JAMES J. CARROLL, district commercial manager of the Illinois Bell Telephone Company, of Gary, has been identified with this great corporation for nearly a quarter of a century, during which time he has won steady promotion through individual merit and great industry. Since locating at Gary, in 1919, he has interested himself actively in civic affairs and at present is a member of the City Planning Commission.

Mr. Carroll was born at North Judson, Indiana, December 29, 1884, and is a son of Michael and Hannah (O'Brien) Carroll. Michael Carroll was born in Queens County, Ireland, and was an infant of one year when brought to the United States by his parents, the family settling at San Pierre, Starke County, Indiana, where he received a public school education and in young manhood secured employment with a construction crew in railroad work. He was thus employed for a number of years with various companies and later removed to Hammond, Indiana, where his death occurred in 1916, burial being made in Calvary Cemetery, near Gary. His father was James Carroll, a native of Ireland, who was a pioneer of San Pierre, and for years was identified with the Monon Railroad. He died at San Pierre about 1890, while his wife survived until 1913, passing away at the advanced age of ninety-five years, being laid .to rest at his side in the family burial ground at San Pierre. Mrs. Hannah (O'Brien) Carroll was born at Lexington, Kentucky, where she was educated in the public schools, and throughout her life was an active member of the Catholic Church. She died February 23, 1930, and is buried at the side of her husband in Calvary Cemetery, near Gary. All seven of the children of Michael and Hannah Carroll are living: John, of Hammond, this state; Margaret, the widow of Jerome Ball, of Plymouth, Indiana; James J., of this review; Hugh E., of Hammond; Leo F., of East Chicago, Indiana; Eugene C., of Hammond, who was a member of the United States Navy during the World war; and Gerald M., of Chicago, Illinois, who was a member of the United States Signal Corps during the World war and saw eighteen months of overseas service.

James J. Carroll attended the public schools of North Judson, Indiana, after leaving which he secured employment with the G. H. Hammond Packing Company, of Hammond, with which concern he remained for one and one- half years . For the two years that followed he was in the employ of the Erie Railroad Company, at Hammond, and following this was employed in the traffic department of Williams & Peters, of Chicago, for one year and eight months. On November 6, 1907, Mr. Carroll entered the service of the Chicago Telephone Company (now the Illinois Bell Telephone Company), in the capacity of chief clerk at the Hammond district office, and October 15, 1919, was appointed manager of the Gary area. On April 1, 1929, he was promoted to his present position as district commercial manager of District No.4, which includes all Indiana properties and a part of Illinois, comprising twenty-three exchanges. This is an exceedingly important post and one in which Mr. Carroll has been able not only to carryon the regular duties in a highly commendable and expeditious manner, but also to improve the service materially through the introduction of newer methods and by his own executive ability. Mr. Carroll is a member of the board of directors of the Home Building Loan & Savings Association of Gary. He is fraternally affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and belongs also to the Rotary Club, of which he was secretary for one year, the Gary Country Club, the Gary Commercial Club and the Chamber of Commerce and the City Planning Commission. He is a Republican in his political allegiance and his religious connection is with Holy Angels Catholic Church.

At Hammond, Indiana, June 27, 1917, Mr. Carroll was united in marriage with Miss Eileen K. Foley, daughter of John J. and Nellie (Cramer) Foley. Mr. Foley, who was for years a locomotive engineer on the Erie Railroad, died at Hammond, May 27, 1930, Mrs. Foley having passed away January 12, 1930. They are buried in a Marion (Ohio) cemetery. Mrs. Carroll was educated in the public schools of Hammond, where she graduated, and the parochial school at Huntington, this state, and for a few years was employed in the office of the Illinois Bell Telephone Company. She takes an active part in the work of Holy Angels Catholic Church and in the Catholic Women's League. Mr. and Mrs. Carroll live in an attractive home at 701 Polk Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOSEPH ARDAPPLE. The Ardapple Storage & Warehouse Company, at 1128 Main Street in Lafayette, is a business to which members of three generations of the Ardapple family have contributed. Though not under the name of the present corporation, the business has been in existence for over sixty-five years.

The founder was Andrew Ardapple, who came to Indiana in 1855, and a few years later began a service in Lafayette using teams and drays for local transportation of goods. Mr. Joseph Ardapple, who was born at Lafayette, February 5, 1870, is a son of Andrew and Sophia Ardapple. As a boy he attended the Jenk School at Lafayette, and when he was eighteen he began helping his father. His father at that time was doing considerable contract work, utilizing a force of teams and drivers, and Joseph Ardapple assisted in concentrating the material for the first brick paving on Main Street. Later he hauled all the brick for the construction of the plant of the Lafayette Steel Products Company. Since 1907 the business has been known as the Ardapple Storage & Warehouse Company. The first location was on Ninth Street, afterwards at Cincinnati and Erie streets, then at 1338 Main Street, and finally the present headquarters at 1128 Main Street. Mr. Ardapple has three warehouse buildings and a service garage and the company uses over 123,000 square feet of space. There are ten employees and they use seven trucks, handling large special contracts, and also operating a daily and hourly service for the convenience of local customers.

Mr. Joseph Ardapple married Katherine Garrison, also a native of Lafayette. They have three children, two daughters and a son, all of whom were educated in Lafayette.

The son, Walter Ardapple, was born at Lafayette, January 19, 1896, and was educated in the grade and high schools and also attended the Lafayette Business College. At the age of sixteen he became bookkeeper in his fatherís establishment and on May 3, 1917, enlisted for service in the World war. He was oversees ten months and after his release from military duty rejoined his father's business, in which he has a responsible part. Walter Ardapple married Dorothy Irvin, who was born at Oxford, Indiana. They have two children, one born in 1923 and the other in 1924, and both are now in school.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


ROSE GRAY DOUGAN is one of the very interesting and cultured women of the City of Denver. She has spent much of her life in travel over the United States and abroad, but her home is in Denver, where her family has been prominent for many years, since 1875.

She was born at Richmond, Indiana, daughter of David Henry and Rosanna (Lamm) Dougan, her father a native of Niles, Michigan, and her mother of Wayne County, Indiana. Her mother was a daughter of Isaac and Rebecca Lamm, of Wayne County, and a granddaughter of Thomas and Sarah (Smith) Lamm, who were married August 4, 1813. Miss Douganís paternal grandparents were William and Ann (Gray) Dougan, who came to Michigan from Ireland, and Mrs. Dougan settled in Wayne County, Indiana, in 1856,after the death of her husband in Niles. The Lamms were early day farmers in the county. Isaac Lamm was also a dealer and shipper in furs, and during the 1850s he built at Richmond a large brick home at the corner of Third and National Road, where Miss Dougan spends several months during the year.

Among her ancestors were the Smith family, who owned a large tract of land in the southeastern part of what is now Richmond, and there employed David Hoover to survey the tract, known as Smithville. Another early pioneer was Jeremiah Cox, who owned the land across the road and founded what he named Jericho. These two men were unable to agree as to a joint name for their community and subsequently David Hoover was called in and named the place in honor of John Smithís home, Richmond, England. John Smith came from Guilford Court House, North Carolina. He was a lifelong Quaker, was a slave owner in the southern states, and when fifty years of age he refused to remain a slave owner, but the law forbade freeing slaves, so he gave them to the Quaker meeting, to be freed as soon as the South became "civilized" (he was sure it would sometime) and came to Indiana in 1804-05. He left behind a large number of his negroes and came north, some of his faithful slaves accompanying him. He was one of the early pioneers of Wayne County.

Miss Dougan's parents were married at Richmond in 1867. Her father graduated from the Bellevue Medical College in 1874, and in 1875 went west to Colorado, practicing two years at Alma, and then located at Leadville, where later he engaged in banking. He died at Richmond in 1919, though his home at the time was at Denver. He is buried in the Earlham Cemetery. Miss Dougan's mother now divides her time between Richmond and Denver.

Miss Dougan attended public and private schools in Denver. She traveled extensively and studied music in Paris. Miss Dougan is a linguist and is a woman of many interests. One of her hobbies is the collection of native finger rings. She has deeply interested herself in the pueblo Indians' arts and crafts, and has particularly striven to get recognition for some of the artistic talents of the Red Men. Miss Dougan is a member of the Richmond Garden Club, National Audubon Society, National Travel Club, American Museum of Natural History, Archaeological Institute of America, and a life member of the American Red Cross.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


EDWARD PAYTON MOORE lived his life at Mitchell in Lawrence- County. That community knew him as a highly valuable citizen on account of his banking experience, his judgment in all financial matters and the wisdom with which he guided an enterprise that involved important interests for hundreds of customers and clients.

Mr. Moore was born September 11, 1869, and died September 17, 1924, at the age of fifty-five. His grandparents were Silas and Mary Moore. Silas Moore was of Virginia ancestry and came to Indiana from Kentucky. The old home he had at Mitchell is still standing and he was one of the early merchants of that community and had a great deal to do with making Mitchell one of the best small towns in this part of the state. He was one of the founders of the local Presbyterian Church. Milton N. Moore, father of the late Edward Payton Moore, was born in Orange County, Indiana, and when the Civil war came on joined an Indiana regiment. He left his store under the management of a brother while he was in the army. After the siege of Vicksburg he returned to Mitchell and resumed his mercantile business. In 1882 he organized the Bank of Mitchell and continued to act as its president until his death on June 1, 1904.

Edward Payton Moore received his formal education in the public schools and a normal college, also had a business course, but the fundamentals of his financial knowledge came to him during the years he was in close contact with his father. He entered his father's bank at an early age, and when his father died he took the post of president and was unfaltering in his devotion to his business duties until he passed away. For many years he was also in the insurance business, conducting the E. P. Moore Company, which probably handled a larger volume of insurance business than any similar organization in the county. Mr. Moore was affiliated with the Lodge of Masons, the Knights of Pythias, belonged to the Elks at Bedford and was very active in the Presbyterian Church, of which he was a trustee.

Mr. Moore married, December 28, 1892, Miss Elizabeth Hyatt, who survives him and continues to reside at their old home at 705 Warren Street in Mitchell. Mrs. Moore represents a long line of American ancestors. Her parents were Henry H. and Mary (Hoffmeister) Hyatt. Her father was born in Washington, Daviess County, Indiana, son of John Hyatt, who in turn was a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (McFerran) Hyatt. Thomas Hyatt was a son of Chadrack and Elizabeth Hyatt. Chadrack Hyatt was with a Maryland company and regiment in the Revolutionary war in 1776 and was wounded in the battle of Long Island, but made his escape through the swampy country. He was under the command of Capt. David Noble and Captain Cresap and Colonel Smallwood. He was a private in Washington's army and after the war enjoyed a pension from the Government. Mrs. Mooreís grandfather, John Hyatt, came from Kentucky and, acquired a large tract of land and opened up a plantation in Southern Indiana. Her father, Henry H. Hyatt, spent most of his life as a merchant at Washington, Indiana and he and his wife are buried in the Maple Grove Cemetery. They were the parents of six children: Clara, who became the wife of Charles Bareford; Harriet, Mrs. Charles R. Hudson; Mrs. Elizabeth Moore; Cameron, who married Laura Jones; Mary, who died in infancy; and Anna.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


GEORGE REMINGTON CARTER. In the death of George Remington Carter, which occurred December 12, 1922, the City of Connersville lost one of its able men and public-spirited citizens. Beginning life with few advantages, through his own efforts he made himself one of the foremost figures in the leather industry, and at the time of his death was president of the George R. Carter Company, which still is operating at Detroit, Michigan. His career was a busy and useful one, full of good and kindly deeds and characterized by excellent public service, and although some years have passed since he was called to the Great Beyond his memory is still kept green and fragrant by the many who knew and appreciated his many sterling qualities of heart and mind.

Mr. Carter was born near Felicity, Clermont County, Ohio, January 4, 1854, and was a son of Henry and Anna (Trisler) Carter, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. Henry Carter was reared in his native community, where he received a public school education, and in young manhood adopted the vocation of farming, in which he was engaged throughout life, his death occurring in Clermont County,Ohio.

After attending the public schools of his native locality George Remington Carter began teaching school in the winter terms and following farming during the summer months. He then moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he took a position with the American Oak Leather Company, and later represented the large old leather house of James N. Duffy Leather Company for a number of years. Because of the failure of his health he spent one year in farming in Clermont County, Ohio, and then went to Williamsburg, Ohio, where he founded a business of his own in a room sixteen by twenty feet, cutting leather strips for different parts of buggies. The excellence his goods, the uniformity of his workmanship and his own personal energy and good management soon attracted attention and patronage, and within four years he had a prosperous and thriving business. This became so large that it outgrew the town, and particularly the railroad facilities, and Mr. Carter moved his plant to Connersville where after various changes it confined itself, as at present to automobile trimmings and findings. When Mr. Carter came to Connersville he founded the George R. Carter Company, a corporation with himself as president; Henry Adrian Carter, vice president; Joel D. Bolender, treasurer; James R. Carter, secretary; Claude Case, director. Following his death his widow became president and remained in that capacity until January, 1929, when the business was sold to the Vogt Manufacturing Company, of Rochester, New York. The business was conducted at Connersville until August, 1930, at which time it was removed to Detroit, Michigan, where it is still conducted under the name of The George R. Carter Company.

Mr. Carter was one of Connersvilleís most highly respected men. During his earlier years he had been a member and lay preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but later adopted the faith of the Christian Science Church, which is that of his widow. He was a Republican in politics and a thirty-second degree Mason and Shriner.

In August, 1887, Mr. Carter was united marriage with Miss Sarah Jane Ringold, who was born near Glendale, Ohio, daughter of John and Martha (McMillan) Ringold, the former born in Holland and the latter in the North of Ireland. Mrs. Carter, who is a high school graduate, is prominent in the Connersville Literary Club and in social circles of the city. She and her husband were the parents of the following children: Henry Adrian, who married Alta Isabelle Bilby and has two children, George Remington and Virginia Isabelle; Martha Anna, who married Joel D Bolender and has two children, George William and Jean Ann; James Remington, who married Mary Agnes Elliott and has two children, Catherine Jane and Martha Susanne; and Iva Pearl, who married Claude Case and has three children, Sarah Maude, Martha Elizabeth and Robert. Mrs. Sarah Jane Carter resides in her own attractive home at 903 Street.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOHN J. HIMSEL was born and reared in Dubois County, Indiana, and his secure place in popular confidence and esteem in his native county needs no further voucher than the statement that he has held continuously since 1923 the office of postmaster of the City of Jasper, the county seat.

Mr. Himsel was born at Haysville, Indiana, June 8, 1873, and is a son of John and Katherine (Retsch) Himsel, both of whom were born in Germany and both of whom were children when the respective families immigrated to the United States and established residence in Indiana. John Himsel was reared on his parentís farm in Indiana and his youthful loyalty was shown when, at the age of sixteen years he volunteered for service as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. He became a member of Company K, Twenty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and reenlisted at the expiration of his original term, so that he continued in active service until. the close of the war, he having taken part in the many engagements in which his command was involved. After the close of his military career he resumed his active alliance with farm enterprise, with which he continued to be identified seven years. At his home in Haysville, Dubois County, he was foully murdered by two outlaws, David Devault and Benjamin Shipley, the latter of whom fired three shots into the body of the victim, and the two desperadoes having made their escape and never have been brought to the bar of justice. Within a comparatively short time after the close of the Civil war John Himsel was united in marriage to Mrs. Katherine (Retsch) Saurtich, widow of John Saurtich, who died while serving as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war, and one of those children later met an accidental death, the surviving son being Martin Saurtich. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. John Himsel the eldest is Thomas, who married Barbara Neukam, their home being at Jasper and their children being two daughters. Elizabeth, second of the children, like her father, met a tragic death, she having been so severely burned that her death soon followed. George, a resident of Sidney, Florida, married Mrs. Jane White, and they have one child, Glenn. John J., of this review, is the youngest of the four children, his father having been murdered on the same evening John was born.

The educational discipline that John J. Himsel received in the public schools of Martin County was advanced by his attending normal school in Dubois County and after four terms in the Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana he taught nine seasons in the rural schools is of his native county. He then completed a course in the Spencerian Business College of Louisville, Kentucky. In 1901 he became manager of the Dubois County Telephone Company, with which he continued until the system and business were sold to the Southern Indiana Telephone Company, in 1926. By the latter corporation he was retained in the same executive capacity until the present time, completing thirty years of continuous service in the same position on May 20, 1931. In 1923 he initiated his administration as postmaster of Jasper, his appointment having been made August 1 of that year and he having been reappointed in 1927. His administration as postmaster has been notably loyal and progressive and has met with unqualified popular approval, constant progress having been made in the service.

The political allegiance of Mr. Himsel is given to the Republican party and he has been influential in its councils in Dubois County, having been elected county chairman four successive terms and being the first man in fifty years to have this honor conferred on him more than once. He is affiliated with both York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity, as well as the Mystic Shrine, and has membership also in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Church in their home city.

June 18, 1899, was marked by the marriage of Mr. Himsel to Miss Katherine Dilly, daughter of Philip and Barbara (Leistner) Dilly, of Dubois County, and of this union have been born five children: Lester is manager of the Woolworth store in the City of Gary, Indiana, and formerly held the same position in their store at Cleveland; Miss Viola is employed as stenographer in the office of a hide and belting company in Indianapolis; Karl K. is employed by the Southern Indiana Telephone Company, with headquarters at Jasper; Elsa is a stenographer in the office of the Jasper Desk Company; and Katherine is a graduate of the training school for nurses that is maintained by Grace Hospital in Detroit, Michigan.

By way of summary it is interesting to note that Mr. Himsel was left homeless and penniless at the age of sixteen, and the extent of his education at that time was the completion of the fourth grade, home obligations having interfered with his schooling from the start. Left to shift for himself, he first decided he must have a better education and consequently worked at hard farm labor during summer months, at a salary of thirteen dollars per month, which earnings provided his meager necessities during the school terms. Unlike the average boy, whose every need is supplied by loving parents, he appreciated the value of every minute of his scant school opportunities and by long hours of study, in addition to chores done to augment his living expenses, he finished the next four years' grades in one, graduating from the common schools of Rutherford Township of Martin County at seventeen years of age, with the second highest grades. Encouraged by this success, he attended another winter of school and after the close of this term, entered Dubois Normal School, as already stated, which prepared him for teaching his first school the following winter, from which time he continued to teach and study at normal schools until married in 1899. After his marriage he taught two more winters, after which time he entered the telephone business, as before mentioned. Mr. Himsel has thus always known the meaning of hard work and frugal living and has suffered personal illness and the death of two children, the oldest, Chloea, and the youngest, Jeremiah. In spite of these many handicaps and with the ambition ever before him to give his children the best advantages of which he was capable, he has succeeded in affording them at least a high school education, sound bodies and a good name.

It is also interesting to note that three professional callings made strong appeals to Mr. Himsel, namely the medical, ministerial and legal, but lack of educational opportunities prevented him from entering any of these.

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INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


O. DALE SMITH, district manager at Muncie for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, is a native of Delaware County and was connected with the clothing trade for a number of years, but found his real forte in insurance.

He was born in Delaware County, January 25, 1894, son of E. A. and Myrtie (Jones) Smith. His grandfather, William Smith, was born in Madison County, Indiana, May 9, 1850, and died December 8, 1897. William Smith married Amanda Smith, who was born October 21, 1853, and died in 1890. The father of William Smith came to Indiana from South Carolina. E. A. Smith was born and reared in Madison County, had a public school education, and has devoted his active career to farming and stock raising and to a mercantile business at Anderson. His wife, Myrtie (Jones) Smith, was born and reared in Delaware County, and died April 9, 1894. She was a daughter of Warren and Nannie (Woodring) Jones, Nannie Woodring being a daughter of William Woodring, an early settler of Delaware County. Mrs. Myrtie Smith was educated in public schools and was engaged in clerical work before her marriage. She was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She is buried in the Jones Cemetery in Delaware County.

O. Dale Smith was the only child of his parents. He was educated in public schools, including the Muncie High School, and then spent two years clerking for the Wolf Clothing Company, was also connected with a shoe business at Springfield, Illinois, for a time, and spent two years with the Bell Telephone Company at Indianapolis. From there he went to Gary and clerked in a retail clothing store until September, 1918, when he answered the call to the colors

He was sent for training to Camp Grant at Rockford, Illinois, later to Camp McArthur, Texas, and from there to Camp Taylor at Louisville, Kentucky, where he received his honorable discharge January 1, 1919, having been a sergeant in the Regimental Headquarters Company. After the war he returned to Gary and was with the Acker-Schmidt Clothing Company in that city until 1923.

Mr. Smith then returned to Muncie, and after six months with the Greiger Clothing Company was made a partner and vice president of the organization, but disposed of those interests and until 1925 was with the Keller Clothing Company.

Mr. Smith retired from the clothing business to become agent for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, and he found insurance such a fascinating occupation and so in line with his special abilities that after a year and a half he was promoted to manager of the Muncie agency and has made that one of the leading agencies of the company in Indiana.

Mr. Smith is affiliated with Marion Lodge No. 35, A. F. and A. M., at Indianapolis, belongs to the Fort Wayne Consistory of the Scottish Rite and Orak Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Hammond. He is secretary of the Eastern Indiana Kennel Club, is active in the Muncie Exchange Club, Delaware Post No. 19 of the American Legion, and is a Phi Delta Kappa. He is a Republican and is affiliated with the Friends Memorial Church at Munice.

Mr. Smith married at Indianapolis, July 16, 1923, Miss Lucille Leffler, daughter of James Harve and Nettie (Sloniker) Leffler. Mrs. Smith graduated from the Muncie High School and is prominent in the social and club life of that city, being a member of the Friends Memorial Church, the Womanís Musical Club, the Kings Daughters and the Eastern Star.

James Harve Leffler, father of Mrs. Smith, was born on a farm near Muncie, June 23, 1862, son of Phillip and Mary (Garrard) Leffler. He was educated in public schools and the Central Indiana Normal School at Danville, after which he taught for a few years, also engaged in farming and stock raising, and left the farm to take up a business career as a hardware and implement dealer at Albany. After about nine years he traded his hardware store for an interest in the Albany Furniture & Manufacturing Company. Not long afterward the plant of this business was burned to the ground without insurance. Mr. Leffler in 1894 moved to Muncie, and for about seven years was deputy county clerk under Clerk John E. Reed. He resigned his work for the county to go with the Indiana Union Traction Company in its right-of-way and claim adjustment department, and while there helped secure the rights of way for the Indiana Northern Traction Company and the line between Newcastle and Middletown. In 1898 Mr. Leffler resumed his active connection with Muncie, where he engaged in the real estate and farm loan business with the firm of Garrard & Company. In 1908 he was nominated and elected county clerk, serving one term of four years. While in that office he became a member of the firm Miltenburger & Leffler, successors to Garrard & Company, and in 1927 he sold the real estate department to Mr. Miltenburger and then acquired an interest in the Ault Insurance Agency at Muncie. As president of this agency he has made it one of the largest in Eastern Indiana. Mr. Leffler helped organize the Western Reserve Life Insurance Company of Muncie, serving as vice president and a member of its board, and succeeded David P. Campbell at his death as president of the company. This insurance business was sold in 1927 to the Northern States Company of Hammond. In 1908 Mr. Leffler helped organize the People's Trust Company of Muncie and has been on its board of directors continuously.

He served one term as junior vice commander of the Indiana Division, Sons of Veterans. He is affiliated with Delaware Lodge No. 46, A. F. and A. M., is a Knight Templar and Scottish Rite Mason, a past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, a past sachem of the Improved Order of Red Men, member of the Loyal 'Order of Moose, Sons of Veterans, Travelers Protective Association, and is a former vice president of the Kiwanis Club. He is a Republican and a member of the Friends Memorial Church, being on the board of trustees and the pastoral committee.

Mr. Leffler married at Eaton; Indiana, June 23, 1888, Miss Nettie A. Sloniker, who was reared and educated in Delaware County. She is a member of the Friends Memorial Church at Muncie, the Eastern Star and the Federation of Women's Clubs. Her parents were David W. and Elizabeth (Green) Sloniker. Her father died in 1917 and her mother in 1918, and they are buried at Beech Grove, Muncie. Mr. and Mrs. Leffler had one child, Josephine Lucille, who graduated from the Muncie High School in 1915, also took work in the Muncie Normal, now the Ball State Teachers College, and was a kindergarten teacher until her marriage to Mr. O. D. Smith.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray