JAMES FREMONT HOOVER, of Veedersburg, has lived a long, busy and active life as a farmer, railroad man and public official.

He was born at Frankfort, Indiana, April 9, 1856. His father, James Hoover, was born at Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, August 23, 1816. The Hoovers came to Indiana from North Carolina and, like nearly all the other pioneers of Wayne County, were Quakers. James F. Hoover is a third cousin of President Hoover, whose ancestors likewise moved westward from North Carolina until his parents established a home in Iowa, where the President was born. The mother of James F. Hoover was America Pickin, who was born near Lancaster, Ohio, September 3, 1829. These parents had a large family of children, two of whom died in infancy. Carrie, Ella, Virginia, William and Franklin are also deceased. The living children are James F.; Andrew R., of Dayton, Indiana; Thomas O., of Fowler, Indiana; and John A., of Frankfort. Thomas O. and John A. are twins.

James Fremont Hoover was educated in the public schools of Illinois and Indiana. After leaving school he farmed for two years and then entered the railway service. For twenty years he was a foreman for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois and the Clover Leaf Railways. Since then farming has been his chief occupation and he still occupies his farm five miles south of Veedersburg in Fountain County.

Mr. Hoover is a Republican and for twenty years held the office of justice of the peace at Veedersburg. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Modern Woodmen of America.

He married, October 12, 1879, Miss Ann Eliza Glaze, who passed away in June, 1890, leaving four children, James Everett, Leeandra (now deceased), Jessie V. and Elsie M. On November 3, 1895, Mr. Hoover married Jane Titsworth. By this marriage there were six children, Franklin, Mamie, Charles, Kenneth, Opal and Willie. Mr. Hoover has thirteen grandchildren.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EDWARD PETER NACHAND. The career of Edward P. Nachand has been an exceedingly active and interesting one, looked at from any point of view. Leaving school at the age of seventeen years, he started to work for his father, and continued actively employed until the World war, when he enlisted in Company No. Five, First Regiment of the U. S. A. S., and saw active and extremely perilous service overseas. Since his return to the United States he has been a resident of Jeffersonville, and is now township trustee of this township, and overseer of the poor. In view of his character and services Mr. Nachand can be called justly one of his community's most valuable citizens.

Edward P. Nachand was born at Jeffersonville, Clark County, Indiana, June 29, 1889, and is a son of Valentine Daniel and Jennie Sarah (King) Nachand. Valentine Nachand was born in Kentucky, a member of a pioneer family of that state, and was a child when brought by his parents to Indiana in 1866, the family settling in Clark County. He attended the rural schools and was reared on a farm, and upon attaining his majority embarked in the produce trucking business, which he eventually built up to large proportions through industry and good business methods. A man of high character and public spirit, he was esteemed and respected by his fellow citizens. Mr. Nachand married Miss Jennie S. King, a native of Clark County, Indiana, and to this union there were born six children.

Edward P. Nachand attended the grade school at Jeffersonville, and was about seventeen years of age when he commenced assisting his father in the produce trucking business. However, he developed a decided flair for mechanics, and in 1915 secured a position in an automobile manufactory at Detroit, Michigan, where he gained much experience and knowledge and remained until 1917. When the United States entered the World war Mr. Nachand was attracted immediately to the possibilities of the flying service. Enlisting in the army, he was assigned to that branch of the service, in which he made rapid progress and was among the first Americans to be sent to France to act as aviators. After five months of training he went overseas and was assigned to the French Aviation Corps, with which he saw thrilling and perilous service for eighteen months, and at the time the armistice was signed bore the rank of sergeant. He then returned to the United States and, again became associated with his father at Jeffersonville, but in the meanwhile also was variously employed on engineering projects. He was elected township trustee, a position in which he is serving his second term. He is also overseer of the poor of Jeffersonville Township, and is particularly active during the holiday seasons in caring for the needy and in the distribution of Christmas baskets, clothing, etc. Mr. Nachand, associated with Col. F. W. Van Duyne, of the U. S. A. Quartermaster Depot, and Mr. C. J. Hertzsch, manager of the local plant of the American Car and Foundry Company, have secured a plot of ground of about thirty-five acres, to be used as a community garden. They arranged for tilling of the soil and had it planted with vegetables, and then divided the garden into a number of small sections. These sections are then allotted to families in need, who cultivate and harvest the crop. Mr. Nachand's official record is an excellent one and there are few men who are more popular in the public service. He maintains offices in the Nickle Building, where at all times he is ready to give of his time and ability in instruction, counsel and aid. Mr. Nachand is one of the Democratic leaders of his community. Fraternally he belongs to the local lodge of Masons; and the Modern Woodmen of America, of which he is venerable counsel. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran Church.

Mr. Nachand was united in marriage with Miss Mary Magdaline Moser, of Jeffersonville, a graduate of Jeffersonville High School and the Moores Hill College, and a woman of superior intellectual qualities, who was an educator for several years prior to her marriage.
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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FRED KREISLE. Tell City, Indiana, has its share of men who have stepped aside from the path of labor to let pass the younger generation with their clear-cut hopes and unrealized ambitions, and to whom life is still a vast and unexplored country. This turning aside may mean much or little to him whose business tasks are finished; but if he has come from a small beginning, and if he has friends and an optimistic outlook, there will always be those who would exchange with him success, as represented by a mere aggregation of wealth. To the retired colony of Tell City belongs Fred Kreisle, who has been a resident of this community since 1858, and an outstanding feature of whose career has been the turning of failure into success.

Mr. Kreisle was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, November 13, 1850, and is a son of Magnus and Christina (Eckardt) Kreisle. His father, who was born September 9, 1823, at Wurttemberg, Germany, was educated in his native land, where he learned the trades of woodworker and cabinetmaker, and at the age of twenty-one years immigrated to the United States and settled, in 1847, at Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Shortly thereafter he moved to Cincinnati and subsequently to Indianapolis, following his trades at both places, and in 1858 moved to Tell City as a pioneer with the Swiss Colonization Company. He was the first manufacturer of Tell City, establishing the Tell City Planing Mill, of which he continued to be the proprietor until his death in 1885. He was a man of high character and sound business judgment, a public-spirited citizen, and an individual who was held in great esteem in the city of his adoption. At Cincinnati he was united in marriage with Miss Christina Eckhardt, daughter of John Eckardt, a cabinetmaker of Cincinnati, and to this union there were born the following children: Fred, of this review; George, who died in 1888; Henry and John, of Tell City; Edward, who died in 1884; William, of Morgan City, Indiana; Susan, who died in 1925; Charles, of Tell City, who died in October, 1930; and Louis, of Cincinnati, Ohio.

After attending the public schools of Tell City, Fred Kreisle began his career as a woodworker in his father's mill. He may be called self-educated, as between the ages of twenty-one and thirty-five years he traveled extensively allover the country, thus obtaining in his own way knowledge at first hand which no amount of schooling could give him. For a total of forty years, prior to his retirement, he was identified with the planing mill and contributed materially to its success. While engaged in the lath plant of the mill Mr. Kreisle became interested in the development of the hub business. During the first year there was a loss of $600, which it took the succeeding two years to make up, but Mr. Kreisle had full faith and confidence in the business, and this was vindicated when it quickly became successful and developed into a $50,000 annual business. He was also a participant in the growth of the furniture factory from an earning of $35,000 to $144,000 annually, and an annual output capacity of $750,000. Turning failure into success has been an outstanding quality of this unusual man, as was demonstrated in the hub venture, when a dominant will and hard work stood the test of a crisis, which for a less sturdy man would have meant certain failure. He is now practically retired, but has various important interests and holdings, being vice president of the Tell City Furniture Company, vice president of the Knott Furniture Company and a member of the board of directors of the Tell City National Bank. His religious connection is with the Evangelical Church.

On August 18, 1877, Mr, Kreisle was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Schlotfeld, daughter of Charles T. Schlotfeld, a cabinetmaker by trade, who later became one of the leading business men of Tell City and founder of the Tell City Furniture Company. To this union six children were born: George, of Denver, Colorado, who married Ethel Philpot and has two children, Mary and Jane; Charles, of Detroit, Michigan, who married Pearl Mosby, and has one daughter, Mildred; Edwin, of Tell City, who married Olefin Fraley, and has five children, William Earle, Raymond, Mercedes, Edwin, Jr., and Quentin; Albert, of Atascadero, California,. who married Mary Beady and has one daughter, Jean; Norman, of Tell City, who married Nelda Huck, and has five children, Fred Peter, Mary Emma, Kletis, Leroy and Alice; and Robert, who lives with his parents at Tell City.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DORA M. SMITH is a native of Eastern Indiana, and his active career has been spent in farming and real estate activities, his home and headquarters now being at Richmond.

Mr. Smith was born in Randolph County, Indiana, in 1876, son of Joseph R. and Barbara J. (Brower) Smith, both natives of Indiana. His mother is deceased and his father died at Muncie in 1930. Dora M. Smith attended public schools until he was fourteen years of age and since then has been self-supporting and dependent upon his own ambition and energies for all that he has accomplished. Up to the age of twenty-eight he was a farm worker for monthly wages. He then started farming for himself, and still owns some valuable farm property which he has supervised in connection with his other business affairs since 1919. He has been in the real estate business since 1914. During the World war Mr. Smith did some tie and timber contracting in Florida. In 1919 he located at Alexandria and was in the real estate business there and at Anderson and Muncie until September 6, 1923, when he located at Richmond.

He married in 1898 Miss Bessie M. Gates, a native of Delaware County, Indiana, daughter of George and Lydia (Heaton) Gates, of Delaware County. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have six children: Walter, of Richmond; Inez, wife of Marion Potter, of Indianapolis; Edna, Mrs. Kenneth Syes, at home; Earl, Dorthea and Doris, all at home.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DEDERICH H. WALLACE has the distinction of being the oldest business man in point of continuous service in the City of Veedersburg. He has been established there for over forty years as the leading pharmacist and druggist.

Mr. Wallace was born in Hanover, Germany, March 21, 1856. His parents were Frederick and Dorothy (Schrader) Wallace, life long residents of the old country. Dederich H. Wallace acquired the equivalent of a high school education in Germany and also had three years of training in the regular army. He was a young man twenty-six years of age when he came to the United States in 1882.

His first location in Indiana was at Yeddo in Fountain County, where for six years he carried on a drug business. Then, in 1889, he moved to Veedersburg, and since that year his name has been associated with the leading drug store in this section of Fountain County. Mr. Wallace is an able pharmacist, and has also built up a large business, handling all the commodities of a first class drug store, including paints and wall paper supplies, school books and the general line of druggists sundries.

Mr. Wallace married in September, 1892, Miss Mollie D. Cox, of Freemont, Illinois. She passed away in January, 1901, leaving a daughter, Dorothy E. Dorothy Wallace graduated from Sweet Briar College of Virginia, taught there for a time and is now an instructor in Goucher College for Women at Baltimore, Maryland, one of the foremost women's colleges in the East. Mr. Wallace subsequently married Anna Brown, of Fountain County. Mrs. Wallace is a member of an old Colonial American family and belongs to the Daughters of the American Revolution. They were married in February, 1902.

Mr. Wallace is a Democrat in politics, a member of the Christian Church, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. In the uniformed rank of the Knights of Pythias he was for twenty-nine years a colonel of the Indiana Brigade and held other official positions in that organization. Mr. Wallace has always given generous response to calls upon his time and means for civic helpfulness and duty. He served three terms in the City Council and for sixteen years was a member of the local school board.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


J. WILLS STEPHENSON had reached the climax of his career as a manufacturer, industrial leaders, banker and citizen when death claimed him at the comparatively early age of fifty-two, on May 8, 1931. Few men of any age have meant more to the community of Marion than this self-made, hard-working and successful business man and generous and public spirited citizen. He had begun his career as a humble worker in a plant at Gas City, and though in later years he was rated as one of the wealthy men of the state, success never changed his democratic habits and personality, and his former fellow workers expressed a high degree of esteem when they called him "J. W.," which initials were his real patent to nobility.

Mr. Stephenson was born at Jasper, Pike County, Ohio, April 27, 1879, son of John W. and Jennie (Wills) Stephenson. Both his parents were natives of Ohio, and his father was a merchant. John W. Stephenson died in 1911 and his widow now resides in California.

J. Wills Stephenson was one of a family of seven children. He had only a common school education. When seventeen years of age he went to work in the tin plate factory of the Morewood Company at Gas City, Indiana. He worked hard, showed a capacity for increasing responsibility, and at the end of five years he had reached the position of paymaster. He left Gas City to go to Canton, Ohio, where for two years he was superintendent of the Carnahan Plate & Sheet Company. He then turned his enterprise in a different direction, and, going to Southern Alabama, was made treasurer and general manager of the Hand Lumber Company and supervised the extensive operations involved in the clearing and working up of fifty thousand acres of timber land.

When, in 1909, Mr. Stephenson returned to Indiana he acquired an interest in the Western Motor Company of Logansport. During the summer of that year this company built a modern plant at Marion for the manufacture of gasoline motors for automobiles and trucks, including a general foundry. This plant was acquired by the Rutenber Motor Company in 1912, with Mr. Stephenson as treasurer and general manager, and still later the business was consolidated with the Indiana Truck Corporation, of which Mr. Stephenson was president and chairman of the board of directors until it was merged with the Brockway Motor Truck Corporation, March 26, 1928. At the time of his death Mr. Stephenson was a member of the board of the Brockway Company.

During his residence in Marion, Mr. Stephenson's activities were being constantly broadened. One of his more recent achievements was the prominent part he played in the merger of the Grant Trust & Savings Company and the First National Bank. At the time of his death he was president and chairman of the board of directors, of the First National Bank, was chairman of the board of the Delta Electric Company, a director of the Peerless Motor Car Company of Cleveland, and was president of the Snapper Creek Land Company, which had extensive Florida holdings. He was one of the organizers of the Delta Electric Company, of which his brother Walter B. is the active head. His energy and executive ability were credited with the chief responsibility in the nationwvide success of the Indiana truck industry.

At the time of his death Mr. Stephenson was president of the Marion Association of Commerce and devoted a great deal of his time to the success of this organization. He was a member of numerous clubs, including the Mecca Club, the Country Club, the Elks Club at Marion, the Columbia Club at Indianapolis, the Wawasee and Tippecanoe Country Clubs, and at one time was a member of the Hamilton Club of Chicago. He was an Elk and Knight of Pythias and had been a benefactor of the Y. M. C. A. and other social and civic organizations.

The esteem and love for this Marion business man were well summed up in an editorial in the Marion Leader-Tribune, quoted in the following paragraphs:

"J. W. Stephenson's death is a keen loss to the community, to every citizen in the community. His interests were large and varied. He achieved exceptional success, but, with it all, he never lost interest in the people. He never forgot the early days of his struggle, when in a factory as a worker he saw something of the difficulties in the way of achievement. He was a self-made man. He rose to a high position by his own efforts. He began most humbly. He was an indefatigable worker. No task was too simple, nor too severe, for him to perform.

Mr. Stephenson, rising from the lowest round of the ladder, was always mindful of the lot of the humblest citizen. He always lent an attentive ear to youth, who, like him, started out with very little. He always gave attention to those who were in distress. None were denied a respectful hearing. Perhaps this is why in all walks of life a tear is shed; in all walks of life there is a poignant regret. One of the sad incidents in Mr. Stephenson's death is the fact that he was a comparatively young man. He had done much but he had planned to do even more for the community. He had means, he had the great desire, he was energetic, and he wanted and was able to do so much. Death has taken him at the very height of his brilliant career.

Mr. Stephenson did much for Marion. He loved his community. He loved every inch of ground in it. He was always happier when at home among his friends. He liked people. Particularly did he like the boys at home, 'J. W.' had as many personal friends as any man who ever lived here. It would be impossible to recite all of his civic contributions. For many, many years he has contributed unhesitatingly, generously and gladly. He helped organize several of Marion's finest industries, notably among them being the Indiana Truck and the Delta Electric. He was a director in a dozen different organizations which have contributed to the industrial, commercial and social welfare of the community. His efforts in behalf of the recent bank consolidation were particularly noteworthy. He was the first president of the merged institution.

"Mr. Stephenson was president of the Association of Commerce, and in that important civic responsibility he served with credit and distinction. He has been prominent recently in the municipal art movement here. He loved and greatly admired beautiful paintings and more than one young artist has been inspired to higher things by his generosity and association with his enthusiasm.

"It would be difficult to attempt a recital of all J. W. Stephenson achieved of a grand and noble nature. There were so many splendid phases of his career. He did so many worthy, generous and beautiful things. There is no doubt but what the community has suffered a distinct loss. A severe one. We have lost a great leader, a fine, earnest, generous and valuable citizen. But there is consolation. The example and inspiration of his life will not die. The good deeds which men do cannot perish. They live on and on and thus inspire hundreds of others to so live. J. W. Stephenson is dead in a worldly sense. But the magnificence and inspiration of his life will go on."

Mr. Stephenson in 1903 married Miss Edith M. Barley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Barley. The Barley family were among the earliest settlers of Marion. Mr. Stephenson is survived by Mrs. Stephenson and four daughters: Dorothy, wife of Lloyd Fanning of East Orange., New Jersey; Helen, Mrs. George M. Kleder, Jr., of Marion; Miss Louise a student in Weber College of Boston; and Miss Mildred, attending the Holton Arms School at Washington.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


J. EDWARD COMER, M. D., has been a resident of the fine little City of Mooresville, Morgan County, since he was a child of one; year, and here it has been his to render in his profession not only a valuable communal service but also a service that now transcends mere local limitations, as he is the owner and conductor of the Mooresville Sanitarium, one of the well ordered health institutions of Indiana, and in this connection as well as in his private practice he now specializes in proctology, to which line of professional endeavor he has given his major attention since 1912. The Mooresville Sanitarium, of modern equipment and service, is established at 33 North Indiana Street, and the home of Doctor Comer is one of the most attractive in the city, at 125 North Indiana Street.

Doctor Comer was born in the City of Indianapolis, January 14, 1876, and, as previously intimated, was about one year of age at the time of the family removal to Mooresville, where he was reared to adult age and where his public-school discipline included that of the high school, he having thereafter continued his studies in the Shortridge High School of Indianapolis. The Doctor is a son of Cornelius L. and Sarah Ann (Clark) Comer, both likewise natives of Indiana, where the latter was born in Wayne County, she having died in 1919, at the age of seventy- three years, and her husband, now a retired contractor, having been born in 1845 and being one of the venerable and honored citizens of Mooresville.

In preparation for the profession of his choice Doctor Comer completed a course in the Indiana Medical College, at Indianapolis, and after being graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, in 1904, he returned to Mooresville, which city has since continued the central stage of his earnest and benignant professional activities. Here he was established in active general practice until 1915, when he purchased and assumed the management of the Mooresville Sanitarium, the service of which he has brought to high standard, the while his practice is now largely confined to proctology. He has membership in the Morgan County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association.

Doctor Comer is found loyally aligned in the local ranks of the Republican party, and he served three years as a member of the Mooresville City Council. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church of their home community, he having been a member of its official board since 1915 and having also served as teacher of the Men's Brotherhood Class in its Sunday School.

The Doctor has much talent as a vocalist, and was formerly first tenor in the Mozart Quartet of Mooresville. He is associated with his brother Charles B. in the ownership of 1,265 acres of land in Indiana, and in addition to this valuable farm property in their native state they own 375 acres in Arkansas, devoted to the raising of cotton and hay. Doctor Comer is one of the vital and loyally citizens of Mooresville and here is an active member of the Lions Club.

The year 1905 was marked by the marriage of Doctor Comer to Miss Ethel Landers, who was born in Morgan County, July 9, 1885, and who is a daughter of Jeremiah and Alice (Combs) Landers, both likewise natives of Indiana. Dr. Kenneth Edward, eldest of the children of Doctor and Mrs. Comer, was born in December, 1906. He received the A. B. degree from Butler University in 1929 and is a graduate of the medical department of the University of Indiana, class of 1933. Ina Mae was born June 8, 1910, was graduated in Madam Blakers School and is now a popular teacher in the public schools. Charles W., born May 20, 1915, is, in 1930, a student in the Mooresville High School, and Mary Alice, who was born January 31, 1919, is likewise a student in the public schools of the home community.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EWING R. EMISON. The professional life of Ewing R. Emison is an expression of zeal, energy and usefulness, culminating in the attainment of well earned success. A resident of Vincennes all of his life, he has won a prominent place in his profession through none of the arts of the charlatan, but by native and developed legal talent, long and steady application, and ready grasp of opportunities. It has been his fortune to gain and hold the esteem and confidence of those with whom he has come in contact and to have won prosperity with honor and without animosity.

Mr. Emison was born at Vincennes, Knox County, Indiana, in 1891, and is a son of James Wade and Sadie Ross (Rabb) Emison. Mr. Emison comes of one of the oldest families of Knox County and which has contributed men of distinguished ability to the professions and business, to public and military life and to agriculture as large land-holders. His great-great-great-grandfather, Lieut. William Westen Clark Emison, settled at Georgetown, Kentucky, in 1770, and was an officer in the Colonial army during the War of the American Revolution. Thomas Emison, the great- great-grandfather of Ewing R. Emison, was born at Georgetown, Kentucky, in 1776, and married a Miss Holmes, of the Georgetown settlement. He built the first flour mill, in 1804, on Maria Creek, where it continued in operation until 1880, in that year being removed to Vincennes. William Weston Clark Emison, the great-grandfather of Ewing R. Emison, was born at Georgetown, and became a pioneer settler of Knox County, Indiana, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life. His son, John W. Emison, was born at Bruceville, Knox County, married Sarah Dunning, also of Bruceville, and spent his career as a farmer and miller.

James Wade Emison, the father of Ewing R. Emison, was born in Knox County, where he attended public school. Later he pursued a course at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and for many years has been engaged in the practice of his profession, being one of the leading members of the Knox County bar. He married Sadie Ross Rabb, of Vincennes, daughter of John H. Rabb, founder of the First National Bank of Vincennes, and they became the parents of four children: Ewing R., of this review; James Wade, Jr., a business man of New York City, who served during the World war as a first lieutenant in the Second Field Artillery for two years; Hon. John Rabb, judge of the Superior Court of Knox County during 1926 and 1927, and now assistant United States attorney at Indianapolis, who was a second lieutenant of infantry during the World war; and Susan Rabb, the wife of Leslie G. Gee, president of the Farmers State Bank of Lawrenceville, Illinois, who was an ensign in the Naval Aviation Corps during the World war.

After attending the public schools of Vincennes Ewing R. Emison enrolled as a student at DePauw University, Greencastle, from which institution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws as a member of the class of 1913. In the same year he entered practice at Vincennes, where he has since met with much success, and is a member of the firm of Emison & Hoyer, with offices at 214 Main Street. He is admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Indiana and the Federal courts, is a member of the Knox County Bar Association, the Indiana State Bar Association and the American Bar Association, and has been identified with much important litigation. A Republican in politics, he has been one of the leaders of his party in Knox County and Indiana for some years. From 1918 until 1922 he served capably in the capacity of county attorney, and in 1924 was campaign manager for President Coolidge in Indiana. From 1920 to the present he has been a member of the Indiana State Republican committee, was Republican national committeeman from Indiana in 1928, and was delegate at large to the National Republican convention at Cleveland in 1924. Fraternally Mr. Emison is a member of the Masons, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. Mr. Emison married Miss Tuley L. Shepard, of Vincennes, and they are the parents of three children: Ellen Ross, James and Thomas.

Among Mr. Emison's distinguished relatives was Thomas Emison, who served as first lieutenant of Dragoons at the battle of Tippecanoe, in Indiana, under Gen. William Henry Harrison. Samuel M. Emison was born in Knox County, Indiana, in 1879, a son of James Emison, a miller by trade and a member of the board of county commissioners. James Emison had four children: Estelle, Maude Duvall, Samuel M. and Martha McFarland. Samuel M. Emison graduated from the University of Indiana in 1899 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and then studied law under James Wade Emison, being admitted to the bar in 1900, since when he has been engaged in a successful law practice at Vincennes, where he was prosecuting attorney from 1902 until 1907. He married Miss M. Adams.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PAUL IVORY TURNER. While he was born and reared on a farm in Randolph County, Mr. Turner's talents readily turned him to the financial profession, and while in later years he has been a man of many interests the institution that largely reflects his business judgment is the Union Loan & Trust Company of Union City, of which he is president.

Mr. Turner was born in 1883, a son of Cyrus S. and Letitia (Hinshaw) Turner, natives of the same county. His grandfather, William Turner, came from West Virginia and was an early day millwright and also a farmer. The maternal grandparents, Silas and Saphrona (Mullin) Hinshaw, were natives of Pennsylvania. Cyrus Turner carried on his farm in Randolph County for a number of years, but in 1893 bought a farm in Darke County, Ohio, to which he moved, and he lived there until his death on August 8, 1923. His wife passed away in 1920.

Paul Ivory Turner had the advantages of the grade and high schools, took a business course at Columbus, Ohio, and in 1907 entered the retail hardware and implement business at Union City.

In 1909 he became one of the organizers of the Union Loan & Trust Company. During the first fifteen years of the growth of this business he served as secretary and treasurer, and since then has been president. The company now does a general banking business, with capital of $50,000 and average deposits of over half a million. J. H. Potts is secretary and treasurer, and J. H. Bickel is vice president.

Mr. Turner is also connected with the Greenville Buick Sales Company of Darke County, Ohio, is a director of the Bailey Manufacturing Company, and is interested in other business organizations and is owner of various city and farm properties.

He married in 1904 Amy Leota Constable. Mrs. Turner was born in Jay County, Indiana, daughter of Harlan P. and Jennie (Smith) Constable, her father a native of the same county, while her mother was born near Covington in Miami County, Ohio. Mr. Turner has served as treasurer of the Christian Church, was for two terms a member of the City Council, is a Republican, and has held all the important offices in the Chamber of Commerce, of which he is now a director. He is a believer in fraternalism and belongs to many of these beneficiary and social organizations. He is a member of the York Rite bodies of Masonry at Winchester, the thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Consistory and Shrine at Indianapolis, the Lodge and Encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, Eagles, Junior Order United American Mechanics, Modern Woodmen of America, Improved Order of Red Men, B. P. O. Elks, the Eastern Star, and is a member of the Union City Country Club.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM H. BOOK since January, 1927, has been director of civic affairs for the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Book was born at Clifton Forge, Virginia, November 22, 1898, son of William H. and Kate (MacKenzie) Book, his father a native of Snowville, Virginia, and his mother of Mercer County, West Virginia. His mother died in 1906 and his father now lives at Columbus, Indiana, a retired minister of the Christian Church.

William H. Book was graduated from Franklin College of Indiana in 1919. He at once joined the staff of reporters of the Indianapolis News and was connected with that paper for six years, leaving it as assistant city editor. For one year he acted as business director for the Indianapolis School City. In 1926 he became assistant director of civic affairs for the Chamber of Commerce, a year later becoming director of the department.

In his position with the Chamber of Commerce he has conducted that organization's analysis of local government budgets, having urged and cooperated with the officials in effecting economies saving several millions of dollars to the taxpayers of Indianapolis. Since its formation in February, 1930, he has served also as secretary of the Indianapolis Commission for Stabilization of Employment, an organization of business and professional men created by the mayor and president of the Chamber of Commerce. In his work with that commission he also has been secretary of its emergency work committee, applying a plan of "made work" for Indianapolis by which able-bodied applicants for public relief are given opportunity by working on useful public projects to earn their relief.

Mr. Book married, April 30, 1921, Miss Margaret Moore, of Indianapolis. Her parents, William O. and Sarah (Overhiser) Moore, were born in Marion County, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Book have two children, William Moore, born March 22, 1928, and Robert MacKenzie, born December 31, 1929.

Mr. Book is a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college fraternity; the Indianapolis Athletic Club and the Professional Men's Forum. His home is at 4728 Kenwood Avenue. He is a director and member of the executive committee of the Indianapolis Chapter of the Red Cross. He served two years as assistant to the president of the American Peace Society and during 1926-28 he was secretary of the George Rogers Clark Memorial Commission. He has been secretary and a member of the Board of Community Welfare of the City of Indianapolis since 1928.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN E. ANDERSON is a native son of Posey County, where both his paternal and maternal grandparents were pioneer settlers. He was a child at the time of his father's death. He was reared and educated in this county and here he has ever maintained high place in popular confidence and esteem. He gave eight years of effective service as county recorder and, as a skilled civil engineer, he served as county engineer and surveyor of his native county from 1922 to 1930, with executive headquarters in the courthouse at Mount Vernon, and is now following his private business as abstractor and civil engineer.

Mr. Anderson was born at Stewartsville, this county, October 12, 1860, and is a son of William T. and Sophrona (Bennett) Anderson, both likewise natives of this county, where they were reared and educated and where they continued to maintain their home until their death. William T. Anderson was here a farmer by vocation, and when the Civil war was initiated he went forth as a gallant soldier of the Union. He went to the front with his regiment of Indiana volunteer infantry and while in service he contracted the illness that resulted in his death within a comparatively short time after the close of his military career, so that his son John E., of this review, retains no definite memory of him. The widowed mother passed the remainder of her life in Posey County and was well advanced in years at the time of her death, the children of the family having been three in number.

The public schools of Posey County afforded John E. Anderson his youthful education and here he continued his association with farm enterprise until he was eighteen years of age, when he joined a corps of civil engineers engaged in railroad work. His service in this connection continued five years, and through study during this period and thereafter he perfected himself in technical knowledge and gained status as a proficient civil engineer. After having been engaged in the drug and grocery business several years at Poseyville he sold this business, and in 1890 he was elected county recorder, which office he retained two terms, or eight years. Upon assuming this office he established his residence at Mount Vernon, judicial center of the county, where he has since maintained his home. While serving as county recorder he established himself also in the abstract business, in which he has since continued, his set of abstracts being recognized as complete and authoritative as pertaining to all real estate titles in Posey County.

In 1904 Mr. Anderson was appointed city engineer of Mount Vernon, and he retained this position under the successive administrations of three mayors of the city, so that his incumbency covered a period of twelve years. In 1922 he was elected county engineer, and in this office he continued his loyal and efficient administration until 1930.

The political allegiance of Mr. Anderson is given to the Democratic party and he has been influential in its local councils and campaign activities in his native county. He is the owner of real estate both in Mount Vernon and in the City of Evansville.

At Poseyville, on the 15th of October, 1882, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Ida Bozeman, who was born and reared in Posey County and who is a daughter of Leonard and Sarah (Jaquess) Bozeman, the former of whom was born in Illinois and the latter in Posey County, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson became the parents of three children, of, whom but one is living, Paul B., who was born July 19, 1890, and who is an accountant by profession, but who is now secretary and manager for a leading real estate concern in the City of Evansville. Maude S., who died at the age of twenty years, was an accomplished musician and was a popular and gracious figure in the social and cultural circles of Mount Vernon at the time of her death. The other child, Scoby S., died in early childhood.
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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EDWARD THEO THOMPSON, administrator for the Indiana University School of Medicine and Hospitals, received his early education in Canada, his training and experience in hospital administration in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and came to Indianapolis in 1928.

Doctor Thompson was born at Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 13, 1899, son of Charles and Thora (Ronne) Thompson. His parents were natives of Denmark, and were married in Canada. His father for a number of years has been a railway inspector, located at Winnipeg. His mother died July 4, 1913.

Doctor Thompson was graduated from the Manitoba Medical College at Winnipeg in 1925 and had his interne experience and training in the Winnipeg General Hospital. For a time he was resident physician of the Ancker Hospital at Saint Paul, later becoming assistant superintendent, and on May 25, 1928, was made administrator for the Indiana University School of Medicine and Hospitals at Indianapolis.

Doctor Thompson married, August 14, 1924, Miss Jessie Wise, who was born at Winnipeg, March 11, 1902, daughter of Herrick and Jessie (Gallop) Wise. Her parents were born in London, but were married in Canada. Doctor and Mrs. Thompson have two children, Bruce Edward, born December 6, 1926, and Donna Jean, born August 1, 1929.

Doctor Thompson is a member of the First Presbyterian Church. He is an independent voter, a member of the Masonic fraternity, Rotary Club, the Indiana Hospital Association, the American Hospital and Children's Hospital Associations, member Mu Chapter Phi Chi medical fraternity, of the Indiana Stamp Club and the American Philatelic Society. When eleven years old he began collecting postage stamps, and that hobby with him instead of pursuing its normal course of a few years has afforded him an absorbing recreation, and his stamp collection now comprises over fifteen thousand units, representing not only all the stamp issuing subdivisions of the world, but many rare specimens. His collection has an approximate value of two thousand dollars.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FRANK HUTCHINSON, vice president of the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills, has been with that institution and local industry for a quarter of a century.

Mr. Hutchinson was born at Lawrenceburg, in 1886. His great-grandfather settled near Cincinnati, Ohio, more than a century ago. Mr. Hutchinson is a son of Thomas Jefferson and Bertha (Kronenberg) Hutchinson. The family came from Ohio to Indiana in 1882, and his father for a number of years carried on a transfer business.

Frank Hutchinson graduated from high school in Lawrenceburg in 1903 and soon afterward went to work for the Lawrenceburg Milling Company, as office boy. He filled various positions in the office and in the sales department, in 1921 was made manager, in 1922, secretary, and since 1923 has been vice president and a director of the corporation.

The Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Company is a notable institution of Dearborn County. The first mills were erected in the late 1830s, on the banks of the Whitewater Canal, and water power was used to turn the wheels. The founder of the mill was Enoch D. Johns. Later Dr. C. G. W. Cornegy built a 300 barrel mill. For nearly a century the mills have been in operation and have had improvements from time to time, and for many years have been operated as roller mills. The flours manufactured by these mills have a well deserved reputation allover Southern Indiana and adjacent states.

The office of the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Company is one of the historic buildings on the Ohio River. The office is alongside the elevators. This office was at one time the Tousey or Vance House. The building was put up in 1820, by Capt. Samuel C. Vance. Captain Vance had been a captain in the Revolutionary war. His home was regarded as the finest residence on the Ohio River between Cincinnati and Louisville. After the death of Captain Vance the building was used as a college, was called the Washington Agricultural School, and finally was sold to Omer Tousey, and later was bought by the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills.

Mr. Hutchinson married Miss Florence Sortwell, of Lawrenceburg, and they have one son, Robert Lewis, born in 1913, now attending Harvard University. Mr. Hutchinson did considerable work in behalf of the Liberty Loan drives during the World war. He is a member of Lawrenceburg Lodge No.4 of the Masonic fraternity, is a Royal Arch Mason, member of the B. P. O. Elks, Kiwanis Club, and is a Republican. He is former president of the Indiana Millers Association, is now on the executive committee of the National Millerís Federation, and a director of the Soft Wheat Association. Mr. Hutchinson's chief interest in local activities has been in connection with the Boy Scouts, he being at present city chairman of that organization and vice president of the Hoosier Hills Area Council.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PHILIP C. BRAUN, president of the Ohio Valley Casket Company at Lawrenceburg, was for many years a banker, and is a member of a family that has played a notable part in the commercial life of Dearborn County for over eighty years.

He was born at Lawrenceburg, in 1868. His father, Peter Braun, came from Germany and settled in Dearborn County about 1843. He was a man of enterprise and fine business judgment, and during all his active life was in business on a scale that kept him much before the public attention. For several years he operated a chain of nine saw mills under contract to supply fuel to the old wood-burning locomotives of the Ohio & Mississippi Railway between Cincinnati and Vincennes. This is now the Baltimore & Ohio Railway. Later he was a member of the mercantile firm Braun & Tate for several years, and when the Peoples National Bank was organized he became its cashier and served continuously until that bank was consolidated with the Citizens National Bank. When he retired from business, in 1905, he had been identified with banking for a longer time than any other citizen of Lawrenceburg. Peter Braun married Sarah Browneller, a native of Pennsylvania. There were four children: Mrs. Elizabeth B. Manning; Mrs. Fannie W. Shedd, now deceased; William F., a retired banker and business man; and Philip C.

Philip C. Braun attended public schools at Lawrenceburg, and when he was eighteen years of age he was messenger for the Pullman Company at Cincinnati and later was promoted to chief clerk. In 1890, when he was twenty-two years of age, he returned to Lawrenceburg and became assistant cashier of the Peoples National Bank. In 1905, when his father retired and when this bank was consolidated with the Citizens National Bank, he became cashier and filled that post until 1928. After having been active in banking for thirty-eight years Mr. Braun retired to become president of the Ohio Valley Casket Company at Lawrenceburg.

This is an old established industry, having been started in 1871, and in 1918 was incorporated as the Ohio Valley Casket Company. It is a large plant, utilizing the hardwood supplies of Southern Indiana and adjacent states, and manufactures a standard line of caskets and funeral supplies. The plant has 320,000 square feet of floor space, and part of the large building is four stories high. The working force comprises eighty persons and during parts of the year the factory is operated night and day. The output of the Ohio Valley Casket Company has a wide distribution, as far east as New York, as far west as Missouri, as far south as Alabama and Mississippi, and north to Michigan.

Mr. Braun is a member of the Indiana Funeral Association, is a director of the Peoples National Bank, member of the Kiwanis Club, Lawrenceburg Lodge No.4, A. F. and A. M., Knights of Pythias, and is a Republican and Presbyterian.

He married Grace A. Wymond, of Lawrenceburg. The four children born to their marriage are: P. W., a business man with the Ohio Valley Casket Company, married Felecia Straub; Robert is deceased; Frederick is superintendent of the Ohio Valley Casket Company; and Sarah Frances is the wife of Frank Dober, of Lawrenceburg. The son P. W. Braun was overseas in France nine months during the World war with the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Battery of Heavy Artillery. The son Robert during the war was in the Officers Training School at Cincinnati.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


THOMAS BROWN JOHNSON, M. D., has not found it necessary or expedient to go outside the borders of his native state to find a desirable field for professional service, and the success that has attended his ministrations in the Indianapolis metropolitan area stands in evidence alike of his technical skill and loyalty and his secure place in popular confidence and good will. In the capital city Doctor Johnson has his residence and professional headquarters at 6001 West Washington Street, in the suburb known as Ben Davis.

Doctor Johnson was born at Waveland, Montgomery County, Indiana, in the year 1882, and is a son of Fountain N. and Mary V. (Brown) Johnson, he being one of twins who survive the honored father, and his brother is Theodore N., a resident of Crawfordsville, this state. Fountain N. Johnson passed his entire life in Montgomery County, where his wife likewise was born, and he became one of its honored and influential citizens, he having served as county treasurer and having long been a leading representative of banking enterprise at Waveland. He was a son of Barnett and Roberta (North) Johnson, his father having come from Kentucky and having figured as the pioneer representative of the family in Indiana, where he followed in the early days the vocation of carriage making.

In the public schools of his native place Doctor Johnson continued his studies until he had duly profited by the curriculum of the high school, and in 1906 he was graduated in the medical department of the University of Maryland. Among his earlier experiences during vacations were working for a telephone company owned by his father. After receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he continued to be engaged in practice at Jamestown, Boone County, until the nation entered the World war, when he subordinated all personal interests to the call of patriotism and, at Fort Benjamin Harrison, near Indianapolis, in August, 1917, enlisted for service in the Medical Corps of the United States Army. He was later assigned to duty in San Francisco, and was in Texas during the closing period of his service, he having received his honorable discharge, with rank of captain, after the armistice brought the war to a close, and having since been established in the successful general practice of his profession in the Ben Davis community of the Indianapolis metropolitan district. The Doctor has membership in the Marion County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, in which he is a past master of the Blue Lodge at Jamestown, and he retains membership also in the Chi Beta Chi college fraternity. While residing at Jamestown he served as president of the Boone County Medical Society and as a member of the county board of pension examiners. His political alignment is with the Democratic party and he and his daughter hold membership in the Christian Church.

In the City of Washington, D. C., in the year 1905, was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Johnson to Miss AdelIa L. Garland, daughter of Richard and Lydia Garland, of Parke County, Indiana. Mary V., the only child of this union, was graduated in high school at the age of sixteen years, and later was graduated in a leading school of laboratory technique in Saint Louis, Missouri, she being now at the parental home and being a popular figure in the social circles of the community, as is also her mother.
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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray