HON. RICHARD NASH ELLIOTT, who served fourteen years as representative of the Sixth Indiana District in Congress, was born in Fayette County and began the practice of law at Connersville in 1896. He has been a prominent figure in his home state and at Washington, and in 1931, on retiring from Congress, was appointed by President Hoover assistant comptroller general of the United States.

He was born on the home farm in Fayette County, April 25, 1873, son of Charles W. and Eliza A. (Nash) Elliott. The Nash family is of Scotch-Irish ancestry and has been in America since Colonial times. Eliza A. Nash was born in Fairview Township, Fayette County; Indiana, daughter of Richard and Margaret (Moffett) Nash, and a granddaughter of Richard Nash, who was a resident of Pennsylvania when the first national census was taken in 1790. Richard Nash II, for whom Richard Nash Elliott was named, was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, in 1798. His wife was also a native of Pennsylvania. Richard Nash in his early life was employed in moving salt and other freight, by flatboat down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, later settled in Indiana and acquired a tract of land in what is now Fairview Township, Fayette County. Richard Nash was a man of leadership in community affairs, serving as justice of the peace.

Charles W. Elliott, father of Richard N. Elliott, was born at Brooksville, Kentucky, and in 1833 came with his parents, John and Rachel (Pigman) Elliott, to Indiana. They located on a pioneer farm in Jennings Township, Fayette County. John Elliott was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, in 1800, and went with his parents from Virginia to Kentucky. He was one of the sterling pioneer farmers and citizens of Fayette County. After his marriage Charles W. Elliott lived at the old homestead, then bought land of his own, and was also a carpenter and builder. He went to the California gold fields in 1849, going west by boat down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, crossed the Gulf of Mexico, and while on the Chagres River in the Isthmus of Panama he was attacked by jungle fever, which nearly terminated his life. As soon as he had partially recovered he returned home and was satisfied with the peaceful routine of an Indiana farmer during the rest of his active life. He died June 8, 1891, and was survived by his widow until March, 1922. Their children were: Lurena M., who died when five years old; Daisy V., who died at the age of four years; Richard N.; Charles W., Jr., who died November 25, 1897; and Cecile Edna, wife of Walter Sefton, of Connersville.

Richard Nash Elliott was educated in the public schools of Fayette County, taught school there for three years and studied law at Connersville in the office of Connor & McIntosh. In December, 1896, he was admitted to the bar, opened his law office in Connersville and for several years was a partner of Ira T. Trusler, subsequent partners in professional work being Frederick I. Barrows, David W. McKee, Hyatt L. Frost and Allen Wiles. During later years he was a member of the prominent Connersville firm of McKee, Wiles & Elliott.

On June 26, 1917, Mr. Elliott was elected to the Sixty-fifth Congress for the unexpired term 1917-19 of Daniel W. Comstock, deceased. He was reelected to the Sixty-sixth Congress in 1918 and continued to represent the Sixth Indiana District until March 4, 1931, his last term being in the Seventy-first Congress. He was a valuable member of Congress during the world war period and throughout the following decade gave an earnest and studious attention to the great problems of economic legislation and international relationships. Soon after he began the practice of law Mr. Elliott, in 1898, was appointed court attorney of Fayette County and filled that office nine consecutive years. For four years he was city attorney of Connersville and was also candidate for mayor of the city, and for the office of prosecuting attorney. In 1904 he was elected to represent Fayette County in the Indiana General Assembly and served in the sessions of 1905, 1907 and the special session of 1908. In 1905 he was appointed a member of the Indiana Tuberculosis Commission. He made a personal tour of investigation of leading institutions for the treatment of tuberculosis in New Mexico, Colorado, New York and Massachusetts, and after a careful study of the laws and methods of management he introduced, in 1907, and championed the enactment of the bill providing for the erection and equipment of the Indiana State Tuberculosis Hospital at Rockville. While in Congress Mr. Elliott was a member of the committee that drafted and reported for passage the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the Woman's Suffrage Amendment. He was acting chairman of the House committee on invalid pensions and was author of the maimed soldiers bill to increase the pensions of soldiers who had lost legs or arms. In December, 1924, in the Sixty-ninth Congress, he was made chairman of the House committee on public buildings and grounds. He was also a member of the United States Public Building Commission, the Arlington Memorial Bridge Commission, the Capital Plaza Commission and the United States Supreme Court Building Commission. He was the author of the Elliott Public Building Act, approved May 25, 1926, and a series of amendatory acts, which authorized the construction in the national capital and throughout the United States of public buildings amount of $700,000,000. Under the terms of these acts the Federal buildings in Washington are being reconstructed. Some of the most noted of these buildings are for the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Justice, Labor, Navy, Post Office, Treasury, and War; and buildings to house the independent bureaus of the Government, the new House Office Building, the United States Supreme Courthouse, the Archives Building, the Natural History Building at the Smithsonian Institution, the Arlington Memorial Bridge and the extension of the capitol grounds.

In addition to these, large Federal buildings are being erected in all of the principals cities of the United States and Federal buildings in all of the smaller cities not heretofore provided with these buildings where the postal receipts will exceed the sum of $20,000 per annum.

This is probably the greatest building program that was ever started by any nation in peace times during the world history. Largely through his influence many thousand carloads of famous Indiana limestone were utilized in this construction program at Washington.

Mr. Elliott has been a lifelong Republican. He was a delegate to the Republican national convention at Chicago, in 1916, and chairman of the Republican state convention in 1930. He has served as a member of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church at Connersville. He is a past master of the Masonic Lodge, a past high priest of the Royal Arch Masons, and is a member of the B. P. O. Elks and Improved Order of Red Men.

He married, January 20, 1898, Miss Lizzie A. Ostheimer. She was born and reared at Connersville, daughter of Simon and Mary E. (Simpkins) Ostheimer. Her father was born in Germany and her mother at Bethel, Ohio. Her father was in the Third Indiana Battery of artillery in the Civil war and later was county treasurer of Fayette County.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES BARAN. Among the foreign-born citizens of Gary who have attained business success and recognition through the medium of their own well directed efforts, few have made greater strides than Charles Baran, a prosperous furniture merchant and real estate operator. Mr. Baran came to this, country at the time he attained his majority, and has been a resident of Gary since 1907. He is essentially a self-made man in the broadest sense of that term, and occupies a substantial place in the esteem and respect of his fellow-citizens and associates.

Mr. Baran was born in Poland, October 26, 1880, and is a son of John and Mary (Kriski) Baran. His parents were born in Poland, where they received educations in the public schools at Zarszyn, and spent their entire lives in their native land, where John Baran was a farmer of moderate means. He died in April, 1919, his widow surviving him until August 1, 1928, and both are buried in the cemetery at Zarszyn. They were the parents of six sons: Charles, of this review; John, of Poland; Joseph, who met his death on a battlefield during the World war; and Walter, Benny and Boles, all of Poland.

Charles Baran acquired his education in the public schools of Zarszyn, following which he assisted his father in the work of the home farm until he reached the age of twenty-one years. At that time he decided that there were greater opportunities for an ambitious and energetic young man to be found in the United States, and accordingly he gathered together his few resources and small capital and made his way to this country, first settling at New York City, where he secured employment and remained for one and one-half years. During this period he saved his earnings carefully, and in 1907, when he first came to Gary, was able to open a modest general mercantile business. Being enterprising, untiring and possessed of good business ability, he built up a paying business, which he conducted along general lines until 1916, in that year turning his attention exclusively to the furniture business, in which he has continued to be engaged with increasing success to the present. He is now the proprietor and sole owner of a large and modern establishment at 1516 Broadway, where he owns the building, conducting his enterprise under the name of the Baran Furniture Company. Early in his career at Gary Mr. Baran became convinced of the value of real estate in the city and its environs, and accordingly branched out into the realty business. From 1923 until 1928 he was a developer of Gary property to the extent of some $4,000,000, and may therefore be called one of the real contributors to the city's growth and progress. He is now president of the Charles Baran Real Estate Company, with offices at 1517 Broadway; president of the Joseph Broadway Realty Company, which owns a large three-story and basement building in the 1500 block, Broadway; and president of the Pennsylvania Lumber Supply Company. He belongs to the Commercial Club and Chamber of Commerce, as a member of which affiliated bodies he gives his support to all worthy civic movements, and during the World war was greatly active in all the drives and a member of Conscription Board No.2. A Democrat in politics, he has been active in his party for years, and in 1930 was the candidate of his fellow Democrats for county commissioner of the First District of Lake County. Mr. Baran is a member of St. Mark's Catholic Church.

On June 22, 1914, Mr. Baran was united in marriage, at Gary, with Miss Rosie Dardziski, daughter of Deofil and Mary Dardziski, the former of whom was for years connected with the Illinois Steel Company and is now associated with Mr. Baran in the furniture business. Mrs. Dardziski died in 1915 and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Gary. Mrs. Baran was educated in the public schools of Gary, graduating from the Emerson High School. She is essentially a home-lover and home-maker, having but few outside activities, but is a faithful member of St. Mark's Catholic Church. Mr. and Mrs. Baran have two children: Charles, Jr., and Rosie, both of whom are attending the Emerson School.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE W. OSBORN is an able Indiana lawyer, has practiced for twenty years at Sheridan in Hamilton County, and his fellow members of the bar and citizens generally understand and appreciate his good work as a lawyer, his high personal character, and undoubtedly just for the fact that he lives in an overwhelmingly Republican county he would have repeatedly been honored with the highest offices in the gift of his fellow citizens.

Mr. Osborn was born on a farm in Marion County, Indiana, October 20, 1879. His father, David Osborn, grew up in Marion County. Mr. Osborn's grandfather was born in Virginia, in 1771, and died in 1875, when 104 years old. His death occurred just a year before the United States celebrated the hundredth anniversary of its independence, and he was a child five years old when that immortal document was signed. He was a pioneer of Indiana and entered land in Marion County in 1822. The patent to the land was signed by President James Monroe. David Osborn married Anna Roberts, also a native of Marion County. Her father, Jacob Roberts, married Miss Van Schack.

George W. Osborn was three years of age when his parents moved to a farm in Clay Township, Hamilton County, and there he grew up. After the common schools he had to depend on his own efforts for his education and advancement, and he paid all his expenses while a student at the University of Indiana. He majored in law and in January, 1907, was admitted to the bar and on the 4th of February began his career as a practicing attorney at Sheridan. Mr. Osborn has the distinction of being the only Democrat to hold the office of prosecuting attorney of Hamilton County. He was in that office during the two years, 1913-1914. In 1920 he was Democratic candidate for the office of circuit judge and in 1928 was again put up by the Democratic party as a candidate for the bench. In this last campaign he made a wonderful showing against overwhelming odds. President Hoover carried Hamilton County by 4,200 votes, and Judge Osborn lost the county by 607 votes, figures that indicate his high personal popularity and his standing as a lawyer.

Mr. Osborn married Miss Bessie Kercheral, who died, leaving no children. His second wife was Dessie Spraul, who passed away in 1929, leaving two sons. John R. Osborn is a student in Butler University at Indianapolis, and is working to meet his expenses. The second son, George W., Jr., is a graduate of the Sheridan High School. He is a remarkable specimen of physical manhood, standing six feet, seven and three-quarters inches, and is an expert ball player. His high school team was the best in this section of the state during his senior year.

Mr. Osborn is a member of the Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Knights Templar Commandery of Masons and is active in the Rotary Club. Sheridan is the smallest town in the world to have a Rotary charter.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


MARTIN FRANK CUNNINGHAM, president of the City Board of Safety of Hammond, has for many years been identified with an industrial establishment which has probably brought more nation-wide publicity to Hammond as an industrial center than any other, the W. B. Conkey Company. Mr. Cunningham for many years has been plant superintendent of this notable institution.

He is a native of Indiana, born in the City of LaFayette February 9, 1880, son of Martin and Ellen (Wimsey) Cunningham. His parents were born in Ireland and had educational advantages in the parochial schools there before they came to America. They met and married in this country and lived out their lives in LaFayette. His father built up a good business as a teaming contractor and wood dealer. Both parents were active in the Catholic Church. The father passed away in 1889 and the mother in 1913. Both are buried at LaFayette. Of their twelve children, twins and several others died in infancy. One son, James, died during the Spanish-American war. The living children are: Miss Mary, of Chicago; Mrs. Katherine Welsh, of Chicago; Margaret, wife of L. Rickey, of Indianapolis; William, of Indianapolis; and Martin F.

Martin F. Cunningham attended parochial school in LaFayette, completed a business college course there, and left school to take up the printing business, serving his early apprenticeship and acquiring a broad knowledge of the business during the four years he was with the Spring-Emerson Printing Company. He left there in 1900 to come to Hammond, to join the W. B. Conkey Company. Except for a few years in Chicago, with the R. R. Donnelley Company, he has been with the Conkey plant ever since. He started as a pressman, was promoted to foreman of the press room, and since 1914 has had the important responsibility of acting as plant superintendent.

Outside of his main line of work Mr. Cunningham has always taken a keen interest in matters of civic and political concern to the community. He has done some valuable work as president of the Board of Safety during the administration of the present mayor. He is president of the Calumet Building & Loan Association, is a director of the Chamber of Commerce, member of the B. P. O. Elks, and for years was active in the Hammond Country Club. In politics he is a Democrat. His chief pastime is the game of bridge.

Mr. Cunningham married at Hammond, September 7, 1904, Miss Mary Edith Morrison. Her parents, Thomas and Jane (Brown) Morrison, were born and reared in Scotland, were married in Canada, and they established their home at Hammond about 1900. Her father for a number of was an employee of the Standard Oil Company at Whiting. He died in 1912. Her mother was killed in an automobile accident at Hammond in 1928. Both her parents are buried at Hammond. Mrs. Cunningham attended public school in Canada. She is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church at Hammond. Three children were born to their marriage. The youngest, Martin, Jr., died when fourteen months old. The two surviving daughters are Marion and Jean. Marion is the wife of Merl Esterline, who is in the nursery business at Indianapolis, and has a daughter, Jane Esterline. Both daughters are graduates of the Hammond High School. Marion after leaving high school spent a year in the Chevy Chase School for Girls near Washington, and Jean spent a year in the National Park Seminary at Washington. Marion for three years was a student in the University of Wisconsin. Jean graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1928 and is now the talented society editor of the Lake County Times at Hammond.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GERARD CORNELIUS DOOGE, a mechanical and structural engineer by training and profession, is one of Gary's prominent business men, being president of the All Pure Ice Company, at 900 Van Buren Street.

Mr. Dooge, as his name indicates, is a descendant of Dutch ancestry. His people are among the prominent Dutch colonists in Western Michigan at Grand Rapids. Mr. Dooge was born in the City of Grand Rapids, February 24, 1882, a son of Bastian and Martha (Stander) Dooge. His father was born in the Netherlands, was educated there and was twenty years old when he came to America and settled at Grand Rapids. For forty-two years he was a grocery merchant in that city, where he died in 1913. His wife, Martha Stander, was born and reared at Elgin, Michigan. She was a devout member of the Highland Dutch Reformed Church at Grand Rapids. She died in 1919. These parents had a family of seven children: Adrian, of Grand Rapids; Aaron, who died in infancy; John, deceased; Harry, of Grand Rapids; Gerard C.; Gertrude, Mrs. William Frey, of Grand Rapids; and William, of Grand Rapids.

Gerard C. Dooge graduated from the Grand Rapids High School in 1900, following which he took the four years' scientific course in the University of Michigan. He was awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in 1904, and at the same time received his degree in civil engineering. During the summer session of the University of Michigan in 1904 he was employed as one of the instructors. In 1905 he entered the service of the Laclede Gas Light Company at Saint Louis, Missouri, as assistant superintendent of the water gas department. For a time he practiced as a consulting engineer at Chattanooga, Tennessee, for six months was assistant county engineer of Scott County, Missouri, and from there went to Cincinnati as assistant bridge engineer with the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railway Company. After a year he returned to Chattanooga as assistant chief engineer for the Converse Bridge Company, with which he remained until 1910. For eight months he was located at McAlester, Oklahoma, as an engineer, when he formed a partnership and practiced as a member of the engineering firm of Eady & Dooge until 1911.

Mr. Dooge came to Gary in 1911 and was a structural engineer for the American Bridge Company until 1924. He left that corporation to become secretary and treasurer of the Zweig Roofing & Structural Steel Company at Gary, but sold his interest in this organization in November, 1925.

In May, 1926, Mr. Dooge and Lawrence R. McNamee acquired the business known as the All Pure Ice Company. On October 3, 1930, Mr. Dooge acquired the interest of Mr. McNamee, and having in the meantime been secretary of the corporation he has since been president and treasurer, while his brother-in-law, Thomas L. Yarrington, is vice president and Mrs. Dooge is secretary. This company has a model plant, and it is one of the chief sources of supply for pure ice throughout the Gary district. Mr. Dooge is also interested in the water distributing company known as the Porter Springs Water Distributing Company, selling bottled supplies of sparkling spring water throughout Gary, Hammond, Indiana Harbor, East Chicago, Michigan City and Valparaiso. They manufacture large quantities of distilled water for medicinal and industrial purposes.

Mr. Dooge is a member of the Commercial Club and the Chamber of Commerce, the Gary Rotary Club, University Club, Gary Country Club. He is affiliated with Gary Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

He married at Chattanooga, Tennessee, March 19, 1914, Miss Lula Ray Yarrington, daughter of Thomas Yarrington. Her father was for many years connected with the Belt Railroad at Chattanooga. Both her parents are deceased and are buried in the Tennessee city. Mrs. Dooge attended school at Chattanooga, finishing her high school work there. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church, organized and was the second president of the Mary Walton Women's Society and is a member of the Service Club. Mr. and Mrs. Dooge have one son, Gerard C., Jr., a student in the Horace Mann School at Gary.

Mr. Dooge's experience and activities have taken him much out-of-doors and he has always been an enthusiast in the matter of out-door sports, and still follows track meets, football fames and is a baseball fan. During the World war he was enrolled in the Home Guards.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ARTHUR BOHN, architect, has impressed his influence and ability in many ways on the life of his home City of Indianapolis. Mr. Bohn has brought to the work of his profession the fundamental art principles and ideals of the old world as well as the new. He is credited with having been of chief influence in the establishment of technical and vocational education in Indianapolis.

Mr. Bohn was born at Louisville, Kentucky. His father Gustavus Bohn, was a native of Germany, came to America and was married at Cleveland, Ohio, and served in the Union army during the Civil war.

Arthur Bohn was educated in private schools in Indianapolis and was apprenticed to one of the leading architects of that city. He left nothing undone in enthusiastic devotion to acquiring the fundamentals of his art, availed himself of every opportunity here, and after accumulating enough money he went abroad to study in Europe. He took a course in architecture at the Royal Polytechnic Institute at Carlsruhe, Germany, where he made such a good record that he was offered a scholarship at the institute. On completing his European studies he returned to Indianapolis and immediately engaged in practice.

While abroad he became attracted to the system of vocational training, which was then already well developed in European countries. On his return he found a few men interested in the same subject in Indianapolis, and by his personal enthusiasm and the wealth of information he had acquired he was able to make great progress in advocating this new departure in educational methods and he and his associates made a practical demonstration, renting rooms and starting classes and gradually extending the instruction to shops and factories in the city. This experimental school won a high degree of popularity through the practical results achieved and in time the Indianapolis school board was appealed to and took over the system thus inaugurated, resulting in the creation of the Manual Training High School. Mr. Bohn himself was one of the first instructors in that school, but had to give up the work on account of the increasing volume of his private practice as an architect. Later Mr. Bohn returned to Europe for further study and spent several years in France, Germany and Italy. During the forty years of his practice he has been the architect of many notable buildings in Indianapolis and in the state. His practice has been devoted chiefly to large work, especially bank and office buildings, department stores, public institutions and many schools. In fact, many of the largest and most important buildings in down town Indianapolis are the product of his genius. He has been successful in many architectural competitions. The most important and monumental work of his career is his design for the State Plaza, which contemplates an aesthetic and orderly grouping of all future state buildings, west of the capitol. The original design was made about twenty years ago and is now being realized by the erection of the State Library and Historical Building, which it is proposed shall be the first unit in this great scheme.

In recognition of his honorable service to the public and profession the Indianapolis Architectural Club in 1927 presented him with an artistically designed memorial, expressed as follows:

"To Arthur Bohn - Because of your service to the community which is exemplified in the buildings which you have designed, because of your contribution to the profession of architecture which has its expression in the high place which you hold in the regard of your fellow craftsmen, because by example and by giving generously of your interest you are a constant encouragement to the student architects whom you choose to call brother draftsmen. It is our pleasure to give this evidence of our appreciation and affection.

Indianapolis Architectural Club.

Mr. Bohn was the first president of the Indianapolis Architects Association, the first president of the Indiana Society of Architects and in1930 and 1931 he was president of the Indiana Chapter American Institute of Architects. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, a charter member of the Chamber of Commerce and Art Association, a member of the Scientech Club, Columbia Club, Indiana Engineering Society and Indiana Historical Society. He resides at 215 East Thirty-second Street.

He married, while a student abroad in Europe, Louise Weiss, a native of Carlsruhe, Baden. They have one son, Herbert Bohn, who was graduated as Master of Science in chemistry from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CARROL C. WILSON is one of the prominent exponents of the insurance business in the City of Gary, where he is district manager for the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, with well appointed offices at 922 Gary State Bank Building. He is also secretary and treasurer of the Calumet Life Underwriters.

On the parental home farm near Angola, Steuben County, Indiana, the birth of Carrol C. Wilson occurred July 15, 1902, and he is a scion, in the third generation, of one of the sterling pioneer families of that county, his paternal grandfather, Newell A. Wilson, having come to Steuben County from Ohio and having settled on a farm in Jackson Township, near Angola. Newell A. Wilson went forth as a gallant soldier of the Union in the Civil war. He came home on a sick furlough before the close of the war and died after several months' illness. The mortal remains of this patriot soldier rest beside those of his wife in the Flint Cemetery near Angola.

Carrol C. Wilson is a son of Fleming N. and Mertie (Barr) Wilson, both likewise natives of Steuben County, where the former was born near Angola and the latter near Orland. The parents were reared and educated in Steuben County and there Fleming N. Wilson has been long and successfully identified with farm enterprise, he having served as president of the local grange of the Patrons of Industry. He has been otherwise influential in community affairs and has given many years of service as a member of the school board of his district. He still gives active supervision to his fine farm estate near Angola. His wife received the advantages of the public schools and in her youth gave two years of service as a teacher in the schools of her native county. She was loved by all who came within the compass of her gentle and gracious influence. The death of Mrs. Wilson occurred July 23, 1929, and she was laid to rest in the cemetery of the old Block Church near Angola. Of the six children the eldest is Mary Erma, who is a successful teacher of music in her home City of Angola; Alma Belle is the wife of Harry Bell, of Angola; Newel died at the age of six years; Lloyd F. resides at Angola and is there district manager for the American Life Insurance Company; Loyal B. is a resident of South Bend and is there a representative of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company; and Carrol C., of this review, is the youngest of the number.

The public schools of Angola, Lafayette and Kendallville afforded Carrol C. his youthful education and after being graduated in the high school at Kendallville, in 1921, he completed a course in the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1927 and from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. After leaving the university Mr. Wilson entered the service of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, and he represented this company in his old home town of Angola one year, he having then been transferred to Gary, where he has since continued his constructive service as district manager for this great insurance corporation.

Mr. Wilson is one of the appreciative and public-spirited citizens and business men of Gary, is a member of the Commercial Club and Chamber of Commerce, in politics he maintains an independent attitude, and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian Church, his wife being a member of the Christian Church.

In the City of Indianapolis, on the 31st of December, 1929, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Dorothy Harris who was born in the City of Washington, D. C., and whose public school education was obtained in the various places in which her father was stationed within the period of her childhood and early youth. Mrs. Wilson was graduated in Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Indiana and in 1928 she was graduated in Butler University, Indianapolis. Prior to her marriage she taught one year in the public schools of Rushville, in this state, and about one year and six months in those of the City of South Bend. She continues her deep interest in cultural affairs, is affiliated with Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and has membership in the Pan-Hellenic Association. Mrs. Wilson is a daughter of Rev. William J. and Jeanette (Harris) Wright, the latter of whom died March 30, 1927. Rev. William Wright has long been an influential clergyman of the Christian Church and has held various pastoral charges in Indiana and other states, and gave a few years of service as a traveling representative of the national interests of the Christian Church as national secretary, his home being now maintained in the City of Houston, Texas.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray