, until the close of his active career. He was a man of excellent business judgment and one who won and held the confidence of his fellow-citizens, who elected him to public office, he having served as township trustee from 1884 until 1888, and as county treasurer from 1894 until 1899. He and his wife became the parents of three children: E. P., of this review, Marguerite and Nellie.

E. P. Trapp attended school in Jennings County and was graduated from the high school at Vernon, following which he became a school teacher in Lovett Township and followed the educator's profession for four years. Appointed deputy county treasurer in 1895, he served in that capacity for four months, resigning that post to accept the position of assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Vernon. In April, 1900, he was made cashier, and has continued to act in that capacity to the present. The First National Bank was organized in 1886, as the Jennings County State Bank. In 1891 the bank became nationalized and was chartered, and in 1911 was rechartered. On December 27, 1930, it was consolidated with North Vernon National Bank of North Vernon, Indiana. Mr. Trapp continued with the reorganization. He is widely known as a capable, conservative and thoroughly learned banker, and has a number of connections with banking organizations. Fraternally he is affiliated with North Vernon Lodge No. 59, A. F. and A. M., and the Royal Arch Chapter of Masonry; and Mount Ida Lodge No. 73, I. O. O. F He served as a member of the school board of Vernon, and in every way has discharged the duties of good citizenship, particularly during the World war, when he was one of the most active men in his community in working for war funds.

Mr. Trapp married Miss Ann Wenzel, of Jennings County, Indiana, of German ancestry, and to this union there have been born six children, including two sets of twins: Marguerite, the wife of Henry Hulse, a business man of Vernon; Florence, her twin, who married William H. Simpson, postmaster of Vernon and a veteran of the World war, who saw two years of convoy service in the United States Navy; John Wenzel, a graduate of Hanover College; Rachael, the wife of Carl Lunsford, a business man of Vernon; Ruth, her twin, who is deceased; and Mary, the wife of Robert Whitcomb, a graduate of Hanover College and now a teacher in the public schools. Mrs. Trapp is prominent in social circles of Vernon, a popular member of the Womenís Club, the Jennings County Historical Society and Vernon Chapter of the Society of Colonial Dames and is secretary of Rebekah Lodge No. 33, Vernon, and district president of the Sixth District, Rebekahs of Indiana.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray