FREDERICK HAROLD VAN ORMAN, president of the Van Orman chain of Hotels, has spent most of his life at Evansville, and over the state his name is familiarly associated with politics and public affairs. Mr. Van Orman is a former lieutenant governor of Indiana.

His father, the late Fred Van Orman, who died at Evansville, was one of the first hotel men to apply to the business the modern principle of centralized managment of a group or a chain of hotels, and at one time the Van Ormans operated or were actively interested in perhaps a dozen modern hotels in Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Illinois and other states. Fred Van Orman was born at Kalamazoo, Michigan, March 17, 1860, of Holland Dutch ancestry and of Revolutionary stock. In early life he was a traveling salesman. In 1887 he took over the management of the Murdoch Hotel at Logansport, Indiana. From that he extended his management and financial control to other hotels, including a number that are very familiar to the traveling public. In 1900 he acquired the management of the St. George Hotel at Evansville and moved his headquarters to that city, from which he directed his hotel interests in seven different states. Fred Van Orman married Demaris Paddock, a native of Coldwater, Michigan, and Frederick Harold, their only child, was born at Flint, Michigan, September 26, 1884.

Frederick Harold Van Orman made his approach to business life with the best of training and early environment. He is a college man, his parents having given him liberal advantages. He attended the Evansville High School, graduated from the Phillips Exeter Academy of New Hampshire in 1904, and this was followed by four years in Harvard University, where he took his A. B. degree in 1908. Immediately after leaving college he joined his father in the hotel business. He was manager of the old St. George Hotel at Evansville until the building was torn down in 1915. He then supervised the construction of the Hotel McCurdy, which was opened in 1917 and of which he continued as manager until 1926, since which year he has been president of the Van Orman chain of Hotels. This system now comprises three modern, European, fireproof hotels, the Hotel Shawnee, at Springfield, Ohio, Hotel McCurdy, at Evansville, and the Hotel Orlando, at Decatur, Illinois.

Mr. Van Orman for a number of years has been a recognized leader in the Republican party of Indiana. In 1920 he was elected to the State Senate from Vanderburgh County, serving four years, and in 1924 was elected lieutenant governor of the state. He is a former president of the Evansville Rotary Club, a director of the Evansville Chamber of Commerce, and in 1922 was elected president of the Hotel Men's Benefit Association of the United States and Canada, the largest and oldest hotel men's association in America. He is at present a director of the America Hotel Association. He is a past potentate of Hadi Temple of the Mystic Shrine and a past exalted ruler of the B. P. O. Elks, both of Evansville.

Mr. Van Orman married, September 26, 1913, Miss Susie Beeler, daughter of Dr. Jerome and Florence (Barrett) Beeler. Her father was a distinguished physician and surgeon at Evansville. Mr. and Mrs. have three sons: F. Harold, Jr., born November 27, 1916; Jerome Beeler, born March 20, 1918, and William Henry, born February 19, 1922. Mr. and Mrs. Van Orman are members of the Episcopal Church.

The bare recital of the outline of Mr. Van Orman's activities such as limited space allows, hardly gives a true picture of the ceaseless energy that dominates his daily work not the genial spirit with which he greets all with whom he comes in contact regardless of the pressure of his work. To quote another commentary on this point: "Mr. Van Orman's personality is injected into his every activity, which includes his business, public appearance as a speaker and entertainer, and politics." In fact, this spirit permeated his relations with his 800 employees as well as with the general public. To watch him work at his desk for even an hour is an inspiration to the casual observer.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


BENJAMIN W. COOPER, M.D., who passed away April 18, 1931, had been established in the successful general practice of his profession at Connersville during a period of about fifteen years, and his ability and prestige distinctly marked him as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of Fayette County.

Doctor Cooper was born in Hendricks County, Indiana, September 1, 1874, a son of Rev. Shelby Tipton Cooper and Marthy E. (Rynerson) Cooper, both likewise native of that county. Lewis Cooper, grandfather of the Doctor, was a native of North Carolina and became a pioneer settler in Hendricks County, Indiana, where he acquired an entire section of land and developed a productive farm, the remainder of his life having there been passed. Though Rev. Shelby T. Cooper became a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church and gave earnest and effective service in the ministry, the greater part of his active life was given to farm industry. He died in Hendricks County in the year 1903, and his widow passed away in 1924, at the venerable age of eighty-four years.

In his native county the public school discipline of Dr. Benjamin W. Cooper included that of the high school at Cartersburg, and his education was thereafter advanced by his attending the Indiana State Normal School at Danville. In the medical department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky, he was graduated as a member of the class of 1907, and after thus receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he initiated the active practice of his profession in the City of Muncie, Indiana, whence he soon removed to Henry County, where he continued his professional activities seven years, he having then removed to Connersville, judicial center of Fayette County, where he continued in practice and where his pronounced success stood in evidence of his technical skill and his personal popularity. He maintained his office at 1820 Virginia Ave and the pleasant family home is at 2131 Iowa Avenue. The Doctor has memberships in the Fayette County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He was a Republican in political alignment and he gave eight years of loyal service as coroner of Fayette County. He was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias, and he held membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, as does also his widow.

The year 1908 was marked by the marriage of Doctor Cooper to Miss Jennie Pierson, who likewise was born and reared in Hendricks County, and who is a daughter of Charles and Margaret Pierson. Helen, elder of the two children of Doctor and Mrs. Cooper is the wife of Merle Luckett, of Connersville, and Everett here remains at the family home.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


C. EARNEST ROGERS has been will known as a business man at Columbus for many years. He is senior partner of the firm Rogers & Schoenover Company, who have the Hudson Essex agency in Bartholomew County.

Mr. Rogers was born in White County, Indiana, September 3, 1878. His grandfather, Nathaniel S. Rogers, settled in White County as a pioneer in 1840, coming from Hampshire County, Virginia, now West Virginia. C. Earnest Rogers is a son of N. S. and Lucenia J. (West) Rogers, the former a native of White County and the latter of Johnson County, Indiana. His father was a contractor. C. Earnest Rogers has one brother, E. W. Rogers.

Mr. Rogers attended school in White County, the Johnson County High School and his first business employment was an manager of the local exchange of the telephone company of Frnaklin. He reamined there then years and then came to Columbus, as manager of the Crump estate. That property remained under his direction and care for eighteen years.

In 1925 he organized the Rogers-Schoenover Automobile Company, starting with the Page-Jewett franchise.

Subsequently he took over the Hudson-Essex franchise and since 1926 has handled the Hudson-Essex cars exclusively. The company does a business selling 200 cars annually in their territory and have six persons employed including expert mechanics. Their office, shop and storage rooms have 1,100 square feet of floor space and every type of modern machinery and equipment are installed for perfect and adequte service on these very popular and high class cars.

Mr. Rogers married Lulu Taylor, and by this marriage has a son, Charles, who graduated with the A. B. degree from Franklin College in the class of 1927. Later Mr. Rogers married Mary M. Morton, and to this Union were born two children, Robert E. and Betsey E., both attending school at Columbus. Mr. Rogers is an active member of the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, of which he was one of the charter members in 1921. He is affiliated with the B. P. O. Elks and is a member of the Hoosier State Automobile Association.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM P. WALTER has been engaged in the practice of law in the City of Fort Wayne since the year 1916, maintains his offices in the Farmers Trust Building and has a substantial law business of representative order.

Mr. Walter was born in the City of Massillon, Stark County, Ohio, January 17, 1879, and is a son of William B. Walter, who was born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1845, and whose father, Jonas R. Walter, was there born in 1820, the family having early been established in that section of the old Keystone State. The marriage of William B. Walter and Mary Alice Donat was solemnized at Massillon, Ohio, November 12, 1872, andis was in that city their son, William P., of this review, was born and reared, his public school education having there included the curriculum of the high school, and he having later attended the Heidelberg Teachers Training School in his native state. In preparing for his chosen profession he availed himself of the advantages of the law department of Tri-State College, at Angola, Indiana, and prior to engaging in the practice of his profession he had been employed in the Government post office service five years. In 1916 he established his residence in Fort Wayne, and here he has since been successfully established in the general practice of law.

December 25, 1900, marked the marriage of Mr. Walter to Miss Elsie Ruch, who was born at Canal Fulton, Ohio, where she was reared and educated, the date of her birth having been July 2, 1881, and she having died in 1902, at Massillon, Ohio, her only child, Chester W., having there been born August 10, 1901. Chester W. Walter gained her early education in the public schools of Massillon and Forty Wayne, in which latter city he had his high school training, and thereafter he studied electrical engineering in the Edison testing laboratory in New York City, he being now in the employ of the Westinghouse Electric Company, with his residence and headquarters in Miwaukee, Wisconsin. April 10, 1921, he married Teresa Fehrenbaugh, and their one child, William Joseph, was born March 3, 1928.

On the 2nd of August, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of William P. Walter to Virginia Bortel, who was born at Massillon, Ohio, December 14, 1888, and the one child of this marriage was Mary Alice, who was born April 25, 1918, in Fort Wayne.

Mr. Walter has manifested no ambition for political office. He is a member of the Allen County Bar Association and the Indiana State Bar Association, and he and his wife have membership in the Reformed Church in their home city.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES ROLL, A.B., A.M., historian, author and editor of History of Indiana, One Hundred and Fifty Years of American Development, has been a teacher of history in the Indiana State Teachers College since 1913. He is a native of Indiana, born in Vigo County, August 8, 1883, a son of John Aaron and Mary Jane (Shaw) Roll. His grandparents came to Vigo County from Ohio and Kentucky in early days. Professor Roll is therefore of old Indiana stock and has spent practically all of his life in the state.

From boyhood Professor Roll has been deeply interested in history. He graduated from the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute in 1906 and from Indiana University with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1910. He received the Master of Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1912. During the year 1912-13 he served as Fellow in American History at the University of Wisconsin. He came to the Indiana State Normal School as assistant professor of history in 1913, later becoming associate professor. He has written numerous historical articles for periodicals and is accounted an authority on Indiana history. Professor Roll is a member of the American Historical Association, Mississippi Valley Historical Association, Indiana Historical Society, Society of Indiana Pioneers, National Education Association and Indiana State Teachers Association. He is a member of the Christian (Disciples) Church.

Professor Roll married Miss Opal McShane, of Tipton, Indiana, June 21, 1911, and they are the parents of two children: Charles Robert, born March 20, 1913; and Helen Marguerite, born November 29, 1916.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Ora A. Davis. No name has been more steadily honored in the legal profession in Warrick County than that of Davis. One of the oldest members of the Boonville bar is James W. Davis, who is still practicing law and who has lived in Warrick County practically all his life. His son of the second generation of the family, Ora A. Davis, has also played a notably successful part in the professional, civic and business life of that community.

James W. Davis married Mary F. Barnett, a native of Indiana. Of their seven children two died in infancy and those living are: Ethel V., Opha O., Herbert L., Ina M. and Ora A. Ethel is the wife of Eli Rose, partner in a lithographing corporation of Chicago, and has a son, Samuel W., born in 1928. Opha is the wife of Ed Heidt, and Evansville musician. Herbert L., bookkeeper and clerk for the Pigeon Creek Coal Company of Warrick County, married Maud Whittaker and has two children, Wanda L., born in 1915, and William, born in 1920. Ina married Roland R. Richardson, a chiropractor at Murphysboro, Illinois, and has a daughter, Mary Janette, born in 1919.

Ora A. Davis received his first educational advantages at Chandler, Indiana, and was graduated from the Boonville High School in 1900. He was a school teacher for nine years and for two years taught in country districts and for seven years at Chandler, where for six years of the time he was principal. In the meantime he was studying law in his father's office and in 1907 was admitted to the bar. The first case he had in court was defending a deaf and dumb man on the charge of drunkeness. His father was then deputy prosecuting attorney and had charge of the prosecution. The result was a hung jury and the case was dismissed. Mr. Davis in 1909 went in the office of Thomas W. Lindsay and in 1910 made the race for prosecuting attorney of Warrick County. He was elected for three consecutive terms, and gave a vigilant and vigorous administration. All the while he was conducting an independent law practice. Mr. Davis opened his law office May 4, 1910, under the firm name of Davis & Davis, in partnership with his father. They dissolved the partnership in 1915 and he has given his full time to his law practice.

Mr. Davis is a real estate owner at Evansville. He owns the most beautiful home in Boonville.

He married at Chandler, Indiana, April 28, 1901, Miss Ethel C. Baum, daughter of William and Hattie (Huber) Baum. Her father was a coal miner and engineer, and died in Warrick County. By his first marriage Mr. Davis has four children: Elbert A., born in Octover, 1902; Claire N., born May 2, 1905; Frank E., born August 2, 1907, and Raymond F., born January 8, 1909. Elbert is cashier of the Southern Indiana Gas & Electric Company at Boonville. Claire married Paul A. Routh, an accountant in Chicago, and she was a teacher before her marriage. Frank, an electrician and superintendent of construction for the Southern Indiana Gas & Electric Company at Boonville, married Grace Wooley, of Warrick County. Raymond is a bookkeeper in the office of the Saw Coal Company at Boonville.

Mr. Davis second wife was Anna Dilday, daughter of Joseph R. and Susie (Archer) Dilday. They were married in March, 1916. Mrs. Davis is also a lawyer, and helps her husband in his office. She was admitted to the practice before the Warrick Circuit Court in 1915. Mr. Davis is a Democrat in politics. He is a past exalted ruler of the Elks Lodge and has filled all the chairs in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a past noble grand and member of the Grand Lodge. He is a member of the Kiwanis Club and the American Legion. In 1918 he jointed the color, waiving his privilege of deferred classification, and entered as a private. He was trained with the Twenty-sixth Training Battery, Ninth Battalion, at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky, until after the armistice.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM L. JONES, manager of the Furnas Ice Cream Company at Fort Wayne, has had over thirty years' experience in the business of manufacturing and distributing ice cream. Ice cream is one of America's unique products, and it might well now class as one of the big industries. During Mr. Jones' personal experience the business has expanded enormously. When he started, in the late 90s, there were very few commercial plants except in the larger cities, and such has been the demand for this popular and substantial article of diet that hundreds of millions of dollars are invested in plants and facilities for its manufacture and sale.

Mr. Jones was born in Howard County, Indiana, September 10, 1877, a son of Dougan and Lydia (Hobson) Jones. His family on both sides were Indiana pioneers. His grandfather, Alfred Jones, was a farmer in Southern Indiana and married Sarah Trogden. The maternal grandfather, Elihu Hobson, who married Miss White, was an early settler in Howard County, where both of them died. Dougan Jones was born near Bedford, Indiana, July 12, 1847, and his wife in Howard County, June 14, 1849. They lived together fifty-six years, until the death of the good wife and mother in 1927. All of their four children are living. Dougan Jones spent his active career as a farmer and is now living retired. Both parents were members of the Friends Church.

William L. Jones grew up on an Indiana farm, attended public school in Howard County, the New London High School, and was graduated A. B. from Indiana University in 1905. As a youth he began teaching in country schools, later taught in the schools of Valley Mills and was principal of the high school at Bloomfield, and after completing his university career was principal of Bedford High School for two years. Mr. Jones graduated from the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis in 1908, and his knowledge of the law has been valuable to him in his business career, but he has never seriously considered engaging in practice. While in school he taught during several summer terms, and before he entered university he worked for the Furnas Ice Cream Company at Indianapolis and Terre Haute. Mr. Jones in the spring of 1909 came to Fort Wayne to organize a branch of the Furnas Ice Cream Company, and has been the active manager and responsible for the great growth of the business of this plant over Northeastern Indiana. His first work for the Furnas company was done at Indianapolis in 1898.

Mr. Jones is one of Fort Wayne's well-to-do and substantial business men. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, member of Mizpah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, belongs to the Fort Wayne Country Club, the Chamber of Commerce, and though reared as a Friend is now affiliated with the Plymouth Congregational Church at Fort Wayne.

He married in 1914 Miss Emma Ringenberg, of Fort Wayne. She was a Methodist. Mrs. jones died in October, 1915, leaving one daughter, Mary Alice, who was born February 26, 1915. This daughter attended the West Town, Pennsylvania, Friends School and is now a sophomore in high school at West Town. Mr. Jones by a second marriage has two other children: Robert, born September 13, 1922, and Virginia Lydia, born September 21, 1924.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


REV. CONRAD URBACH. Among the spiritual leaders of Warrick County, few are held in greater veneration and respect by the people than Rev. Conrad Urbach, priest of St. Rupert's Church, which is located eight miles east of Newburg. Coming to the United States in 1913, as a youth of eighteen years, he was ordained in 1924, and since 1926 has labored with zeal and enthusiasm in his present parish, winning the admiration and friendship of people of all creeds because of the genuineness of his faith and the worth of his accomplishments.

Father Urbach was born November 23, 1895, in Germany, and received his early education in the public schools of his native country. After coming to the United States in 1913 he continued his studies, and completed his theological work at St. Meinrad, Spencer County, where he was ordained in 1924. His first charge was at Terre Haute, where he spent one year, then being transferred to Lawrenceburg, where he passed a like period, and in 1926 took up his work at St. Rupert's, where he has since remained.

St. Rupert's parish was established in 1858, as a mission, being taken care of by the Benedictine Fathers from St. Meinrad. The first of these was Abbott Martin Marty, who was followed by Father Joseph. In 1875 Father Brooks, of Rockport, began to fill this charge, and continued to do so until 1885, in which year the parish was furnished its first regular pastor, Father Zogelmann. He was succeeded in 1886 by Father Charles Wagner, who served from 1886 until 1902, and was succeeded by Father Michael Wagner, who remained until 1903. In the latter year Father Mathias Schmitz took charge and remained until 1911, when he was succeeded by Father Zerelbach, who, in turn, was replaced by Father Bleuel, who remained until 1920. The next priest to take charge was Father August Riehl, who remained until 1926, in which year Father Urbach assumed the duties.

Father Urbach has become widely and favorably known to the people all over Warrick, Spencer and Vanderburg counties, as a man of great piety, untiring industry, sound intellectual attainments and a love for the calling to which he has consecrated his life. Under his leadership the parish is prospering, both spiritually and in temporal affairs, and those of all denominations recognize in him a modest but really earnest man whom they welcome into movements making for the welfare of the community in every way.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray