VERNON R. HELMEN, South Bend attorney, is a native of that city and represents the third generation of a highly respected family of Northern Indiana.

He is one of the sons of Frederick T. and Emma (Lempke) Helmen, who have lived at South Bend since 1883. Both parents were born in LaPorte County, and all the earlier ancestors of the family came from Germany and were pioneers of Northern Indiana.

Frederick T. Helmen was born in LaPorte County, April 30, 1858, son of Frederick and Frederika (Werner) Helmen. In Germany the Helmen name was spelled Hellmann. Frederick Helmen was born in Germany, August 7, 1829, and was married after he settled in LaPorte County, Indiana. His wife was born May 30, 1831. He worked in a flour mill and later became a farmer. Frederick Helmen died January 24, 1909, and his wife on October 24, 1919.

Frederick T. Helmen married Emma Lempke, who was born in LaPorte County, June 3, 1861, daughter of Charles and Dorothy Frederika (Wilhelm) Lempke, natives of Germany, where her father was born April 5, 1826, and her mother on June 24, 1840. Charles Lempke settled in LaPorte County about 1849. His wife came to Indiana in 1856, at the age of sixteen, and after their marriage they settled on a farm, where they spent the rest of their days. Charles Lempke died, March 23, 1872, and his wife on September 22, 1877. All these ancestors were German Lutherans in religion.

Frederick T. Helmen was educated in public schools of LaPorte County, learned the trade of carpenter and millwright, and after coming to South Bend spent forty years as foreman in the woodworking department of the South Bend Chilled Plow Company. He is now conducting a grocery business near Roseland and owns a farm just outside the City of South Bend. He is a Democrat in politics, is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church and the Knights of the Maccabees.

The seven children of Frederick T. Helmen and wife are: Harry W., a successful physician and surgeon at South Bend; Vernon R., a member of the South Bend bar; Effa Bertha, wife of John E. Bernhardt, of 225 Hammond Place, South Bend; Charles Adam, South Bend dentist; Frederick John, assistant cashier and assistant secretary of the St. Joseph Bank of South Bend; Erma Pauline, connected with the Associates Investment Company; and Arthur Horace, manager of the Moskins Clothing Store of Waukegan, Illinois.

Vernon R. Helmen attended the grade and high schools of South Bend, completing his high school work at Notre Dame. He also attended the Valparaiso Normal School and in 1917 was graduated from the law department of Notre Dame University. As a young man he engaged in teaching, for two years in the River Park School, in what is now a part of South Bend, and another two years in Clay Township in St. Joseph County. While attending Notre Dame University was secretary of the educational department of the Y. M. C. A. of South Bend, and continued in that work for about five years. After finishing his law course he went Duluth, Minnesota, as educational director of the Y. M. C. A. for one year. He began his work as a lawyer with the firm of Baldwin, Baldwin & Holmes, at Duluth, but after a short time left to enlist for service in the World war. He attended the Field Artillery Officers Training School at Camp Taylor, Kentucky, receiving his honorable discharge on November 29, 1918. Returning to South Bend, he engaged in law practice until 1921. During the next five years he was in the Government service at Chicago as an internal revenue agent in the estate tax division of the Treasury Department. Since 1926 Mr. Helmen has carried on a general law practice at South Bend. While in Notre Dame he was vice president of the Junior Law Class and president of the Day Students organization. He has been president of the Clay Township civic center, and president of the South Bend-Mishawaka health service Epworth League Union. He takes an active part in the Methodist Episcopal Church and for ten years has taught a class in Sunday School.

Mr. Helmen married, March 11, 1922, Miss Margaret Ackerburg, of Chicago. They have two children, Vernon R., Jr., born August 8, 1923, and Suzanne Margaret, born December 11, 1928.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


J. K. HAWES, M. D. The Hawes family is of English ancestry and in Indiana was founded by Jason Hawes, who came from New York into the state about 1816, bringing his family, consisting of a wife and eight children, four boys and four girls. Using an Ohio River flat-boat, he landed at Utica, where he lived for some years.

Jason Hawes was a stone mason and built many of the houses of the day. Later he moved to the western side of the county, where his family grew to maturity. A son, Nathan, born in New York in 1802, married Nancy, the daughter of Hugh Kelly, who likewise came to Indiana by way of the Ohio, about 1812. The Kellys were of Irish lineage, coming out of Virginia into Ohio, where Nancy was born in 1804, thence to Indiana. To this union there were born nine children. Nathan was a farmer, as was his son, Ep, born in 1839.

Ep Hawes married Harriet, the eldest daughter of Jesse O. and Salina Gates Coleman, of Edinburgh, in 1864. Jesse Coleman came to Indiana from Connecticut in 1848. He was of English descent. His grandfather Coleman was born in England, his wife was of the Gates family of whom General Gates, of Revolutionary fame, was the most prominent member. Jesse Coleman was a colonel in the Union army.

Ep Hawes took his young wife to the Hawes homestead at Memphis, Clark County, where they raised their family and where she spent her last days - going to her reward in 1916, of seventy-three. Ep Hawes relinquished the farm to a son, Samuel, and now, at the age of ninety-two, makes his home with his son, James Kelly, at Columbus.

James Kelly Hawes was born in Clark County, July 28, 1874, was educated in the common schools and at Borden Institute, a private school, after which he taught school, both in Clark County, Indiana, and in Jefferson County, Kentucky, then he studied medicine at the Central University of Kentucky, now the University of Louisville, graduating in 1898. He came to Columbus, August 1, 1898, and has since resided here, practicing his profession.

Doctor Hawes as a physician has been a prominent figure in his profession and in the community life of Columbus for over thirty years. During the World war he was acting assistant surgeon of the United States public health service. Since 1919 he has been deputy health commissioner of the State of Indiana and a director of the United States public health service. He was county health officer of Bartholomew County from 1908 to 1909, is a member of the staff of the Bartholomew County Hospital, is secretary of the Bartholomew County Medical Society and of the Fourth District Medical Society and is a member of the Indiana State and American Medical Associations. Doctor Hawes is affiliated with St. John's Lodge of Masons, Knights of Pythias, the B. P. O. Elks, is a member of the Christian Church and is a Republican voter. He married Miss Myrtle Wisner, of Bartholomew County, in 1899. To their marriage were born seven children: Harriet, is a graduate of Butler University of Indianapolis, and is the wife of Kenneth R. Williams, of that city; William graduated Bachelor of Science from Purdue University, took his Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees at Brown University of Providence, Rhode Island, and at this time is doing research work for the National Research Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology at Cambridge, Massachusetts; Marvin graduated Bachelor of Science and M. D. from Indiana University and is now an interne at Saint Vincent's Hospital in Indianapolis; Mary, Ruth, James and Robert are at home.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ROBERT JUDSON ALEY, president of Butler University, is a native of Indiana, born at Coal City May 11, 1863, son of Jesse J. and Paulina (Moyer) Aley.

He has been a teacher for over half a century, doing his first work in country schools in 1877, when only fourteen years old. While teaching he studied at and graduated from Valparaiso University, and received his A. B. degree in 1888 and Master of Arts degree in 1890 from Indiana University, being instructor in mathematics at the university while studying for the Bachelor's degree. He held the chair of mathematics in Vincennes University from 1888 to 1891, and at Indiana University from 1891 to 1909. He was acting assistant professor of mathematics at Stanford University in California in 1894-95. The University of Pennsylvania gave him the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1897, and that university and also Butler College and Franklin College have since bestowed upon him the honorary LL. D.

Doctor Aley served as superintendent of public instruction of Indiana from March, 1909, to November 12, 1910. He left this position to go to the University of Maine as president, remaining there until 1921, when he returned to his home state to become president of Butler University at Indianapolis. Doctor Aley is known among scholars for his research work in higher mathematics and is author of several text books and special treatises. For years he was mathematical editor of the Inland Educator and Educator- Journal. For nine years he was editor-in- chief and president of the Educator-Journal. Among other titles of honor he has worthily borne was his election as president of the National Education Association for the year 1916-17. He has also been president of the National Council of Education, is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of other learned organizations. He is a Phi Beta Kappa, member of the Disciples Church, a Knight Templar and a thirty-third degree Mason. Doctor Aley married, August 28, 1884, Miss Nellie Archer, of Spencer, Indiana, and they have had two sons, Bruce, now deceased, and Maxwell.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


HON. JAMES BINGHAM, former attorney- general of Indiana, has been a member of the bar of the state for forty years. After leaving the office of attorney-general he remained at Indianapolis, where he is still conducting a large practice, with his son as a partner and with offices in the City Trust Building.

Mr. Bingham was born in Mill Creek Township, Fountain County, Indiana, March 16, 1861, son of Alexander and Jane (Savage) Bingham. His father was born near Blue Lick Springs, Kentucky, and his mother in Ohio. They were married in Indiana. His father was a carpenter by trade, but spent most of his active years on a farm. He died March 26, 1886. He was much interested in local politics and at one time was candidate on the Republican ticket for the Legislature. His wife died in 1868, when thirty-three years of age.

James Bingham grew up on a farm, attended the common schools and the Ladoga Normal School and Valparaiso University. At the age of twenty-two he became a teacher, a work he continued for six years, and for two terms of two years each was county superintendent of schools in Fountain County. When he began the study of law he had to overcome the handicap of poor eyesight, and his wife read to him from the law books, and largely through the medium of her eyes he qualified for practice and after his admission to the bar she continued to assist him for several years. Mr. Bingham was prosecuting attorney of the Twenty-first Judicial District for one term. He practiced in partnership with C. M. McCabe at Covington, Indiana, until March, 1894, when he moved to Muncie, where he and A. M. Wagner were associated, and in 1895 Jesse R. Long, Bloomington, Illinois, joined them in the firm of Wagner, Bingham & Long. Mr. Wagner retired in 1899, but Bingham & Long were together until 1906.

In the fall of 1906 Mr. Bingham was elected attorney-general of Indiana, and by reelection served two terms. While he was attorney- general he was associated with Will White and William Haymond in a law firm at Muncie, retiring from the partnership soon after his term expired, January 1, 1911, and practiced alone in Indianapolis until 1915, when his son, Remster A., joined him.

Mr. Bingham married, December 26, 1885, Elizabeth Remster, of Fountain County, daughter of Andrew and Tamsin (Smith) Remster. Her father was born near Salem, New Jersey. Of the children of Mr. And Mrs. Bingham the first, a daughter, died in infancy. The son Remster A., his fatherís law partner, was overseas during the World war, being discharged with the rank of captain. He married Catherine Kidder and has two children, Remster and Katherine. The second son, Charles, was also overseas, was gassed and discharged with the rank of first lieutenant. He also studied law and entered the partnership with his father and brother, continuing until his death, April 27, 1929. He married Joy Reed, who survives with one son, James.

Mrs. Bingham passed away April 6, 1925. Mr. Bingham attends the Second Presbyterian Church, is a Republican, a member of the Columbia Club, Indiana State, Indianapolis and American Bar Associations, and was one of the organizers of the Delaware County Bar Association. Among other clients his firm represents as attorneys the Live Stock Exchange Bank.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PERRY A. BRAY, who is president of the Hamilton County Historical Society, has lived all his life in that county, whose people have a high degree of esteem for his business abilities and his deep interest in preserving all essential matters of history.

He was born on a farm April 22, 1861. His father, Henry W. Bray, was a native of Kentucky, born about the same time that Abraham Lincoln first saw the light of day in the log cabin that has since become a shrine. The Brays moved across the Ohio River into Indiana about the same time that Thomas Lincoln brought his family to Spencer County. However, the Brays settled in Hamilton County. Henry W. Bray became a well-to-do farmer and was always active in politics, at first as a Whig and later as a Republican. He held the office of county commissioner. He married Miss Betsey Mills, who was a descendant of the Jameson family, her ancestor, Thomas Jameson, having been a Virginia soldier in the War of the Revolution. Perry A. Bray has the old marriage certificate of his grandparents, who were married in 1778 in North Carolina. Miss Betsey Mills was born in Tennessee, of North Carolina stock. Her people came to Indiana in 1820, but subsequently spent several years in Tennessee before becoming permanent residents of the Hoosier State.

Perry A. Bray grew up in Hamilton County, had the advantages of the common and high schools, and from early manhood engaged in farming. In 1906 he disposed of his farming interests and has since been a resident of Noblesville, where he became connected with the postoffice.

He married Miss Elizabeth Perry. Five children were born to their marriage, two of whom died in infancy. Their daughter, Judith Ann, who died in 1926, was the wife of Gibson Hastings and left a son, Gibson Jr. Rachael, who finished her education in the Western College for Women at Oxford, Ohio, is the wife of Wilbur Sevier, of Indianapolis, and has a son, James W. Bray Sevier. Mary Bray was educated at Purdue University and is the wife of Gerald W. Kennedy.

Mr. Bray has always been a staunch Republican in his political affiliations. In 1910 he was appointed census enumerator for Hamilton County. He is a member of the Friends Church, belongs to the Masonic fraternity and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has been president of the Hamilton County Historical Society since 1926 and is also a member of the Indiana State Historical Society.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


HON. J. DELBERT FOOR, who for two terms was a representative from Vigo County in the Indiana Legislature, is a prominent physician and surgeon, practicing at Terre Haute.

Doctor Foor was born in Miami County, Indiana , August 9, 1871, son of David and Ellen (Alspach) Foor. His parents were born in Ohio. David Foor was eleven years of age when brought to Indiana by his parents, Frederick and Elizabeth Foor, in 1839. They settled Miami County, when that region was a part of the frontier advance of settlement into Northern Indiana. Frederick Foor took up a homestead from the Government, and spent the rest of his life as a farmer. David Foor grew up there, and after his marriage located on a farm in Miami County. He was always a staunch Democrat in politics. David died in 1910, when eighty-two years of age, and his wife passed away in 1908, at the age of seventy. They had a family of five children.

J. Delbert Foor grew up on a farm, had the advantages of the common schools and the high school at Macy. After that his advantages were such as he could obtain through his own activities. At the age of sixteen he made up his mind to become a physician. By work on the home farm he accumulated a little money, which he invested in the educational opportunities of Valparaiso University. He studied pharmacy, was graduated Ph. G. with the class of 1895 and then worked as a pharmacist to pay the expenses of medical college. In the fall of 1897 he entered the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis. For his work at Valparaiso University he received one yearís credit, and in 1900 was graduated with the M.D. degree. He was a member of the first four-year class of Indiana Medical College. Doctor Foor then returned to Miami County to practice, where he continued for one year. From 1901 to 1905 he was located at Jasonville in Greene County. In 1904 Doctor Foor was the unsuccessful candidate on the Democratic ticket for coroner of Greene County. In 1905 he moved to the Village of Blackhawk in Pierson Township, Vigo County, and practiced medicine there until 1911, when he came to the larger opportunities of the City of Terre Haute.

Doctor Foor, while living at Blackhawk, was elected a member of the Sixty-sixth Indiana General Assembly in 1908. He was re-elected in 1910. During his two terms he made himself a constructive influence in a sound legislative program. He introduced and secured the passage of several important laws. One of them was the bill to prevent infant blindness, an Indiana statute which was subsequently copied by many other states of the Union. He was also instrumental in securing the passage of the hydrophobia bill, by which a fund is created in each county to secure the prompt and effective treatment of persons afflicted with hydrophobia.

Since coming to Terre Haute Doctor Foor has devoted his entire time to his extensive general medical practice. He has always been a student of his profession and his experience as a doctor has made him familiar with some of the difficulties attending practice in the earlier days. While a country physician in Greene and Vigo counties he rode horseback and drove a horse and buggy to make his professional rounds and frequently had to contend with the difficulties of poor roads.

Doctor Foor is a Democrat in politics and has been active in the county Democratic organization. Doctor Foor for fourteen years has had his office at 831 1/2 Wabash Avenue in Terre Haute. He has always lived a very clean and exemplary life, abstaining from drinking or smoking, and to this in part can doubtless be ascribed his youthful appearance and his great energy. Doctor Foor is a member of Terre Haute Lodge No. 19, A, F. and A. M. He married in April, 1900, at Indianapolis, Miss E. Leora Whitlock. She was born and reared in Marion County, Indiana.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN J. REIBOLDT, prominent banker and business man of Laurel for many years, was born in Franklin County, Indiana, March 4, 1856. His parents, John Jacob and Catherine (Mettle) Reiboldt, were natives of Germany and were married in Franklin County. Catherine Mettle crossed the ocean on a sailing vessel, being seventy-two days at sea before arriving at New Orleans. After their marriage John Jacob Reiboldt and wife settled on a farm three miles south of Brookville, where he died in 1858. His widow then became the wife of his brother, George Peter Reiboldt, who was in the baking business at Brookville until the fall of 1866, when he moved to Laurel and continued business there.

John J. Reiboldt had a few terms of attendance at the public schools of Franklin County as a boy, but most of his strength and energy were devoted to farming, in which he was associated with his brother, John Peter, until he was twenty years of age. He started in business as a clerk in William L. Day's hardware store, and after a year bought a half interest, and they were partners for twenty-seven years. In 1894 these same men engaged in banking, organizing the Day & Reiboldt Bank at Laurel. In 1904 Mr. Reiboldt sold his mercantile interests and at that time acquired Mr. Day's holdings in the bank, and since then he has been president and active head of the Laurel Bank, which has a capital of $10,000.

Mr. Reiboldt on October 31, 1893, married Miss May Ferguson, who was born at Clarksburg, West Virginia, daughter of Len Ferguson. She died in 1914, leaving a son, Carl Ferguson Reiboldt, who was born in 1904. This son possesses an unusual baritone voice and is now taking special work in New York City for the development of his musical abilities. Mr. Reiboldt is a member of the Lutheran Church, has served as president of the town board, and served on the County Council of Franklin County twelve years. He is a Republican and a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN APPLEGATE TITSWORTH, senior member of the law firm Titsworth & Titsworth at Rushville, has lived all his life in Rush County and all his grandparents were early settlers in Rush and Fayette counties.

He was born in Noble Township, Rush. County, February 2, 1871, son of George W. and Rhoda J. (Applegate) Titsworth, and grandson of Peter and Sarah (Reed) Titsworth, the former coming to Rush County from Montgomery County, Ohio, and of John and Anne (Kerr) Applegate, of Fayette County. John Applegate was a carriage maker. Though he died in 1870, some of the vehicles he made were of such staunch construction that they are still in use. George W. Titsworth spent his active life as a farmer and served as a member of the County Council. He died in 1907 and his wife in 1919.

John A. Titsworth attended country schools, graduated from the Orange High School, taught for two years, and in that way earned the money for his college expenses. He spent two years in Purdue University, taking the civil engineering course, and then entered the law department of the University of Michigan, where he was graduated in June, 1893. After graduating he taught in Noble Township, Rush County, and in 1894 opened a law office in Rushville. He was associated with John M. Stevens until 1908 and for fourteen years was with James A. Watson and Thomas M. Green in the firm of Watson, Titsworth & Green. Later for one year Perry E. O'Neal was with him, and since then he has had as his active associate Russell B. Titsworth, his son. Mr. Titsworth has tried thousands of cases in Indiana courts, and during the nine years he has been associated with his son Russell the firm has represented a large number of banks and industrial and public utility corporations and several railway companies, and have also been attorneys for the City of Rushville and the school board and library board of the city. Mr. Titsworth has also been counsel in many important will and murder cases.

He has always been a Republican, but never an active candidate for public office, though he has served as county and city attorney. He has been president of the Rushville Rotary Club, president of the Chamber of Commerce, president of the Chautauqua Association. His law office has been local headquarters for Senator Watson and other noted Indiana Republicans. For nine years he was chairman of the official board of the Main Street Christian Church and adult superintendent of the Bible School.

Mr. Titsworth married, June 16, 1896, Miss Cora D. Brooks, who was born in Noble Township, Rush County, daughter of William M. and Laura D. (Downey) Brooks. Their son Russell B. is now prosecuting attorney of Rush County and city attorney. The daughter, Gladys, is the wife of Frank Peary, and both are prominent educators, she holding the degree Bachelor of Science and Master of Science from Hillsdale College, while Doctor Peary is an M. D., now doing research work with the Rockefeller Foundation. The third child, Harold J., is also an attorney, practicing at Rushville. The mother of these children died January 11, 1905, and on July 8, 1914, Mr. Titsworth married Nelle L. Lyons. She was born in Rush County, daughter of Charles and Florence (Downey) Lyons. The only child of this marriage, John Charles, died at the age of five years.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray