LLOYD J. VOYLES, Evansville attorney, with offices in the Mercantile Bank Building, was overseas during the World war., and completed his legal education after returning home. He practiced at Saint Louis for one year.

He was born in Edwards County in Southern Illinois, December 1, 1899, and his parents, Lloyd F. and Lura (Melrose) Voyles, were born in the same county. His father is a retired real estate man.

Lloyd J. Voyles, the only child of his parents, attended public schools in Edwards County and in 1918 completed his preparatory work in the McKendree Academy at Lebanon, Illinois, the oldest academy in the Northwest Territory. As soon as he was out of school he enlisted in the army and went overseas in the summer of 1918, remaining in France about a year. He became a student in the University of Illinois, but completed his education and took his law course at Washington University in Saint Louis, in 1922. After being admitted to the Missouri bar, July 18, 1922, he remained in Saint Louis, for six months associated in practice with Nathan Frank and for six months was with the legal department of the Travelers Insurance Company. Mr. Voyles came to Evansville in September, 1923, and for two years was associated with the law firm of Walker & Walker. He has been practicing alone since 1926. He is a Democrat in politics, but his whole time and exertions are given to his business as a lawyer.

Mr. Voyles married at Saint Louis, November 18, 1922, Miss Grace Spencer, daughter of Albert B.. and Anna M. Spencer. Mr. and Mrs. Voyles have two children, Patsy, born February 6, 1924, and Lloyd, Jr., born September 15,1928.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


THOMAS HUNNELL, a retired business man of Evansville has lived in that city all his life, and his own work and influence have contributed to a very honorable family record, so that the name Hunnell has a substantial influence wherever spoken in that community.

Mr. Hunnell was born at Evansville April 3, 1854. His father, William Hunnell, located in Evansville in 1834. He conducted a planning mill and for many years took an active part in the upbuilding of the city. For twelve years he was a member of the City Council. He died across the Ohio River at Henderson, Kentucky, in 1909. William Hunnell married Mary E. McCorkle, a native of North Carolina. They were the parents of nine children, David, Henry, Elizabeth, James, John, Rachael,, Thomas, Jacob and Lida. Mr. Hunnell is the only surviving son, and two of his sisters are living, Rachael and Lida. Rachael is the widow of Henry Haynie, lives in California, and has a daughter, Emma. Lida is the wife of Fred Tennemyer, a retired building contractor of Evansville.

Thomas Hunnell attended public schools in Evansville and as a youth learned the painting and decorating business. He did the work of a journeyman until 1894, when he took up the contracting business for himself and was probably the leading painting and decorating contractor in the city until he retired from the business in 1922. He now looks after his investments, including several business buildings, and is also a stockholder in the Sonntag Hotel and Lowes Theater. Mr. Hunnell is a Republican in politics.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM F. MORRIS, physician and surgeon, is a native of Gibson County, .Indiana, and it is to his home community and his home people he has devoted his active years as a professional man. Doctor Morris resides at Fort Branch.

He was born in Gibson County, September 14, 1875. His father, John T. Morris, was a native of the same Indiana county, and was a Civil war soldier with Company F of the Fourth Indiana Cavalry. He participated in several battles and was once slightly wounded on the jaw. John T. Morris was born in 1838 and lived to be eighty-four years, eleven months of age, passing away in December, 1922. He was one of the last survivors of Grant's armies. After the war he followed farming and also operated saw mills. John T. Morris married Elizabeth Miller, who was born in .Gibson County and died in 1917. They were the parents of six children: George T., of Elberfeld, Indiana, married Mary Heldt and has four children; Dr. J. L., a physician practicing at Princeton, Indiana, married Artie Epperson and has one child; Silas, of Elberfeld, married Augusta Ebracht and has two children; R. B. Morris, of Elberfeld, married Lula Smith and has four children; Dr. William F.; and Eva May, wife of W. C. May.

William F. Morris grew up in a rural locality in Gibson County, attended the common schools and high school, and had work in the Princeton Normal School. He completed his professional education in one of the oldest and best medical colleges in the country, Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, where he was graduated M. D. in 1900. Soon after getting his diploma he located at Fort Branch, and has been a reliable doctor in that community for the past thirty years. He is a member of the Gibson County, Indiana State and American Medical Associations. During the World war Doctor Morris spent much time in helping raise funds and in other work of a patriotic nature. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Methodist Church, and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

He married in September, 1902, Miss Ercel Arburn. They have one son, Ludson D., born in September, 1907. He graduated from Evansville College with the A. B. degree and in 1929 entered Chicago Medical College, with a view to following the same profession as his father.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


DR. EVERETT ALLEN KING, physician and surgeon in Fort Wayne, has brought to the important work of his profession a thorough training and also the indispensable requisites of youth, enthusiasm, high ideals and a tremendous energy which accounts for his rapidly increasing popularity.

Doctor King was born in Crawford County, Indiana, October 28, 1901. His parents, Joel V. and Dora (Allen) King, were also born in Crawford County, his father in 1878 and his mother in 1880. The grandfather, George King, was an early settler of Indiana and is now eighty-eight years of age, a resident of Orange County. The maternal grandfather, Archibald Allen, was a Union soldier in an Indiana regiment in the Civil war and died in 1927, at the age of eighty-two. Joel V. King is a retired farmer, a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Christian Church.

Dr. Everett A. King graduated from high school at English, Indiana, in 1920, took his pre-medical course in Valparaiso and graduated from the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati in 1925. His work in medical college was supplemented by practical training and experience as an interne in the Methodist Hospital at Fort Wayne during 1925-26, and when he left his duties as interne he immediately engaged in private practice. He is a member of the Allen County, Indiana State and American Medical Associations. He also belongs to the Phi Alpha, Gamma medical fraternity. In 1928 he was candidate for the Republican nomination for county coroner and took defeat by a narrow margin of three votes. In 1930 he was appointed deputy coroner of Allen County. Doctor King is a member of the B. P. O. Elks, Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Orchard Ridge Country Club and the Trinity Lutheran Church.

He is most happily married and has a wonderful wife and daughter. He married, May 16, 1927, Miss Margaret Louise Simminger, of Fort Wayne. Their daughter is Sylvia Louise, born July 6, 1928.

Click here for photo.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


JOSEPH W. SMADEL, M. D., has been established in the practice of his profession in the historic old City of Vincennes during a period of more than thirty-five years, and his personality, ability and successful achievement mark him as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of his native state.

Doctor Smadel was born at New Albany, county seat of Floyd County, Indiana, December 5, 1871, and is a son of Tobias and Magdalena (Schau) Smadel, who were born and reared in Baden Baden, Germany, where their marriage was solemnized. Tobias Smadel received his youthful education in the excellent schools of his native land and was a self- reliant and ambitious young man of twenty years when he came to the United States. He was long and successfully established in the mercantile business at New Albany, Indiana, and in the period of the Civil war he there served as a member of the Indiana Home Guard. He and his wife continued their residence at New Albany until their death and they are survived by three children: William M: is still a resident of the old home City of New Albany; Dr. Joseph W., of this review, was next in order of birth; and George, who was a retired farmer, and died at Auburn, Indiana, in 1929.

Doctor Smadel received the advantages of the public schools of New Albany, including the high school, and in preparation for the profession of his choice he went to the metropolis of Kentucky and entered the medical department of the University of Louisville. In this institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1896, and in the year that he thus received his degree of Doctor of Medicine he established his residence at Vincennes, in which city he has continued in active general practice during the intervening years, with standing as one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Knox County. He has insistently kept in touch with the advances made in medical and surgical science, has been a close student of the best standard and periodical literature of his profession and has taken effective post-graduate courses in the New York Post Graduate School of Medicine and in the Peter Brent Brigham Hospital in the City of Boston, Massachusetts. In the period of continuous service Doctor Smadel now ranks as the second oldest physician in Vincennes, and he has continuously maintained his office headquarters at 729 Main Street during a period of over a quarter of a century. He controls a large and representative practice, has given several terms of service as a member of the city board of health, and he is one of the honored and influential members of the Knox County Medical Society, having served the society two terms as president, besides maintaining active membership in the Indiana State Medical Association and the American Medical Association. As a member of the State Medical Association he was for six years counselor for the Second Congressional District of Indiana.

Doctor Smadel is unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican party, and while he has had no desire for political preferment he is known and valued as a liberal, progressive and public-spirited citizen. The Doctor is affiliated with both York and Scottish Rite bodies of the Masonic fraternity, as well as the Mystic Shrine, and his is the distinction of having his basic affiliation with Vincennes Lodge No.1, A. F. and A. M., the, the oldest in State of Indiana.

The first marriage of Doctor Smadel was with Miss Clara Green, of Detroit, Michigan, she having died in 1905, and the one surviving child being Joseph E., who received his B. A. degree in 1927 from the University of Pennsylvania, and his M. D. degree from Washington University of Saint Louis with the class of 1931. For his second wife Doctor Smadel wedded Miss Fannie E. Stitzel, of Louisville, Kentucky, and she likewise is deceased, no children having been born of this union.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


PHILIP E. ROWE, postmaster of his native City of Mount Vernon, judicial center of Posey County, was here born on the 18th of July, 1897, and he is a representative of one of the old and honored families of the Hoosier State. He is a son of Isaac A. Rowe and Ottillie (Prenzel) Rowe, the former of whom was born in Harrison County, this state, and the latter in Posey County, at Mount Vernon, where they still maintain their home. Isaac A. Rowe served at one time as sheriff of Posey County, but the major part of his active career has been devoted to the L. & N. Railroad Company as bridge foreman. Of the four children the eldest is Maurice P., who is a telegraph operator by occupation and who married Miss Mary Gill, their two children being Phyllis and Robert. Lester G., who is now one of the progressive dairy farmers of New York State and who is a former county surveyor of this county, married Miss Margaret Zerbe, and their one child is a daughter, Elizabeth Caroline. Philiip E., of this review, is next younger of the children. Charles T., who is .claim adjuster for the Fidelity Casualty Company of New York, married Miss Vivian Coers, and they maintain their residence in Indiana's capital city.

Afer being graduated in the Mount Vernon High School Philip E. Rowe was for a time employed as clerk in a local mercantile establishment, and later he was associated with his father in the contracting and building operations on the L. & N. Railroad until there came to him the call of patriotism, when the nation became involved in the great World war. He was but eighteen years of age when he enlisted in the Indiana National Guard, and in his World war service he became second lieutenant in Company L, One Hundred Fifty-second United States Infantry, from which he was transferred, in 1918, to ,Company G, One Hundred Fifty-first Infantry, and advanced to the rank of first lieutenant. With this latter command he served as divisional bombing officer, he having been sent overseas in September, 1918, as a member of an advance school detachment of the Thirty-eighth Division, and having thus attended the bombing school at Chatillon-sur-Seine, where he was appointed an instructor at the completion of his technical course and where he continued his service in such capacity until the school was closed, in 1919. He had formulated plans for continuing in service in the United States Army, but abandoned this purpose. After his return to his native land he received his honorable discharge, at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, June 20, 1919.

After terminating his military career Mr.Rowe was for several months associated with one of his brothers in the garage business at Ziegler, Illinois, and he next gave a year of service as a specialty salesman for the great Chicago meat-packing concern of Swift & Company. During the ensuing two years he was engaged in the clothing business at Mount Vernon, as junior member of the firm of Lowenhaupt & Rowe. He then sold his interest to his partner, and thereafter he was a traveling salesman for the Crown Chair Company until 1925, in which year he was appointed acting postmaster at Mount Vernon, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the regular incumbent, A. W. Mackey. He thus initiated his service on the 1st of September, and on the 15th of the following December he was given official appointment as postmaster, of which position he has since continued the incumbent and in which he is giving most effective and loyal administration.

Mr. Rowe is a stalwart in the local ranks of the Republican party, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in their home city. In the Masonic fraternity his basic affiliation is with Beulah Lodge No. 578, A. F. and A. M., at Mount Vernon, and in the Scottish Rite he has received the thirty-second degree, besides which he is a Noble of Hadi Temple of the Mystic Shrine, in the City of Evansville. He has membership in Mount Vernon Lodge No. 277, B. P. O. E., is actively affiliated with the American Legion, and has membership in the Mount Vernon Chamber of Commerce and the local Kiwanis Club.

Mr.. Rowe still retains vital interest in military affairs and in addition to being a member of the Officers Reserve Corps of the United States Army he is an officer in the .Indiana National Guard, in which he is captain of Battery E, One Hundred Thirty-ninth Field Artillery, he having organized this battery, which has its headquarters at Mount Vernon, and having been its captain from the beginning. The battery enjoys the use of a fine state-owned armory and stables, as well as a large drill field in the city. Mount Vernon also has the only tax-built World War Memorial in Indiana, a beautiful monument secured through the untiring efforts of the American Legion Post. Mr. Rowe was president of the Kiwanis Club of Mount Vernon for the year 1929, and through service of ancestors he is eligible for affiliation with the Sons of the American Revolution. Mr. Rowe is the owner of real estate in his native city and is a stockholder and a vice president of the company that owns and operates the tollbridge at New Harmony, Posey County. He is also chairman of the Disaster Preparedness Committee of the American Red Cross for Posey County.

At Evansville, Indiana, on the 20th of September, 1923, Mr. Rowe was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Cuyler Holton, daughter of the late William E. Holton, who was a prominent banker at the time of his death and whose father, Dr. William M. Holton, was long a leading physician and surgeon of Posey County. Mrs. Otillie (Brinkman) Holton, widowed mother of Mrs. Rowe, is a daughter of the late Henry Brinkman, who was a prominent merchant in Posey County many years. Mr. and Mrs. Rowe have one child, William, born June 11, 1924.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


LOUIS W. THOMAS is a loyal and efficient arbiter of law and order in his native county, and his secure place in popular esteem is shown in his having been elected to his present executive office, that of sheriff of Posey County. He is a representative of the third generation of the Thomas family in this county, his birth having here occurred on the parental home farm in Black Township, August 3, 1880. In this county were likewise born his parents, Miles W. and Mary J. (Lewis) Thomas, and the respective families established residence in Posey County in the pioneer days. Miles W. Thomas was long numbered among the substantial exponents of farm industry in his native county, was influential in community affairs and served six years as trustee of Black Township. He and his wife now reside in the City of Evansville, where he is living virtually retired, and of their six children two died in early childhood and Minnie at the age of fourteen years. Of the three surviving children Louis W., of this review, is the eldest. Elizabeth, who is thirty-eight years of age at the time of this writing, in 1929, is the wife of William Woodward, a painter by trade and vocation, and they reside .in Mount Vernon, judicial center of Posey County. They have no children. Thompson, who is twenty- seven years of age, is successfully engaged in farm enterprise in Kentucky, he having married Miss Minnie Loveland, of Posey County, and their two children being Betty Ann and Dorothy May.

The childhood and early youth of Louis W. Thomas were compassed by the invigorating influences of the home farm, and he continued to be associated with its operations until he was twenty years of age, his educational advantages in the meanwhile having been those of the public schools. At the age noted he engaged in farm enterprise in an independent way, and he continued in the active management of his farm, in Black Township until 1927, when he sold the property, he having been elected county sheriff in the preceding November and having removed to Mount Vernon and assumed his official duties January 1, 1927. He is giving a most efficient administration in this position, and is thus giving further evidence of his loyalty to and interest in his native county. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party, he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his wife have membership in the Baptist Church.

At Mount Vernon, on the 13th of October, 1907, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle M. Crunk, who likewise was born and reared in Posey County and who is a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Barnett) Crunk, her father having been one of the prosperous farmers of this county at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have three children: Thelma Elizabeth, who was born December 5, 1909, is the wife of Edward Kingsley, a progressive young farmer of Posey County, and they have one child, Zeltha Jean. Dorothy Olivia, born December 16, 1911, and Louis Lee, born November 5, 1920, are attending the Mount Vernon public schools and represents much of juvenile buoyance in the parental home.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


WILLIAM MICHAUX FORD left a large and worthy impress upon the civic and material history of his native town and county, was in the most significant degree loyal, progressive and public-spirited as a citizen, and the community manifested its sense of loss and bereavement when he was called from the stage of life's mortal endeavors, his death having occurred at New Harmony, Posey County, June 19, 1923. Mr. Ford had large and varied property and capitalistic interests in this community and was president of the Mount Vernon National Bank, at the county seat, at the time of his death.

Mr. Ford was born at New Harmony on the 19th of January, 1846, and was a son of Richard and Prudence (Birkbeck) Ford, whose marriage was here solemnized, the latter having been born in the State of Illinois . Richard Ford became a leading merchant at New Harmony, and was a large land owner both in Posey County and in the State of Illinois, he having been eighty-two years old at the time of his death, in 1901, and his wife likewise having passed the closing years of her life at New Harmony-the family home for years. She was ninety-one years old when she died in 1915. Of the eight children two died in early childhood; William M., of this memoir, died at the age of seventy-seven years; Morris died at the age of seventy-two; George was seventy-six years of age at the time of his death; Charles is seventy-eight in 1931; Ann B. is seventy-two and Lincoln R. is sixty-eight years of age at the time of this writing, in 1931. Morris married Helen Chaffin, and he is survived by one son, Edwin C., a Posey County landowner. George, who was a representative farmer, married Eliza Lichtenberger, and he is not survived by children. Charles is an exponent of farm industry both in Posey County and Illinois, the maiden name of his wife was Mollie Wiley and they have no children; Miss Ann B. resides in the home of the widow of her brother William M., of this review; Lincoln R. is a substantial farmer in Posey County, the maiden name of his wife was May Rose Husband, and they have no children.

The schools of New Harmony afforded William M. Ford his youthful education, and after leaving school he became actively associated with his father's mercantile business. He long continued in the general merchandise business at New Harmony, where he also owned and operated the flour mill of which his only son and child is now in charge. For forty years Mr. Ford was associated in the mill with John Corbin, who was president until he died in 1911 and Mr. Ford bought it in 1916. He organized and was president of the Mount Vernon and Evansville Traction Company, that operated cars between those points for many years. He was associated with Braddock McGregor in promoting the installation of well equipped electric light plants at both New Harmony and Mount Vernon, and after operating the plant at the county seat a number of years they sold it to the city, as did they later sell the New Harmony plant, which likewise became a municipal concern. Mr. Ford was the owner of several valuable farms in Posey County and, as before stated, was president of the Mount Vernon National Bank at the time of his death. He had important real estate holdings in New Harmony, including the beautiful seventy-four year old home still occupied by his widow, who has lived in the house since it was built, and the mill operated by their son. He was a Republican in political allegiance and was affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He was one of twenty-six members of the Workingmenís Institute, which is a highly important institution in New Harmony, described more fully elsewhere in this work and membership in which was and is regarded as a distinct honor and responsibility. He was too young to enter military service in the earlier stage of the Civil war, but was in the 100-day service in the closing part of that conflict.

At New Harmony; on the 15th of November, 1871, Mr. Ford was united in marriage to Miss Mary T. Lichtenberger, who was here born and reared and who is a daughter of the late Adam and Caroline (Beal) Lichtenberger, her father having owned and operated a flour mill at New Harmony many years until it was destroyed by fire. Mrs. Ford still resides in New Harmony, where she has long been a gracious and popular figure in social and cultural circles. The only child, Harry Cuyler Ford, was born September 9, 1.873, and he give supervision to his farm interests and also to the operation of the well equipped local flour mill that is an integral part of his fatherís estate. He married Miss Marcia V. Corbin, daughter of John and Mary (Truscott) Corbin, of New Harmony, and they have three children: Richard C., born September 23, 1904, John Birkbeck, born December 4, 1906, and died November 25, 1928, and William Michaux II, born November 3,1909. Richard C. attended the University of Pennsylvania, later took a course in business college, and he is now associated with the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company at Baltimore. William is at Lehigh University at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the class of 1933.

INDIANA ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT Vol. 5
By Charles Roll, A.M.
The Lewis Publishing Company, 1931


Deb Murray