HENRY MALEY, who was often referred to as "The Father of the Hardwood Lumber Industry of Indiana," had his manufacturing interests in several states, but his home for many years was at Edinburg, Indiana, and from that city he directed his activities in the lumber industry.

Mr. Maley, who died July 6, 1908, was born March 18, 1840, at Planig, Germany, where family records date back to 1540, to a Thomas Molich, which was the early German spelling of the name. Three months after his birth his parents, John and Christina (Mohr) Maley, brought their family to the United States and settled on a farm in Shelby County, Indiana. His father was a farmer all his life. Henry Maley was one of six children. The country schools of Shelby County gave him his educational advantages. He worked with his father on the farm, and while living in Shelby County served as road supervisor. His home was with his parents until his marriage. From early manhood he was identified with the lumber business. For many years he was an associate of Daniel Wertz, of Evansville, under the firm name of Maley & Wertz. Later he turned over his interest in this organization to his son Claude, and the business in 1920 was incorporated and still retains the name of Maley & Wertz Lumber Company. Henry Maley was probably the best authority on hardwood lumber in the entire state. His name stood high in lumber and manufacturing circles all over the country, and he built up an immense business in the cutting, milling and distribution of hardwood products. He was president of the Henry Maley Lumber Company and was actively associated with seven other lumber organizations in different parts of the country. He was also a director and stockholder in several banks.

Along with his growing business power Henry Maley constantly manifested a kindly interest in his fellow men and was public spirited in his relationship with his home community. He was a Democrat in politics, was a member of the Lutheran Church, a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and member of the Shrine at Indianapolis. He also belonged to the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Mr. Maley married, January 10, 1864, Miss Rebecca Compton, who was born in Ohio and was a child when brought to Indiana. Her father, William Compton, was born in Ohio and her mother, Elizabeth (Duke) Compton, was a native of Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Maley had six children: Alla, William, Charles, Maude, Claude and Alma. Alla, who died in 1912, was the wife of E. W. Robbins, a lumber man, and they had one child, Leland, who married Earl Ensley, a real estate man in California, and the Ensleys have a son, named John, born in 1907. William died in 1915.

Charles Maley, a lumberman in Jackson, Mississippi, married Elizabeth Remington, and his four children are Charles, Jr., born in 1907; Richard, born in 1911, both of whom attended southern universities; Claude, born in 1915, and Elizabeth, born in 1917.

The daughter Maude Maley was married January 3, 1900, to F. M. Cutsinger, a lumberman, who was born in Shelby County, Indiana, and is one of Evansville's prominent business leaders. They have lived in that city since 1904. Mr. and Mrs. Cutsinger have one daughter, Elizabeth, born July 24, 1912, a graduate of the Emma Willard School of Troy, New York, and now attending Wellesley College, at Boston.

Claude M. Maley, who died in 1917, married Eva Webb, who died in 1921. They had two children: Henry and Margaret. Henry attended Culver Military Academy and an eastern college and Margaret attended Ogontz School in Pennsylvania.

The daughter Alma Maley is the wife of John W. Graham, owner of the Edinburg Cabinet Company at Edinburg, Indiana, and has a son, John Maley Graham, born in 1907, who is a graduate of the Hill School of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and also attended Princeton University. He is now assisting his father in the cabinet business.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


HON. DANIEL W. COMSTOCK, soldier, lawyer, judge, congressman, lived his life on a high. plane of intellectual attainments and public and private honor, and his name is treasured among those of eminent citizens in Wayne County and in the state at large.

Born at Germantown, Ohio, December 16, 1840, and graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware in 1860, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts, he had at the outset of his career the advantage of thorough education, and all his life was marked by a fine appreciation of things of the mind and spirit. Soon after leaving college he came to Indiana, and in September, 1861, located at Newcastle, where he was admitted to the bar. In 1862 he was elected district attorney for the Eleventh Common Pleas District.

This office he resigned to go into the army. He enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry Regiment, and successive promotions made him a regimental sergeant major, first lieutenant of Company F, captain of Company C, and finally he was detailed as assistant adjutant general of the First Brigade, Seventh Division of the Military Division of Mississippi. He was in service until September, 1865, when he received an honorable discharge.

In 1866 he established his permanent home at Richmond. Almost immediately he was elected city attorney. From that time on his career was a series of public honors bestowed by appreciative fellow citizens through the medium of the ballot box. In 1872 he was elected prosecuting attorney of the Wayne Circuit Court, and was reelected in 1874. In 1878 he was elected to the Indiana State Senate to represent Wayne County. In the Senate he became a member of the judiciary committee and chairman of the joint committee on the revision of laws.

He was known as a master of the science of law and also of its application and interpretation. He was eminently qualified for the duties of the bench. For two terms he served as judge of the Seventeenth Judicial Circuit. Each time he was nominated without opposition. In October, 1896, Judge Comstock resigned from the circuit bench to accept the nomination of the Republican party as a candidate for judge of the Appellate Court. He was elected, and served as an appellate judge until January, 1911. He then resumed his law practice at Richmond, but in 1916 he was elected on the Republican ticket to Congress to represent the Sixth Indiana District. Judge Comstock entered Congress March 4, 1917, but was not spared to serve in the body with the distinction expected of him, since his death occurred a little more than two months later. The many encomiums passed upon his character and his life by his fellow citizens, the different bar associations, the press of the country, and his fellow members in Congress brought solace to his sorrowing family. His comrades of the Grand Army of the Republic mourned his passing, especially those in the Department of Indiana, of which he had been department commander for the last four years of his life. Few men leave a better record behind them, or more who were genuinely attached to him in the warm bonds of true friendship.

Judge Comstock married, June 2, 1867, Miss Josephine A. Rohrer at Germantown, Ohio. Judge Comstock died at Washington, May 19, 1917. Mrs. Comstock survived him and passed away at Richmond, January 14, 1925. They had a family of three children: Elizabeth M.; Major Paul Comstock, of Richmond, and Clara Comstock, now dean of Women at Earlham College, Richmond.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


MAJOR PAUL COMSTOCK, who earned his military title in the World war, has been a member of the Indiana bar for over thirty years, and in his home city of Richmond his professional attainments have supplemented the splendid record made by his father, the late Judge Daniel W. Comstock, whose career has been sketched preceding.

Major Paul Comstock was born at Richmond, March 16, 1873, and was educated in the grammar and high schools of his native city, attended Earlham College there and the Ohio Wesleyan University. From 1893 to 1898 he was employed in the maintenance of way and claim departments of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In the spring of 1898, after the beginning of the Spanish-American war, he assisted in raising Company F, One Hundred and Sixty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was made first lieutenant of his company, and when the regiment arrived at Jacksonville, Florida it became a part of the Seventh Army Corps, commanded by Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. He was with his company in the Army of Occupation in Cuba from December, 1898, to April, 1899. He returned to the United States with the rank of captain and was honorably discharged at Savannah, Georgia.

In 1900 he was admitted to the Indiana bar, and at once began the practice of his profession in Richmond. Along with a busy law practice he has found time for many political and civic services. He was prosecuting attorney of Wayne County in 1901-02, and from 1920 to 1924 was chairman of the county central Republican committee.

Major Comstock is a veteran of two wars of the nation. While past the draft age, he felt it his duty to give the benefit of his military training to the Government when America joined the allies in 1917. After passing he necessary examination he was accepted and assigned as assistant instructor at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, remaining here until August 15, 1917, when he was ordered to Camp Taylor, Kentucky. He was put with the Eighty-fourth Division and in June, 1918, took the first detachment of troops to Camp Sherman. On September 8, 1918, he went on to Camp Mills, Long Island, and thence overseas. For a time he was assigned to the general headquarters of the American Expeditionary Forces, later became an inspector of the Twenty-eighth Division, and assistant inspector of the Second Army Corps under General Bullard, and finally was made Inspector of the Eightieth Division. After the armistice he returned home, and was honorably discharged at Camp Lee, Virginia, with the rank of major, June 4, 1919. Shortly afterward he resumed his law practice in Richmond.

Major Comstock married in 1903 Miss Ella W. Wilson. She was born at Ironton, Ohio, daughter of Henry B. and Mary E. (Willard) Wilson, also natives of Ironton. Major and Mrs. Comstock have two children: Winifred talented vocalist, is the wife of Dr. Wilfred V. Bowman, of London, England; and Kathleen, still in school. Major Comstock and family belong to St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Richmond, and he is a member of its vestry. For four years he was secretary of the board of trustees of the Indiana World War Memorial, a position that entailed upon him a vast amount of work and responsibility. He is a member of the Richmond Post of the American Legion, the Country Club, the University Club of Indianapolis. His home on Reeveston Road is one of the finest residences in Wayne County.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


FREDERICK A. MILLER, president and editor of the South Bend Tribune, by virtue of his business position and other activities is one of the well known Indiana men of the present generation.

He was born at South Bend, January 31, 1868, and is a son of Alfred B. Miller, who was a co-founder and during his active lifetime was also president and. editor of the South Bend Tribune. Probably no other name has been so long and continuously associated with Northern Indiana journalism as that of Miller.

The founder of the American branch of the family was Francis Miller, who was born December 26, 1777, parish of Anvers, County Donegal, Ireland. Coming to America he settled in Southwestern Pennsylvania, where his son, Benjamin Franklin Miller, the grandfather of Frederick A., was born in Westmoreland County, July 27, 1811.

B. F. Miller, father and father-in-law, respectively, of Alfred B. Miller and Elmer Crockett, founders of The South Bend Tribune, the first issue of which appeared as a weekly March 9, 1872, a printer by trade, set type on that first issue and continued a compositor on the paper until advancing years caused retirement. The printer's stick he used throughout his activity in The Tribune composing room is now in the possession of his grandson.

Mr. Miller was born July 27,. 1811, in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, a son of Francis Miller, born in the North of Ireland and died in 1837 and is buried in City Cemetery in South Bend. The son served his apprenticeship with the Genius of Liberty, Uniontown, Pennsylvania. At about twenty years of age he established the Philanthropist in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, to fight slavery. The famous statesman, James G. Blaine, received the first ideas on abolition doctrine from the Philanthropist. In 1835 Mr. Miller moved his newspaper to Cincinnati, Ohio. The Philanthropist aroused fierce antagonism among Kentucky slave owners. After it had been published nearly a year in Cincinnati they assembled one night in Covington, Kentucky, crossed the Ohio River, broke into the Philanthropist office and threw type and press into the river. Left without sufficient funds, Mr. Miller returned to Pennsylvania. The Philanthropist was soon revived with money from Northern abolitionists.

One of the close friendships he formed in Pennsylvania was with Bayard Taylor, then young and unknown, who later became a noted traveler and writer and who was United States minister to Berlin, where he died in 1878. Mr. Miller moved to South Bend in 1838. He worked on the Free Press when it was bought by Schuyler Colfax in 1845 and renamed the Saint Joseph Valley Register. He continued on the Register, often doing editorial work in Mr. Colfax's absence. Mr. Miller was elected sheriff of Saint Joseph County in 1852, on the Whig ticket, reelected and served a second term. He died in South Bend April 17, 1888.

Alfred B. Miller was born in South Bend, February 6, 1840, and died December 10, 1892. His wife, Esther A, Miller, was born in Akron, Ohio, June 20, 1843, and died in South Bend January 15, 1906. Among her ancestors were two brothers named Tarbell, who came to America in 1600 from Wales, locating in Salem, Massachusetts.

Frederick A. Miller graduated from the South Bend High School in May, 1887, and on July 3rd the same year began work on his father's paper, the South Bend Tribune, as a reporter, and has been with that publication in active service for forty-four years. Mr. Miller is a member of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, the National Press Club, Indiana Press Association, Incorporated, the American Red Cross, South Bend Rotary Club, Knights of Pythias and Royal Arcanum. He was one of the organizers, one of the first directors and the first president, in 1909, of the South Bend Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Miller is a Republican, a member of the First Presbyterian Church, the Northern Indiana Historical Society of South Bend and the Indiana Historical Society, and is a member of the Sout;h Bend Country Club.

He married, June 8, 1892, Miss Flora Dunn, of South Bend, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. F: Dunn.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES H. BYFIELD, Indianapolis architect, has mastered his profession through long years of practical experience and close application to the branches of his art. He has done a great deal of work that has been highly commended by other architects.

Mr. Byfield was born at Louisville, Kentucky, May 23, 1873, son of Vincent D. and Rebecca T. (Johnson) Byfield. His parents were born in 1840, his father at Akron, Ohio, and his mother at Harrison, Ohio. Vincent Byfield was a molder by trade and from 1883 to 1888 lived at Madison, Indiana. He died at Indianapolis in 1911 and his wife passed away in 1893. Charles H. Byfield was educated in the public schools at Madison, attended the Indianapolis High School, and to supplement his practical work he took courses with the International Correspondence Schools of Scranton, Pennsylvania. On leaving high school he went immediately to the building trades. He chose perhaps the most difficult phase of carpentry, stair building, and for five years his time was fully occupied in drafting and designing and laying out work of that nature. He was employed with Samuel Brubaker on the Century Building, and put in seven years with the firm of Rubush & Hunter. Since January, 1927, he has had his own offices as an architect in the People's Bank Building.

Mr. Byfield drew plans for the Wulsin Building in 1912, built in 1915 the Davlan Apartment Building of six stories, in 1916 was architect for the Williams Hotel on Senate Avenue and Washington Street. In and around Indianapolis many public schools and other structures also represent his abilities as a designer and practical builder.

Mr. Byfield married in 1894 Lina E. Livingston, who was born at Wilmington, Indiana, daughter of Stevin and Margaret (Buffington) Livingston. They have four children: Margaret, wife of A. L. Butterworth, a shoe manufacturer at Marion, Indiana; Charles H., a student in Butler University; Lionel E. And Elizabeth, both in high school. Mr. L. Byfield and family are members of the Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Indianapolis Architects Association, the Indianapolis Athletic Club, is a Republican, a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, and member of the Knights of Pythias. His home is at 3864 North New Jersey Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


LEO J. HOEFLING, a native son of Indiana, is a resident of Daviess County, where he has the active management of the Graham Farms. Mr. Hoefling has had a varied business experience, and has shown his capacity for the executive side of business in the energetic way in which he has handled this large farming property.

Mr. Hoefling was born in Vanderburg County, Indiana, May 4, 1896. His father, Fred Hoefling, was born in the same county, November 3, 1863, and has spent his active career as a farmer and stock raiser. He still lives in Vanderburg County, where he married Theresa Hillenbrand, daughter of William.Hillenbrand. They have a family of children as follows: Theresa, Catherine, Sylvester, Leo J., Rose, Aloys, Agnes, Zita and Odelia.

Leo J. Hoefling grew up on his fatherís farm and became thoroughly familiar with this routine of work during his boyhood. His education was the product of attending the public schools of Vanderburg County, and he was also in school at Evansville and was graduated in 1916 from Lockyears College at Evansville. On leaving school Mr. Hoefling became an employee of the Graham Glass Company at Evansville. Later he followed Mr. Robert Graham when that well known Indiana manufacturer engaged in the making of automobile trucks, first at Evansville and later Detroit. He won the appreciation of Mr. Graham for his industry, initiative and reliance, and in 1927 Robert Graham employed him as manager of the Graham Farms in Daviess County. During the World war Mr. Hoefling was with the Motor Transport Corps and was in training at Valparaiso and Rolling Prairie in Northern Indiana.

Mr. Hoefling married, August 10, 1926, Miss Norma Heitzman, of Evansville. They have one son, John Joseph, born February 8, 1928. Mr. Hoefling is a member of the Catholic church, Knights of Columbus, B. P. O. Elks, and is affiliated with the American Legion Post at Washington.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM D. BOLINGER. Among the prominent business men of Sullivan in Sullivan County, Indiana, is William D. Bolinger, vice president of the Jennings Lumber Company. William D. Bolinger was born on a farm in Sullivan County, Indiana, November 30, 1881, the eldest of the four children of James S. and Mary A. (Chestnut) Bolinger. His father, who was born in Kentucky, was still a youth when he came to Sullivan County, Indiana, and after completing his education engaged in agricultural operations, with which he continued to be identified until his death, December 12, 1925. He was a man of high character and integrity who won and held the respect and esteem of those with whom he was associated, and whose career was characterized by public-spirited citizenship. His widow still survives him, at the age of seventy- six years, making her home on the old farm in Sullivan County, in which community she was born. There were four children in the family: William D. Bolinger, of this review; James, a resident of Florida, who married Emma Abell; Herman, residing with his mother on the old home farm in Sullivan County, who married Myrtle Sparks and has two sons; and Hazel, who married Fred Wooley, of Terre Haute, Indiana, and has three children.

William D. Bolinger received his early education in the public and high schools, where he made the most of his opportunities, and then pursued a course at the State Teachers College, Terre Haute. With this preparation he felt equipped for business life, but decided to learn the trade of electrician, which was to assist him greatly later in his career. He worked at that trade for about six years, in the meantime saving his earnings carefully, and in 1901 invested his capital in a retail clothing business, which he operated until 1906, then selling out to form his first connection with the automobile industry. In 1921 Mr. Bolinger sold his automobile interests and embarked in the lumber business at Sullivan, Indiana, where he still has large and important interests in the lumber line. In April, 1929, he changed his place of residence to Princeton, where he established the Bolinger Motor Company, Inc. Selling this interest in 1931, he returned to Sullivan to devote his full time to the lumber business. Mr. Bolinger has displayed his versatility by engaging in a number of lines of business effort, in each of which he has attained success and prominence. He bears an excellent reputation in business circles as a man of high character and strict integrity and has the complete confidence and esteem of those with whom he has been associated. A Republican in politics, he is well informed on public subjects and a supporter of constructive public movements, but has not sought nor cared for public office. With his family he belongs to the Christian Church, while fraternally he is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner and a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks No. 911 of Sullivan, and the Woodmen of the World.

On May 8, 1903, Mr. Bolinger was united in marriage with Miss Clennie May Jennings, daughter of W. V. and Leucretia (Lloyd) Jennings, and to this union there have been born two children: Alice June, born June 7, 1904, a graduate of Indiana University, who married George Leonard, of Chicago, Illinois, and Howard, born September 7, 1907, also a graduate of Indiana University, who is engaged in business operations with his father.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES WALLACE BINGHAM. Bingham is a name that has had a long and honorable standing in the bar of Northern Indiana. Charles W. Bingham, who practices at Mishawaka, with offices in the First National Bank Building, is a son of the late E. Volney Bingham, one of the very able lawyers and outstanding citizens of St. Joseph County for many years, and is a brother of Judge Bingham of the Superior Court.

Charles W. Bingham was born at Mishawaka, October 12, 1889. His father, E. Volney Bingham, was born August 1, 1844, in Penn Township, St. Joseph County, son of Alfred and Ann (Miller) Bingham. Alfred Bingham was a native of New York State, came to Indiana in pioneer times, and for many years was connected with the St. Joseph Iron Company at Mishawaka. The first important chapter in E. Volney Bingham's life experiences was his service as a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war. He was sergeant major in Company G of the Forty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. A few years after the war, having completed his law studies, he began practice at Mishawaka, and his law business and his participation in public affairs continued uninterrupted until his death in 1923. During President Cleveland's administration he was postmaster of Mishawaka. He was a Democrat who had a leading position in his party in the state. He was elected a member of the State Senate for two terms, and for many years was deputy prosecutor of the St. Joseph Circuit. He gave his attention to the public school interests of his community as a member of the Mishawaka school board.

E. Volney Bingham married Hattie E. Grimes, who passed away in December, 1929. She was born at Lagro, Wabash County, Indiana, daughter of Dr. James F. and Caroline Grimes. Doctor Grimes was until his death one of the best loved physicians in Mishawaka. Mrs. Bingham had been a resident of that city since infancy. She was married on December 7, 1871, and for many years was a leader in the First Methodist Episcopal Church and in the city's social life. She was the mother of four children: Kate, deceased, who married John F. Nuner, deceased; H. Beth Bingham is principal of the South Side School in Mishawaka; Judge J. Frederick Bingham is judge of the St. Joseph County Superior Court at South Bend; and Charles W.

Charles W. Bingham received his early education in the grade and high schools of Mishawaka and in 1911 was graduated LL.B. from the University of Michigan. At the outset of his law practice he was associated with his father, and this association was kept up until the death of the elder Bingham. During the World war he served on the war trade board and later was with the Motor Transport Corps in Florida, holding the rank of lieutenant. Mr. Bingham from 1922 to 1926 was city attorney of Mishawaka. He has a large general practice and is a lawyer who represents the highest standards of ethics in his profession. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge and the St. Joseph County, Indiana State and American Bar Associations.

Mr. Bingham married, June 30, 1923, Miss Florence Stuller. She was born at Eden, Ohio, and grew up at Mishawaka. Her mother is Mrs. A. Stuller, of Mishawaka. Her father is deceased. Mrs. Bingham taught in the Mishawaka public schools for several years. She is president of the local chapter of the Red Cross and has a wide range of social duties.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 3
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray