ELTON R. CLARKE, physician and surgeon at Kokomo, is a native of Indiana, and when he took up his work at Kokomo he had the advantage of an unusually thorough and varied experience and training for his profession, gained not only in schools but in hospitals and clinics both in the Middle West and the Pacific Coast.

Doctor Clarke, whose full name is Elton Russell Clarke, was born at Indianapolis, December 29,1893. His father, Rev. George H. Clarke, for many years a gifted and well loved minister of the Christian Church, was born in Shelby County, Indiana, September 23, 1861. Rev. Mr. Clarke married at Centerville, Indiana, in 1892, Miss Flora Belle Jones, who was born in Wayne County, Indiana, March 19, 1871. Doctor Clarke has two brothers: Marion F., of Indianapolis, and Herbert M., of Franklin, Indiana.

Elton R. Clarke during his boyhood attended schools in the different localities where his father had his pastoral duties. He graduated from the high school of Rensselaer, Indiana. From 1911 to 1915 he was a student in Butler College, from which he holds his A. B. degree. After graduating he went to New York University as assistant in the biology department, and in 1916 taught chemistry in the Kokomo High School, and from 1916 to 1918 was an associate instructor in the Indiana University School of Medicine at Indianapolis. Doctor Clarke in March, 1918, was enrolled for active service in the Army Medical Corps, being discharged in 1919. After leaving the army service he entered Rush Medical College of Chicago and was graduated M. D. in 1922. Following his graduation Doctor Clarke spent several years on the Pacific Coast, serving as an interne in the General Hospital at Los Angeles, for six months was connected with the Hollywood Children's Hospital, and for three years was with the E. H. Thompson Clinic at Burbank, California.

Doctor Clarke returned to Indiana in 1926 and located at Kokomo, where some years earlier he had been an instructor in the high school. He had the good fortune of becoming associated with one of the ablest physicians of the city, Dr. J. W. Wright, and since the death of Doctor Wright in June, 1929, Doctor Clarke has practiced alone.

He served as secretary of the Howard County Medical Society in 1928-29, is a member of the Indiana State and American Medical Associations, and in 1928 was elected coroner of Howard County for a two-year term, being reelected in 1930. Doctor Clarke is a member of the American Legion and belongs to various bodies of Masonry, the B. P. O. Elks, the Phi Delta Theta and Phi Beta Pi college fraternities. He is a Republican and a member of the Christian Church.

He married, October 11, 1924, Miss Ruth Holman, of Kokomo, daughter of J. E. and Eva Wright Holman. Mrs. Clarke is liberally educated, having attended DePauw University, and in 1919 was graduated from the University of Illinois. She is a member of Kappa Kappa Kappa, Alpha Omicron Pi and the P. E. O. Sisterhood. For five years before her marriage she was a popular teacher in the Kokomo High School. Doctor and Mrs. Clarke have one daughter, Dorothy Mae, born August 27, 1925, at Burbank, California.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JAMES WEST WRIGHT through a long period of years represented the highest qualifications of the medical profession and of good citizenship in Howard County. He lived well into his seventies, and his was a life of service to the end.

He was born near Burlington, Carroll County, Indiana, August 25, 1855, and died at his home in Kokomo, June 23, 1929. His father, Owen West Wright, was born near Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1817 and came to Indiana in 1845. His mother, Caroline Fennell Wright, was born at Staunton, Virginia, in 1827 and came with her parents to Indiana about 1840. Doctor Wright through his father was a direct descendent of Thomas Pearson, friend and confidant of William Penn, and accompanied Penn on his first visit to Pennsylvania. At Penn's request that he give a name to the settlement in the colony he suggested Chester in honor of Pearson's native city of England. Doctor Wright was a great-great-grandnephew of Benjamin West, president of the Royal Academy of Arts. Through his mother he was a descendant of Peter Hanger, who came from Germany to Pennsylvania, in 1745, and later in Augusta County, Virginia, became owner of land now included in the City of Staunton, Gypsy Hill Park being part of his original holding.

Doctor Wright's education was obtained in the Burlington schools. He taught for two terms; then became a student at DePauw University, and was initiated in the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. While a student at DePauw he made choice of medicine as his life's work. He prepared for a career in Ohio Medical College, now the medical department of the University of Cincinnati, from which he was graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1884. Later he took graduate work in Rush Medical College of Chicago.

Doctor Wright located at Kokomo in March, 1885. Early in his career he took rank among the leading physicians of the community, and that standing was maintained to the end of his life. During more than forty years he was a general practitioner, and his attitude toward his profession was the high and fine one of the old fashioned family doctor. In many families he ministered to three or four generations. He was a fine example of professional worth and Christian character, was cultured, skilled, refined, modest, kindly and unfailingly dutiful and honorable.

His usefulness was not summed up in his labors as a successful physician. Be desired to do, and did, his share of the civic work of his generation. Quietly but substantially he supported every movement for community welfare. He sought opportunities for unselfish service, and having done a good deed never advertised the fact. He never collected an account if he felt that its collection would work a hardship. He literally spent himself to the limit in serving others.

Doctor Wright was at one time president of the Howard County Medical Society, was secretary of the Kokomo Board of Health, served for several years as president of the district board of pension examiners and was chairman of the Howard County Medical Reserve Corps during the World war. He was a member of the Indiana State and American Medical Associations, was an Elk and a charter member of the Kokomo Country Club.

Early in life he united with the Disciples of Christ and soon after locating at Kokomo became a member of the Main Street Christian Church, a connection which was actively maintained the remainder of his life. He served as a member of the building board of the present church edifice, and at his death was a member of the board of trustees. Politically he was a Republican, having cast his first vote for Rutherford B. Hayes.

Doctor Wright never married. For many years his home was maintained with his sister, Mrs. Eva Wright Holman, with his niece, Ruth Holman, now the wife of Dr. Elton R. Clarke, and his nephew, James W. Holman, who married Esther Carter.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE T. WILLIAMS, M. D., has lived at Crawfordsville and practiced as a physician and surgeon for over a quarter of a century. His home record is a highly commendable one, as all his circle of patients and friends testify, and he also has to his credit a splendid record as a medical officer with the American Expeditionary Forces during the World war.

Doctor Williams was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, June 8, 1865. His father, Henry Williams, was a native of Shelby County, Kentucky, born October 14, 1836, and throughout his active life followed the trade of cabinet maker. He lived to be ninety years of age, passing away May 21, 1926. Doctor Williams' grandfather, Garland Williams, was a minister of the Gospel. The mother of Doctor Williams was Nancy E. Gott, daughter of Thomas Gott, a native of Kentucky. Henry Williams and wife had four children: May E., deceased; Mrs. Lillian Allen; Charles G., of Crawfordsville; and George T.

George T. Williams was educated in the public schools of Shelby County, Kentucky, and during his boyhood determined the profession he would follow. In preparation therefor he entered the Indiana University School of Medicine, where he took his M. D. degree in 1887. Doctor Williams during the early years of his practice had post-graduate training and experience in New York City. For one year he practiced at Frankfort, Indiana. Later he located at Crawfordsville, which city has since been his home and the scene of his earnest and faithful work as a physician and surgeon, the only important interruption to his career there coming during the two years he was with the colors.

Doctor Williams enlisted and was called to active duty December 13, 1917. He had four weeks of training at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, was then ordered to active duty at Governors Island, New York, where he was in command of the Fifty-ninth Medical Detachment of the Coast Artillery Corps at Fort Hamilton. Six weeks later, on March 28, 1918, he sailed for France, landing at Brest April 8. The early months were spent in quiet sectors, but on September 13 he was with the troops in the front line during the St. Mihiel campaign, in which area he was stationed until September 15. From September 16 to November 11 he was in the midst of the Argonne Forest, in the tremendous fighting which was the concluding phase of the war for the American Expeditionary Forces. All the time he was in France he held the rank of captain, but did the work of a regimental surgeon, having four surgeons under him. His commanding officer, Col. R. C. Cravins, in recommending his promotion speaks of him as a "most excellent regimental surgeon and most excellent man in every way." A more explicit statement regarding his ability and his service is contained in the letter written by Col. J. M. Wheeler, also recommending his promotion, which reads: "Captain Williams has performed the duties of major surgeon of the regiment since his assignment of February 6, 1918, in a highly satisfactory manner. He is fifty-three years old, has had over thirty years' experience as a surgeon, is in excellent physical condition and competent in every way for duty as a major surgeon of a regiment. He has had over six months' service overseas with the A. E. F., two and a half months of which have been in active service in this zone of operations. Should he receive promotion I would request that he be given service under my command."

In going overseas Captain Williams was assigned as troop surgeon of his transport, which carried 6,500 soldiers and 340 officers, and not a life was lost during the voyage. Captain Williams received his honorable discharge at Camp Upton, New York, February 2, 1919, and a few days later was back home resuming the broken threads of his professional duties at Crawfordsville.

Since the war he has been affiliated with the American Legion Post. He is a Democrat, a Baptist and belongs to the various political organizations. He married, October 17, 1888, May E. Todd, daughter of Johnson and Ruth A. (Van Cleve) Todd. The Todds were among the first settlers of Brown Township, Montgomery County.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


THOMAS A. CLIFTON, of English descent, in early life was a school teacher, also a foreign missionary, but for about forty years his chief work has been in the newspaper field. Mr. Clifton is editor and publisher of the Covington Republican, Fountain County.

He was born in Iroquois County, Illinois, December 15, 1859. The family lived in Indiana before going to Illinois and later returned to Fountain County. His father, Housen Clifton, was born near Lebanon, Kentucky, his parents coming to this county from Kentucky. The mother Permelia Seeley, was a daughter of Monteville Seeley, who came from New York State and was of Scotch ancestry. Thomas A. Clifton is the only survivor of six children, the deceased being Mary, Martha, Emma, William and Jackson. Mr. Clifton's father served three years in the Union army, being in the Sixty-third Indiana Infantry, and his grandfather, William Ceton Clifton, was a soldier in the Mexican war from North Carolina.

Thomas A. Clifton attended school in Fountain County and was a member of the class of 1885 in DePauw University. He began teaching before completing his university career and before graduating he undertook a special mission for the Methodist Northern Conference in India in 1885. On December 14, 1885, he married Miss Lorena Pomeroy, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cooper Pomeroy, of Williamsport, Indiana. They resigned their school work to go to India for the purpose of establishing a boys' high school. The funds for establishing this school were supplied by an endowment given by Mrs. Philander Smith, of Oak Park, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Clifton opened the school, arranged its work and secured its affiliation with Calcutta University. After having carried out their mission successfully they returned home in 1888 and Mr. Clifton then resumed work as a school man at Williamsport.

In 1891 he established the Warren Review, and in addition to owning that newspaper was also later publisher of a newspaper at Fowler, Indiana, another at Veedersburg and one at Williamsport. He sold out his interests to other newspapers and since 1897 has concentrated his energies almost entirely upon the Covington Republican. It is published in a modern plant and building and Mr. and Mrs. Clifton through their newspaper, have been an exceedingly valuable influence to this community. By appointment of the governor, Mr. Clifton has served on the board of the Central. Hospital for the Insane, and the board of the State School for the Blind, both at Indianapolis.

He and Mrs. Clifton have two children. Their daughter, Adda was born in India and the first words she learned were those of Hindustana. After completing her education she was married to D. F. Smith. She died in 1919 at Covington. The son, Cooper, lives at Attica, Indiana, where he is now in charge of the Daily Ledger-Tribune, and was previously connected with the Commercial News of Danville, Illinois, and was president two terms of the Typographical Union there. He married Ruth Furr and has a son, Cooper, Jr., born July 16, 1918.

Mr. Clifton is a Republican, is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Clifton is active in the Eastern Star Chapter, the Woman's Club and the Literary Club of Covington. She is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and traces her ancestry back to the twelfth century in England.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DR. FRANK DALLAS ALLHANDS, a physician whose work has made him a beloved figure in the community of Wingate, Montgomery County, where he has carried on his practice for over thirty years, is a member of a pioneer family of Indiana.

His great-grandfather, John A. Allhands, was born in Pennsylvania. From Pennsylvania he went to Virginia, and later to Kentucky, and came to Indiana when this was a territory. His first .home was established on the banks of the Ohio River. He voted at the first election held in Indiana. He became a free soiler in politics, later a Republican and his descendants have followed his example in their attitude toward political principles.

Doctor Allhands was born in Clark County, Indiana, November 23, 1869. His father, George Allhands, was born in the same county, spent a successful life as a farmer and died in 1924. He answered President Lincoln's last call for troops in the Civil war and was in the army five months. Doctor Allhand's grandfather was also named George. He was born in Kentucky. The mother of Doctor Allhands was Sarah De La Hunt, who was born in Owensborough, Kentucky, but her parents were natives of Indiana, and her ancestors came from Dublin, Ireland. Mrs. Sarah Allhands died in 1894. Of her twelve children six are living besides Doctor Allhands: John M., of Cliffside, North Carolina; Robert L., of Wingate, Indiana; Pleasant R., of Attica, Indiana; Margaret E., of Boston, Massachusetts; Ada F., of Charlestown, Indiana; and Grace Lee, of Crawfordsville.

Doctor Allhands grew up on a farm and attended local schools, continuing his education in the Borden Institute at Borden, Indiana. He had to work for the opportunities to prepare himself for a professional career. For seven years he taught school, and paid his own expenses while a student at the Kentucky School of Medicine, in Louisville, Kentucky, where he was graduated M. D. in 1897.

In 1904 he took post-graduate work in the New York Polyclinic and has been known always as a close student and observer, a man who has profited by his long and successful experience. Doctor Allhands has steadily practiced medicine at Wingate since 1898. As a physician he has a reputation that extends well over Montgomery, Fountain and Tippecanoe counties. He is a member of the various medical associations, is a Master Mason and Knight of Pythias, a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Doctor Allhands owns a home in Wingate and also has several good farms.

He married in October, 1901, Miss Georgia Goodwin, a daughter of Columbus Goodwin, of Clark County, Indiana. Five children were born to their marriage, one dying in infancy. Dallas G., whose home is at Salt Lake City, Utah, married Mary Nugent and has one child, Keith. The son Tyler and the daughter Vashti are both students in the Indiana State Teachers College at Terre Haute. The youngest is Franklin D., a student in a college at Huntsville, Texas.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FRANK ZIMRI HOCKETT. The prosperity of any community, be it large or small, may be measured by the character of its business houses, for they represent the demands and purchasing ability of the citizens. Judged by such a standard South Bend, Indiana, is one of the leading cities of its size in the state, and among the concerns which are contributing a fair share toward the maintenance of this prestige is the Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Company, of which Frank Z.. Hockett is manager.

The birth of Mr. Hockett occurred on a farm in Franklin County, Tennessee, July 16, 1895, and he is a son of M. P. and Daisy (Sparks) Hockett, of Anderson, Indiana. The father was born in Ohio, but reared at Anderson, Madison County, Indiana, where his father, Dr. Zimri Hockett, was an outstanding pioneer physician. In 1893 M. P. Hockett moved to Franklin County, Tennessee, and was there engaged in farming until 1897. He then returned to Anderson, entered the mercantile business and continued to conduct it until his retirement several years ago. His wife, mother of Frank Z. Hockett, was born at Anderson, of which her father was not only a pioneer, but it was he who organized the city. M. P. Hockett and his wife have had six children, of whom five are now living, one of the sons having died, and of them all Frank Z. Hockett is the fourth in order of birth.

Frank Z. Hockett was graduated from the high school of Anderson, and later took a commercial course in a business college at Indianapolis, Indiana. His entire business career has been connected with the plumbing and heating industry; his first connection with it being in the office of the May Supply Company of Anderson. After five years with that house he went to Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and was in the employ of a plumbing supply house of that city until he entered the army for the World war. He served in the Signal Corps at Camp Custer, Michigan, and was there when the armistice was declared. Following his honorable discharge he entered the branch office of the Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Company, plumbing supplies, at Rockford, Illinois, and later was made manager of this branch. So able did he prove, and so well did he conduct the affairs of the branch, that in 1927 he was transferred to South Bend, made manager of the branch at this point, and he is still holding this important position, with characteristic thoroughness. His headquarters are at 1831 South Main Street, where the company owns a fine large office, display rooms and warehouse building, recently erected, and well adapted to the various purposes for which it is intended.

Mr. Hockett was married to Miss Genevieve Rosmand Monks, a native of Rockford, Illinois, and a daughter of Mrs. W. H. Monks, of Rockford. Mr. and Mrs. Hockett have three children: Mary Louise, William LeRoy and Patricia Jane. Mr. Hockett is a member of the Masonic Order and is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a Knight Templar. He also belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the South Bend Chamber of Commerce, the South Bend Exchange Club and the American Legion. He is not only one of the prosperous citizens of South Bend, but he is an influential factor in movements which have for their object the advancement of the people at large.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CLAUDE WILLIAMS is the publisher of the Fountain- Warren Democrat, of Attica, one of the best newspapers in this section of Indiana. It is a publication that is now in its fiftieth year, having been established in 1880.

Mr. Williams was born at Attica, Indiana, July 3, 1895. His father, George M. Williams, is a veteran representative of the newspaper profession. He was born in Owen County, Indiana, August 16, 1860. He taught school for a time, was superintendent of the Owen County schools from 1887 to 1891, but most or his active life has been devoted to newspaper work. For a year, from 1891 to 1892, he owned a half interest in the Owen County Democrat. Selling out to his partner in 1892, he bought the Fountain-Warren Democrat in June, 1892, and is still acting as editor of the paper. He has served as a member of the Attica school board and is a director of the Attica Building & Loan Association. George M. Williams married Florence Magill, who died in 1897, leaving four children: Mary and Edith, both connected with the Democrat; Bruce who lives in San Diego, California; and Claude.

Claude Williams was educated in the grade and high schools of Attica, learned the trade of printer under his father and on January 1, 1927, took over the business management of the publication, leaving his father the duties of editor. The family have succeeded in making this one of the best weekly newspapers in the state.

Mr. Williams during the World war was in the navy and was on the U. S. S. Virginia in convoy duty, making two trips to France. He enlisted in March, 1918, and was discharged in April, 1919. His brother, Bruce, was also in the navy. Mr. Williams is a Democrat and a member of the Democratic Editorial Association. He is a Royal Arch Mason.

He married, December 5, 1926, Miss Cleta Hardin, of Covington. They have one son, Robert Magill, born March 11, 1928, and one daughter, Mary Ann, born November 17, 1930.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES ELWOOD MIDDLETON, a life long resident of Howard County, for many years identified with its business, banking and public affairs, was born near West Middleton, November 19, 1856, son of William and Jane (Moulder) Middleton, his father having been instrumental in establishing the little village of West Middleton.

Charles E. Middleton attended common schools and the New London High School and as a young man took up a business career. He was connected with a general merchandise firm and was bookkeeper for the Spraker Brothers at Kokomo for several years. From 1899 to 1903 he served as deputy county clerk, was county clerk from 1903 to 1907, and again deputy county clerk from 1907 to 1915, when he was again elected to the office of county clerk, serving from 1915 to 1920.

For the past ten years he has been engaged in banking, first as trust officer for the Kokomo Trust Company, from January 1, 1920, to May 1, 1927, and in 1927 was made trust officer of the Citizens National Bank of Kokomo.

Mr. Middleton is a Republican, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and B. P. O. Elks and is a member of the Friends Church. He married, October 28, 1880, at West Middleton, Miss Mary Caroline Torrence, daughter of Robert E. and Sarah J. Torrence. Mr. Middleton has two children: Mrs. Pearl Middleton Leach, a widow, and Louis Middleton, clerk of the Circuit Court of Howard County.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


LOUIS MIDDLETON, clerk of the Circuit Court of Howard County, is a member of a family that has had a highly respected place in this county for many years.

Mr. Middleton was born in 1886 at West Middleton, Howard County. West Middleton was named for his grandfather, William Middleton, a native of Maine and an early settler of Howard County, a man of constructive influence in the development of the community of West Middleton. Louis Middleton is a son of Charles E. and Mary C. (Torrence) Middleton. His father was also born near West Middleton in Howard County and for many years was a county official. His wife, Mary C. Torrence, was born in Grant County, Indiana, and died May 31, 1929. The one other child is Pearl M., widow of Percy Leach and now living with her father in Kokomo.

Louis Middleton was three years of age when his parents moved to Kokomo. He attended school there, and has had a variety of business experience, but most of his time during the past twenty years has been given to the duties of public office. In 1912 he was appointed deputy county clerk and served under his father until 1920. He was then deputy under Henry Quigley and in 1924 was elected to office of clerk of the Circuit Court of Howard County, and to the responsibilities of this position he has devoted all his time and talents. He is a member of the Friends Church at Kokomo. He married, June 13, 1912, Miss Gretchen Springer, of Kokomo, daughter of Louis and Daisy Springer. Her parents were born in Indiana and both reside in Kokomo.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ISAAC WILLARD CRAIG is a well known business man of Darlington, Montgomery County. He was born August 25, 1863.

His father, Robert Craig, was a native of Kentucky, moved to Indiana in 1830 and spent his long and useful life as a farmer. He died in 1889. Robert Craig married Lydia Martz, whose father, John Martz, was an early settler of Montgomery County. These parents had a family of eight children, one of whom died in infancy. The names of the others were Vincent, Candace, Mary, Charles, Eva, John, a resident of Wichita, Kansas, and Isaac Willard.

Isaac Willard Craig was educated in public schools at Darlington, and throughout his business career his experience has been in the hardware trade. He was a merchant at Rossville for twelve years, when he sold his establishment there and then moved to Darlington, where for twenty-nine years he has remained, and has earned a host of friends who admire him for his integrity and willingness to serve the best interests of the community.

Mr. Craig married, August 16, 1889, Miss Siloam Cox. Her father, Esaias Cox, was a Darlington pioneer and was a lieutenant in Company B of the One Hundred and Twentieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war. Mrs. Craig for many years has done her part in community work and in civic affairs and has supported well planned public improvements. Mr. Craig is a member of the Book Lovers Literary Club and is chairman of the book committee of the Darlington Library Board.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE ALBERT MAURER has for forty years been an active figure in the newspaper business in St. Joseph County and for over thirty years of that time has been manager of the Mishawaka office of the South Bend Tribune. It is largely due to his energetic management, his knowledge of the people and local conditions and the thorough-going news service he has instituted and maintained that the South Bend Tribune occupies first place in this community as a local newspaper. His office is credited with having contributed approximately 4,600 to the regular circulation of the Tribune.

Mr. Maurer was born in South Bend, December 10, 1869, son of Fred M. and Mary (Steirling) Maurer. Mr. Maurer secured his public school education at La Porte, Indiana, and had his first training as a newspaper man on the La Porte Herald, where he was an apprentice printer. In 1890, when he was twenty-one years of age, he first located at Mishawaka and in 1891 moved to South Bend, where he began his long career with the Tribune. For seven years he was in the mechanical department. In January, 1899, he was transferred to Mishawaka as manager of the office in that city.

Mr. Maurer is a Knight Templar Mason, is affiliated with Mishawaka Lodge No. 453, Knights of Pythias, the Maccabees, is a past secretary of the Mishawaka Business Men's Association, member of the Lions Club, Fellowship Club, Chamber of Commerce and the First Methodist Episcopal Church. He has given his influence to many civic undertakings and has been especially interested in this big out of doors. Fishing is his hobby.

Mr. Maurer married in 1894 Miss Lida Nettleton, and they have one son, Llewellyn S. Maurer, of Mishawka.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


KOPS BROTHERS is a business organization that also represents one of the oldest families in the River Park district of South Bend. No name is better deserving of esteem because of the very honorable character, industry and integrity that has always been exemplified by those of the Kops name in South Bend.

The father of the men comprising the firm of Kops Brothers was the late Frederick Herman Kops. He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1844. He was reared and educated there, had a practical education and was well trained in habits of industry and thrift. In 1868 he came to America and settled at South Bend. For several years he was a worker in the plant of the Studebaker Wagon & Carriage Company. Later he went to Sandusky, Ohio, where he married, and in 1882 returned to South Bend, at which time he located on Mishawaka Avenue. Here he started a truck farm, and from that time until his death, in July, 1912, he was identified with a business for the growing and production of vegetables, and from handling his own output got into a business buying and selling the products of others, placing his business on a wholesale basis. In 1897 he moved his plant to a new location on Mishawaka Avenue, where he acquired a tract of seven acres. On this was erected a large greenhouse, which is still conducted as a part of the activities of Kops Brothers.

F. Herman Kops' wife was born in Sandusky, Ohio, and passed away February 20, 1920. They had five children, Fred Conrad, Mary O., Florence Catharine, Wilbur George and Elsie Clemintine. Mary is married, but the other four children are single and have always lived together at the old home at 1822 Mishawaka Avenue. Miss Elsie was born in South Bend and has been a teacher in the public schools for twenty years. The four oldest children were born in Sandusky, Ohio.

Fred C. and Wilbur G. Kops took over their father's business at his death in 1912. They have conducted the greenhouse, are individual growers of vegetables products and still continue the wholesale vegetable business established by their father. In 1920 they also added to their enterprise a coal business, since conducted as Kops Brothers Coal Company.

The Kops Brothers are members of the River Park Business Menís Association and are affiliated with the Knights of Pythias Order.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray