HON. LINDLEY P. LITTLE, county attorney of Fountain County, has a long record of public service as an educator, lawyer and public official.

He was born in White County, Indiana, December 25, 1868, son of John S. and Martha J. (Pope) Little, his mother being a daughter of John Pope of North Carolina. His father was born in Ohio, followed the occupations of farming and carpenter work, and died when sixty-five years of age. Mr. L. P. Little has two sisters, Mattie and Hettie.

He acquired his early education in the schools of White and Fountain counties and at the National Normal University, Lebanon, Ohio, being dependent upon his own efforts and earning his way through school. For seven years he was engaged in the work of teaching, then took up the study of law and since his admission to the bar had enjoyed a steadily increasing practice. He has been one of the respected and popular officials in the courthouse at Covington for many years. For eight consecutive years he was county attorney, after which there was an interval of three years when he was out of office. He is now serving his tenth year in that position and is president of the Fountain County Bar Association. Mr. Little is a stanch Republican and is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men and the Christian Church.

He married in Fountain County, April 2, 1890, Miss Myrtle Musgrove, daughter of Isaac Musgrove. She died in January, 1917. Seven children were born to their marriage. Goldie, the oldest, is a music and art teacher in the high school of Greenwood, Indiana. Frank H. and Earl both live at Indianapolis and are married. Leslie E., also of Indianapolis, is married and has two sons, named Leslie, Jr. and Harold Gene. Ralph S., a traveling salesman, is married and has two sons, Ralph K. and Gordon. Martha Elizabeth is married to Harry E. Spindler, of Clarion, Pennsylvania. Mildred Lucile is a student in Indiana University and for two successive years was president of the Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES A. MARSHALL learned the trade of printer when a youth, and printing and publishing have constituted the chief business of his career. He is manager and publisher of the Darlington Herald in Montgomery County.

Mr. Marshall was born at Darlington, October 10, 1884. His father, Flavious H. Marshall, was also a native of Indiana and spent practically all his life at Darlington. For a number of years he was a farmer, and left the farm to go on the road as a traveling salesman. He was seventy years of age when he passed away in 1924. Flavious H. Marshall married Sarah A. Armstrong, daughter of William Armstrong, of a pioneer family of Indiana. Of their children three are living: Minnie E. Newman, of Saint Paul, who has a daughter, Charlotte; Edith Weesner, of Denver; and Charles A.

Charles A. Marshall had the advantages of the grade and high schools at Darlington, and his apprenticeship at the printerís trade followed immediately after his school work. He is a skillful printer, and has had experience in several other lines of business. In 1916 he bought the Darlington Echo from Gertrude Cook, changing the name to the Herald, and has made it a paper representative of all the best interests of the community, carrying all the local news and furnishing a valuable medium of publicity.

Mr. Marshall married, June 1, 1927, Miss Pauline Cox, daughter of Denton T. Cox, of Darlington. Mr. Marshallís mother was a descendant of Revolutionary ancestors. His wifeís grandfather, E.H. Cox, was a lieutenant in the Union army during the Civil war. Her brother, Byron Cox, was a soldier in the World war and the American Legion Post at Darlington was named in his memory.

Mr. Marshall is a Republican in politics and is a member of the State Editorial and the National Editorial Associations. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic fraternity and the Knights of Pythias.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


THOMAS M. CAMPBELL. No citizen of Darlington has received a higher degree of esteem, justly earned, than Thomas M. Campbell, who has lived in that locality most of his life. He has a distinction which has perhaps not been given to any other citizen of Indiana, in the fact that for forty-eight consecutive years he has been kept in the office of justice of the peace of his township.

Judge Campbell was born in Fountain County, Indiana, November 4, 1850, son of Thomas N. Campbell, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, and a grandson of John T. Campbell, who came from Scotland. Thomas N. Campbell was a cooper and carpenter by trade. At the very outset of the Civil war he enlisted, and was with the colors four years, four months and sixteen days. He was in Company G of the Twentieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He fought in a number of battles, was once severely wounded, and his death, in 1872, was no doubt brought on by his hard service as a soldier. He married Sarah Grimes, a native of North Carolina, who passed away in 1884.

Thomas M. Campbell was the only child of his parents. He grew up and received his early school advantages in Fountain County, attended the Waveland Academy, and in 1866, when a boy of sixteen, began learning the trade of barber. For a number of years he carried on a confectionary business. Part of his time has been taken up with his duties as justice of the peace.

Judge Campbell has made both a hobby and a business of his interest in poultry growing. He has studied poultry and has an encyclopedic knowledge of the standards, the types and the points of excellence in many of the poultry breeds, and as a licensed poultry judge of the American Poultry Association has traveled all over the country both in the United States and Canada, attending poultry shows and exhibitions. Judge Campbell is one of Indianaís leading poultrymen, and for years has carried on a profitable business as a breeder of poultry, specializing in the White Langshans and the Golden and Silver Sebright Bantams.

In politics he is a Republican and is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the B. P. O. Elks. He married, December 30, 1879, Miss Sattie Hollingsworth. Her father was a Civil war soldier. Judge and Mrs. Campbell have four children. Miss Zola is at home. Catherine married Bryant Walkup, a World war veteran who died from wounds and shell shock received during the war, leaving one child, Ben Walkup. The daughter Ruby is the wife of Doctor McLeroy, a World war veteran who is still in France, in charge of a veteranís hospital, and they have one child, Billie. Laurence Campbell, of South Bend, enlisted in the United States Army before America got into the war and served until after the armistice.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


KAZIMIR KARL FIWEK was born in Poland, March 2, 1881. He has been an American since he was twenty-one years of age, and his career at South Bend has brought him many prominent and successful relationships with the commercial and civic life of that city. He is one of the outstanding representatives of Polish-American citizenship there.

Mr. Fiwek is manager and principal owner of the Fiwek Brothers, retail hardware and furniture merchants at 501-503 South Carlisle Street. His father, Thomas Fiwek, died in Poland in August, 1919. After the death of his father, Kazimir returned to his native country and remained there eight months, then he brought his widowed mother and sister to South Bend, where they are both living, the mother being seventy-nine years of age.

Kazimir K. Fiwek was educated in Poland, had some training in practical lines of work there, and it was in June, 1902, that he arrived in South Bend. During the next eight years he was an employee in the plant of the Singer Manufacturing Company. While working during the day he attended night school and made every possible effort to equip himself for a career in business lines. From 1910 to 1917 he was in the saloon business at South Bend and was proprietor of a restaurant from 1917 to 1923.

Mr. Fiwek in 1922 put up a substantial two-story building, 120 by 50 feet, on South Carlisle Street, and in this building in January, 1923, he and his brother Stanley opened a stock of hardware and furniture, which has since been known as the Fiwek Brothers Store, one of the most complete mercantile houses in the city in its line. In addition Mr. Fiwek is a director of the Peoples State Bank and for several years has conducted a private real estate business. He owns a farm in Olive Township, St. Joseph County.

Mr. Fiwek is first vice president of the Polish American Central Civic Club, is active in the Z. Balicki Falcons and other Polish organizations, and St. Adalbertís Polish Catholic Church.

He first married Miss Anne Gruzinski, who was born in Litwa, Lithuania, but was reared in South Bend. She passed away in February, 1921, leaving three children, Sophia Anna, Clement Kazimir and Eleanor Dorothy. In 1924 Mr. Fiwek married Mrs. Helen Repczynski, of South Bend.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES MARCUS MACKAY is a native of Canada, learned telegraphy during his youth, and has had a very busy and important career in railroad service. He is now the local freight and ticket agent for the Pennsylvania Railway at Gary. In addition to his connections as one of the leading transportation officials of the city he has numerous connections with the organized business and social affairs of the community.

Mr. Mackay was born at Simcoe, Ontario, in Norfolk County, Canada, July 22, 1869. His grandfather was an Englishman by birth and a pioneer of Ontario. His parents were William M. and Miriam (McDonald) Mackay. His father spent the active years of his life as a merchant at Courtland, Ontario. He was postmaster there for forty years and also held the office of township treasurer. His later years were spent at Gary, Indiana, and his death on October 20, 1927, at the age of eighty-seven, was the result of drowning when he fell in the Calumet River. His wife died in 1919 and is buried at Courtland, Ontario, and his body was taken back and laid beside hers. Of their three children Nettie died when fourteen years old and the only sone is Charles M. The daughter Ethel is the widow of William Fleming, of Burgessville, Ontario, and she has a son, Paul, now eighteen years of age.

Charles M. Mackay received his early educational advantages in the grade and high schools of Courtland. After mastering the telegraphic art he became an operator with the Michigan Central Railway, in whose service he remained five years, and then for a time was operator at Woodstock, Canada, for the Canadian Pacific. In the spring of 1893 he accepted transfer to Ithaca, Michigan, where for two months he was operator for the Ann Arbor Railway Company. In April, 1893, nearly forty years ago, he came to Lake County, Indiana, and has continuously been in the service of the Pennsylvania Railway Company since that date. After a few days at Hobart he was sent to Hegewisch, Illinois, as freight clerk and operator, three months later was advanced to relief agent on the division, with headquarters at Plymouth, and on September 1, 1895, was made agent at Columbia City, Indiana. On September 1, 1899, he was transferred to Valparaiso as freight and ticket agent, and on February 12, 1912, came to Gary, where for a number of years he has been local freight and ticket agent for the Pennsylvania.

Mr. Mackay is a Knight Templar Mason, a member of the Lodge and Encampment and a past district deputy of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and was president in 1924-25 of the Lions Club. He votes as a Republican, for two years was a director of the Gary Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the Commercial Club and the Christen Science Church.

He married at Plymouth, Indiana, February 24, 1895, Miss Margaret Maish, daughter of Daniel and Belinda (Baker) Maish. Her father was a merchant at Jewett, Ohio, where he died. His widow later married a Mr. Richey, who died and is buried in Ohio. She moved with her family to Plymouth, Indiana, locating on a farm, and she died in Valparaiso about 1910. Mrs. Mackay attended grade and high schools at Plymouth. For two years she was second reader in the Christian Science Church at Valparaiso and is an active member of that church at Gary. Mr. and Mrs. Mackay had four children: Ruth, Blanche, Lee (who died when nineteen months old) and Miriam. Ruth is the wife of Fred A. Ring, a resident of Gary, and their two children are Beverly and Miriam. Blanche was married to Charles E. Petillon, sales manager for W. T. Alexander & Company of Chicago, with home at Gary, and they, too, have two children, Don and Lee. Miriam is the wife of Forde L. Bruce, a salesman with the Calumet Supply Company at Gary.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE M. WELLS, M. D., is well established in his professional work at Lafayette, being one of the professional men with offices in the Lafayette Life Building.

He is a native of Kentucky, born at Glasgow in Barren County, June 29, 1887. The Wells family came from England and first settled in Virginia. The family was represented by soldiers in the War of the Revolution and later in the Civil war. They settled in Barren County, Kentucky, about ninety years ago.

The father of Doctor Wells was Joshua C. Wells, a native of Kentucky and a farmer in that state. He married Emma Piercy, and they had a family of eight children.

Dr. George M. Wells was educated in Barren County, attended high school at Glasgow, and completed his medical training in Loyola University at Chicago. He was graduated in 1916 and for a brief period practiced his profession in his home county in Kentucky.

In May, 1918, he enlisted in the Army Medical Corps, was assigned duty on the examination board, was sent to New Haven, Connecticut, and was given special training at Yale University in tuberculosis. In September, 1919, he was honorably discharged, with the rank of first lieutenant.

Doctor Wells on January 1, 1920, began practice at Chalmers in White County, Indiana, and from there in the fall of 1922 moved to Lafayette. While living in White County he served as a member of the health board. He is well liked, a man of pleasing personality, public spirited and willing to do his share in civic undertakings.

Doctor Wells married Miss Ollie Spear, of Barren County, Kentucky. They have two children, Opal C., a student in Purdue University, and George M., Jr.

Doctor Wells was secretary of the Barren County Medical Society while in that state. He is a member of the Tippecanoe County, Indiana State and America Medical Associations, the American Legion, Lafayette Lodge No. 492 of the Masonic fraternity, and is a Republican and a Baptist.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PERRY F. WRIGHT is founder and owner of the Wright Machine Company at Lafayette, a business which he has carefully developed with standards of thorough workmanship and service that have brought a constant flow of orders for its products.

Mr. Wright is a native of Indiana, and has been identified with the electrical and machinery industries since boyhood. He was born in White County, April 18, 1886, son of Theodore J. Wright and a grandson of James Perry Wright, the latter of whom came to Indiana and settled in White County before the Civil war. He was a soldier in the Union army. By profession he was a lawyer and was also an inventor, his mechanical genius having been transmitted on to his grandson. He married Martha Louden. Theodore J. Wright was a carpenter by trade and later was in the grain business. He was born in Jasper County, Indiana, and married Katherine Cartmill, of Chillicothe, Ohio.

perry F. Wright was one of their five children and was educated in White County, attending grade and high schools there. When seventeen years of age he became an employee of the Sterling Electric Company. He was with that organization eleven years and resigned as superintendent to establish a business of his own in the fall of 1913. The Wright Machine Company, with plant at 14 South Third Street in Lafayette, operates a general machine shop, and does a large amount of custom business, making special tools, the equipment of the plant and the personnel of experts being capable of turning out finished products in this line. Mr. Wright has sixteen men in his employ.

He is also a director of the Rush Manufacturing Company. During the World war he turned his plant over to the uses of the Government, handling contracts for war material. During the last month of the war he was in the East, at the Watervaliet Arsenal.

Mr. Wright married Miss Anna L. Brice, a native of Hamilton, Ohio. They have three children: Donald P., a graduate of Purdue University, with the Bachelor of Science Degree and now associated with the Wright Machine Company, and Glenn C. and Virginia, both in school.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


W. LYNN AGNEW, prominent Hammond business man, was born in that city November 29, 1897, but grew up in South Dakota. He returned to Hammond about the time of the World war, and has been one of the energetic and public spirited citizens of the community.

His grandfather was Captain Agnew, a Union officer of the Civil war, who was born and reared in Ohio and for a number of years was a merchant at Winamac, Indiana. After retiring from business he lived in Chicago, where he died about 1902. His wife passed away in the same year and both are buried at Maywood, Chicago. William H. Agnew, father of W. Lynn, was born in Ohio, was a child when brought to Indiana and acquired his early education in public schools and the State Normal School. He taught for several years near Winamac. His brother was the late Nate L. Agnew, a former member of the Indiana State Senate, and who was a teacher in the law department of Valparaiso University. William H. Agnew moved to Hammond in 1890 and was connected with the Hammond Packing Company until the plant was burned in 1900. He then took his family to South Dakota, settled on a homestead and was engaged in ranching until his death at his home on White River, near Pierre, on March 9, 1918. He was laid to rest in a cemetery at Winamac, Indiana. William H. Agnew married Clara A. Walburn, who was born and reared at Nappanee, Indiana, and attended school there. She is an active member of the Baptist Church and the Eastern Star. The first wife of William H. Agnew was Mary Overmeyer, mother of three children: Chester W., of Gary, a plasterer contractor; John C., probate commissioner of the Superior Court at Hammond; and Catherine. By the second marriage there were also three children: Adelaide, wife of George Hensley, of Belleville, Illinois; Frances, Mrs. C. S. Connor, of Minneapolis; and W. Lynn.

W. Lynn Agnew attended school in South Dakota, graduating from the Vivian High School. He completed his education in Creighton University at Omaha, Nebraska, and in 1918, after the death of his father, returned to Hammond with his mother. For about a year he was with the American Steel Foundry Company and in 1919 entered the automobile business at Gary. In 1921 he returned to Hammond and became sales manager for the E. L. Shaver Company. In 1928 he bought out the Shaver business and changed the name to the Agnew Motor Company, dealer in Hudson and Essex cars, of which he is owner. This is one of the leading sales organizations in Hammond, and his company had beautiful show rooms and offices at 5311 Hohman Avenue.

Mr. Agnew is active in social anc civic organizations, including the Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of McKinley Lodge No. 712, A. F. and A. M., Hammond Chapter No. 117, Royal Arch Masons, Hammond Commandery No. 4, Knights Templar, Orak Temple of the Myustic Shrine, is a member of the Shrine Club and the Shriners Drum and Bugle Corps. He was formerly active in the Kiwanis Club, is a member of the Woodmar Country Club, a Republican and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church.

He married at Hammond, October 3, 1925, Miss Virgene Hammond, daughter of Frank and Nellie (DeBow) Hammond. Her father was a grandson of Thomas Hammond, founder of the Hammond Packing Company and of the City of Hammond. Frank Hammond is a banker, formerly was vice president of the First Trust & Savings Bank and is now president of the Calumet Building & Loan Association. Mrs. Agnew was educated in the Hammond High School and Indiana State University. She is a Delta Gamma and Kappa Kappa Kappa and member of the Presbyterian Church. They have three children, Claire Gene, and twins named Muriel and Lynelle.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOSEPH ECKMAN is one of the older living native sons of St. Joseph County. He was almost old enough to have some memory of the first railroad line that went through this county. The country he grew up in was only one stage removed from that of the earliest pioneer. During his lifetime he has witnessed a remarkable series of developments that have completely changed the City of South Bend, from a town with a few manufacturing industries until it has become one of the big industrial centers of America. Mr. Eckmanís occupation has always been that of a farmer, but the growth of South Bend gradually encroached on his farming land, and eventually he saw fields that he cultivated for many seasons absorbed into one of the industrial divisions.

Mr. Eckman was born in Center Township, St. Joseph County, December 1, 1847. His father, William Eckman, was born near Dayton, Ohio, and married, in 1843, Catherine Ullry, also a native of Southwestern Ohio. They came to St. Joseph County in the early 1840s and William Eckman died in 1857. Catharine Eckmanís parents, Joseph and Catherine (Cripe) Ullry, on coming to St. Joseph County first settled in Clay Township and later on a farm in Center Township.

Joseph Eckman grew up with his widowed mother on the old homestead in Center Township, and his early advantages were those of the district schools. He took up farming as an occupation, and in 1874, three years after his marriage, he bought a farm of a hundred acres in Portage Township. This land adjoined the City of South Bend on the south, lying west of South Michigan Street. Here he was engaged in the practice and routine of a farmer for over forty years, until the World war. The tremendous growth of South Bend eventually made his farm too valuable as suburban property to keep it any longer for agricultural production, and Mr. Eckman disposed of most of it after planning it as a subdivision, and it is now completely covered with fine homes. He still owns several lots on South Michigan Street. His own home is at the corner of South Michigan Street and Eckman Avenue. It is the house which he built when he bought the land, though it has been remodeled and completely modernized. He has retained the ground, and his property is one of the most attractive in the entire subdivision. Though much of his time has been taken up in recent years by his real estate activities, Mr. Eckman still regards himself as a farmer. He owns another tract of forty acres of land hat, with the extension of the city limits, now adjoins the city line on the south.

Mr. Eckman has always cast his vote as a Republican. From 1901 to 1909 he served as a member of the Portage Township advisory committee. He is a charter member of the St. Joseph Valley Grange, is a member of the Masonic Lodge, and is a Methodist.

He married, October 12, 1871, in Portage Township, Miss Anna M. Van Buskirk. She was born in Ohio and was two years of age when her parents came to St. Joseph County, Indiana. Her parents, Thomas and Susannah (Kollar) Van Buskirk, were married at Dayton, Ohio, her mother having been born near that city, while her father was a native of Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Eckman have four children, all of whom live in South Bend: Etta R., wife of Charles Whitmore and the mother of three children, named Donald E., Winifred Jeanette and Anna Virginia; Bessie, the wife of Eli Krow; William Eckman, who married Marie Fanning; and Arthur J., who is married and has a son, Arthur J. Jr.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PETER L. BISHOP, a nonagenarian, one of the oldest residents of Jay County, is an interesting link connecting the modern age with the pioneer epoch. He went through all the exeriences of the pioneers in clearing up the wilderness and developing farms while Indiana was still a state depending almost altogether on agriculture. In his personal experience he has witnessed the improvement of roads, the growth of towns and cities, great industrial centers, the expansion of railroads and he was past fifty years of age when the first automobiles were seen on the streets of Portland.

Peter L. Bishop was born in Bear Creek Township, Jay County, May 12, 1839, son of Thomas and Frances A. (Hossick) Bishop. His parents were natives of Germany, his father born in Darmstadt and his mother in Wuertemberg. Thomas Bishop after coming to America lived in Pennsylvania three years and in 1836 entered 160 acres of land in Bear Creek Township of Jay County. He made the preliminary improvements and in 1837 his wife joined him and for eighteen months they lived in a log cabin which had only a dirt floor, after which a floor of puncheon was laid. Their cabin was one of an increasing number that marked isolated clearings in the dense woods that covered this section. Mrs. Thomas Bishop once got lost in these woods. She had gone out to look for the cows, and becoming bewildered she went one, getting farther and farther away. Reaching a stream of water, she took off her shoes and walked down the bed of the creek for a mile and a half, until she came in sight of the house of Samuel Huey, near Portland. In the meantime her husband had aroused some of his neighbors but the search was fruitless through the remainder of the day and night and it was on the following morning that his wife was found. She was a fine type of pioneer woman, untiring in her work, and a very earnest Christian, being a member of the United Brethren Church, while her husband was of the German Reformed. She lived to be eighty-two years of age and he passed away at the age of eighty-seven, at their old home in Bear Creek Township. They reared a large family of children: Mrs. Caroline Smith; Peter L.; Catherine, who married William Prillaman and went to the State of Washington; George W., who in 1862 enlisted as a private in Company C of the Eleventh Indiana Cavalry, was wounded at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, and died at Jeffersonville, Indiana; Benjamin F., who made his home at Indianapolis; John V., who also established his home in the State of Washington and spent some time in the Klondyke gold fields; Mary M., who became the wife of John Kunkle, of North Dakota; and Adam D., who stayed on the old homestead.

Peter L. Bishop came to manhood with the experiences of a pioneer community. He attended school a few months each winter, one of the old-fashioned schools of Indiana, where the teaching was confined to the rudiments of knowledge. As soon as his strength permitted he was called into the fields and to the woods to assist his father in breaking the soil, in cutting the trees and in clearing away the underbrush, and that was his best training for the duties and responsibilities of manhood. Farming has constituted his occupation, and he was active until advanced years, brought him the ease he so richly deserved. He has been a worthy representative of a very worthy and important family in this section of Eastern Indiana. His father on coming to Indiana was accompanied by two brothers, Peter and George Bishop. They traveled overland from Bucyrus, Ohio, with oxen and wagons. The only sister of the family, Sophia, married Jacob Marshall and lived out her life in Seneca County, Ohio.

Peter L. Bishop has always voted as a Democrat and has been an earnest church member. He is an elder and former superintendent of the Sunday School of the Lutheran Church.

In December, 1861, he married Miss M. J. Grigsby. She was also born in Bear Creek Township, daughter of James and Rheney A. (Morgan) Grigsby. Her parents were natives of Muskingum County, Ohio, and during their residence in Bear Creek Township improved a farm, and later, in 1884, moved to Missouri, where James Grigsby died in 1893, having survived his wife one year. Peter L. Bishop after his marriage moved to Butler County, Ohio, and for fourteen years lived in that state. In partnership with Jacob Emerick he embarked on an extensive program of fruit growing, planting fifty acres of peach trees and ten acres of strawberries and, being pioneers in the production of fruit, they profited. Mr. Bishop continued active in the business until he sold his interests and returned to Bear Creek Township, where he bought 120 acres of land and subsequently added forty acres of adjoining land, giving him a well proportioned farm, which he improved with a commodious residence and other buildings.

Peter L. Bishop is a well loved old resident of Jay County, as was also his wife. He is now past ninety-two. Mrs. Bishop died July 2, 1930. They had a family of five children. Their first child, Theresa, died in infancy. Their son George W. is deceased. The other children are Charles G., who looks after his fatherís affairs and cares for him in his declining days, Giles F. and Nina G. Nine is the wife of R. D. Wheat, a well known attorney at Portland, and former judge of the Jay County Circuit Court.

Charles G. Bishop has for many years been an outstanding citizen of the Bryant locality of Jay County. He has been reelected for a second term as trustee of the township and has taught in the public schools of this county for a quarter of a century. He was postmaster at Bryant and was also elected twice to the office of trustee of his township several years ago. Charles G. Bishop married Lillie Rae Foss. She was born at Cardington, Ohio, in 1881, daughter of Isaac Foss, now deceased, and his wife, Mrs. Eva Foss, who lives at Visalia, California. Mrs. Charles G. Bishop passed away December 3, 1925. Her only son, Claude F., born in September, 1905, is a linotype operator at South Bend and married Miss Marjorie McKee, of Portland, daughter of E. A. McKee, former editor of the Portland Sun. This union resulted in incompatibility after three years and Claude F. Bishop subsequently married Violet Butler, of Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Nina G. Bishop, wife of R. D. Wheat, has one son, Cree, who is a chemist. He is married and lives in Detroit, Michigan. George W. Bishop, who married Tavia Penney, of Hamilton, Missouri, and both now deceased had a son, Lee R., who is a public accountant, married and lives in Detroit, also a daughter, Freda, who married and lives in Richmond, Indiana. Her husband is a grocery man. Giles F. Bishop married Miss Maid Milligan, of Portland, Indiana. Both are still living in Dayton, Ohio. Giles F. was a street railway conductor for twelve years and for eighteen years was deputy auditor and afterwards deputy recorder of Montgomery County, Ohio. They have three sons, all of whom are high school and university graduates. All were present at the old homestead on May 12, 1931, to celebrate the grandfatherís ninety-second anniversary. On this occasion Peter L. Bishop, the grandfather, said: ďI think the socks, shirts, sweaters and slippers I have now will be all Iíll need for several years yet.Ē Long may he live.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray