GEORGE C. CULLOM, prominent business man of Frankfort, is an alumnus of two of Indiana's best known higher institutions of learning, Butler and Purdue, and has had thirty- five years of active business experience, at first as a druggist at Frankfort and for the past fifteen years as an executive of the wholesale house of W. M. Shafor & Company.

Mr. Cullom was born on a farm near Culver's Station in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, November 23, 1872, son of W. H. and Mary (Bausman) Cullom. His early environment was a farm, with attendance at rural schools, and in 1889, at the age of seventeen he entered Butler College. He was there three years, and contributed to the budding prestige of Butler College athletics, being a member of the football team of 1890 and 1891, a championship team both years. In 1892 he entered the School of Pharmacy of Purdue University at Lafayette, graduating in 1894. At Purdue he also played baseball and football and was a member of the Purdue championship football team of the early 1890s, and it was thirty-five years before the university was able to repeat and again claim the honors of a championship in Middle West football.

Mr. Cullom after graduating from Purdue became a member of the firm Cullom & Rous, druggists at Frankfort. He sold his interest to Mr. Rous in 1900 and following that was a partner with Charles Ashman in the drug business until 1914, when he sold out. Leaving the drug field, he became associated with the W. M. Shafor & Company, wholesale grocers. He acquired a financial interest in the corporation, was made secretary and treasurer, and still holds those executive offices, and is also sales manager.

Mr. Cullom through the years has been a leader in organized commercial, civic and social activities at Frankfort. He helped organize the first Chamber of Commerce and was its president two years, and is now vice president of the Rotary Club. In 1928 he was one of the local men who founded the Country Club, and in 1929 he succeeded E. O. Burget as president of the club. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and B. P. O. Elks, is a Republican, and he and his family are Presbyterians.

He married, November 22, 1899, Miss Maude Coulter, daughter of David Alexander and Mary (Depew) Coulter, of Frankfort. Their only child is Paul Coulter Cullom, who was born February 11, 1904, and is now connected with the Fletcher-American Company of Indianapolis. Paul C. Cullom married in September, 1928, Miss Esther Harding, of Des Moines, Iowa.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DAVID ALEXANDER COULTER was for nearly three-quarters of a century a resident of Clinton County, Indiana. When he died at Frankfort, June 11, 1928, he left an impressive record of constructive business achievement, sound and public spirited citizenship and a relationship with his community and fellow men that deserve the memorial of a record that can be read by future generations. He was a man of very strong character, and it was his character that gave his material achievements added value and influence.

He was born in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, December 21, 1846. His grandfather Coulter was a native of Ireland and came to America when a young man, locating in Juniata County where he married and reared his family and where for many years he was distinguished as an eloquent, earnest and scholarly minister of the Presbyterian Church. His son, John Coulter, Jr., father of David A. Coulter, was born in Juniata County in 1813, and in 1854 brought his family to Indiana, locating on a farm in Ross Township. He died at Rossville, September 24, 1864. John Coulter, Jr., married in 1836 Margaret Given, daughter of James and Nancy (Enslow) Given, of Juniata County. Her father followed the Coulters to Clinton County, Indiana, in 1856, and he and his wife spent their last years at Frankfort.

David Alexander Coulter was eight years of age when his parents moved west to Clinton County, but he remained there, completing his education, and it was in 1863 that he came to Frankfort, where for a short time he was clerk in the firm of A. B. and B. Given, his uncles. In the spring of 1864 he enlisted in Company H of the 135th Indiana Infantry and served until September 29, 1864. Most of the time he was on garrison duty and several times came in contact with the Confederate cavalry under General Forrest. After his military service he was clerk for John Brown, a Logansport merchant, until 1867, when he returned to Frankfort and joined his brother, J. W. Coulter, in the firm J. W. Coulter & Brother, clothing merchants. During these early years the community was given evidence of his unusual business capacity and leadership. He helped organize the First National Bank of Frankfort and became a member of its first board of directors. In 1871, disposing of his interest in the clothing business to his brother, he moved to Rockville and for a short time gave his attention to coal mining operations there, and also assisted in establishing the Parke Banking Company of Rockville. After his return to Frankfort he rejoined his brother and they erected a new business block for their store. In 1878 he acquired his brother's interest in the clothing business, but in 1881 disposed of his mercantile interests and then entered the Farmers Bank of Frankfort.

The later generation of Frankfort citizens remember him chiefly for his activities as a banker and financier. He was cashier of the Farmers Bank until 1904, when he became its president. He was president of the Waterworks Company of Frankfort, and was auditor of the American Life Insurance Company of Indianapolis. These and many other activities occupied him and made of his career one of usefulness and service until his death.

David A. Coulter for eight years was commissary general of the Indiana State Militia, with the title of colonel, on the staff of Governors Mount and Durbin. He rendered some valuable service as trustee of the Indiana State Prison at Michigan City. During the nine years he was president of the Frankfort School Board the new high school building was erected, at that time one of the largest and finest high schools in the state. He was for two terms a member of the council. He was deeply attached to the principles as well as the personnel of the Republican party. He took a large measure of satisfaction in having served as a delegate to the national convention at St. Louis in 1896, when William McKinley was nominated to run against the free silver champion, William J. Bryan. His public services as well as his private business career were guided by strong convictions, positive character and integrity. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the B. P. O. Elks and the Presbyterian Church.

David Alexander Coulter married in January, 1874, Miss Mary Depew, of Parke County, Indiana. She survives him and resides at Frankfort. Three children were born to their union, the only one living being Maude, wife of George C. Cullom, of Frankfort.

Click here for photo.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DAVID INGLE, Evansville coal operator, is a great-grandson of John Ingle, who arrived at Evansville August 1, 1818, direct from England, and whose family through four generations, covering more than a century, have provided personal leadership, business resourcefulness and vision in the enlargement and growth of Evansville's destiny as a commercial and civic center.

John Ingle was born in Huntington County, England, in 1788, was an English farmer and left his country largely as a result of the heavy losses to English agriculture during the Napoleonic wars. In Southern Indiana he bought a farm, establishing the country home since known as Inglefield. He served as country postmaster, and died at the age of eighty-six. His son, John Ingle, Jr., was born, January 12, 1812. His early education was largely the result of reading his fatherís library in the log cabin home in Southern Indiana. He learned the trade of cabinet maker, and while employed in Philadelphia studied law in the office of Thomas Armstrong. Two of his fellow students were George R. Graham, who subsequently became editor of Graham's Magazine, and Charles J. Peterson, founder of Petersonís Magazine. He was admitted to practice and opened an office in Evansville in1838, but in 1850 gave up law in order to devote his time to business. John Ingle, Jr., is credited with supplying the enthusiasm, the organization and other resources which made possible the construction of the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad, one of the pioneer railroad lines of Southern Indiana. He was president of the company until 1873, two years before his death. In 1866 he organized John Ingles & Company, coal mining operators, and that company started the mining industry in Southern Indiana. John Ingle, Jr., was the first president of the Evansville Library Association. He was an intense patriot during the Civil war, and throughout his life he practiced and set a splendid example of Christian manhood and conduct. While he was head of the railroad he permitted the operation of the road only six days of the week in order that the railway employees might have their Sunday for rest. John Ingle, Jr., married Isabella C. Davidson, whose father, William Davidson, was a native of Scotland.

One of their seven children was David Ingle, Sr., who died October 18, 1909, and who for many years was active in the coal mining industry, being founder of the Ayrshire Coal Company. David Ingle; Sr., married Fanny Burbank, who is a resident of Evansville, now seventy-four years of age. Their children were David, Frances, wife of William Bebb, William D., who married Grace Ross and has five children, and Katherine.

David Ingle Jr., was born in Evansville October 25, 1875, attended grammar and high schools and graduated as a mining engineer from the Rose Polytechnic Institute at Terre Haute, Indiana, in 1897. His active experience, covering over thirty years, has been in coal mining, as an engineer and operator, and he is now operating the Ayrshire Coal Company, founded by his father in 1880. Mr. Ingles is a member of the American Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Masonic fraternity and in politics is a Republican.

He married, October 5, 1904, Miss Effie Hughes, daughter of R. P. and Effie (Rose) Hughes, of an old Evansville family. Her father was president and active head of the William Hughes' Company. Mr. and Mrs. Ingle have two children, David III and Thomas H. These sons, born in 1906 and 1920, represent the fifth generation of the Ingle family at Evansville. David III graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1928 and is now associated as an engineer with his father in the coal industry. On April 6, 1931, David Ingle III married Miss Susan Hopkins, of Evansville, daughter of John Stuart Hopkins, a prominent Evansville business man and political leader.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


THOMAS M. MARTIN is the resourceful and popular chief of the police department of the historic old City of Vincennes, judicial center of Knox County. His has been long and efficient service in connection with this important municipal department. His first appointment to his present office was made in April, 1917, and he served a term of four years. In July, 1926, he was again appointed for a term of four years and in January, 1930, was reappointed under the J, W. Kimmell administration.

Mr. Martin was born in Lawrence County, Illinois, June 15, 1879, and is a son of John M. Martin, who was born and reared in Ohio and whose father, Micheaux Martin, was born in Virginia, of French ancestry, he having removed from the Old Dominion State and become a pioneer settler and farmer in Washington County, Ohio, much of the land that is now the site of the City of Marietta, the county seat, having-been a part of his original farm estate. John M. Martin gave the greater part of his active life to farm industry and specialized in the raising of live stock. He supplemented his industrial activities in Lawrence County, Illinois, by there serving a number of years as postmaster of Bridgeport. He married Miss Mary Ann Scalley, of Louisville, Kentucky, and they became the parents of seven children: Byron P., is deceased; John E., who married Miss Nellie Carney, resides in Vincennes; William D., is deceased; Anna, who resides at Vincennes, Indiana, is the widow of C. H. Bubenzer, who was here a member of the City Council, in 1917, during the J. D. McDowell Administration; Thomas M., of this review, was next in order of birth; Margaret is the wife of Henry E. Sandifer, of Vincennes; and Mary is the wife of Frank Smith, of Walbach County, Illinois.

Thomas M. Martin received his early education by attending the public schools of his native county, and as a youth he became identified with railroad construction work, in the capacity of fireman of a steam-shovel. He was thus engaged several years, and thereafter he was engaged in the meat-market business in Illinois during a period of six years. In the initial period of his residence in Vincennes, Indiana, the city's present chief of police was here concerned with business affairs, and he later passed a number of years in the western states. He was first appointed Chief of Police of the Vincennes department in April, 1917, and served until 1921. In the latter year came a change in the administration of municipal affairs and he retired from the police service. During the ensuing three years he was employed at Universal City, California, and he then returned to Vincennes and again became a member of the police department, of which he was made the chief in July, 1926, his administration in this office having fully justified his reappointment in January, 1930. He has the work of his department thoroughly systematized and has the confidence and loyal cooperation of the other members of the department-eighteen in number. He was elected president of the Indiana Association of Police Chiefs in 1928, and was made a life member of that association.

Mr. Martin married at Vincennes, Indiana, July 11, 1921, Augusta Rush, daughter of Samuel and Hattie Rush, of Vincennes. Mr. and Mrs. Martin have one child, Mary Ann, born September 24, 1924. In his political affiliation Mr. Martin is a strong Democrat, and he is a chartered member of the Jefferson Club of Knox County.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


CHARLES POOLE CLEMENS. In 1927 one of the prominent business men of Princeton passed from the companionship of friends and kindred into the unseen world to which all mankind is hastening. Through six and fifty years, rich in the fruit of good deeds, Charles Poole Clemens discharged every duty of life, as citizen son, brother, philanthropist and Christian. A true patriot, an ardent though not blatant reformer, a faithful friend, loving and beloved.

Mr. Clemens was born at Greensburg, Indiana, November 25, 1871. Left an orphan at an early age by the death of his parents, he was reared in the home of his grandmother and acquired a public school education. When about seventeen years of age he became identified with the stone-cutting trade and subsequently with the business of building monuments. From Greensburg he moved to Oakland City with his family and there made his home until 1913, when he settled permanently at Princeton and became founder and owner of the Princeton Memorial Works, with which business he continued to be identified until his final illness, his death following about two weeks later as a result of heart disease and other complications. Mr. Clemens was early trained to habits of industry, strict economy and perfect integrity, enduring qualities which he carried with him through life. He made himself the friend and helper of those in his employ and those who were associated with him. Much might be said of his benevolence. He regarded himself as a steward indeed, and he was a faithful one. He was a member of the Blue Lodge of Masonry, a past worthy patron of Golden Fleece Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1902 Mr. Clemens was united in marriage with Miss Ollie M. Clark, of Greensburg, who survives him and they became the parents of six children: Poole, Charles O., Ora, Lloyd, Nellie Mae and Mildred Virginia, all of Princeton. Mr. Clemens is also survived by a sister, Mrs. James Ayers, of Denver, Colorado

Since the death of Mr. Clemens the business has been owned and occupied by Poole and Charles O. Clemens, under the style of Princeton Monument Works, Clemens Brothers, proprietors. Both are college men and progressive and enterprising business citizens. Charles O. Clemens was attending Oakland City College when his father was stricken with his fatal illness, and gave up his studies to hasten home to assist in the business. Both of the sons had their business training when young under their father, who taught them the art of stone-cutting, and some of the most beautiful and massive monuments to be found at Princeton and near-by communities have come from the modern plant at the corner of Spruce and Prince streets, where pneumatic tools and appliances are used in all the work done. Both brothers are Masons and Mrs. Charles P. Clemens belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star and the Daughters of the American Revolution. The family is widely known and greatly respected throughout the county.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILBUR C. PATTERSON .is known and valued as one of the progressive citizens and business men of Indianapolis, where he is owner and manager of the prosperous enterprise that is conducted under the title of the Patterson Shade Company, with headquarters at 132 North Delaware Street. Mr. Patterson was born at Morristown, Shelby County, Indiana, January 22,1887, and is a son of Homer S. and Ollie (Fox) Patterson, both likewise natives of Indiana, where the former was born at Kokomo. The Patterson family was early founded in Pennsylvania and from that state came the first representatives in Indiana, where was gained a goodly measure of pioneer precedence.

Wilbur C. Patterson received the advantages of the public schools of Alexandria, Tennessee, and Memphis, Tennessee, and after completing his high school studies he found, at the age of nineteen years, employment as clerk in a leading department store in Memphis. He was thus engaged ten years and in the meanwhile gained a thorough and valuable business experience. At the time of severing his connection with this line of service he initiated his independent business career, by forming a partnership with R. L. Williams in the window-shade business. This fir established its business at Memphis, Tennessee, and the partnership continued five years in the original location and removal was then made to Indianapolis, where the business has since been successfully continued, at first under the title of Patterson-Williams Shade Company and later under the present title of Patterson Shade Company, Mr. Patterson now having sole ownership of the large and prosperous business built up by the company.

In the World war period Mr. Patterson enlisted for service in the Ordnance Corps of the United States Army, in which he gained the rank of sergeant, and with which he continued in service until the armistice brought the war to a close, though his unit was not called to overseas service. He duly received his honorable discharge and he is now an active member of the American Legion. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party and he and his wife are members of the Meridian Street Methodist Episcopal Church in their home city. Mr. Patterson has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, besides being a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is an active member of the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce, is a director of the Hoosier Motor Club, and has membership in the Optimist Club.

The year 1920 marked the marriage of Mr. Patterson to Miss Bertha Louise Maxwell, who was born in Ohio, and the one child of this union is a winsome daughter, Mary Louise, born in the year 1927.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM LANE EWING. In Knox County, three miles east of Vincennes, on U. S. Highway No. 61, is located the Mont Clare country estate of the Ewing family. This is one of the show places of Indiana, a practical farm and also a country place of great beauty that for man years has been carefully parked and landscaped. There is a beautiful house, the entire environment shows the care and labor of more than a century, during which it has been in the Ewing family.

This was the birthplace of William Lane Ewing, Sr., who was born there in 1812 and when a boy was taken to Saint Louis, where he grew up and became one of the most conspicuous citizens of that city. He was in the wholesale commission business for many years and a prominent leader in public affairs. He delivered the opening address when the famous Eads bridge was opened to traffic across the Mississippi River.

His son, William Lane Ewing, Jr., was born in Saint Louis, March 16,1843, was educated at Saint Louis, completing his training in the Christian Brothers College. He then joined his father in the wholesale commission business, and was elected and served as mayor of Saint Louis in 1882-1884. When he retired from business he returned to the old home, Mont Clare, at Vincennes, and devoted the last years of his life to the improvement of the farm. He died at Vincennes June 4, 1904.

The founder of the Mont Clare estate was Nathaniel Ewing, a native of Pennsylvania and of Scotch ancestry. He established Mont Clare at Vincennes whi1e Indiana was still a part of the Northwest Territory. Nathaniel Ewing was a banker and lawyer, and for a number of years was connected with the Government land office at Vincennes. William Lane Ewing, Sr., married a member of the Berthold family of Saint Louis, connected with the Chotoes of that city.

William Lane Ewing, Jr., married in July, 1883, at Vincennes, Miss Mary Flemming, who survives him and continues to occupy the Mont Clare estate. She is a daughter of John and Harriett (Schafer) Flemming. The Flemmings came from Ireland and settled in Virginia and about 1642 moved to Frederick, Maryland. The Flemming colonial farm home during the Civil war was used as a hospital. Mrs. Ewing was one of a family of seven children. Her sister Clara married Charles Heyman of Indianapolis, Indiana. Her brother John has been active in public affairs in Saint Louis and her other living sister, Alice, is the wife of T. C. Whalen, of Indianapolis.

Mrs. Ewing has one son, William Le Clede Ewing. He married for his first wife Ola Du Kate, who died at Biloxi, Mississippi, leaving two children, William L.. and Nathaniel D. Mrs. Ewing is a member of the Methodist Church and the Fortnightly Club of Vincennes.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


OLIVER W. MCGAUGHEY is a prominent Fountain County attorney, member of the law firm of Wallace & McGaughey at Veedersburg.

He was born in Putnam County, Indiana, December 20, 1870. The McGaughey family came from County Down, Ireland, being Scotch-Irish, and first settled in Virginia, in the village of McGaheysville, the landmark of his family's settlement there. Mr. McGaughey's father, Jacob McGaughey, was born in Putnam County, Indiana, and during the Civil war was with a regiment of Indiana Infantry. He enlisted at Greencastle, was sent to Camp Morton and served until the close of the war, when he came out with the rank of sergeant. He spent his active life as a farmer and died in 1924. Jacob McGaughey married Mary A. Leonard. They had a family of three sons and one daughter. The son, G. Stanley, is a minister of the Christian Church, Saint Paul, Indiana, and is married and has two children. Charles McGaughey, an attorney practicing law at Greencastle, is married and has one child. The daughter is Mrs. Minnie Call, who lives south of Greencastle.

Oliver W. McGaughey grew up on a farm and was educated in the public schools of Putnam County, attended the Shurtleff College Academy School at Upper Alton, Illinois, and in 1899 was graduated with the A. B. degree from Wabash College. His first profession was the ministry of the Christian Church. For three years he was with the Sixth Christian Church of Indianapolis, spent two years in the Central Christian Church at Columbus, Indiana, for two years was pastor of the First Christian Church at Everett, Washington. He still does occasional preaching and is a splendid example of Christian manhood and conduct.

While in the ministry he prepared himself for the law, taking post-graduate work in Butler University and completing his law course with the American School of Law. He was admitted to the bar in 1909 and has had a busy practice for twenty years. For two years he was honored with the office of president of the Fountain County Bar Association and in 1909 was elected as a Republican to the office of mayor of Veedersburg. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, the Tribe of Ben Hur, the Modern Woodmen of America, and was a member of the Indiana House of Representatives in the session of 1931.

Mr. McGaughey married, November 1, 1899, Miss Alberta Booe, daughter of Arthur Booe, of Veedersburg. To this union one son, Gilbert, was born, who is now in business at San Diego, California, and is married and has one son. Mr. McGaughey, on September 17, 1911, married Miss Ardella Inlow, daughter of John B. Inlow and granddaughter of J. M. Livengood. Mr. and Mrs. McGaughey have two children, John Max and Martha Alice, both attending school at Veedersburg.

Clickhere for photo.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray