LOYS W. GREEN is a lawyer, practicing at Newcastle, and his professional work so far gives promise of a very successful career as a member of the Indiana bar. Mr. Green had in mind the law as his vocation a number of years ago, but various circumstances, including the necessity of earning his own living, deferred his formal preparation, but it had one advantage in that he began his practice as a lawyer with the background of a successful business experience.

Mr. Green was born in Tipton County, Indiana, January 6, 1897. His great-grandfather, John Green, was one of the pioneer lawyers of the state and a man of much political prominence. He was born in Virginia, in 1807, came to Indiana when young and was one of the early graduates of Hanover College. He removed to Tipton County in 1847 and was judge of the Common Pleas Court in 1860-69 and later served a term as state senator. He died in 1885. Loys W. Green is a son of Benjamin Butler and Mary O. (Lamm) Green, his mother still living in Tipton County, where both parents were born. His father, who was a farmer and salesman, died July 12, 1924.

Loys W. Green graduated from high school in 1915 and immediately became a wage earner as a glass worker in a plant at Elwood. He left that employment to join the colors, enlisting in June, 1918, in the United States Navy, in the radio service. He was at Camp Perry and at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station near Chicago and five different times was scheduled to go to France but through confusion and mistakes in the clerical department regarding his name he never got overseas. As master-of-arms he helped train over 1,000 young men at Camp Perry. He was released from active duty in March, 1919, and received his honorable discharge in September, 1921.

During the year 1919-20, after leaving the service, he was a student in Indiana University and from 1920 to the spring of 1923 worked at his old job in the glass factory at Elwood. In March, 1923, he became a traveling salesman for a house at Brocton, Massachusetts, and in 1925 became a representative for the Regina Electric Corporation of Rahway, New Jersey. In May, 1925, this company located him at Bloomington, Indiana. Upon leaving Bloomington, in 1926, he resumed his studies and in June, 1929, graduated from the law department of The Umversity of Indianapolis, at Indianapolis, and has since been in practice in Newcastle. Mr. Green is a Republican, a member of Sigma Delta Kappa legal fraternity, a member of the Masonic fraternity, is a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church and belongs to the Henry County Bar Association.

He married, September 17, 1924, Miss Jessie O. Currey, who was also born in Tipton County, Indiana, daughter of Jonathan and Florence (Calvin) Currey. Her father was born in Franklin County and her mother in Switzerland County, Indiana. Mrs. Green graduated from high school in 1914, and the following year was a student in Indiana University, and while teaching continued her work in the university during the summer sessions. For eight years before her marriage she was engaged in teaching, working in country schools near Anderson for four years, was a Latin teacher in the Wilkinson High School from 1920 to 1924 and, returning to Indiana University in 1925, graduated in 1926, receiving the A. B. degree. In the fall of 1926 she resumed her teaching work as instructor in Latin and history at Kennard in Henry County, and still holds that position.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


KARL T. BROWN, Muncie physician and surgeon, a specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat cases, was a lieutenant colonel in the Medical Corps with the American Expeditionary Forces, and is a man of very interesting accomplishments and experience.

He is a native of Indiana, having been born at Westfield in Hamilton County, July 26, 874. His parents were Robert R. and Mary (Trueblood) Brown. His grandfather, Samuel Brown, came from Virginia, was a farmer and stock raiser and owned a large body of land at what is now French Lick, Indiana. Robert R. Brown was born and reared in Salem, Indiana, attended public schools in Washington County, and spent his active life as a merchant. He was with the Fifth Indiana Cavalry throughout the period of the Civil war. He died in 1899 and is buried at Fairmount. His wife, Mary Trueblood, was born and reared in Washington County, attended school there and at the University of Michigan, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She died in 1903. Her father, Dr. Joshua Trueblood, came to Indiana from North Carolina and for many years did the work of a capable country doctor all over Washington County. Doctor Trueblood was well read in literature as well as in medicine, and in the course of a busy lifetime wrote a great deal of verse. Doctor Brown cherishes a book of verse written by this ancestor, describing a trip back to his old home in North Carolina. The ancestral records of the Trueblood family have been traced back for three hundred years. The great-grandfather of Doctor Trueblood was an Englishman who came to America and settled in the Carolinas. Robert R. Brown and wife had a family of eight children, three of whom died in infancy. Anna is Mrs. A. C. Pilkenton, of Frankfort, Indiana; Will A. was a merchant at Marion and died December 25, 1927; Dr. Paul D. is chief pharmacist at the Methodist Hospital at Indianapolis; Dr. Karl T.; and Bessie is the wife of William F. Hackett, of Rochelle, Illinois.

Dr. Karl T. Brown was educated in the public schools of Hamilton County, graduating from the Westfield High School, and in 1896 from Mount Vernon College. He took his M. D. degree at the Barnes Medical College of St. Louis in 1899, and had training and experience as an interne in that city. For ten years Doctor Brown practiced at Crawfordsville, Indiana, and then removed to San Antonio, Texas, where he was in practice when America entered the World war.

In 1917 he was commissioned a first lieutenant in the Medical Corps, attended the Medical Officers Training School at Fort Riley, Kansas, for six months, was on duty at Camp Travis, Texas, until June, 1918, and then went overseas. While in France he was promoted to captain and later to major, and finally to lieutenant colonel in command of the Three Hundred and Fifty-eighth Medical Detachment of the Ninetieth Division. He went with his division into Germany and was with the Army of Occupation at the base at Coblenz. He returned home and received his honorable discharge at Camp Taylor, Louisville, July 8, 1919.

Doctor Brown since the war has been located at Muncie and has a reputation allover Eastern Indiana as a specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat cases. His offices are in the Johnson Building. Recently the war department sent Doctor Brown the copy of a citation dated in France, November 24, 1918, General Order No. 146 of the Ninetieth Division, reading in part as follows: "The division commander desires to record his appreciation of the services of all members of the division, and particularly those specifically cited below for their extraordinary work during the recent Meuse-Argonne offensive. Their courage, heroism and sacrifice exemplify the spirit of all rank during this operation. Major Karl T. Brown, Three Hundred and Fifty-eighth Infantry, showed distinguished gallantry under artillery bombardment, when a German 150 countermeter high explosive shell struck within six feet of his head and scattered fragments around him. His first action was to rush to his commanding officer to see if any harm had come to him." The date of this event was September 29, 1918.

Doctor Brown is a member of the Indiana Academy of Ophthalmology, the Association of Military Surgeons, Muncie Academy of Medicine, Delaware and Blackford Counties Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is a past commander of Delaware Post No. 19, American Legion, and is a member of Muncie Lodge No. 433, A. F. and A. M., has membership in the Scottish Rite Consistory and Hella Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Dallas, Texas, is a member of Muncie Lodge No. 245, B. P. O. Elks, and a charter member of the Exchange Club. Doctor Brown has been very public spirited and has given freely of his time and effort to the promotion of worthy public enterprises. For the past four years he has been president of the Muncie park board and for four years was president of the library board. He is former state president and for two years was a member of the executive committee of the Izaak Walton League, having organized the Indiana Division of that league. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Delaware Country Club, is a Republican and is on the board of trustees of the High Street Methodist Episcopal Church.

Doctor Brown married at Greenfield, Indiana, June 12, 1900, Miss Mae Duncan, daughter of John T. and Mary (White) Duncan. Her father, a farmer and stock raiser, died in 1904 and is buried in Greenfield, and her mother still lives on the old homestead. This land was entered from the Government by John T. Duncan's grandfather. Mrs. Brown attended public schools at Greenfield, the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute, and was a teacher at Muncie before her marriage. She is a church worker, a member of the Eastern Star and one of the prominent club women of Eastern Indiana, being now district president of the Federation of Women's Clubs, and is also president of the McRae Club.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


SIDNEY EWALT BAKER, mayor of the City of Newcastle, is a native of Indiana, and has had a good deal of successful business experience and took up his duties as mayor well qualified for a successful administration.

He was born at Rushville, in 1887, son of Stephen M. and Isabelle (Perkins) Baker. His paternal grandparents were William and Elizabeth (McNeal) Baker, the former a native of England and the latter of Ireland. They were married after coming to New York State. Prior to the Civil war Mrs. Elizabeth Baker, then a widow, moved with her family to Covington, Kentucky. Stephen M. Baker was born in New York State, grew up in Kentucky and as a youth learned the cigar makerís trade. He was a farmer in Rush County, and he died at Anderson, Indiana, in 1897. His wife, Isabelle Perkins, who was born in Rush County and died in 1912, was the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca (Ewalt) Perkins, Kentuckians, who were very early settlers of Rush County. One of the Perkins family surveyed the original plat for the City of Rushville.

Sidney Ewalt Baker was educated in grade and high schools and when fifteen years of age began to earn his own living. For several years he worked in a furniture factory, in a planing mill and engineering plant, and was with a furniture factory at Piqua, Ohio, for several years. In April, 1909, he became a resident of Newcastle. His first business here was a restaurant. In 1915 he began writing insurance, and later entered the service of the Chrysler automobile plant, at first in the tool department, then in the receiving department, and for a number of years has been foreman of the tool cribs and general receiving room.

Mr. Baker became a member of the Newcastle City Council on January 1, 1926. In 1929 he was elected mayor, beginning his official term on January 6, 1930. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His home is at 2414 Broad Street.

He married, March 23, 1914, Miss Gladys Lancaster, who was born in McLean County, Kentucky, daughter of Robert and Alice (Craig) Lancaster. They have two children, Sidney E. and Paul McNeal.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FRANK BALDWIN GARNER, Doctor of Dental Surgery, has been in practice in his native City of Muncie for thirty years. His father before him was an honored member of the same profession here.

Doctor Garner was born at Muncie November 18, 1878, son of Dr. John W. and Margaret (Baldwin) Garner. His grandfather, John Garner, was born in Mecklenburg, Virginia, in 1793 and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He was fifty years old when his son, Dr. John W., was born. John Garner moved to Ohio, and he and his wife are buried at Dayton. Dr. John W. Garner was born at Dayton, attended school at Piqua, Ohio, and when twenty- two years of age came to Muncie and became a very skillful representative of the profession of dentistry, which he practiced until his death on November 16, 1908. He was a Knight Templar Mason and a member of the Presbyterian Church. His wife, Margaret Baldwin, was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, was left an orphan at the age of twelve years and was reared and educated at Dayton, Ohio, by her aunt, Mrs. Galloway, who conducted the Cooper Seminary. Mrs. John W. Garner died in 1909, and she and her husband are buried in the Beech Grove Cemetery. Of their three children Doctor Frank is the oldest; Helen is Mrs. Will W. Kemper, of Lancaster, Ohio; and John A. died when three years old.

Frank Baldwin Garner attended the grade and high schools of Muncie and in 1901 was graduated from the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania. He immediately returned to Muncie, joined his father in practice, and they constituted the firm of J. W. Garner &. Son from 1901 to 1908. For over twenty years Doctor Garner has practiced alone. He has a suite of offices in the Johnson Building, and has assembled all the equipment and apparatus required of the modern dentist in his practice. Doctor Garner is affiliated with Muncie Lodge No. 433, A. F. and A. M., Muncie Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, is a member of the Exchange Club, and belongs to the County, Indiana State and National Dental Associations. For a number of years he cooperated in the work of the Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Delaware Club, a Republican and a member of the First Presbyterian Church.

Doctor Garner married, April 25, 1906, Miss Virginia Whitney, of Muncie, daughter of W. S. and Jessie (Dumont) Whitney. Her father, who died June 20, 1928, was a well known rail. road official. For twenty years he was general passenger and freight agent of the Ohio Electric Railway Company. He lived in several cities, including Columbus and Cincinnati, and for fifteen years at Springfield, Ohio. He is buried in Muncie, where his widow survives him. Mrs. Garner's grandfather, Ebenezer Dumont, was a colonel in the Union army during the Civil war and came out with the rank of brigadier general. He also served a term in Congress. Mrs. Garner's brother, Harry B. Whitney, was an Indianapolis business man, and while there was captain of Battery A of the Indiana National Guard. Later he went to London, England, and when America joined the Allies he sought the opportunity of getting into service at Paris, was commissioned captain of a company in the Sixth Field Artillery of the First Division of the American troops, and his and another company raced for the honor of being the first to participate in the actual fighting at the front. The other company won the race. He participated in five major offensives, including the Meuse-Argonne. Captain Whitney now lives in Philadelphia.

Mrs. Garner attended school at Indianapolis. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church. They have three daughters, Martha, Margaret and Virginia. Martha graduated from the Muncie High School in 1925, also attended the Western College for Women at Ox ford, Ohio, and is now doing clerical work in her father's office. Margaret attended grade and high schools at Muncie, and Virginia, graduated from high school in 1929 and is now a student in Indiana University.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FRANK M. CORY, superintendent of schools at Hagerstown, has been in school work since he was seventeen years of age. He is a native of Eastern Indiana, born in Randolph County, July 5, 1892.

Mr. Cory's parents, John W. and Ida May (Crouse) Cory, were also native Indianans, his father of Henry County and his mother of Randolph County, and in the latter county they have spent most of their active lives as farmers. Frank M. Cory attended grade and high school, grew up on an Indiana farm, and after his first work as a teacher he attended the University of Indiana, where he was graduated with the A. B. degree in 1917. Mr. Cory won his Master of Arts degree at Columbia University, New York, in 1923. Several Indiana communities have a high measure of appreciation of his abilities as an educator. For three years he was principal of the public school at Fountain City, for three years was superintendent at Centerville, and then beame assistant county superintendent of schools at Oxford, Ohio. Mr. Cory came to Hagerstown in 1926, as superintendent of the joint schools of town and township.

He married, in 1919, Miss Marie Lumpkin, a native of Randolph County, Indiana, daughter of Robert and Nora (Maulsby) Lumpkin. They have four children, Charles Robert, Walter H., Margaret Louise and James Edward.

Mr. Cory is a Baptist, and in politics votes independently. He is a Royal Arch and Council Degree Mason, and is president of the executive committee of the local Boy Scouts organization. He was chairman of the Lions Club in 1931. He is a member of the School Menís Club of Indiana, the City and Town Superintendents Association of Indiana and the National Education Association.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WATSON CLYDE NICHOLSON is a native of Indiana, and the most effective years of his business career have been spent in Newcastle. He has built up a splendid business, and has worked effectively with the Chamber of Commerce and other organizations that represent some of the most vital civic influences of the community.

Mr. Nicholson was born at Hard Scrabble, Madison, Indiana, November 22, 1883, son of George Benton and Laura A. (House) Nicholson. His father was born in the same county, was a mechanic, and lived at Marion until his death in 1902. The widowed mother resided at Marion at the time of her death in August, 1930.

Watson C. Nicholson was educated in grade and high schools and when eighteen years of age went to work for a bottling plant at Marion. There he learned the bottling business, and remained at Marion until 1907, when he established a plant of his own at Newcastle. For a number of years he manufactured a general line of soft drinks, and since 1919 has been the authorized bottler in this territory for Coca Cola. When he started business, in 1907, he used a small building at 609 West Church Street. Additions have been made to this from time to time, but recently the growth of his business has reached a point where Mr. Nicholson has been obliged to make plans for a complete new plant. He employs six men in the bottling works and the distributing service.

Mr. Nicholson married, in 1906, Miss Grace Taylor, who was born in Huntington County, ,Indiana, daughter of Alonzo and Elizabeth (Rhinehart) Taylor. They have one son, Donn Edward, born February 12, 1910.

Mr. Nicholson since becoming established in business has been known as a liberal citizen, contributing to every worthy cause in his community. He is a member of the Dynamo Club, the Chamber of Commerce, the Apollo Club, Kiwanis Club, is active in the Christian Church and is a member of the church choir. Politically he casts an independent vote. Mr. Nicholson is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, a member of the Knights of Pythias, Loyal Order of Moose, Fraternal Order of Eagles, B. P. O. Elks and Modern Woodmen of America. He and his family reside at 800 South Eleventh Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CLARENCE L. BOCK, physician and surgeon, holds a very prominent place in professional circles in Indiana. He was born in this state, and since graduating from medical college has had his home and center of practice at Muncie. He was born at Kokomo, Indiana, June 7, 1886, son of Samuel A. and Eliza Ann (Eikenberry) Bock. He was reared and educated and attended the grade and high schools at Young America in Cass County. In 1913 he took his A. B. degree at Indiana University, and the University Department of Medicine made him an M. D. in 1915. He had interne experience and training in the Methodist Hospital at Indianapolis and then engaged in general practice at Muncie.

Doctor Bock in June, 1917, enlisted for service in the Army Medical Corps. He was at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in March, 1918, was sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey, and from there went overseas, being assigned to Base Hospital No. 204 in England, and later to Base Hospital No. 53 at Langres, France, where he remained until July, 1919. From lieutenant he was promoted to captain, and while at Base Hospital No. 53 was given the rank of major. Doctor Bock received his honorable discharge July 30, 1919, and at once resumed his professional work at Muncie. For the past ten years he has specialized in urology, and is one of the outstanding men in that line of work in Eastern Indiana. He has a fine suite of offices in the Western Reserve Life Building, and in his work employs a special interne and nurses. He is a member of the Muncie Academy of Medicine, the Delaware County, Indiana State and American Medical Associations. Doctor Bock has always been interested in civic undertakings. He is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, a member of the Optimist Club, Chamber of Commerce, Dynamo Club, and the Nu Sigma Nu medical fraternity. He is a Republican and a member of the Grace Episcopal Church.

Doctor Bock married at Burlington, Indiana, in September, 1915, Miss Lucille Mercer, of Burlington, where she finished her high school education. She was a member of the Christian Church. Her mother, Mrs. Amanda Mercer, lives at Burlington in Carroll County. Mrs. Bock died February 17,1920, leaving two children: Frances Grace and Martha Louise. At Indianapolis, May 29, 1921, Doctor Bock married Mrs. Lenora (Waite) Barr, daughter of Gordon and Lenora (Schmidt) Waite. Her mother lives at Indianapolis. Her father was a Civil war veteran, being a member of the crew of gunners on the famous Monitor in its battle with the Merrimac in Hampton Roads. During this battle he was washed overboard, but was rescued by his gunner's mate. Mrs. Bock by her first marriage has a son, Joseph Gordon, who has been formally adopted as a child of Doctor and Mrs. Bock. Her first husband was killed in a railroad accident in 1917. Mrs. Bock attended the public schools at Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Business College, and was in the offices of the Indianapolis News for several years. She is a member of the Grace Episcopal Church and the Indiana Federation of Women's Clubs.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ROBERT D. BARNES, president of the Kirby- Wood Lumber Company of Muncie, was a young man when he came from his native State of Colorado and established his residence in Muncie, and here he now stands forward as one of the most progressive business men and most loyal and public-spirited citizens of the vital city that is the metropolis and judicial center of Delaware County.

Mr. Barnes was born in the City of Denver, Colorado, August 29, 1873, and is a son of James P. and Emily J. (Hart) Barnes, one of whose eight children died in infancy, the other children having attained to adult age and their names being here entered in the respective order of their birth: Willard, Gerritt, Robert D., Harriet, Smith, Russell and Lawrence.

James P. Barnes was born in the State of New York, where he was reared and educated, his marriage was solemnized in Wisconsin, where his wife was born at Horicon, and they gained a good measure of pioneer precedence in Colorado, where they established their residence in 1873, the year in which their son Robert D. was there born. James P. Barnes eventually established the family home in Colorado Springs, where he was long and successfully engaged in the hardware business and where he and his wife passed the remainder of their lives, he having died in June, 1925, and his wife having passed away in the preceding month, so that in death they were not long separated. Their mortal remains rest in Evergreen Cemetery at Colorado Springs, both having been earnest communicants of the Protestant Episcopal Church. The ancestral line of the Barnes family traces back to staunch English and Scotch stock.

The public schools of Colorado Springs afforded Robert D. Barnes his early education, which was supplemented by his attending Colorado College three years. During the ensuing sixteen years he was associated with his father in the hardware business at Colorado Springs, and he then came to Muncie, Indiana, and engaged in the lumber business, with Thomas H. Kirby and J. C. Wood as his associates in the enterprise. The death of Mr. Kirby occurred in 1911 and that of Mr. Wood in 1918. In January, 1928, Mr. Barnes purchased the Wood estate interest in the business, which is now conducted under the corporate title of Kirby-Wood Lumber Company, a title through which Mr. Barnes, president of the company, continues to pay honor to his former associates. This is now one of the largest .lumber concerns in this section of the state and its business is of both wholesale and retail order, the latter department being the more important. Large and well equipped yards centralize the company's business in Muncie, and these are established, with the offices of the company, at the corner of Hoyt and Liberty streets.

Mr. Barnes is a Republican in political alignment, but above mere partisanship is his attitude as a loyal and progressive citizen. He has given nine years of service as a valued and constructive member of the City Council. He is one of the influential members of the local Rotary Club and the Muncie Chamber of Commerce. In the Masonic fraternity Mr. Barnes has received the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. His Masonic affiliation is with Muncie Lodge No. 433, A. F. And A. M.; he is a past high priest of Muncie Chapter No. 30, R.A. M.; and is a past commander of Muncie Commandery No. 18, Knights Templar. He is still affiliated with Colorado Springs Lodge No. 309, B. P. O. E., of which he is a charter member. In their home city he and his wife are communicants of Grace Church, Protestant Episcopal.

On the 11th of June, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Barnes to Miss Edith Kirby, daughter of the late Thomas H. and Anna (Cassidy) Kirby, the former of whom died in 1911, as previously noted in this context, and the latter of whom died in 1929. Mr. Kirby was long one of the leading business men and honored and influential citizens of Muncie, he having been president of the Kirby Lumber Company, predecessor of the present Kirby-Wood Lumber Company, and having also been a member of the firm of Kirby Brothers, here engaged in the lumber business. Elizabeth, first born of the two children of Mr. and Mrs. Barnes, is deceased. The surviving child, Robert D., Jr., was born and reared in Muncie and here his public-school discipline included that of the high school, he being now associated with the lumber company of which his father is president. He married Miss Louise Howard, of Muncie, in the year 1929, and they are specially popular figures in the social life of their native city, even as Robert D., Jr., is one of its representative young business men.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ELMO A. FUNK, Anderson business man was educated for the profession of civil engineer. For a number of years he was in the engineering department of railways, afterwards returned to Anderson, and has been identified with several business organizations of that city, at the present time being general manager of the Kreusch Ice Cream Company.

Mr. Funk is a native of Nebraska, but his people have been in Indiana for four generations. He was born on a farm near Beatrice, Gage County, Nebraska. His great-grandfather, Joseph Funk, was born in Virginia, of German ancestry. After coming to Indiana he settled in Henry County, later moved to Madison County and located in Richland Township. This was an early date in Eastern Indiana development, long before the railroad era, and what is now the village of Linwood was for some years known as Funk Station. It was in this locality that Joseph Funk lived out his life.

His son, William Hamilton Funk, who was born in Henry County, took up farming as a vocation and became a prominent leader in the agricultural life of Madison County. He acquired a large amount of land in Richland Township, and was a successful stock raiser. Four of his brothers were Union soldiers at the time of the Civil war. William Hamilton Funk married Barbara Bowers, who was born in Delaware County, Indiana, where her parents were pioneer settlers. William Hamilton Funk and wife lived to a good old age and reared a family of eight children.

One of these ,vas Clement Funk, who was born on a farm near Middletown, Henry County, Indiana, in 1862, was educated in rural schools and had the training of a farm boy. When a young man he went out to Nebraska and acquired 160 acres of wild prairie land near Beatrice. During the next six years he went through many of the experiences of the real pioneers, breaking out the virgin soil, putting up buildings and developing a farm from land that had never before been cultivated. After his experience as a Nebraska farmer he returned to Anderson and became a dealer in agricultural implements, a business he followed until his death in 1926. He married Mary Jane Dearing, who was born in Cambridge City, Indiana, and resides at Anderson. Her father, Thomas Dearing, was a native of Ireland and when eight years of age came to the United States, in company with his sister and her husband. Soon after they landed in New York City he became separated from his relatives and never saw them again. He was taken care of by strangers, and from the age of twelve was dependent entirely on his own resources. He became an employee of a horse dealer, who brought him to Indiana, and eventually he settled in Lafayette Township, Madison County, where he acquired land and made himself a successful factor in the business of farming and stock raising. He remained a resident of that township until his death at the age of sixty-five. Thomas Dearing married Julia Broderick, who was also born in Ireland, and was a child when her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Broderick, came to the United States and settled near Cambridge City, where John Broderick lived out his life as a farmer.

Elmo A. Funk was one of the two sons, his brother being Galand Funk. Elmo A. Funk was educated in a one-room school house in Lafayette Township and the familiar environment of his boyhood was an Indiana farm. Later he attended St. Mary's parochial school and the Anderson High School, graduating in 1906. Mr. Funk in 1911 received the degree Civil Engineer from Notre Dame University, and did his first professional work in the engineering department of the Big Four Railway Company, with headquarters at Wabash and at Galion, Ohio. From 1912 to 1914 he was with the engineering staff of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul road. He resigned to return to Anderson and become city engineer. He held that office for five years, a very important period in the city's development, since during this time the war conditions served to realign and concentrate industries and bring an enormous increase of population to the city. When Mr. Funk resigned as city engineer he acted as assistant general manager and later as assistant vice president and sales manager of the Hill Pump Works. From this organization he came to the Kreusch Ice Cream Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer, as well as general manager.

Mr. Funk married, in 1915, Mildred Mary Kelly, who was born at Anderson, Indiana, daughter of Thomas P. and Beebe (Breen) Kelly. Her father was born at Anderson, a son of Patrick Kelly. Mr. and Mrs. Funk have two children, Thomas and Mary Jane. Mr. Funk has been a member of the City Planning Commission, has been a director of the Chamber of Commerce and was the first secretary of the Community Fund. He has also been a member of the charity board, was president of the Rotary Club, and he and his wife are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and he belongs to Anderson Council No. 563, Knights of Columbus.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


LEE AULT, of Cambridge City, now retired, is a veteran educator, and spent nearly half a century in school work in various communities in Eastern Indiana.

Mr. Ault was born at New Madison, Ohio, April 29, 1846, son of Jacob W. and Rachel (Wallace) Ault. His father was born in Germantown, Ohio, and his mother near Hamilton in the same state, and they were married December 27, 1840. His life was devoted to farming. He died April 25, 1893, and his wife on July 25, 1909.

Lee Ault attended the Whitewater Academy of Indiana and the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, a school which, under the Holbrooks, became one of the best institutions of higher learning in the Middle West. Mr. Ault began his work as a teacher in Darke County, Ohio, on September 5, 1864, and he was in close contact with schools and school interests until he retired in 1912. In 1869 he became superintendent of schools at Farmland, Indiana, remaining there three years, was superintendent at Winchester five years, at Hagerstown eleven years, at Centerville one year, at Williamsburg six years, and rounded out his work as superintendent of schools at Cambridge City, where he remained ten years. From 1883 to 1887 he was out of school work, but still connected with educational interests as a representative of the American Book Company of Cincinnati and of the Lea Brothers & Company of Philadelphia in territory comprising the states of Ohio, Indiana and West Virginia.

At the close of his last term as superintendent of schools at Cambridge City Mr. Ault acted as a salesman for the Collier Company until 1917. During the World war period he was appeal agent and chief clerk of conscription board No.2 of Wayne County. He has always found opportunities for useful work and he was bookkeeper for a coal firm at Cambridge City until ill health compelled him to desist from a regular routine of business duties.

Mr. Ault for five years was associated with Enos L. Watson as editor and publisher of the Herald at Winchester, Indiana. He has served on the town board and for two and a half years was president of the town council of Cambridge City. Mr. Ault has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1871 and has filled chairs in the Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter and Council, and also in the Knights of Pythias. He made an interesting trip of study and observation abroad in England during 1907.

On May 25, 1869, Mr. Ault married Mary E. Bowen, who died August 25, 1904. She was born at Hagerstown, Indiana, daughter of Rev. William C. and Priscilla (Magee) Bowen, the former a native of Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, and the latter of Hillsboro, Ohio. Mr. Ault and wife had a family of six children: Miss Harriett, who taught in public schools for twelve years, now her father's housekeeper; Ina May, wife of Dr. C. E. Canaday, of Newcastle, Indiana; Harry, head of the auditing department of Sprague Warner & Company at Chicago; Frank, with the Charlton Silk Company of Chicago; Charles, a manufacturer of women's shoes at Auburn, Maine; and Edgar, in the china and glass business at Chicago.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN J. LENNON during most of his working career has been identified with the chief industry of the Indiana "City of Roses," and in the course of time he capitalized his experience and savings in a business of his own. He is one of Newcastle's successful florists.

Mr. Lennon was born in County Armagh, Ireland, in 1877. His parents, James and Rose (McCann) Lennon, lived all their lives in Ireland. His father died in 1928 and his mother is still in Ireland.

John J. Lennon attended common schools and was seventeen years of age when he left his native land and came to America. During the next five years he worked for a florist in Chicago and then came to Newcastle, Indiana. He found employment in some of the local greenhouses and for nineteen years acted as superintendent of the South Park Floral Company.

Mr. Lennon made a beginning of a business of his own when, in 1917, he bought a tract of ground 132 by 150 feet on South Fourteenth Street. Here he put up a home and also started a greenhouse. Later he bought two lots on Park Avenue just back of his home, which permitted of expansion of his greenhouse facilities. Here he has 8,000 square feet under glass and has a plant that makes a large contribution to the tremendous winter production of flowers in Newcastle. During the summer he specializes in the cultivation of vegetables.

Mr. Lennon married, in 1903, Miss Josephine Clancy, who was born at Newcastle, daughter of John and Bridget (Fitzmorris) Clancy. They have one daughter, Mildred now employed in the office of the Hoosier Manufacturing Company. Mr. Lennon and family are Catholics. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EDWARD F. KING, physician and surgeon, with office in the Citizens Bank Building at Anderson, is a native of Indiana and was born while the home of the King family was located on Walnut Street, Indianapolis. Doctor King has made a very creditable record in his professional career. He holds his father in very high regard as a splendid example of American citizenship, one who raised himself from poverty to affluence and influence.

His father, Bernard King, was born in County Down, Ireland. At an early age h was left an orphan. When fourteen years of age he came to the United States. He possesses the characteristics of Irish wit, great native intelligence and remarkable industry and the ability to fit himself into his surroundings. From New York he went on to Cleveland and worked at different things in that city, also in Cincinnati. Later he was employed in construction work on the main building for the Female Insane Asylum at Indianapolis. He also took the opportunity of attending a night school to supplement his meager educational opportunities.

As a result of ill health he tried an outdoor occupation, starting out with a pack of merchandise on his back and walking over many country roads and in rural communities throughout the states of Indiana, Kentucky and Illinois. He showed the qualities of a good salesman, and when his profits justified it he bought a horse, which carried him and his pack, and he continued riding through the country. When his capital had been further supplemented he became a huckster, using wagon and horse and selling fruits and vegetables over Marion and adjoining counties of Indiana. The next stage in his business career came when he opened a grocery store at Walnut and Lock streets in Indianapolis. He ran a business in such a manner as to attract trade, even from as far away as Haughville on the other side of the river. Later he became a dealer in coal and feed, and for years was a live stock buyer. He was an excellent judge of cattle, and frequently was commissioned to buy stock for the Deaf and Dumb Asylum and other state institutions. His surplus wealth was invested in real estate, and after disposing of his mercantile interests he devoted all his time to the handling of his private property. His home in later years was on East Market Street, Indianapolis. He married Elizabeth McKenna also a native of Ireland, and also left an orphan at an early age. She came to America with an older sister and lived in Cleveland for a time. They reared a family of eleven children.

Edward F. King obtained his early education in the St. Bridget Parochial School, later in one of the public schools of Indianapolis, and was a pupil in the Shortridge Manual Training High School. In 1907 he began the study of medicine at Purdue University, and later entered the medical department of Louisville University, where he was graduated. Doctor King practiced medicine at Bargersville in Johnson County until 1924, when he returned to Indianapolis, opened an office for private practice, and also did the work of local surgeon for the Illinois Central Railroad in Marion, Morgan and Johnson counties. From Indianapolis he came to Anderson, and has rapidly built himself into a profitable business and into high favor and esteem a capable doctor. He has done post-graduate work in children's diseases, in skin, internal medicine and other subjects at the Indiana University School of Medicine. While acting as railroad surgeon he joined the American Association of Railway Surgeons.

Doctor King married, in 1912, Nancy Davis Williams, who was born at Hawesville, Hancock County, Kentucky, daughter of William and Antoinette (LaMar) Williams. They have six children, Charles Edward, Marie Antoinette, Robert Wrae, Ruth LaMar, William Bernard and John. Doctor King since coming to Anderson has been physician to the local branch of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. He and his family are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 4
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray