JOHN H. SHORT
This well and favorably known citizen of Boston, Wayne county, is now living retired from the active duties and cares of life, enjoying the fruits of his years of toil in the past. About four years ago he gave up the management of his farm, which is located in the suburbs of Boston, a portion of the place having been cut up into town lots, indeed, and since then his eldest son has carried on the homestead. Though born and reared in the south, Mr. Short was not in sympathy with the Rebellion, and in April, 1864, he enlisted in the one-hundred-days service in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-third Indiana Infantry, under Captain William R. Mount. He was stationed chiefly at Bridgeport, Alabama, and employed in doing guard duty, until his time was up, when he was mustered out in Indianapolis.

Born near Greensboro, Guilford county, North Carolina, July 25, 1834, a son of Alfred and Hannah Short, our subject was left an orphan at the age of fourteen, at which time his father died, while death had bereaved him of a mother's love and care some four years before. With his sister and five brothers John H. grew to manhood in his native state, and there they all continued to live, with the exception of himself. They stayed on the old farm until the marriage of the eldest brother. John H. is now the only survivor of the family, besides one other brother, Alonzio Short, who is now in the south.

When he was sixteen years old John H. Short started out to make his own way independently. Going to Rockingham, Virginia, he found employment as a traveling salesman for a tobacco manufacturer. His business was to take a well equipped wagon and travel from one town and plantation to another, selling tobacco, of which he had a full supply in all grades and prices, and, as was customary in those days in the south, he followed the courts, which convened at the various county seats. Thus employed, two years rapidly rolled away, and we next find him at school again, in Jamestown, North Carolina, for he felt the need of better educational training by this time. Afterward he was employed with a railroad engineering force, in the testing of the ground for grades in a line laid out by railroad surveyors.

On the 1st of May, 1857, Mr. Short arrived in Richmond, Indiana, on his way to Kansas, in company with a friend and former schoolmate. With not the slightest intention of remaining here, Mr. Short concluded to stay over until the following Monday, in order to visit with George Irwin, an old friend whom he fortunately met here. For several reasons, and because he liked the looks of the country hereabouts, he stayed and found employment at cutting wood and in manufacturing brick. He helped manufacture much of the brick that went into the houses of Joel Railsback, near Chester, Daniel Brower, near Boston, and John D. Josheaway, of Abington. The next winter he took a contract for cutting one hundred cords of wood and the following year he went to Illinois and worked in a brickyard at Bloomington for one season. The succeeding winter he again cut wood and the next three years he was employed on the farm of Benjamin Brown, of Boston township. He also worked for J. M. Bulla, James Hart and others, some across the line in Union county.

October 4, 1863, Mr. Short married Margaret Conley, who was then living with her aunt, Mrs. Judith Grimes, lately deceased, and then a resident of Wayne township. Mrs. Short was a daughter of John J. Conley, formerly proprietor of large nurseries and greenhouses in Richmond, and later the owner of the farm which is now the property of our subject and wife. For one year Mr. Short rented a farm of John Ropers, and subsequently leased land of George Davidson. In 1866 he took charge of the toll-gate on the Boston pike, a mile south of Richmond, and continued to occupy that position for nearly thirteen years, after which he bought his present farm, the old Conley estate. One of the noticeable features of the homestead is the splendid orchard, one of the best in the county, and the fine stately rows of pine trees which adorn the landscape. Oran, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Short, is an energetic young farmer and is caring for the farm with ability. He built a neat, modern farm house on the turnpike a few years ago and there he and his cheerful, thrifty wife, formerly Minnie Millott, dwell in comfort. Louie, the only living daughter of our subject, is the wife of Douglas Druley, and mother of Hattie, Maggie, Eva, John and Ernest. Mattie, youngest daughter of Mr. Short. died at the age of ten years, three months and twenty-three days; and Albert and Walter are at home. Mr. and Mrs. Short are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics Mr. Short is a Republican.

Four brothers of Mr. Short were Union soldiers in the civil war, Jasper N., Winster M., Alonzio P. and Albert. Alonzio P. rendered service for four long years in a cavalry regiment, and yet was never wounded. He and the subject of the foregoing sketch are the only sons now living.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



OLIVER P. MORTON
One of the "war governors" of the nation was Oliver Perry Morton, of Indiana. At the period when the country was in the throes of civil war, upon the chief executives of the states rested a responsibility second only to that of the president. The course of the governor at this crisis largely shaped the conduct of his people, and his unswerving allegiance and determined loyalty, or his strong opposition to the Union, were either greatly instrumental in securing the support of the commonwealth for the national government or in causing the development of secessionist principles. No governor throughout the entire country manifested greater patriotism or fidelity to the cause of liberty and union, or more courageously upheld the hands of the president, than Oliver Perry Morton, and under his guidance Indiana won as a loyal state honors exceeded by none of her sister states.

Mr. Morton was born in Saulsbury, Wayne county, Indiana, August 4, 1823, and died in Indianapolis, Indiana, on the 1st of November, 1877. His father, a native of New Jersey, whose ancestors came from England with Roger Williams, dropped the first syllable in the family name of Throckmorton. At the age of fifteen the son was taken from school and indentured to a brother who was a hatter. After working at his trade for four years he determined to fit himself for the bar, spending two years in Miami University and studying law in Centerville, where he began practice in 1847. He soon attained professional eminence, and was elected a circuit judge in 1852, but at the end of a year, when his term expired by the adoption of a new state constitution, he willingly left the bench, and before resuming practice spent a year in a law school in Cincinnati. Having been a Democrat with antislavery convictions, he entered into the people's movement in 1854, took an active part in the formation of the Republican party, and was a delegate to the Pittsburg convention the same year, and the candidate of the new party for governor. In a joint canvass with Ashbel P. Willard, the Democratic nominee, he established a reputation for political ability, but was beaten at the polls and returned to his law practice.

In 1860 Mr. Morton was nominated for lieutenant-governor on the ticket with Henry S. Lane, and during the canvass took strong ground in favor of exacting from the southern states obedience to the constitution. Upon convening, the legislature elected Governor Lane to the United States senate, and on the 16th of January, 1861, Mr. Morton took the oath as governor. He opposed every compromise with the secessionist party, nominated to the peace congress men of equally pronounced views, began to prepare for the coming conflict before Fort Sumter was fired upon, and when President Lincoln called for seventy-five thousand volunteers he offered to send ten thousand from Indiana. The state's quota was raised at once. He reconvened the legislature on the 24th of April, obtained authority to borrow two million dollars, and displayed great energy and ability in placing troops in the field and providing for their care and sustenance. He gave permission to citizens of Indiana to raise troops in Kentucky, allowed Kentucky regiments to be recruited from the population of two of the southern counties, procured arms for the volunteer bodies enlisted for the defense of Kentucky, and by thus co-operating with the Union men in that state did much toward establishing the ascendancy of the national government within its borders. When the question of the abolition of slavery arose, the popular majority no longer upheld the governor in his support of the national administration.

In 1862 a Democratic legislature was chosen, which refused to receive the governor's message, and was on the point of taking from him the command of the militia, when the Republican members withdrew, leaving the house without a quorum. In order to carryon the state government and pay the state bonds, Governor Morton obtained advances from banks and county boards, and appointed a bureau of finance, which, from April, 1863, until January, 1865, made all disbursements of the state, amounting to more than one million dollars. During this period he refused to summon the legislature. The supreme court condemned this arbitrary course, but the people subsequently applauded his action, and the state assumed the obligations he incurred. The draft laws provoked the secessionists in Indiana to form secret organizations and commit outrages on Union men. They plotted against the life of Governor Morton and arranged a general insurrection, to take place in August, 1864. The Governor discovered their plans and arrested the leaders of the Knights of the Golden Circle, or Sons of Liberty, as the association was called.

In 1864 Mr. Morton was nominated for governor, and defeated Joseph E. McDonald by twenty thousand eight hundred and eighty-three votes, after an animated joint canvass. He resigned in January, 1867, to take his seat in the United States senate, to which he was re-elected in 1873. In the senate he was chairman of the committee on privileges and elections and the leader of the Republicans, and for several years he exercised a determining influence over the political course of the party. On the question of reconstruction he supported the severest measures toward the southern states and their citizens. He labored zealously to secure the passage of the fifteenth amendment to the constitution, was active in the impeachment proceedings against President Johnson, and was the trusted adviser of the Republicans of the south. After supporting the Santo Domingo treaty he was offered the English mission by President Grant, but declined, lest his state should send a Democrat to succeed him in the senate. At the Republican national con¬vention in 1876 Mr. Morton, in the earlier ballots, received next to the highest number of votes for the presidential nomination. He was a member of the electoral commission of 1877. After a paralytic stroke, in 1865, he was never again able to stand without support, yet there was no abatement in his power as a debater or in the effectiveness of his forcible popular ora¬tory. Immediately after his return from Europe, whither he had gone to consult specialists in nervous diseases, he delivered, in 1866, a political speech, of which more than one million copies were distributed in pamphlet form. After visiting Oregon in the spring of 1877, as chairman of a sena¬torial committee to investigate the election of Lafayette Grover, he had another attack of paralysis, and died soon after reaching his home.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



ALBERT E. WILLIAMS
This well known farmer and honored citizen of Washington township, has throughout his active business life been prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Wayne county and has for over thirty years resided upon his present farm. He was born, however, in Rush county, Indiana, March 26, 1857, and is a son of Thomas and Olive (Elwell) Williams, both natives of Washington township, Wayne county. The father, who was born June 15, 1820, is a son of Joseph and Charity (Adams) Williams, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. In early life Joseph Williams came with his parents to Brookville, Franklin. county, Indiana, where his father died. The latter was a member of the Society of Friends. The son was married in Franklin county and continued to make his home there until after the birth of two of his children. About 1814 he came to Wayne county, where he entered land and improved a farm. He was one of the pioneer Methodist ministers of this section and was highly respected by all who knew him. After his children had all married and left the parental home, he sold his farm to a son and moved to Fairview, Rush county, where he served as a local preacher until called to the better world in 1856. He was a devoted Christian who labored earnestly for the betterment of his fellow men, and the world is certainly better for his having lived. His children were Wesley, a resident of Hancock county, Indiana; William, a Methodist minister. now deceased; Deborah, who first married a Mr. Pettigrew, and secondly a Mr. Hardin; Mary, wife of John Howard; Thomas, father of our subject; James and Joseph, both farmers, now deceased; Mrs. Rachel Hart; and Polly.

Thomas Williams grew to manhood upon a farm in Wayne county and remained with his parents until his marriage, when he settled in Rush county, where he improved a good farm of over four hundred acres and built thereon a good brick residence to replace his first home, which was a log structure. In 1864 he removed to Knightstown, where he engaged in the marble business for four years, and then located on the old Elwell homestead in Wayne county, where our subject now resides. After operating this place for ten years he removed to Milton, where he lived retired, though he still owned this farm and one in Rush county until his death, which occurred December 2, 1889, when he disposed of all his property by will. He was an ardent Democrat in politics and served as township trustee in Rush county. He was an active worker in the Methodist church, and was a social, genial gentleman who commanded the respect and esteem of all with whom he came in contact. His widow is still living and continues to make her home in Milton. To them were born seven children, namely: Samantha, who died at the age of nineteen years; Caroline, who died at the age of six; Olinda, widow of L. F. Hinchman, a farmer and stock dealer; Parnitha, wife of Dr. D. H. Miller, a druggist of Franklin, Indiana; Ellen, wife of J. B. Payne, a business man of the same place; Alice, wife of M. H. Moore, a grocer of Emporia, Kansas; and Albert E., our subject.

Albert E. Williams began his education in the schools of Rush county, and later attended the common schools of Knightstown and Wayne county, the seminary at Spiceland, Indiana, and the Northwestern University, at Irvington. He was thus well equipped for life's responsible duties and is today one of the most intelligent and well informed men of his community.

He grew to manhood upon his present farm and after his marriage, in 1878, commenced housekeeping there, his father having given him one hundred acres, to which he has since added eighty acres. He also owns another well improved farm of one hundred and thirty-three acres. This is the original Elwell homestead. He has remodeled the brick residence and made many other improvements which add to the value and attractive appearance of the place. He has carried forward quite successfully the work inaugurated by his father, and is to-day one of the well-to-do and prosperous citizens of his community. In connection with general farming he is engaged in stockraising, making a specialty of Short-horn and Durham cattle. Although an ardent Democrat in politics he has never cared for the honors or emoluments of public office. His honorable, upright life has gained for him the confidence and high regard of all with whom he has come in contact, and he has been called upon to act as guardian for others and as executor of his father's will.

In 1878 Mr. Williams married Miss Lizzie E. Beeson, who was born in Washington township May 25, 1858, a daughter of B. F. and Catherine (Howard) Beeson, who are represented elsewhere in this work. Her paternal grandfather, Benjamin Beeson, was a native of North Carolina and a son of Benjamin Beeson, whose father, Isaac Beeson, was of the fifth generation removed from Edward Beeson, a native of Lancastershire, England, who came to America with one of William Penn's colonies in 1682 and first settled in Pennsylvania. A number of years later he moved to a Quaker settlement in Virginia, and from there went to Brandywine, near Wilmington, Delaware. His descendant, Isaac Beeson, previously mentioned, removed from there to North Carolina, and from him springs the Indiana branch of the family. Three brothers came to this state: Isaac, in 1812, located near Richmond; Benjamin, in 1814, settled where Mrs. Williams' father now lives; and Thomas, in 1818, lived where his son, Elwood Beeson, now makes his home.

B. F. Beeson, Mrs. Williams' father, is one of the most prominent and highly respected farmers of Wayne county, and the poor and needy are never turned from his door empty-handed. He married Catherine Howard, a lady of more than ordinary attainments, who is beloved by all who know her. She was born in Wayne county January 22, 1827, and is a daughter of John and Sarah (Calaway) Howard, who came here from North Carolina about 1814, and entered land and improved the farm now occupied by Elijah Hurst. There all their children were born. Finally selling that place they moved to Madison county, Indiana, but later returned to Wayne county and bought the farm where the Valley Grove church now stands. After his children were all grown Mr. Howard gave that place to a son and built for himself a residence in the same neighborhood, where he spent his last days. He was thrice married and by the last wife had one son, Charles. There were two sons by the first union, - Samuel and Joseph, - and by the second there were twelve, including the following: Mary E., Sarah, Mrs. Dwiggins, Lydia, Rachel, Cynthia, Catherine, John A., Neill and Margaret. Mrs. Williams is the fourth in order of birth in a family of seven children, the others being: William, who died in 1873, aged twenty-two years; Oliver H., a farmer of Wayne county; Joseph, who died in 1873, aged eighteen years; Sanfed, who died the same year, aged thirteen years; Elmer, a resident of Cambridge City; Ira J., who died in infancy; May, wife of J. Coyne; and Minnie, wife of F. Flora. The sons and mother, who passed away April 14, 1873, died within four months, of spinal meningitis. For his second wife Mr. Beeson married Miss Kate Roadcap, in 1879. She was born in Virginia August 5, 1844, and came to Indiana with her parents, Henry and Lydia Roadcap, now residents of Henry county. Our subject and his wife have an interesting family of four children: Frank R., born August 23, 1879; Elsie, September 30, 1884; Harry B., July 31, 1886; and Carl P., January 16, 1890.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



MORDECAI D. DODDRIDGE
It is now eighty-five years since the family to which this well-known citizen belongs became identified with Wayne county, and its various members have won for the name an enviable distinction by their intelligence and worth. This high reputation is in no way diminished in this generation, and our subject, who is counted among the leading agriculturists of Washington township, displays in a marked degree the admirable characteristics which the name suggests.

The family is of English origin and was founded in America during colonial days, some of its representatives settling in New England, others in Pennsylvania. The Indiana branch springs from Joseph Doddridge, who left England early in the eighteenth century and first settled in New Jersey, whence he removed to Maryland, where several of his children were born. Among them was Philip Doddridge, who when grown removed with his parents to Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he married. His son John was born in that state, May 2, 1786, and there married Avis Manchester, a native of Rhode Island. In 1814 Philip Doddridge, his son John. David Jenkins and John Spahr formed a colony and came to the territory of Indiana. Building a flatboat, they floated down the Ohio, with all their possessions, families and stock, to Cincinnati, where they sold the boat and then started across the country for the new Eldorado, cutting their own road in many places. Arriving at the twelve-mile purchase, Wayne county, Philip Doddridge entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, where the family settled and improved a farm, which is now occupied by David J. Doddridge. He also entered other large tracts and gave each of his children a farm. In England the family was connected with the Episcopal church, but on coming to free America joined the Methodist church, and soon after locating in Indiana Philip Doddridge and his son John were instrumental in organizing one of the first churches in this region. For a time services were held in the different cabins, but at length these two gentlemen gave the land for a church and cemetery, and the first house of worship, which was a log structure, was erected in 1816. In honor of the family it was named Doddridge Chapel. It was a historic church, and its converts are now scattered throughout many states. In 1832 the congregation erected a brick edifice, and when it became too small it was replaced, in 1876, by a more commodious and modern structure, which is still in use. It is a standing monument to Philip and John Doddridge. Many of the old settlers were laid to rest in the cemetery adjoining the church. The children of Philip Doddridge were Mrs. Hannah Jenkins, Mrs. Sabra Spahr, Mrs. Walters, and John.

John Doddridge carried forward the work inaugurated by his father, and after the latter's death inherited the home farm, on which he erected a good brick residence, which is still in use. He entered other lands in Tipton and Marshall counties, and, being quite successful in his undertakings, he left a large estate. He was a leader in all church work, and as an exhorter traveled throughout the country, attending meetings within a radius of twenty miles. He was a man honored and respected wherever known, and his death, which occurred in 1851, was widely and deeply mourned. His faithful wife, who was also an earnest church worker, survived him for many years, dying in 1883, at the advanced age of ninety-three. In their family were eight children, all born in Indiana with the exception of Isaac, the father of our subject. The others were: Philip, who died in Washington township, Wayne county; John, who died in Kansas; Mrs. Phoebe Baker; Mrs. Eliza Ream; Sarah, wife of Rev. McMullen; David J., who resides on the old homestead; and Mrs. Nancy McMullen.

Isaac Doddridge was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1809, but was reared on the Indiana frontier, and his education was necessarily limited, as there were few schools in this section at that time. At the age of twelve he commenced driving a four-horse team to Cincinnati, Ohio, in the freighting business, in which he was interested for many years. After his marriage, in 1834, he moved to Union county, Indiana, where he bought land and improved a farm, remaining there eleven years. He then purchased the Lambert farm, in Wayne county, which was his home for the same length of time, and spent the remainder of his life on the old Dickson Hurst farm, where he died January 27, 1896. He was a very industrious and energetic man, and became one of the largest landowners of the county, having at one time three thousand acres, divided into well improved farms, many of which he rented. His tenants have nothing but praise to say of him, as he was a most kind and liberal landlord. He was quiet, genial and companionable, never allowing business or trivial things to worry him; and he was a man of unquestioned integrity and honor. He kept well-posted on public questions, and was an ardent supporter of the Republican party. On the 27th of March, 1834, he married Miss Sarah Weekly, who was born in North Carolina in 1816, a daughter of Isaiah and Agatha (Fishback) Weekly, who came to Indiana in 1819 and located in Wayne county, where her father developed a farm in the midst of the forest. He led the quiet, honest and unassuming life of a farmer, and was an earnest member of the Methodist church. His children were: Fanny, wife of P. Jenkins; Sarah, mother of our subject; Betsy, wife of Philip Doddridge; and Mordecai, all now deceased with the exception of Mrs. Jenkins. To Isaac Doddridge and wife were born eleven children, namely: Mary, who first married John Wright, and secondly William Wright; Phoebe, who died March 27, 1884; Francena, wife of W. Kramer; Eliza, wife of H. Houseworth; John H., a Methodist minister of Bloomington, Indiana; Isaiah, a farmer; Mordecai, our subject; Lurena, wife of John Judkins; Benjamin, who died in 1890; Wilbur, a farmer; and James, a resident of Milton.

Mordecai Doddridge was reared to the honest toil of a farmer and was educated in the common schools and the National Normal of Ohio. After completing his education he engaged in teaching school, in both Wayne and Union counties, until his marriage. After his marriage he settled on a farm owned by his father west of Doddridge chapel, and commenced life in earnest. In 1896 he purchased what is known as the Isom Small farm of one hundred and sixty acres, to which he has since added forty acres, and there he continues to make his home, engaged in general farming and stock-raising, with good success. He feeds most of the products of his farm to his stock. That he stands high in his community and is very popular with his fellow citizens is shown by his election to the office of trustee in a strong Democratic township when he is a Republican. He is a leading member and active worker in the Methodist church, and has held all of the church offices. He has been called upon to settle many estates, which demonstrates the fact that the people place the utmost confidence in him. He was appointed executor of his father's will and this required great care and attention, as the estate was large.

On the 12th of September, 1883, Mr. Doddridge married Miss Mary J. Spahr, who was born in Abington township, Wayne county, May 11, 1854, and they have become the parents of two children: Joseph I., born July 23, 1886; and Sarah E., born May 29, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Doddridge hold membership in the Doddridge Chapel Methodist church, and occupy an enviable position in social circles.

Mrs. Doddridge's paternal grandfather, John Spahr, was one of the colony previously mentioned who came to Wayne county in 1814 and settled in Abington township, where Mrs. Doddridge's father now lives. There he spent the remainder of his life and was actively and prominently identified with the moral and material development of the county. He was twice married and by the second union had two children: Joseph B., father of Mrs. Doddridge; and Nancy, wife of Isaac Jenkins, who was also a member of the colony of 1814 and is still living in Centerville. Joseph B. Spahr has spent his entire life upon his present farm, and as an agriculturist has met with marked success. He has made a specialty of the raising of short-horn cattle. He is a sincere and consistent Christian, a member of the Methodist church, and his life is well worthy of emulation. Formerly he was a Democrat in politics but for many years has affiliated with the Prohibition party and is a stanch adherent of its principles. He married Miss Matilda Burgess, a daughter of Richard and Susan Burgess, natives of Virginia and honored pioneers of Wayne county. By occupation her father was a farmer, miller and millwright. His children were Alexander and Leander, both farmers of Wayne county; Matilda, the first wife of Joseph B. Spahr and the mother of Mrs. Doddridge; and Martha, the second wife of Mr. Spahr.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



HON. BRANSON L. HARRIS
One of the families which have been prominent in the history of Wayne county from its early days was founded here several years prior to the beginning of the war of 1812 by Benjamin Harris, the grandfather of the subject of this memoir. The Harris family originated in Wales, and some time during the last century one Obediah Harris, with two of his brothers, made a settlement in Virginia. They were members of the Society of Friends, and sought the greater religious liberty which they were permitted to enjoy in the young American colony. Obediah Harris lived in North Carolina for a number of years, and there his son Benjamin was born. In 1810 Obediah Harris and his youngest son and namesake, both of whom were ministers of the Quaker church, came to Indiana and passed the remainder of their days in the northern part of Wayne and the southern part of Randolph counties.

It was subsequent to his marriage to Miss Margaret England that Benjamin Harris determined to try his fortunes in the new northwest, and made his removal with his family to Indiana, and located on land about six miles north of Richmond, Wayne county. He and his estimable wife spent the rest of their lives here, and of their large family, most of whom grew to maturity, married, and had homes of their own, only one, Elizabeth, the youngest daughter, is now living, her home being in Fountain City, this state. Those who have passed away were Obediah, Barsheba, Pleasant, James, John, Rebecca, Margaret, David, Sarah, Aaron and Nathan.

James Harris, the father of Branson L. Harris, was born in North Carolina, and was a lad of fourteen years when he accompanied his parents in their removal to Indiana. During the war of 1812 he entered the army and served for several months on behalf of his country, for which offense against the teachings of the Quaker church he was turned out of the society. He managed to survive that affliction, however, and later became a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal denomination. As a young man, he performed the hardest kinds of pioneer labor, such as clearing a way the forests, splitting rails, raising log cabins, and breaking the virgin soil with the crude implements of that period. Thus he earned the money with which to purchase a little tract of land for himself. His first home was on a farm of eighty acres, in Green township, west of Williamsburg, but this property he sold three years later and entered a quarter-section of land in the southeastern part of the same township. About 1827 he exchanged that place for one owned by his eldest brother Obediah, it being near the center of the same township. There he spent the rest of his busy and prosperous life, his death occurring in July, 1854. Quiet and industrious, upright and gentle, he was a most worthy and respected citizen, faithful in the discharge of all his duties. Though he was a Whig with strong antislavery principles, he did not desire to serve in public positions, preferring to keep out of politics, but was a justice of the peace for several years. In the early part of 1816 he married Naomi, daughter of John and Sarah Lewis. She was a native of North Carolina, whence she emigrated to this state with her parents, and she survived her husband a number of years. To James and Naomi Harris five sons and two daughters were born, Branson L. being the eldest: Winston E. is a resident of Williamsburg, wayne county; Addison R. died at the age of three years; Milton R. died a number of years ago; Allen M. lives in Richmond, this county; Hannah, deceased, was the wife of William Campbell; and Sarilda is the wife of William Thornburg.

The birth of Branson L. Harris took place April 21, 1817, upon his father's old homestead in Green township. His entire life, eighty-two years has been spent in Green and Clay townships, his attention chiefly devoted to agriculture. In his young manhood he worked for neighbors until he had saved a little capital, and his next step was to rent a farm. Later he bought a small tract of land, and added to this as he could afford. At last he had one hundred and seventy acres of finely improved land, lying in one body, and this he sold some years ago, buying instead his present farm adjoining Green's Fork.

An eventful day in the history of our subject was September 19, 1839, when his marriage to Miss Martha Young was solemnized. She was born March 23, 1817, in the same locality, and they had grown up together. Her parents were Jesse and Ruth (Martindale) Young, respected early settlers of Green township. Two sons blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Harris, namely: Addison and Alonzo M. The latter, who was born September 13, 1845, and resides on the farm near his parents, is married and has one daughter, Lenora, who is the only grandchild of our subject and wife. The elder son, whose birth took place October 1, 1840, was educated in Christian (now Butler) University, near Indianapolis, and later read law in that city, with Barber Howland as his preceptor. He won a splendid reputation as a member of the legal profession, and became about equally prominent in the ranks of the Republican party in this state. In the spring of 1899, after he had abundantly proved his ability in the state senate, where he had previously served the people, he was appointed by President McKinley to the very responsible and important post of minister to Austria and is now representing this great government in the court at Vienna.

By a rather remarkable coincidence Branson L. Harris and his distinguished son were members of the legislative body of Indiana at the same time, serving in the lower and upper house, respectively. The former was elected to represent his county in the general assembly of the state as early as 1852, and in 1875 and 1877 was honored with re-elections, thus serving, altogether, three terms. About 1850 he was given the office of justice of the peace, acting in that capacity for some five years, and he also served as town¬ship trustee. Both he and his sons have been stanch Republicans, keeping themselves thoroughly posted upon all of the great questions of the day. Mr. and Mrs. Harris, who are loved and revered by all who know them were largely influential in the founding of the Christian church at Green's Fork, and have contributed liberally of their time, means and zeal toward its upbuilding.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JESSE BOND
Jesse and Phoebe Bond, the grandparents of Henry T. and Abner D. Bond, of Clay township, and of Lewis Bond, of Cambridge City, Wayne county, were among the earliest of the pioneers of this county, as they arrived here in 1807. Their ancestors were members of the Society of Friends, and its principles were believed in and practiced by them throughout their lives. The founder of the Bond family in America was one of the colonists who accompanied William Penn; and a son, Joseph Bond, was the father of Stephen Bond, who settled in Virginia, and of Edward and Samuel, who located in North Carolina, while the other sons, Benjamin, Silas and John, remained in Pennsylvania. Edward Bond, who. as mentioned, removed to the south, married a Miss Mills, and to them were born the following named children: Benjamin, Edward, John, Joshua, William, Jesse, Joseph, Anne and Keziah.

Jesse Bond was born in 1779, married Phoebe Commons, a daughter of Robert and Ruth (Hayes) Commons, and in 1807 they emigrated from Virginia to what was then the territory of Indiana. For a few years they lived upon land which now is the site of Earlham College, near Richmond. Then removing to the homestead, which is in the possession of Abner Bond, his grandson, Jesse Bond spent more than half a century there, passing to his reward upon the 4th of April, 1862. His devoted helpmate died many years previously, when in her sixty-third year, June 30, 1845. By the aid of his sons he had succeeded in clearing and greatly improving the old farm, which is situated about a mile south of the present town of Green Fork, in Clay township. For his day he was considered in quite affluent circumstances in his later years, but the life which he and his household led was simple and devoid of expensive luxuries, as this was a matter of long habit and religious training. He was a man of high standing in the community and influential in the Quaker church, often preaching and assisting in the services. Needless to say his integrity and uprightness of word and deed won for him the love and high regard of everyone with whom he was associated.

To Jesse Bond and wife were born several children, namely: Nathan, whose birth took place in 1803, and whose wife was formerly Tamar Kentworthy; Robert, born in 1804, and married Rachel Thornburg; John, born in 1806, and married Mary Barnett; William C., born in 1808, and married Hannah Locke; Enos, born in 1810, and wedded Susanna Hoover; Isom, born in 1812, and married Dinah Kentworthy; Ruth, born in 1814, and married William Nicholson; Hannah, born in 1816, wife of John Wilson; Isaac, born in 1818, and married Katherine Eirgood; Jesse, born in 1820 and was three times married, - first to Jane Cox, then to Harriet Hank, and finally to Belle King; and Lydia, born in 1822, became the wife of Oliver Mendenhall. With the exception of Jesse and his wives, all were residents of Wayne county at the time of their marriage. In 1899 the only survivors of the family of Jesse Bond, the senior, are William, Jesse, Hannah and Lydia.

Robert Bond, the father of Henry T., Abner D. and Lewis Bond, was born in Virginia in 1804, and consequently was very young when he was brought to this county, with whose welfare his own was thenceforth to be connected. The lady of his choice was Rachel Thornburg, a daughter of Henry Thornburg, an early settler of Jefferson township, Wayne county. She was a native of Tennessee, and came to this section with her parents in childhood. After his marriage, Robert Bond located upon land adjoining his father's homestead, and on this property he and his estimable wife passed the rest of their days. Following the worthy example of his father, he adhered to the Society of Friends and illustrated the noble ideals which he cherished in his daily life. Loved and mourned by a large circle of sincere friends, he entered the silent land on the 28th of March, 1864. Of the six sons and two daughters born to himself and wife, and reared to maturity, only three, H. T., A. D. and Lewis, survive. John, Milton, Larkin, Emily and Lydia E. have passed away.

Henry T. Bond was born upon the parental homestead in Clay township, February 10, 1827, and on the 4th of September, 1860, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary A. Boyd. Her father, Robert Boyd, was one of the pioneers of Wayne county and later removed to Henry county, where he spent the rest of his life. Mr. Bond was bereft of his wife, who died in October, 1897, leaving three children: Robert B., Emma F. and James Edgar.

Abner Bond, who resides upon the old homestead formerly owned by his grandfather, Jesse Bond, was born April 19, 1836. His marriage to Miss Mary E. Scott, a daughter of John and Jane (Willetts) Scott, was solemnized in 1860. To Mr. and Mrs. Bond the following named children were born: Emma Celeste, September 24, 1861; Maud, March 16, 1865; Virgia Blanche, April 14, 1877; and Edith A., May 20, 1882. The eldest daughter became the wife of A. R. Jones, of Centerville, Wayne county, and died November 4, 1889, leaving two children: Forest B., who was born April 8, 1876, and Mary Lucile, born October 24, 1879. Maud, the second daughter of Mr. Bond, married William Woodruff, and resides near her father's home. Virgia Blanche died February 4, 1878. Edith A. is living with her father on the farm.

The Bond brothers are highly respected by those who have known them from their boyhood, and they are indeed worthy representatives of this honored pioneer family. At all times they have been safely relied upon to use their influence, and means if need be, in the advancement of whatever has been for the good of the community.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



ISHAM SMELSER
During the pioneer epoch in the history of Wayne county, the Smelser family was founded within its borders by Jacob and Elizabeth (Smith) Smelser, who, leaving their homes in Kentucky in 1822, took up their residence in Boston township, Wayne county, Indiana, where they spent their remaining days. The members of the family took an active and prominent part in the development of this section of the state, aided in transforming its wild lands into rich farms, and in other ways promoted the progress and advancement which made a once wild region the home of a contented, prosperous people. Jacob Smelser lived to witness much of the development of the county, his death occurring December 8, 1875, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-one years. His wife passed away April 7, 1869, at the age of seventy-five years. They had nine children: Harriet, widow of William Byers, and a resident of Richmond; Solomon, who is mentioned in connection with the sketch of Nicholas Smelser, of Harrison township, Union county; Catherine, who married Isaac Esteb, of Boston township, Wayne county; Margarey, deceased wife of John Sedgwick; James, who died leaving a widow, who now lives four miles east of Richmond; Isham, of this review; Jacob, a resident of Frankton, Madison county, Indiana; Minerva, wife of James Hart, of Harrison township, Union county; and Tracy, widow of Zachariah Osborn, of Boston township, Wayne county.

Isham Smelser, whose name heads this article, was born on the old family homestead in Wayne county, November 23, 1823, and was therefore reared amid the wild scenes of frontier life. He aided in the arduous task of clearing wild land and converting it into fertile fields, continuing to assist his father until his marriage, when he began farming on his own account. The first land he owned was a tract of one hundred and eighty-two acres, given him by his father, and with characteristic energy he began its development. He was very industrious and enterprising, and as his financial resources increased he added to his landed possessions until he was the owner of an extensive and valuable property. In connection with the cultivation of his fields, he engaged in raising cattle in large numbers. He fed these for the town market, and found that branch of his business a very profitable one. His capable management, enterprise, well directed efforts and honorable dealings were the important factors in his prosperity and brought him a very handsome competence.

In 1850 Mr. Smelser and Miss Henrietta Farlow were united in marriage. The lady was a daughter of John and Catherine Farlow, of Harrison township, Union county, where the family located at a very early day. It was in that locality that Mrs. Smelser was born, and there her marriage occurred. Four children were born of this union: John F. and Richard E., who reside on the old family homestead, now owned by the latter; Jacob S., a resident farmer of Boston township, Wayne county; and Mary E., wife of Walter W. McConahan, of Center township, Wayne county. Both Richard and John are members of the Knights of Pythias fraternity of Abington, Indiana. The former owns four hundred and five acres of land, - the old family homestead, - and the latter is the owner of a valuable farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Boston township. They carried on business in partnership for five years, but have since dissolved their business relations. They are both men of executive ability and enterprise and are numbered among the leading citizens of the community. The father of this family was a faithful member of the Universalist church, very regular in his attendance on its services, and was fond of an argument on religious topics, on which he was well informed. Straightforward in all his business dealings, loyal to his duties of citizenship, he commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow men, and by his death the community lost one of its valued citizens. He passed away September 28, 1882, in his fifty-ninth year, and his wife, surviving him some time, died December 15, 1893, at the age of sixty-seven years.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



HON. WILLIAM BAXTER
In the death of William Baxter, September 6, 1 886, Wayne county lost one of her most prominent and useful citizens, and though more than a decade has been added to the past since he passed to his reward he is remembered in many a home, and his good works in various directions still speak his praises. While he was deeply concerned in numerous philanthropic enterprises, he was, more especially heart and soul identified with the temperance cause. Gifted with eloquence and a ready flow of language, he delivered able addresses on the subject of temperance, in all parts of this state and Ohio. A Republican, politically, he was elected on that ticket to the Indiana legislature, and served one term there in the '70S. Later he was further honored by being elected to the state senate, and while a member of that honorable body he introduced and secured the passage of the bill known as the Baxter local-option bill. He was actively engaged in all measures of public importance and was a thorough disbeliever in the system of capital punishment which prevails. Not only was he prominent in the Woman's Reformatory of Indianapolis and deeply interested in all state-prison reforms, but in every practical manner he also sought to do good to his fellow men. In short, his life was the embodiment of the highest teaching of Christianity, of love and service toward God and man.

A native of Yorkshire, England, William Baxter was born February 11, 1824. His parents were John and Mary (Pollard) Baxter, likewise of Yorkshire birth. The father was a minister of the Methodist church, and doubtless his beautiful example and wise teaching had much to do in forming the character of his son William. He was very influential in his own neighborhood, for he was not only a good man but one of brains and liberal ideas, and a great student. He was the father of ten children, three of whom died in England. The father having died, WiIliam Baxter came to the United States in 1848 and made a home in Philadelphia, to which his widowed mother came the following year, and the rest of the family later crossed the Atlantic.

Prior to leaving his native land Mr. Baxter had studied law, but he concluded that he would not follow that vocation, and instead he accepted a position as manager of a woolen-goods factory. At the end of a few years he became interested in the tea trade at Liverpool, and after arriving in Philadelphia he dealt in wool in wholesale quantities, as a partner in the firm of David Scull & Company. When he came to Richmond in 1864 he continued buying, shipping and selling wool to his old Quaker City house up to 1875. He became the owner of a fine one-hundred-acre farm in what is now West Richmond, and from 1875 until his death he was a stockholder and director in the Wayne Agricultural Works, of Richmond.

In England Mr. Baxter married Mary Wickett, who died soon after their removal to Philadelphia, and their only child, a son, died in infancy. December 3, 1856, Mr. Baxter married Mary Barker, who survives him and resides in Richmond, loved and respected by all who know her. Her parents, Enoch and Sophia (Davis) Barker, were both natives of North Carolina, and left that state to take up their abode in the north on account of their opposition to slavery. They came to this state in 1831 and five years later the father died at his home near Thornton, Boone county. The mother survived him for sixty years, dying at a very advanced age in Richmond, in 1896.

The five living children of William and Mary (Barker) Baxter are: Sarah, wife of Edward Fletcher, of this place; Mary E., wife of John G. Sutton, of Warsaw, Indiana; Maria, at home; Lucy V., who married Percival B. Coffin, of Chicago; and William H., a citizen of Richmond.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



ANDREW F. SCOTT
It is a well attested maxim that the greatness of the state lies not in the machinery of government, or even in its institutions. but in the sterling qualities of its individual citizens, in their capacity for high and unselfish effort and their devotion to the public good. To this class belonged Andrew F. Scott of Richmond, a man prominent in the business, social and church circles of the city. His influence for good was widely felt, and his example was indeed worthy of emulation. He was at all times actuated by the highest motives and the most lofty principles; he lived for the benefit of others, and his memory remains as an unalloyed benediction to all who knew him. The history of Richmond would be incomplete without the record of his life, so intimately was he connected with its commercial and benevolent institutions.

Andrew F. Scott was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, on the 28th of December, 1811, and made the best of the advantages afforded him for the acquirement of an education. In 1838 he left the Old Dominion in order to try his fortune upon the prairies of the far west and took up his residence in the little village of Richmond, Indiana. He entered upon his vocation here as a school-teacher, and later accepted the position of clerk for Daniel Reid. In 1839 Mr. Reid was appointed registrar of the land office at Fort Wayne, and appointed Mr. Scott his chief deputy. In 1841 the latter was appointed deputy sheriff of Wayne county and returned from Fort Wayne to Centerville in order to assume the duties of his new position. On the expiration of his term of service he went to Cincinnati and entered the employ of a steamboat company, with which he was connected until 1847, when he came to Richmond and embarked in merchandising. For four years he successfully carried on operations in that line, and then assumed the duties of county clerk, to which office he was elected in 1851 for a term of four years. In 1855 he was again chosen for that position, being elected almost without opposition. When his second term expired he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and carpentering, which he followed for six years, when, in 1866, he became a partner in the grocery firm of Forkner, Scott & Elmer, which relation was maintained for a number of years. In 1872 he was instrumental in organizing the Second National Bank, was one of its leading stockholders, and at its formation was elected president, in which position he continued to serve to the time of his death. To his enterprise, sagacity, keen discrimination and thorough reliability, the success of the institution is largely due, and to his efforts may be attributed its high standing in financial circles. He was a man of unquestioned integrity in all business transactions, was progressive in his methods and very energetic; and the success and prosperity he achieved was the deserved reward of honorable labor. He aided in organizing, and was a stockholder in the Richmond Natural Gas Company.

In 1839 Mr. Scott was united in marriage with Miss Martha McGlathery, of Philadelphia. She was born in Norristown, Pennsylvania, June 17, 1808. Her father was a wealthy market gardener near Philadelphia, who came to Richmond, Indiana, in 1837, and lived here until her marriage to Mr. Scott, July 11, 1839. She was a faithful helpmate until her death, January 8, 1888. She was a member of the United Presbyterian church, but her home among the flowers and plants was her delight. In regard to her benevolent character we can empathically say she never turned the needy from her door unsupplied. Her kindness of heart often carried her to the limit of her resources. For example, during the civil war word was received that the soldiers were suf¬fering for blankets to keep them warm; and Mrs. Scott contributed the last comfortable or quilt she had in the house.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Scott were John, Letitia, Augustus and Mary; but an are now deceased with the exception of Augustus. Letitia died February 22, 1863, at the age of twenty-two years. She was married in 1859 to Joseph McNutt, who died in 1877. They had two children. The elder, Albert Scott McNutt, is a graduate of the West Point Military Academy and was stationed for some time in the west, at Cheyenne, Fort Thomas and other points, with the rank of first lieutenant. The younger son, Frank A., is a man of superior education and has traveled all over the world, having circumnavigated the globe. He served as secretary of the legation at Madrid and consul at Constantinople. He recently married a Miss Van Cortland Ogden, an heiress of New York city, and now lives in a palatial home in Rome, Italy. Mary E. was the wife of John M. Tennis, and had one daughter, Martha, wife of Joseph Gibson, of Richmond, Indiana.

For many years Mr. Scott was one of the leading and zealous members of the United Presbyterian church of Richmond, and served as elder for a long period. He was always found in his place at the church services and lived that practical religion which teaches charity, kindness, sympathy and benevolence. The poor and needy found in him a warm friend, yet his aid was always unostentatious, and was frequently bestowed when the recipient knew not who was the donor. In politics he was always a stanch Democrat, .and for eight years served as a member of the city council, taking an active part in the advocacy and adoption of all measures tending to prove of public benefit. He was an exemplary member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Masonic order and of the local humane society. He passed away March 16, 1895, honored and respected by all who knew him. The banks of the city were closed during the hour of the funeral services, and throughout this section of Indiana was mourned the death of this honored pioneer, enterprising citizen, faithful friend, devoted husband and father and earnest Christian gentleman. At the meeting of the Humane Society, the following tribute to his memory was read by Mrs. F. M. Clark:
" The cause of humanity never had a truer friend than this loved and valued member of our society who has passed to the higher life. The stereotyped words customary on such occasions seem but mockery when we remember all the grand traits that went to make the character of this, one of nature's noblemen. In all the relations of life, family, church and society, he displayed that consistent Christian spirit, that innate refinement, that endeared him alike to man, woman and child. He early learned that true happiness consisted in ministering to others, and his integrity and fidelity were manifest in every act of his life. Splendid monuments record the virtues of kings, history's pages chronicle the deeds of heroes, but the memory of our brother will live in the hearts of those who knew and loved him. The example of such a life is an inspiration to others, and his influence will be felt long after the marble has crumbled and history's pages are dust. We feel that in the death of Andrew F. Scott our society has sustained an irreparable loss, and we extend to his family our sincere sympathy in this their great bereavement."

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



AUGUSTUS C. SCOTT

Of an old Virginia family that was founded in Indiana at an early period in the history of the Hoosier state, Augustus C. Scott is a worthy representative. He was born in the city which is still his home, Richmond, August 4, 1843, and is a son of Andrew F. and Martha Scott. His grandfather, Jesse Scott, was a native of Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he spent his entire life in the occupation of farming. Andrew F. Scott likewise was a native of. Rockbridge county, born December 8, 1811. He was educated in the common schools, was reared on a farm, and in 1838 came to Indiana. For many years he was identified with the growth, development and improvement of Wayne county, and in his death, which occurred March 16, 1893, the community experienced a great loss.

Under the parental roof Augustus C. Scott was reared to manhood, and pursued his education in the schools of Centerville and Richmond, and through this source and by means of reading, experience and observation he has become a well informed man. For many years he has successfully engaged in farming and stock-raising, and is now the owner of two valuable farms. The larger, comprising two hundred and seventy-eight acres of rich land, is situated a mile and a half east of Richmond, while the other, of sixty-three acres, is three miles southeast of Richmond, and both are in Wayne township. Thus conveniently near the city, Mr. Scott gives to them his personal supervision and derives from the property a very desirable income. For a number of years he has successfully and extensively engaged in the raising and selling of stock, and being an excellent judge of stock he makes judicious purchases and profitable sales. His business interests, however, have not been confined to one line of endeavor. He is a man of resourceful ability and has been an active factor in the successful control of some of Richmond's leading enterprises. He is a stockholder in the Richmond Natural Gas Company, and also in the Second National Bank, and through these avenues adds materially to his income.

In marriage Mr. Scott was united with Miss Rachel, a daughter of John S. and Rachel (Thorne) Brown, the wedding being celebrated May 3, 1888. They became the parents of four children, namely: Thomas H., now deceased; Andrew F., Martha Mabel and Ruth Eloise, all at home. The family is one of prominence in Richmond, and their home is the center of a cultured society circle.

In his political views Mr. Scott is a Democrat, but aside from casting an intelligent ballot in support of the principles of his party he takes little part in political affairs. At all times and in all places he commands the respect of his fellow townsmen by his upright life, and in the history of the county he well deserves representation.

His father-in-law, John S. Brown, deceased, was born in New Jersey in 1812, and in 1819 was taken to Preble county, Ohio, by the family in their emigration to that point. After growing up he became a successful farmer, buying the old home farm of six hundred acres, where Mrs. Scott was brought up. She was the youngest of nine children, eight of whom are still living. Mr. Brown was especially successful in the rearing of live stock, practically carrying out the maxim, "The best is none too good." For about eight years he was connected with a firm in Richmond engaged in packing pork. In his religious views he was liberal, not connected with any church, though by birthright a Friend. In 1836 he married Rachel Thorne, a native of New Jersey, who was engaged in school-teaching before her marriage. She was an active member of the Hicksite Friends' meeting, and was a clerk of the meeting at her death in 1856. Mr. Brown died in 1879.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JAMES H. WALKER
This well known agriculturist and highly esteemed citizen of Washington township is a worthy representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Wayne county, being a son of John B. and Susan (Sinks) Walker, natives of Tennessee and Ohio, respectively. The maternal grandfather, Jacob Sinks, came to this county from Ohio, about 1818, and located on land adjoining the new village of Milton, which his wife's father, Mr. Yount, had entered from the government. He improved a part of the land for farming purposes, and platted a portion, laying out about a fourth of the town of Milton into lots, which he sold. He built the first gristmill at that place, which was burned a number of years ago. Later he added a sawmill to that structure, the power being obtained by damming the Whitewater river. He was a very enterprising and public-spirited man, whose services were of inestimable value to the new country, and he did all in his power to promote the interests of Milton, taking a foremost place in any movement for the benefit of his adopted town or county. He built many of the residences of Milton, and continued to make that place his home until his death. He was a consistent member of the Society of Friends, was a man of stern integrity and honor, and was highly esteemed by his fellow citizens. He had four children: Daniel; Anna; Susan, mother of our subject; and Jacob, all of whom are now deceased.

John B. Walker, the father of our subject, was a blacksmith and woodworker by trade, and was an expert mechanic. He came to Milton in 1818, and was soon afterward joined by his brother and sister. Seeing the need of agricultural implements in this new country, and both being good mechanics, the brothers soon embarked in the manufacture of plows, for which there was a great demand, and now many of the old men, who were then boys, say that the first plow they used was made by Walker & Brother. They are also willing to testify to the honest work done by the firm, and the honorable way in which they conducted all their blacksmithing and woodwork business, which they continued for many years. The father of our subject also engaged in farming, and was a great fancier of fine horses. He probably did more than any other individual in early days to improve the grade of horses in this county, and owned several fine stallions. He bought a small tract of land adjoining the corporation of Milton, erected thereon a commodious residence, and there spent the remainder of his days, dying November 4, 1852. On coming to Milton he was a Methodist, but finally became converted to the Christian church, and was ever afterward one of its devoted and leading members. He was a man of high integrity, was honorable in all his dealings, and in all respects his life was most exemplary. Politically he was a Whig. His wife survived him for many years, and died on the old homestead, at Milton, June 26, 1880. She too, was a consistent member of the Christian church, and was loved and respected by all who knew her. Their children were Sarah C., who died at the age of twelve years; Jacob S., who died in 1880, leaving a wife and five children; Mary A., wife of J. McNamee; and James H., our subject.

James H. Walker was born in Milton, April 13 1851, and was only an infant when his father died. He was reared at the old home by a good Christian mother, who tenderly cared for him, and he was educated in the local schools. He was always engaged in agricultural pursuits, and also in teaming to some extent, and he now owns a good farm besides the sixteen acre tract at the old home. The house built by his father in 1837 is an elegant structure and is still well preserved.

In 1880 Mr. Walker wedded Miss Mary C. Macy, who belongs to a prominent early family of Jay county, Indiana. Her parents, Obed and Mary (White) Macy, were natives of North Carolina, and with their respective parents came to Jay county, where their marriage was celebrated. The father, who is a carpenter by trade, now resides in Adams county, Indiana, an honored and highly respected citizen of that locality. Politically, he is a Democrat, and religiously adheres to the faith of the Society of Friends. His wife died when Mrs. Walker was very young. The latter was born April 16, 1856, and is an only child. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have one daughter, Carrie S., born May 30, 1884. Mother and daughter are consistent members of the Methodist church, and the family is both widely and favorably known. Politically, Mr. Walker is a stanch Republican, and though he takes an active interest in all public questions and political affairs he has never aspired to office.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JONATHAN ROBERTS
The specific history of the west was made by the pioneers; it was emblazoned on the forest trees by the strength of sturdy arms and gleaming ax, and written on the surface of the earth by the track of the primitive plow. These were strong men and true who came to found the empire of the west these hardy settlers who builded their rude domiciles, grappled with the giants of the forest, and from the sylvan wilds evolved the fertile and productive fields which have these many years been furrowed and refurrowed by the plowshare. The red man, in his motly garb, stalked through the dim, woody avenues, and the wild beasts disputed his dominion. The trackless prairie was made to yield its tribute under the effective endeavors of the pioneer, and slowly but surely were laid the steadfast foundations upon which has been builded the magnificent superstructure of an opulent and enlightened commonwealth. To establish a home amid such surroundings, and to cope with the many privations and hardships which were the inevitable concomitants, demanded an invincible courage and fortitude, strong hearts and willing hands. All those were characteristics of these pioneers, whose names and deeds should be held in perpetual reverence by those who enjoy the fruits of their toil.

The Roberts family was one of the first to locate in Wayne county, and Jonathan Roberts, only three years of age at the time of their arrival, is therefore numbered among the honored pioneers who have not only witnessed the remarkable growth and transformation of the region, but have been important factors in its progress and advancement. He was born in Butler county, Ohio, May 30, 1808, his parents being Thomas and Ann. (Whitson) Roberts. The father was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1759, and was a son of Walter Roberts, who was a native of the same county and was of Welsh descent. He removed with his family to South Carolina, and after attaining his majority Thomas Roberts was married in that state to Ann Whitson, who was a native of Long Island. They became the parents of eight children, all of whom were born in South Carolina, with the exception of our subject. In 1806 they removed with their family to Preble county, Ohio, and the same year Thomas Roberts came to Wayne county, where he entered a quarter-section of wild government land, and in March, 1811, with his wife and seven children, moved onto the place. One of his daughters had married previously to that date. The father had erected a small log cabin in the woods at what is now the northeast corner of South Thirteenth and A streets and began the development of his farm, all of which is now within the corporation limits of the city. He first cleared a small patch of ground, fenced it in with brush and planted it with turnips. The only people then living in Richmond were Jeremiah Cox and John Smith, who had previously entered land now included within the corporate limits of the city. In 1812 Thomas Roberts built a hewed-log house on his farm, one of the best residences in this section of the country, and for many years it stood as one of the landmarks of the region, indicating the onward march of progress.

For about thirty years Thomas Roberts lived upon his farm, and was then called to the home beyond, September 25, 1840, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife survived him only a few days, passing away on the 28th of October of the same year. Both were members of the Society of Friends. Their children were Rebecca, who became the wife of Nathan Hawkins, but both are now deceased; Walter, who died in Dover, Wayne county; David, who died in Richmond; Phoebe, who became the wife of Henry Hawkins and is now deceased, as is her husband: Sarah, wife of William Whitacre; Thomas and Solomon W., who also have passed away; and Jonathan, who is the only survivor of the family.

Jonathan Roberts was reared under the parental roof and in the midst of the wild scenes of pioneer life, and early began to perform his share in the arduous task of clearing and developing a new farm. His education was acquired in the subscription schools, but his advantages in that direction were not very arnple. After entering upon an independent business career he followed farming for some years, and at one time was the owner of a valuable tract of land, eighty acres, and also seven residences in Richmond. He has bought and sold real estate to a considerable extent, and in his transactions has met with a creditable and gratifying success, gaining a comfortable competence that has enabled him to live retired for the past ten years. He is now enjoying a rest which he has truly earned, for his business career was one of activity, honesty and usefulness. On the 28th of January, 1831, Mr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Mary Smith, daughter of Jairus and Aves Smith, who had formerly lived in New York. Four children were born of this union: Aves, wife of W. S. Elliott, a farmer residing near Kokomo, Howard county, Indiana; Eli, who is living with his father, and is engaged in the operation of a farm; Elvira, deceased wife of Josiah Philips; and Henry S., an agriculturist of Wayne township, Wayne county. The mother of this family died August 1, 1888, at the age of seventy-eight years, four months and five days. In his political affiliations in early life Mr. Roberts was a Whig. He has always been a member of the Society of Friends, and has served as elder for twelve years. His father also held the same office in the church and the family has long been connected with the organization.

Mr. Roberts has spent almost his entire life in this county; has seen the introduction of the railroad, the telegraph, the telephone; has watched the transformation of wild land into beautiful homes and farms, while towns and villages have sprung up and have become imbued with all the progress and advancement of the east. In the work of growth and upbuilding he has ever borne his part, has been honorable in business, loyal in friendship, faithful in citizenship, and now in his declining days can look back over the past with little occasion for regret.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JOHN M. WESTCOTT
The pioneers of a country, the founders of a business, the originators of any undertaking that will promote the material welfare or advance the educational, social and moral influence of a community, deserve the gratitude of humanity. One of the most important factors in the upbuilding of Richmond is the Hoosier Drill Works, an extensive enterprise that has brought success not alone to the stockholders, but has also added to the general prosperity by furnishing employment to many workmen and thus promoting commercial activity. The man who stands at the head of this concern, John M. Westcott, is also connected with other leading enterprises of Richmond, and at all times is a public-spirited, progressive citizen whose support is never withheld from measures that tend to advance the public good.

Mr. Westcott is a native of Indiana, his birth having occurred in Union county in 1834. His parents were Henry and Sarah (Dyche) Westcott, the former a native of New Jersey, of English descent, and the latter a native of Kentucky, of German descent. Their marriage was celebrated in Warren county, Ohio, and in 1832 they became residents of Union county, Indiana. Their family numbered four children, Ruth E., George H., John M. and Jennie M.

At his parental home the subject of this review was reared to manhood and in the public schools near his home he acquired his education. His early experiences were those common to frontier settlements, and with the progress and development of Indiana he has long been actively identified. In the early part of his business career he was engaged in the dry-goods trade, and on abandoning merchandising he dealt in grain and feed, his capable management and well directed energies bringing him desirable success. In 1862 Mr. Westcott removed to Richmond, where he engaged in the grain and feed trade until he became identified with the industrial interests of the city in 1872. In that year he became a stockholder in the Hoosier Drill Works, then located in Milton, Indiana, and for some time thereafter devoted his entire attention to that business. Believing that it could be made a very paying investment, he secured a controlling interest by purchasing the stock of Isaac Kinsey, and since that time, by his business and executive ability, his keen discrimination and unflagging industry, he has made the Hoosier Drill Works a most paying enterprise. In the spring of 1878 the company purchased the ground on which the present works are located and erected the buildings the following summer. About the time Mr. Westcott became the heaviest stockholder of the concern, Omar Hollingsworth also became a partner, and since that time J. A. Carr and F. A. Wilke, his other sons-in-law, have become partners, and the entire business is now in control of the family, with John M. Westcott as its president; Omar Hollingsworth, treasurer; James A. Carr, vice-president, and Burton J. Westcott, secretary. They have the largest plant in the world manufacturing exclusively seeding machines, and the annual output is worth one million dollars. The seeders are sold all over the world, and in the works four hundred men are employed.

John M. Westcott is a man of resourceful ability, whose energies have by no means been confined to one line. In the spring of 1883 he purchased forty feet of ground on Main street, between Seventh and Eighth streets, and erected thereon a four-story brick business block, with a stone front. It is finished in modern style, heated with steam and supplied with all accessories and conveniences that are found in first-class business houses. He is the chief owner of the Westcott Hotel, of Richmond, which was projected in 1892 by the Commercial Club, of which J. M. Westcott was then president, and in whose honor it was named. To his public spirit, enterprise and liberality is due the fact that Richmond now has the finest hotel in the state. The amount originally subscribed was one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, of which one hundred and ten thousand was subscribed by Mr. Westcott. He is at all times most liberal in support of any movement which will benefit the city, and with most generous hand gives of his means for the promotion of a worthy cause. He is the owner of some valuable real estate, including a fine stock farm of five thousand acres in Dickinson county, Kansas, the greater part of the land being under a high method of cultivation. His farm of two hundred and twenty-five acres, located in Center township, Wayne county, is devoted to the raising of fine-bred horses and imported Shetland ponies.

In 1855 Mr. Westcott was united in marriage to Miss Carrie Mitchell, a native of Warren county, Ohio, and at that time a resident of Wayne county, Indiana. They are now the parents of seven children: Alice C., wife of Omar Hollingsworth; Lucilla B., wife of J. A. Carr; Jennie M., wife of F. A. Wilke; Charles G., Burton J., Harry M. and Maude Evelyn. In 1880 Mr. Westcott purchased an entire block, bounded by Main, South A, Fourteenth and Sixteenth streets, which had already been laid out with walks and drives, and immediately began the improvement of the property. The second year he erected a large brick residence, and since then three other residences have been added, one for each son-in-law. The grounds are spacious and well kept, adorned with shrubs and flowering plants and shaded by beautiful trees. Hospitality characterizes the Westcott home, and the household is the center of a cultured society circle.

Socially, Mr. Westcott is connected with Whitewater Lodge, No. 4 1, I. O. O. F. Since 1849 he has held membership relations with the Methodist Episcopal church, and to all moral, educational and social interests he is a liberal contributor, doing all in his power to benefit and elevate humanity. He feels a personal interest in the men in his employ and in times of sickness or trouble they find in him a faithful friend. His business career has been crowned with a well merited success. He has made good use of his opportunities and has prospered from year to year, conducting all business matters carefully and systematically, and in all his ads displaying an aptitude for successful management. He has not permitted the accumulation of a fortune to affect in any way his actions toward those less fortunate than he, and has always a cheerful word and a pleasant smile for those with whom he comes in contact.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



SAMUEL G. DUGDALEB The honored subject of this memoir was at one time closely identified with the business interests of Richmond, Indiana, being one of her most prominent and influential merchants. He was very successful in his business and had lived a retired life several years previously to his death. His parents were Benjamin and Hannah (Kaighn) Dugdale, to whom he was born in Trenton, New Jersey, June 2, 1821. His mother was a native of that state, and his father came to New Jersey from Mount Melick, Ireland, and moved to Richmond in 1837, with a family of four children, of whom Samuel was the youngest. The father was a tanner by trade, but followed that business only a few years and then engaged in the drug business, first in Trenton and later in this city, and was succeeded by his sons, James, Thomas and Samuel. Mrs. Dugdale departed this life in 1842, and her husband followed her eight years later. Thomas soon retired from the business, leaving James and Samuel to continue it as Dugdale & Company. Some time in 1849 they disposed of the stock.

Samuel G. Dugdale then embarked in the confectionery, notion and wall-paper business, carrying it on until 1871. In 1879 he took up his residence in the country near this city, and lived in retirement until 1892, when he was stricken with paralysis and he once more moved to Richmond, where he passed away December 28, 1897. He was quite prominent in fraternal circles. He was made an Odd Fellow in White Water Lodge, No. 41, and became a member of the Oriental Encampment in 1862; he was also a member of the grand lodge of Indiana. He was twice married, his first wife being Miss Susanna Downing, sister of the late H. R. Downing, a leading undertaker of this city. Their nuptials were solemnized in 1848 and resulted in the birth of two children, George B. and Horace L., both deceased. Mr. Dugdale then led to the altar Miss Emma E. Salter, of Richmond, in 1859, and their home was blessed by the advent of a daughter, Emma L., who makes her home with her mother in Richmond.

Mrs. Dugdale is a lady of culture and refinement, and is the daughter of a physician, Dr. James W. Salter, whose name is held in affectionate remembrance by the older residents in this community. He was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1808, and was a son of William and Hannah (Wilson) Salter. William Salter was born in England and came to this country in 1806, locating first in Philadelphia, where he followed his trade of a printer. He was a Quaker in his religious affiliation, and founded and published "The Friend," a paper devoted to the interests of the Society of Friends. He married Hannah Wilson, of that state, where he remained but a short time, then returning to Philadelphia, and resuming the publication of "The Friend." His wife died in Philadelphia in 1838, and three years later he came to Richmond with his family, where he died on March 1st of the following year.

Dr. Salter entered a drug store in Philadelphia when eleven years old, and made his own way through life from that time. He became familiar with the use of drugs, and at the age of eighteen took up the study of medicine under Doctor Snow, of Philadelphia. In 1830 he graduated from the Jefferson Medical College and located on what was then known as "Fox Chase," since a part of Philadelphia. He remained there two years and October 4, 1832, was united in marriage with Miss Caroline L. Pyle, of Philadelphia, and four years later removed to Richmond, Indiana. He was the third physician to locate here, the others being Drs. Warren and Plummer. He soon became very popular, and built up a large practice. In 1842 he moved onto a farm on the Elk Horn, near Richmond, and gave up a large practice, but was induced to take it up again in 1849, when the cholera broke out, and traveled almost night and day in his endeavors to relieve the afflicted. He was untiring in his efforts, and many families had reason to bless his ministrations. About 1866 he purchased the Weekly Telegram, Richmond, which paper he edited and conducted for a few years, when he sold the property and finally retired once more from active life, his death occurring August 21, 1886, in Topeka, Kansas, where he had located two years before his death. His wife passed away May 21, 1869. Mrs. Dugdale was one of seven children left to perpetuate his memory.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



WILLIAM M. THOMPSON.
William M. Thompson, the subject of this memoir, and at one time the county treasurer of Wayne county, was one of the most popular and efficient financiers and officials of this section of the state. For more than thirty years he was an honored citizen of Richmond, actively interested in all measures advanced for the good of the people, and performed his full share in the development and improvement of the city.

A son of Montgomery and Piety (Horne) Thompson, William M. was born October 6, 1838, on a farm which his father had entered from the government, this homestead being situated east of the town of Arba, in Randolph county, Indiana. His education was acquired in the district schools of the period, and long ere he had reached his majority he had mastered all departments of agriculture, under the judicious instruction of his father, who was a practical, successful farmer and a leader in local affairs. When he was twenty-one years old he was married, and for some five years subsequent to that event he carried on agricultural operations on a farm adjoining the old homestead owned by his father. Later he turned his attention to the management of a general store at Bethel, Wayne county, and in 1861 he came to Richmond, which was thenceforth to be his home. Here he went into the grocery business with George W. Barnes, and continued with him for some six or seven years. Then, buying an interest in a grocery, the business was conducted for five years under the firm name of Thompson & Good, at the end of which period the senior member retired and embarked in the same kind of enterprise on his own account. He continued actively engaged in business until 1892, when he sold out and retired from the field of commerce.

One of the most noticeable characteristics of Mr. Thompson from his youth was the readiness with which he won friends. He possessed that rare sympathy and sincerity, that genuine kindliness of heart and manly courtesy of manner which never fail to attract. Doubtless these traits accounted largely for his popularity and prosperity in business and as a public official. From his twenty-first year he was zealous in the Republican party, and was sent as a delegate to numberless district, county and state conven¬tions. In 1876 he received the nomination for the county treasurership, and, having been duly elected, he entered upon the duties of the office in October of that year. Accurate and methodical in his work, he won the commendation of all concerned, and, when he was again placed in nomination, upon the expiration of his first term, he was elected with little opposition, and con¬tinued to give general satisfaction while he was in office.

On the 2d of February, 1859, Mr. Thompson married Miss Lucinda Vannuys, of Bethel, Indiana, and for over thirty-five years they harmoniously pursued life's journey together. Two children were born to them, a son and a daughter: Charles V., now a resident of Chicago; and Rosa, wife of Theodore H. Hill, a member of the well known Richmond firm of Louck & Hill, proprietors of the Richmond planing-mill. The death of Mr. Thompson occurred at his pleasant home on North Thirteenth street, Richmond, October 17, 1894. His loss has been deeply mourned in this community, and his memory is enshrined in the hearts of scores of his old friends and associates, to whose interests he was ever faithful, sacrificing his own rather than theirs.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JOHN F. KIBBEY.
The name of Judge Kibbey is enduringly inscribed on the pages of Indiana's history in connection with the records of her jurisprudence. After many years of activity in the legal profession, however, he is now living retired at his pleasant home in Richmond. His superior ability won him marked success; he was crowned with high judicial honors; and in business and private life he won that good name which is rather to be chosen than great riches. He is one of the native sons of Wayne county, his birth having occurred May 4, 1826, his parents being John Crane and Mary (Espy) Kibbey. The Kibbey family is of Welsh extraction, and was founded in America about 1700, the original American ancestors locating midway between Trenton and Newark, New Jersey. There Ephraim Kibbey, the grandfather of the Judge, was born and reared. In 1777 he enlisted as a private in Captain Jacob Martin's company, Fourth Battalion New Jersey Continental line, and served during the continuance of the Revolutionary war. He then returned to New Jersey, where he remained until his removal to Ohio. He was a surveyor, and in that capacity started westward with a party of emigrants. They located on the Ohio river, just below the mouth of the Little Miami river, on a tract of land known as the Symmes Purchase, and there founded the town of Columbia. Mr. Kibbey assisted in the survey of that tract of land. On the 1st of January, 1790, General St. Clair arrived in Columbia and on the following day appointed Ephraim Kibbey an ensign in the army. The latter also commanded a company under General Wayne, known as "Mad Anthony" by reason of his great daring in battle. He served with the rank of major. He died in 1807. His wife was, before her marriage, a Miss Crane, and to them were born six children, three sons and three daughters.

To this family belonged John Crane Kibbey, who was born in New Jersey, March 17, 1783, and in 1788 was taken by his parents to Columbia, Ohio, where he was reared to manhood. He acquired his education under the direction of his father, who had been a teacher in early manhood, and pursued his studies at night in books borrowed from Governor Morrow, of Ohio. With his uncle, Mr. Crane, he learned the tanner's and currier's trade, and at the time of his marriage was the owner of a half-section of land in Warren county, Ohio. In 1812 he purchased seven hundred acres of land near Salisbury, Wayne county, Indiana, and one hundred and sixty acres two miles west of that place, and the following year removed to Salisbury, then the county-seat. He established a tan yard, and for some years was prominently connected with the business and public life of the community. In 1814 he was appointed justice of the peace and did a large business in the justice court. In the early ‘20s he came to Richmond, then a mere hamlet. Here he continued to serve as justice of the peace, and also built and conducted a tavern in the town. He soon relinquished that business, however, but for some years continued to hold the office of justice of the peace, and owned large property interests in Richmond, Salisbury and Wayne county. He was a Democrat of the old school and cast his first presidential vote for Jefferson, in 1804. He continued to support the Democracy until 1854, when the Kansas-Nebraska bill was passed, and he left the party. In 1850 he removed to Illinois, where he died in 1856, the year of the inception of the Republican party, whose principles and faith he endorsed. He married Miss Mary Espy and to them were born ten children, nine daughters and a son.

The last named, and the youngest of the family is Judge John F. Kibbey, the honored subject of this review. He was born May 4, 1826, in Wayne county, Indiana, in which he has always lived. He remained in Richmond until the age of fourteen years, then removed to Centerville, at that time the county-seat, and in 1874 returned to Richmond, where he has resided continuously since. He acquired his preliminary education in the common schools, later attended the Wayne County Seminary, in Centerville, and afterward became a student in Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio. In 1850 he entered upon the study of law, his preceptor being Governor O. P. Morton, of Centerville. His preparation was thorough and comprehensive, and in 1852 he was admitted to the bar. While studying he engaged in teaching in the country schools and in Hagerstown. In 1851 he was appointed county surveyor, and in 1852, 1854 and 1856 was elected to that office, which he filled most acceptably until 1857, when he resigned.

In 1853 Judge Kibbey formed a law partnership with Governor Morton, which connection was continued until 1860, when the latter was elected chief executive of the state. In March, 1862, Judge Kibbey was appointed attorney-general of Indiana, and continued to fill that position until November, when the regular election occurred. During the two years following he engaged in the private practice of law to some extent, but his time was largely taken up with military duties. In 1863 he was appointed a commandant, with the rank of colonel, of the congressional district in which Wayne county is located, his duty being to procure enlistments for the army. He enlisted sixteen companies, of which he was commander while they were in Richmond. The greater part of these constituted the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and a portion were in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry.

In March, 1865, he was appointed judge of the sixth common-pleas judicial district, composed of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin counties, and in the autumn of that year was elected to that office, being re-elected in 1868 and 1872. In March, 1873, the common-pleas court was abolished, and Wayne county was made the seventeenth judicial circuit, of which Mr. Kibbey was elected judge, at a special election, in October, 1873. In 1878 he was re- elected, his term expiring October 21, 1885, when he resumed the practice of law, continuing therein until his retirement from the profession, in 1898. As a lawyer he soon won rank among the distinguished members of the bar of Indiana. The favorable judgment which the world passed upon him in his early years was never set aside or in any degree modified during his long career at the bar and on the bench. It was, on the contrary, emphasized by his careful conduct of important litigation, his candor and fairness in the presentation of cases, and his zeal and earnestness as an advocate. His contemporaries unite in bearing testimony to his high character and superior mind. What higher testimonial of his able service on the bench could be given than the fact of his long continuance thereon? A clear insight into the legal problems presented, combined with absolute fairness and a high sense of justice, made his decisions particularly free from bias, and won him high encomiums from the public and the bar.

On the 5th of May, 1852, was celebrated the marriage of Judge Kibbey and Miss Caroline E. Conningham, daughter of Daniel C. Conningham, of Centerville. They had five children, as follows: Joseph H., an attorney-at-law of Phoenix, Arizona, who went to that place in 1888 and was United States judge from 1889 until 1893, under the Harrison administration; Mary E., who became the wife of Rev. William E. Jordan, a Methodist Episcopal minister, who died in 1890, while her death occurred in 1883; John C., who is in the employ of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad at St. Louis, Missouri; Frank C., a member of the Thirty-second Michigan Regiment, located at Grand Rapids, Michigan, who prior to entering the service was clerk of the court in Florence, Arizona; and Walter P., who died in 1876, at the age of ten years.

In his political associations Judge Kibbey was a Democrat until 1854, when, on account of the attitude of the party on the slavery question he left its ranks. When the Republican party was organized, in 1856, he became one of its supporters and has since been most earnest in his advocacy of its principles. In 1871 he became a member of the Presbyterian church in Centerville and three years later transferred his membership to the Presbyterian church in Richmond. A prominent and exemplary Mason, he belongs to the blue lodge, chapter and commandery of Richmond. He has drawn about him a circle of devoted friends, and has at all times commanded the respect and esteem of his fellow men by his superior intellectual attainments and his upright life. Professional eminence is an indication of individual merit, for in professional life advancement cannot depend upon outside influences or the aid of wealthy friends; it comes as the reward of earnest, persistent labor, and the exercise of natural talents, and is therefore the fitting reward of labor. For years Judge Kibbey was accorded a prominent position at the Indiana bar and his professional career was an honor to the district which so honored him.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JACOB R. WEIST, A.M., M.D.
One of the most exacting of all the higher lines of occupation to which a man may lend his energies is that of the physician. A most scrupulous preliminary training is demanded and a nicety of judgment little understood by the laity. Then again the profession brings one of its devotees into almost constant association with the sadder side of life, -that of pain and suffering,- so that a mind capable of great self-control and a heart responsive and sympathetic are essential attributes of him who would essay the practice of the healing art. Thus when professional success is attained in any instance it may be taken as certain that such measure of success has been thoroughly merited. In the subject of this review we have one who has gained distinction in the line of his chosen calling, who has been an earnest and discriminating student, and who holds a position of due relative precedence among the medical practitioners of eastern Indiana.

Dr. Weist was born in Preble county, Ohio, November 26, 1834, and is a son of John and Keziah C. (Scott) Weist. The family is of German lineage, and the grandfather, Jacob Weist, was a native of central Pennsylvania. He was reared to manhood in Little York, in that state, and thence removed to Preble county, Ohio, where he died in 1848, during a cholera epidemic, at the age of seventy years. He followed farming throughout his life and was a man of intelligence and eminent respectability. He married Catharine De Coursey, a lady of French descent, who was born near Baltimore, Maryland. They had a family of seven children, six sons and a daughter. John Weist, the father of the Doctor, was born in Little York, Pennsylvania, in 1800, and during his boyhood removed with his parents to Preble county, Ohio, where he died in 1857. He carried on agricultural pursuits as a life work, and his capable management of his business affairs, and his energy and industry brought to him a well deserved success. He was a very prominent and influential member in the Methodist Episcopal church of his neighborhood, took an active interest in its work, and lived an exemplary Christian life. His integrity was proverbial and his word was as good as any bond that was ever solemnized by signature or seal. He married Miss Keziah C., daughter of George Scott. Her father belonged to a family of Swiss extraction and in early life was a sailor. He made his home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for many years, but subsequently removed to Huntington county, Indiana, where his last days were passed. In his family were three sons and two daughters.

In the common schools of his native county Dr. Weist acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by study in the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio, where he pursued a classical and scientific course. In 1878 the Jesuit College, -St. Xavier- of Cincinnati, Ohio, conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. Prepared by a broad general knowledge for entrance into professional life, he entered the office of Dr. Samuel Ferris, of Preble county, Ohio, and later attended a course of lectures in the Western Reserve Medical College, at Cleveland, Ohio, and then for a time practiced in his native county. He then entered the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia, where he was graduated in 1861.

The same year Dr. Weist opened an office in Richmond, and in March, 1862, was appointed assistant surgeon to the Sixty-fifth Regiment of Ohio Infantry, in which capacity he acted until July of the same year, when he was transferred to the Fourth Ohio Cavalry, with which he remained fourteen months. In September, 1863, he was appointed surgeon of the First United States Colored Troops, and continued with that command until the close of the war, being discharged in November, 1865, when he returned to Richmond, where he has since been engaged in private practice. His service as assistant surgeon was with the Army of the Cumberland, a part of the time in charge of a hospital in Nashville. and his service as surgeon was in eastern Virginia and North Carolina, first in the field and then in charge of hospitals in Newbern and Goldsboro, subsequently chief operating surgeon in the Eighteenth Army Corps hospital at Point of Rocks, Virginia, and finally becoming acting medical inspector and director of the Twenty-fifth Army Corps.

All this was a splendid training school for the young physician. With a comprehensive knowledge of anatomy and the science of medicine, he carefully applied his wisdom to the alleviation of the suffering of the gallant men who were fighting for their country, and in so doing gained an ability that that has classed him first among the surgeons of eastern Indiana and gained him national reputation. He has always made a specialty of surgery, and his success has been most marked. He succeeded because he desired to succeed. He is great because nature endowed him bountifully, and he has studiously, carefully and conscientiously increased the talents that were given him. A perfect master of the construction and functions of the component parts of the human body, of the changes induced in them by the onslaughts of disease, of the defects cast upon them as a legacy by ancestry, of the vital capacity remaining in them throughout all vicissitudes of existence, he has gained an eminent place among the practitioners of Indiana and is recognized authority on many questions affecting not only surgery but the general practice of medicine as well. He has been surgeon of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for twenty consecutive years and for twenty years served on the United States board of pension examiners. He was one of the original members of the American Surgical Association, which is limited to a membership of one hundred, and served for fourteen years as secretary of that distinguished scientific body, with which he is still connected. This society was organized in New York city in 1880 and Dr. Weist was chosen its first secretary. He is also a prominent member of the Southern Gynecological Association, the American Medical Association, which he represented at the International Medical Congress in 1881, and the Indiana State Medical Association, serving as president of the last named in 1875. Through his connection with these various organizations, as well as through constant study and the perusal of the most reliable medical journals, he keeps in constant touch with his profession in its advance toward perfection. He has not always been a follower but has many times been a leader in the investigation that has led to valuable discoveries, and has contributed many important medical papers to the journals of his profession. Next to surgery perhaps his most important dissertations have been on hygiene and sanitary affairs.

In 1856 Dr. Weist was united in marriage to Miss Sarah I. Mitchell, of Portsmouth, Ohio, and to them were born three children, but only one is now living, the others having died in infancy. Their son, Dr. H. H. Weist; has followed in the professional footsteps of his father. He was born in Richmond, July 10, 1868, read medicine under the direction of his father, attended lectures in the Bellevue Medical College, and was graduated in 1891. The following year he was a student in the medical department of the University of Michigan, and afterward at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Vienna, Austria. He then traveled extensively over the continent, and is now engaged in practice with his father in Richmond. He is a young man of splendid intellectual and professional attainments and exceptional ability.

Dr. Jacob R. Weist holds membership with various fraternal societies, is a Knight Templar Mason, a Knight of Pythias, and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Loyal Legion. He is deeply interested in the affairs of the city which has been his home for thirty-seven years, and for a long period served as its health officer. He has always advocated the measures which have advanced its welfare, and has labored for its improvement and progress. In private life he has gained that warm personal regard which arises from true nobility of character, deference for the opinions of others, kindliness and geniality. He inspires personal friendships of unusual strength, and all who know him have the highest admiration for his good qualities of heart and mind.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



MARTIN V. BROWN
This well known and prominent merchant of Milton, Indiana, who is a worthy representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Wayne county, was born in that city December 1, 1838, and was educated in its public and subscription schools. His parents, John and Ara Anna (White) Brown, were born, reared and married in Pennsylvania. The father was born August 11, 1812, and was a son of John Brown. Sr., who belonged to a family of Scotch origin which was founded in America during colonial days. The latter served through the Revolutionary war as a soldier of the Continental army and made his home in Pennsylvania. He was of long-lived stock, and he and his wife lived to the ages of eighty-five and eighty-six years, respectively. In religious faith they were Lutherans, he having been baptized by a Lutheran minister when only a few days old. Their children were John, Adam, George, Philip, Henry, Samuel, Regena, Eliza and Catherine.

John Brown, Jr., the father of our subject, left the home farm before he attained his majority and learned the tanner's trade. After working for a time as a journeyman in his native state he purchased a tannery in the western part of Center county, Pennsylvania, which he conducted for a number of years. In company with another gentleman he then came west on a prospecting tour, going as far as Iowa and Missouri, but, deciding to locate in Indiana, he took up his residence in Wayne county in 1835. The first year was spent in Centerville, but at the end of that time he removed to Milton, where he purchased an interest in a tannery, which the firm remodeled and enlarged and conducted the same for ten or twelve years. He then sold his share in the business and purchased a tract of land. In 1849 he went to California, by way of the isthmus, and remained for a time on the Pacific slope prospecting and mining with reasonable success. He opened many camps and gave the name to several rivers and towns, but he met with no hairbreadth escapes. Returning east by the same route he rejoined his family in Milton, and devoted his attention to farming and stock-raising throughout the remainder of his life. He cleared and improved a fine farm, erecting thereon commodious and substantial buildings. In politics he was a pronounced Democrat and was once the candidate of his party for the state legislature, but was defeated by General Solomon Meredith, a very strong opponent, who beat him by only a small majority, however. He filled some important township offices and was a man of prominence in his community. He died October 1, 1898, aged eighty-six years, and his estimable wife passed away June 29, 1890, aged seventy-nine years. She was born December 20, 1810, and had two brothers, Jackson and Daniel, both residents of Pennsylvania. The White family were connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. Our subject is the oldest in a family of four children, the others being Jackson, who spent ten years in Montana, but died in Milton, Indiana; Martha J., now Mrs. T. Williamson, of Sherman county, Kansas; and Albert, who died leaving a wife but no children.

Martin V. Brown remained on the home farm until twenty-two years of age, then worked in a mill two years and engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store for the same length of time at Lewisville. On the 1st of March, 1868, he purchased a building and stock of groceries and hardware and embarked in business at Milton, where he has since successfully carried on operations. He also owns and conducts the old homestead farm, and in business affairs has met with well merited success.

On the 1st of November, 1866, Mr. Brown wedded Miss Mary J. Mack, who was born in Preble county, Ohio, September 20, 1844, a daughter of Alexander and Catherine (Hoover) Mack, natives of Pennsylvania, who went with their respective families to Ohio and were married in the latter state. They were farming people, who in 1848 removed to Carthage, Illinois, where they bought a farm. After their deaths, about eleven years later, the family was scattered and Mrs. Brown returned to Ohio, where she lived with an aunt for two years and later with her grandfather. In 1864 she came to Lewisville, Henry county, Indiana, where she made her home with an uncle until her marriage. She is the second in order of birth in a family of five children, the others being Mrs. Emerite Slater, now of Chicago, Illinois; Maria L., who first married a Mr. McClure, and afterward R. T. Rogers, of Denver, Colorado; Charles, a resident of Elmo, Missouri; and Catherine, wife of C. White. The parents of these children were faithful members of the Presbyterian church. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown have been born five children: Cora M., at home; Frank W., who died at the age of seventeen years; William, who is a clerk in his father's store and the master of the Masonic lodge; John A., who married Nora St. Clair, the daughter of a prominent physician of Milton, and Mary J., at home.

Mr. Brown is one of the prominent and influential representatives of the Democratic party in his community, and he takes an active interest in political affairs. He has held about all the town offices, and was once the candidate of his party for county treasurer. He is one of the leading members of the Masonic lodge of Milton and has served as its treasurer for nearly thirty years.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



CYRUS O. HURST
One of the earliest families making permanent settlement in Wayne county, Indiana, was that now worthily represented in this section of the state by the gentleman whose name forms the heading of this sketch. For almost a century the Hursts have been identified with the agricultural interests of their community, aiding materially in the development of the resources of their section and taking an active part in everything calculated to promote the welfare and happiness of the majority.

As early as 1802 a little party of three, John and Benedict Hurst and Elizabeth, the young wife of the former, might have been observed making the tediously long and difficult journey through the almost pathless wilderness from Maryland to Ohio. The two young men, who were able-bodied and full of the vigor and enthusiasm of youth, walked the entire distance, over the mountains and through the forests, while Mrs. Hurst was on horseback, with all of her own and husband's earthly possessions in the packsaddle of the trusty animal she rode. Simple as was this primitive mode of traveling, the slender means of the three became nearly exhausted by the time that they reached Hamilton, Ohio, and there they concluded to remain for a period. The young husband worked at whatever he could find to do, clearing land and splitting rails, chiefly, and, assisted by his industrious wife, managed to accumulate a little money. Two of their children were born during their sojourn there, one in 1804 and the other two years later. In 1807 the family came to what has since been known as Wayne county, and here Mr. Hurst entered eighty acres of land. He not only devoted himself to the clearing and cultivating of this property but was one of the first to embark in the raising, buying and feeding of hogs, which he disposed of in the Cincinnati markets. Both he and his wife were extremely economical and hard-working, very little having to be expended for the maintenance of the household, for she spun and wove cloth for garments, and most of their necessities were produced on the farm. Thus they continually added to their substantial wealth, bought land and made investments, and, after providing each of their twelve children with a good start in independent life, left over two thousand acres of land to be divided among them. Mr. Hurst was a man of such strict honor and absolute integrity that his mere word was considered as good as a written contract, and to his posterity he left an unblemished name and a record of which they should be very proud. After years had been spent in the little log-cabin home, a better structure sheltered the family, and from time to time the so-called luxuries of an advancing civilization found their way into the always happy home. Mr. Hurst was the proud possessor of the first cook-stove that was owned in this locality, and one of the first ingrain carpets of the period was treasured by his wife in her best room. In her girlhood she had married a Mr. Marshall, who died a short time thereafter, and thus she was a widow at the time of her marriage to Mr. Hurst. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hurst were natives of Maryland, and he was of Irish descent. She died November 5, 1850, having survived him a few years. Death came to him when he was comparatively a young man, or at least in his prime, in May, 1838, when he was fifty-six years of age. Their children were: Cynthia, born December 8, 1804; Benedict, December 11, 1806; Bennett, December 8, 1808; Sanford, April 5, 1811; Melinda, December 7, 1812; J. Marshall, February 13, 1814; Isaac, February 5, 1817; Anna, April 11, 1819 (died when young); Dickson, December 7, 1821; Elijah and Silva (twins), born October 29, 1824 (the latter married R. Watt); and Mary E., born July 12, 1827, became the wife of John Orr.

J. Marshall Hurst, the father of Cyrus O. Hurst, was reared amid the environments of pioneer life, and early learned to perform all kinds of difficult work. Ambitious and possessed of the same spirit of enterprise which had characterized his father, he energetically improved the forest-covered farm upon which he located after his marriage, and in 1859 he settled upon the place now owned by our subject. Here he and his family spent about a year in a small house which stood upon the place, and in the meantime he erected a large two-story brick residence upon a better site. At that time this was not only the finest house in the township but even one of the very best in the county, and even today but few farm houses excel it in every respect. Together with the large barns and other buildings which stand upon the farm, the superiority of the soil and the topography of the land, its general suitability for the raising of various kinds of crops, and other notable features, it is undoubtedly one of the most valuable homesteads in the county.

Mr. Hurst was extensively engaged in the stock business, raising, buying and selling cattle and hogs. Successful in most of his financial enterprises, he gradually amassed a fortune, and when death put an end to his labors he owned ten hundred and forty-five acres of land, besides having a large bank account to his credit.

For a companion and helpmate along the journey of life, J. M. Hurst chose Miss Sarah Willetts, a daughter of Elisha Willetts, of Virginia. He was a pioneer in this township, where he entered and improved land and spent the rest of his days. Social and cheerful in disposition, he was a general favorite with his neighbors, and his more substantial qualities gave him a high place among his associates. Mrs. Hurst had several brothers and sisters, namely: Nelson, Elias, James, Eldridge, Ervin, Mrs. Clarissa Busby, Mrs. Joanna Rogers and Mrs. Mary Jones. Their mother was a member of the Methodist church, but both Mr. and Mrs. Hurst were faithful workers in the United Brethren church. They were the parents of ten children, named as follows: Fernandez, now of Minneapolis, Minnesota, a hero of the civil war; Mrs. Mary E. Fox, of Madison county, Indiana; Cyrus O.; Mrs. Eliza J. Welker, who died in January, 1899, in this county, and left five children; Allison, now of Anderson, Indiana; Mrs. Clara Lamott; Jesse W., of Anderson; Roxy, wife of W. Wilson; Clarence, of Chicago; and Mrs. Emma Reed, of Anderson. The father departed this life May 11, 1868, and the mother lived until March 12, 1887.

The birth of Cyrus O. Hurst took place in Waterloo township, Fayette county, September 18, 1849. In his boyhood he received much better educational privileges than had fallen to the lot of his forefathers, and he made the best of his opportunities. Needless to say that he gained a thorough knowledge of agriculture, for there were no drones among the Hursts, and every boy had his task to perform. So well did our subject succeed that he took charge of the homestead when he was seventeen, and continued to carry on the work which had been inaugurated by his father. In 1872 he settled upon a portion of the old estate, bequeathed to him in his father's will, and eight years later he purchased the rest of the homestead and removed to the brick house already mentioned. At present he owns six hundred and eighty¬-five acres of excellent land, and has fine investments in various concerns, besides carrying a ten-thousand-dollar life policy, and in other ways proving that he is a thorough business man of the period, far-sighted, methodical and enterprising.

Prospered as he has been, and abundantly blessed "in basket and in store," Mr. Hurst does not neglect his duties toward those less fortunate, and the needy and sorrowing. It is one of his chief pleasures to minister to these, and many a person feels deeply indebted to him for timely assistance. He is a liberal contributor to the work of the Methodist denomination, with which he and his wife are identified. Politically he is a Democrat, as were his ancestors, and has officiated as township trustee and in other local positions of responsibility.

The wedding of Mr. Hurst and Miss Sarah Waymire was solemnized in this township in 1872. She is a daughter of Isam and Elizabeth A. (Taylor) Waymire, of Wayne county, this state, and Virginia, respectively. Isam was a son of Rudolph and Abigail (Fuller) Waymire, both of German descent and natives of Guilford county, North Carolina. Rudolph Waymire served in the war of 1812, and about the close of that struggle emigrated to Indiana, where, after leasing land for a few years, he obtained a soldier's warrant for forty acres, and later added thirty acres more. Two of his brothers, David and Jacob, also came to this state and owned and improved property. Rudolph Waymire and wife had eight children - Sabina, Sultana, Neely, Tempa, Betsey, Fanny, Isam and Mary A. Mrs. Hurst's maternal grandparents were Haskell and Permelia (Eddings) Taylor, of Virginia. Haskell was a son of Zachariah Taylor, a veteran of the Revolutionary war. Elizabeth A. (Taylor) Waymire was born in the Old Dominion February 23, 1827, and when ten years of age accompanied her parents to Union county, Indiana. Later they removed to Putnam county, where they died. Their children, seven in number, were named: Elizabeth A., Susan J., William, Thornton, Lorana, Ophelia and Hiram. Mrs. Hurst is the eldest of four sisters, of whom Mary is unmarried, Eliza J. is the wife of B. Miles, and Miranda is Mrs. J. Wise. The three children of Mr. and Mrs. Hurst are: Cora, born January 9. 1873, and now the wife of Daniel Clevinger; Lea M., born February 14, 1874, and now wedded to R. H. Houseworth; and Charles E., born September 22, 1878. He is unmarried and is an energetic, capable young man, upon whom has devolved much of the care of the old homestead during the last few years.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



ZACCHEUS TEST, A. M., M. D.
According to well authenticated family traditions the Tests are of Flemish extraction, but were residents of England fully two hundred and fifty years ago. They espoused the faith of the Society of Friends and three of them are said to have accompanied William Penn to America, settling in the eastern part of "Penn's Woods," or Pennsylvania. Thence some of them drifted to Salem, Salem county, New Jersey, and there Samuel Test, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born, January 8, 1774. He was a hatter by trade, but made farming and milling his chief business after his removal to Indiana. On the way west he stayed for a short period at Waynesville and Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1816 arrived in Union county, this state, where he lived many years. Finally he came to Richmond and died here, in 1856. He was a strong anti-slavery man and a Whig, and was very active in the Society of Friends, of which he was a life-long and a useful member. He married Sarah Maxwell, also a native of New Jersey, and to them were born ten children.

The parents of Dr. Zaccheus Test were Samuel, Jr., and Hannah (Jones) Test. The father was the second child of Samuel and Sarah (Maxwell) Test, and was born in Salem, New Jersey, August 6, 1798. He accompanied the family on its removal to this state, and in the spring of 1835 he came to the vicinity of Richmond and embarked in the manufacture of woolen goods, near the well known "Test Mills." He departed this life in 1849, respected and beloved by all who knew him. He, too, was a devout and faithful Friend and aided materially in the work of the church. Of his seven sons, the Doctor is the second. The eldest, Josiah, died in 1864; William, Rufus and Oliver, all reside at present near the Test Mills; Erastus is professor of mathematics in Purdue University, at Lafayette; and Lindley M. is engaged in the insurance and real-estate business in Peru, Indiana.

Dr. Zaccheus Test was born in the village now called Quakertown, Union county, Indiana, September 13, 1828. After irregular attendance at the common schools he entered "Friends' Boarding School" (now Earlham College), at its opening, in 1847, and after a two-years course went to Haverford College, at Haverford, Pennsylvania, where he was graduated in 1851. A year later he took up the study of medicine, being a student of Dr. William B. Smith, of Richmond, and graduated in the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, in the spring of 1855. Poor health compelled him later to give up the profession. Having assisted in the organization of the institution, he became, in 1859, a member of the faculty of Earlham College, where for several years he was in charge of the classical department. In 1866 he accepted a position in Howland School, Union Springs, New York, where he remained till 1879.

During all these years the Doctor was closely occupied in study, especially in the line of the history and systems of philosophy. In 1861 or 1862, Franklin and Marshall College, Pennsylvania, conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. In 1874-5 it was his privilege to spend a year abroad, mostly at the University of Tubingen, southern Germany, occupying the vacations more or less in European travel. Returning by way of England, he was appointed, in 1879, supervisor of German in the public schools of Richmond and served in that capacity up to the close of 1898. As an educator he has met with encouraging success. His heart and mind have been wholly in the great work, and he seems especially gifted by nature and training to lead and develop the mental faculties of the young.

In 1879 Dr. Test became a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal church, and a year later was ordained a deacon. In 1883 he was admitted to the priesthood and for three years was the rector of the Connersville church. For fourteen years he has been the honorary assistant of St. Paul's parish in Richmond. Into religious work, as into everything else which he undertakes, he puts his whole soul and talents, and by the strength of his noble personality wields an influence for good that cannot be estimated.

In 1857 Dr. Test married Miss Elizabeth M. Pray, of Dublin, Wayne county, who died in 1870. Their two living children are Alice T. and Mrs. W. W. Gilford. Miss Alice is a graduate of the State University and of the State Normal School, and for several years has been a successful teacher in the schools of Richmond. In 1876 the Doctor married Miss Sarah Anthony, of Union Springs, New York, his present wife, a cousin of Miss Susan B. Anthony.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DEAL
The life of a good man exerts a far-reaching influence, not only over his immediate associates, but, it may be, over the minds and lives of multitudes who have not directly enjoyed his companionship. It is when recalling the career of such a man as Benjamin F. Deal that one is reminded of the beautiful words of the poet, who speaks of

"Those immortal dead who live again
In minds made better by their presence, live
In pulses stirred to generosity,
In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn
For miserable aims that end with self."

The parents of Benjamin F. Deal, George and Mary (Morgan) Deal, were natives of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and spent their entire lives in that state, their attention being given to agriculture. The father had one brother who won fame as a statesman, and at one time was a member of congress from Pennsylvania. The mother's nephew, Senator John Sessney, was in the senate during President Lincoln's administration.

Born on the old homestead near Bedford Springs, Pennsylvania, November 30, 1830, our subject passed his youth in the quiet pursuits of a country lad, and received his preliminary education in the common schools. Subsequently it was his privilege to attend the university at Lewisburg, where he completed his higher studies, and soon afterward he engaged in teaching. In 1854 he came to Indiana and, settling in Boston township, Wayne county, he there conducted a general store for two or three years. Then, selling out, he carne to Richmond, where he found employment as a clerk, and ultimately embarked in the grocery business on his own account, carrying on a store for about five years. From the time that he disposed of that business until his death he was actively and extensively engaged in the buying, packing and shipping of produce, in wholesale and retail quantities, his market for the same being chiefly in the east. He was a man of pronounced busi¬ness ability, and by his energy, correct methods and absolute integrity and reliability, he won the high regard of all with whom he had financial dealings. He took an intelligent interest in public affairs, and was an ally of the Democratic party, though in no sense an office-seeker or po1itician. Religiously, he was a Baptist, and for years was an earnest worker in the First church of this city. He held various official positions in the congregation and was a zealous helper in the Sunday-school. He was summoned to his reward January 27, 1887, when he was still in his prime and ere the powers of his keen mind had suffered in the slightest degree from the inroads of old age. His memory is tenderly cherished in the hearts of his innumerable friends, whom he endeared to himself by many a deed of kindness and sympathy.

On the 30th of November, 1856, Mr. Deal married Miss Lucinda Williams, a daughter of Benjamin and Margaret (Bennett) Williams, of Wayne county, Indiana. The father was a native of North Carolina, and in the early history of Indiana he accompanied John Williams, his father, to this state, settling near Albington, where he engaged in farming. He was successful and enterprising, and at the time of his death, in 1846, though he was then but forty-four years of age, he was the owner of two large and valuable farms. Six weeks, perhaps, covered the whole time of his school days, yet by study and persistent practice he became an exceptionally fine mathematician and penman and was well posted in the sciences and in general matters. He was an old-line Whig, and in religion was a consistent Methodist. His wife was an aunt of General Thomas Bennett, a well known military personage in the annals of this section. Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, three sons and eight daughters. His maternal grandfather Philips was a Revolutionary soldier.

The eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Deal, John T., was born August 6, 1857. He was graduated in the Richmond high school, and attended the business college of this city. His higher education was obtained in Earlham College, and subsequent to his leaving that institution he took up the study of law with Judge James Perry and the Hon. Henry U. Johnson. Having been admitted to the bar, he established an office and was very successfully engaged in practice for eight or ten years. In 1893 he retired from his professional work, and has since given his time and attention to the management of a farm situated near the village of Boston, Wayne county, which includes farming lands to the amount of more than six hundred acres. He also attends to the management of his mother's interests. He is a young man possessing talent and energy, and is making a success of his agricultural labors. Robert W., the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Deal, was born June 15, 1859, and died when but nine months old. The youngest son, Otis F., whose history is given in following paragraphs, is likewise deceased.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



OTIS F. DEAL.
There is something especially sad in the death of a young man who is in the full vigor of life and promise; and when the crushing news came to the friends of Otis F. Deal that he who had left them but a few hours before, the impersonation of manly strength and enthusiasm, had fallen at the touch of the fell destroyer, the blow was almost unbearable. Few young men in Richmond or in the employ of the Panhandle Railroad were more popular or respected, for he had a kind word for everybody and was always ready to lend a helping hand to a comrade or fellow traveler along life's journey.

In tracing the history of Otis F. Deal it is learned that his birth occurred April 28, 1868, and that he was thus less than twenty-three years of age when his happy useful career came to a close on that disastrous 25th of February, 1891, in the railroad accident at Hagerstown, Indiana. Yet he had accomplished infinitely more than most men of thirty or thirty-five, and had developed business qualities which would have done credit to one of twice his age and experience. As a student he was naturally gifted and won the highest encomiums of his teachers. After completing his high-school work in Richmond he entered Earlham College, where, in addition to pursuing two distinct courses of study, he made up some preparatory work, and at the time of his graduation, in June, 1887, carried off the honors of the class of twenty-five members (the largest class ever graduated from the college) though he was the youngest person in the class.

Two weeks prior to his graduation he entered the employ of the Pan¬handle Railroad as a rod-man, and was rapidly promoted to more responsible positions. About two years before his death he was made engineer, having charge of a division from Indianapolis to Cincinnati and Logansport, and was in line for the superintendency, as his services were thoroughly appreciated by his superiors, who rightly judged him capable of occupying positions to which they would not have dreamed of calling any other man of his age and limited experience. As an instance of the remarkable confidence which they reposed in him, it may be cited that on one occasion he was sent to Indianapolis as a lobbyist, to prevent the passage of a measure detrimental to the interests of the corporation, and that he succeeded in his intervention. Nor were his abilities confined to railroading affairs. He was the originator and prime mover in the American Tin Plate Company, of Elwood; in the Plate Glass Factory of the same town, and was associated with the Elwood Land Company. In the Plate Glass company and the Elwood Land Company he was a stockholder, and had been tendered the management of the first named plant, the matter not having been determined upon at the time of his death. When Gas City, Indiana, was a town of the future, Mr. Deal went there, as a civil engineer, and succeeded in laying out the place and in giving it a start toward prosperity. His exceptional ability made him in great demand, and his time was more than occupied by the innumerable enterprises which were constantly being urged upon his attention.

In the home and among his friends the lovable traits of character and disposition of Otis F. Deal shone forth undimmed. He was a loyal and duti¬ful son, an affectionate brother, a consistent Christian, and a more sincere friend is rarely met. From his youth he was an earnest, graceful, extemporaneous speaker, and he wielded the pen with a master hand, his thoughts being expressed in a clear-cut, happy manner. The best and noblest elements of manhood were exemplified in him, and thus, though he has passed from our vision, the memory of his upright, beautiful life remains.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



HIRAM C. ELWELL
This well known citizen is a leading and representative agriculturist of Washington township, Wayne county, where he was born October 11, 1843, and was reared in about the usual manner of farmer boys of his day, his education being obtained in the common schools. His parents, Eli and Elizabeth (De Camp) Elwell, were both natives of New York, the former born in Dutchess county, September 1, 1789, the latter born in Onondaga county, May 3, 1804. She came with her parents to Indiana and located near Brookville. Later her father, Richard De Camp, moved from Franklin county to Wayne county, where he remained a number of years but spent his last days in St. Joseph county. He was a representative of a prominent New England family, was broadminded and liberal in his views, and was a farmer by occupation. His children were Charles, Israel, Harry, Elizabeth, Mrs. Harriet Jeffries, Mrs. Christiana Kidd and Mrs. Olive Redfield.

Eli Elwell, father of our subject, was reared on a farm and received a good collegiate education, which he put to practical use as a teacher. Leaving his native state he went to Virginia in a carry-all, and after teaching school there for a time he proceeded to Ohio, where he had an uncle living. From there he came in his carry-all to Wayne county, Indiana, and purchased eighty acres of land, on which a two-story log house had been built, an orchard set out and a few other improvements made. He taught one term of school here, but gave the greater part of his time and attention to agricultural pursuits, in which he met with excellent success, becoming the owner of two hundred and fifty-six acres in the home farm, besides lands in Rush, Boone and Madison counties. He loaned money for many years and speculated extensively in notes and securities. After giving each of his children a home and helping them in other ways, he left at his death an estate valued at forty-five thousand dollars. Retiring from active labor in 1866, he removed to Milton, where he purchased a pleasant home and there spent the remainder of his days, dying March 4, 1875. His estimable wife survived him for some time and passed away in 1887. Politically he was a stanch Whig and later a Republican, but he never aspired to office, preferring to give his undivided attention to his business interests. However, he served as one of the three trustees of his township in early days and filled other local offices. In business affairs he was systematic and methodical, and as a civil engineer in laying out land for any purpose he always made a plat of it. He was a Universalist in religious faith, and was one of the most prominent and influential men of his community. His children were as follows: Mrs. Olive Williams; Mrs. Emma E. Marvin, who died June 18, 1899; Mrs. Hulda Murphy; Laura, who married F. Ferguson, now of Kansas, and died leaving two children; Horace, a prominent farmer of Rush county, Indiana; Mrs. Savanna Miller; and Hiram C., our subject.

Hiram C. Elwell assisted his father in the operation of the home farm during his boyhood and youth and remained at his parental home until his marriage in 1866. Two years of his married life was spent upon that farm, and at the end of that time he erected a house upon a tract of ninety-six acres given him by his father. To it he has since added until he now has a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres; the log cabin has been replaced by a large and substantial two-story frame residence; good barns and outbuildings have also been erected, and he has successfully engaged in both farming and stock-raising. His pleasant home is situated four miles south of Milton and is one of the most desirable farms of the locality. Upon an adjoining tract which he purchased has been built a complete set of farm buildings, and this place is now occupied by his son. In political sentiment he is a stalwart Democrat.

In 1866 Mr. Elwell married Miss Julia Patterson, a daughter of John and Delilah (Beeson) Patterson. When young her father came to Indiana, where he grew to manhood, and for some years he was engaged in farming in Fayette county, where all his children by his first wife were born. Later he bought a fine farm in Shelby county, and, on disposing of that place, he removed to Tipton county, where he owned six or eight hundred acres of land. At one time he was prosperous, but by endorsing the note of a porkpacker he lost heavily and this greatly reduced his estate. He was a strong Democrat in politics and a very prominent man in his community. He died in October, 1870, and the mother of Mrs. Elwell passed away in Fayette county in 1850. To them were born six children, named as follows: Mrs. Elmira Lowery, deceased; Benjamin, deceased; Julia, wife of our subject; Jefferson C., now a resident of Greenfield, Indiana; Mrs. Jane Brattain, and Mrs. Letitia Cass, a widow, now a resident of Memphis, Tennessee. For his second wife Mr. Patterson wedded Miss Mary J. Legg, a daughter of Thomas Legg, of Fayette county, and to them were born four children: John M., H. Woodford, William and Mrs. Laura Brantal, of Tipton county. The second wife died eight months after his death. He was a genial, pleasant gentleman and an entertaining companion, was public-spirited and enter¬prising, and believed in always keeping abreast of the times.

To Mr. and Mrs. Elwell were born two children, but the elder, Frank V., died young. Wilbur, born April 27, 1868, is now engaged in farming on a portion of the homestead. He married Miss Catherine Thompson, a daughter of Miles Thompson, a farmer of Fayette county, and to them have been born two children: Marie, who is now attending school, and Glenn, at home.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JOHN L. RUPE
A practitioner at the Richmond bar, John L. Rupe was born in Economy, Wayne county, Indiana, October 27, 1847, and is a son of Henry B. and Jane M. (Hervey) Rupe. The family originated in Germany and was first planted on American soil in Virginia. George Rupe, the grandfather of our subject, was born and reared in the Old Dominion, and in 1821 came to Wayne county, Indiana, where for a short time he engaged in the manufacture of hats. He then removed to Economy, where he continued in the same line of business for many years; he died in the early '60s, when he had reached the age of sixty-five years. He married Margaret Baldwin and they had four children, namely: Catharine became the wife of Dr. Henry Carver; and both are now deceased; Henry B.; John L., a medical student, who died in early manhood; and Hamilton N., a pump manufacturer of Indianapolis.

Rev. Henry Baldwin Rupe, father of our subject, was for many years one of the most distinguished, influential and honored citizens of Wayne county. He was born in Blount county. Tennessee, June 23, 1821, and died in Richmond, June 28, 1897. When only six months old he was brought by his parents to Wayne county, and he spent the days of his boyhood and youth in Economy. He became a leader in public thought and action there and left the impress of his individuality upon the moral, intellectual and material development of the town. In his youth he learned the hatter's trade under the direction of his father, and he followed the business for some time, but abandoned it in 1858 in order to devote his energies to other duties. He was endowed by nature with excellent oratorical gifts, and before attaining his majority gave much time to public speaking, devoting his attention to the discussion of slavery and temperance questions. Youthful enthusiasm, combined with strong mentality and a dear insight into the problems under discussion, made him a very forceful as well as entertaining speaker, and for years he delivered many public addresses through¬out the country on liberty, temperance and popular education. He was a lover of freedom and an inflexible opponent of oppression. Injustice always stirred his indignation. He "loved righteousness and hated iniquity," was a man of broad humanitarian principles and gave his influence to all that would elevate his fellow men. In politics he acted with the Free-soil party until the organization of the Republican party, when the latter, which gave promise of larger service to the cause of freedom, received his support. The distinct character of his moral convictions made him a radical in politics and religion, but his radicalism was associated with a soundness of judgment and breadth of sympathy that kept him from fanatical extremes. During the civil war he was an ardent patriot and an enthusiastic supporter of the administration, while to the Union cause he contributed generously of his means and personal influence.

In the local interests of Economy, where he resided for almost forty years, he also took a deep and commendable interest, giving his co-operation and assistance to all measures for the general good. For many years he served as a member of the school board, and the cause of education in Economy found in him a warm friend. He served as justice of the peace for some time, and in 1862 was elected county treasurer, which position he filled for four years. In early life he united with the Wesleyan church, led to this step by the strong anti-slavery sentiment of that denomination. Not long afterward, however, further study and reflection led him to adopt the views of the Baptist church, with which he united, becoming a most active worker in the Sunday-school and along many lines of Christian labor. After several years devoted to public speaking on political and moral questions, many of his friends urged him to enter the ministry, and after considerable hesitation on his part he resolved to do so, and was ordained. He seldom accepted a regular pastorate, depending upon other means for a livelihood, but through the intervening years, until failing health caused his retirement, he seldom failed to fill some pulpit on the Sabbath and deliver the "glad tidings of great joy" to the people. A local paper said of him: "Besides the regular supply of several churches of his own faith, he was continually being called on to preach at school-houses and churches in all parts of the county, to people of various denominations. It is doubtful if any other man in the county has been called on to speak in so many parts of it, or to so many congregations with beliefs differing from his own, as he was. As a speaker he was animated, sympathetic, impressive and magnetic. In Christian doctrine he was thoroughly evangelical; in denominational beliefs he was positive and unyielding; yet his Christian sympathies were so broad and his Christian character was so genuine that his denominational opinions were never a bar to the most cordial fellowship with all who possessed the spirit of Christ."

"On he moves to meet his latter end,
Angels around befriending virtue’s friend;
Sinks to the grave with unperceived decay,
While resignation gently cloves the way,
And all his prospects brightening to the last,
His heaven commences ere the world be past."

The family of this honored man is well represented by John L. Rupe, a successful and distinguished lawyer of Richmond, whose marked abilities have gained him prestige among those who are devoting their energies to the legal profession. He spent the first fifteen years of his life in his native town of Economy, and then went with his parents to Centerville, where he remained for ten years. He acquired a good English education in the public schools, and was engaged in business with his father in the county treasurer's office from 1862 until 1867. In the latter year he began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1868. In 1868 he was deputy auditor of the county, and in 1870 was elected district attorney, filling the position most acceptably for two years, when, in 1872, he was re-elected. He served in that capacity until 1873, when the office was abolished by act of the legislature, doing away with the common-pleas system.

In March, 1872, Mr. Rupe removed to Richmond, where he has since made his home. In 1875 he was elected city attorney, holding the office for eight years. With the exception of a single year he has served as county attorney a period of twelve consecutive years, and his long continuance in office is unmistakable evidence of his ability as a practitioner and of his unwavering fidelity to duty. In 1883 he was elected mayor of Richmond for a two-years term, and his administration was most progressive, the affairs of the city being ably and systematically managed. For a quarter of a century he has been connected with most of the important litigation tried in the Wayne circuit, and his clientage has been very extensive. During that time he has been in several partnership relations. In 1878 he formed a partnership with Hon. Henry C. Fox, under the firm name of Fox & Rupe, which connection was continued until the former was elected to the bench. In 1879 he became a partner with William Dudley Foulke, and the firm of Foulke & Rupe continued in active practice until 1887, when the senior partner retired to private life. Subsequently Mr. Rupe became associated in practice with Charles H. Burchenal under the firm name of Burchenal & Rupe, which relation was continued until 1894. Through the last five years Mr. Rupe has been alone in practice, and has met with gratifying success in his professional labors. Since 1890 he has been solicitor for the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Company. His knowledge of law is comprehensive, embracing an understanding of nearly every department of jurisprudence. He has won for himself very favorable criticism for the careful and systematic methods which he has followed. He has remarkable powers of concentration and application, and his retentive mind has often excited the surprise of his professional colleagues. As an orator he stands high, especially in the discussion of legal matters before the court, where his comprehensive knowledge of law is manifest and his application of legal principles demonstrates the wide range of his professional acquirements. The utmost care and precision characterizes his preparation of a case and have made him one of the most successful attorneys in Richmond.

Mr. Rupe has been twice married. On the 1st of August, 1867, he wedded Lucy Schlagle, of Centerville, who died in November, 1871. In January, 1875, he was again married, his second union being with Miss Emma Strattan, of Richmond. He has always been a public-spirited citizen, loyal to the best interests of the city, state and nation, and during the civil war patriotically responded to the country's call for troops. Although only fifteen years of age, he served from May until November, 1864, as a member of Company C, One Hundred and Thirty-second Indiana Infantry, and is now a member of Sol. Meredith Post, G. A. R., of Richmond. He is a very prominent Mason, belonging to the blue lodge, chapter and commandery, and has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, in Indianapolis Consistory. He belongs to the Protestant Episcopal church, contributes liberally to its support and does all in his power to promote its growth and work. His political support is given the men and measures of the Republican party, and his firm belief in its principles prompts him to advocate its cause on many occasions. He is a man of well rounded character, his varied interests having produced a symmetrical development; and while his energies are chiefly given to his business he is a valued factor in the church, fraternal and social circles, where his upright life and genial temperament make him a general favorite.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



JOSEPH C. RATLIFF
The life history of him whose name heads this sketch is closely identified with the history of Wayne county, which has been his home for more than three-score years and ten. He began his remarkable career in the early pioneer epoch of the county, and throughout the years which have since come and gone has been closely allied with its interests and upbuilding. His life has been one of untiring activity and has been crowned with a degree of success attained by comparatively few men. He is of the highest type of busi¬ness man, and none more than he deserves a fitting recognition among those whose enterprise and abilities have achieved results that awaken the wonder and admiration of those who know them.

Joseph C. Ratliff was born in Wayne township, near the city of Richmond, on the 6th of July, 1827, being a son of Cornelius and Mary (Kindley) Ratliff. On the maternal side he is of German lineage, and on the paternal side is of English descent. Tradition says that his remote ancestors lived in the north of England near what is known, even to-day, as the Red Cliffs. One of the family became a member of parliament and was known as Redcliff, which name, in the course of time, was changed to Radcliffe, the present English spelling. The great-great-grandfather of our subject was James Ratliff, a native of England, who, according to tradition, came to America with William Penn and was present at the signing of the treaty made with the Indians under the famous old elm tree that stood on the site of the present city of Philadelphia. He was a prominent member of the Society of Friends, with which organization his family had been identified from the beginning.

Joseph Ratliff, the great-grandfather of our subject, was born in North Carolina, and married Mary Fletcher, by whom he had four sons, -one of whom removed to Pennsylvania, another remained in North Carolina, a third came west, and the grandfather of our subject became a resident of Indiana in 1810. He made the journey westward with his family and Spent his remaining days in Wayne county, where he died in 1828 at the age of seventy-four years. He was a very prominent and influential member of the Society of Friends, and was one of the committee that opened the New Garden quarterly meeting of Friends in 1811. He married Elizabeth Charles, and had a family of six daughters and two sons.

Cornelius Ratliff, the younger son, was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, December 25, 1798, and in 1810 came with his father to the territory of Indiana, locating on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, a half mile northwest of Richmond. His father secured that land by obtaining a patent from the government and paying a dollar and a quarter per acre. It had been entered by another man, but had not been improved to any extent. Indians were far more numerous in the neighborhood than white settlers, and the district was an unbroken wilderness of heavy timber. This was six years before the city of Richmond was laid out and six years before Indiana was admitted to the Union. In all the hardships and trials of frontier life which fell to the lot of the family Cornelius Ratliff shared, and in the arduous task of developing a new farm he bore his part. He was only twelve years of age at the time of the arrival of the family in Wayne county, and on the old homestead he was reared, and there also spent his mature years, inheriting the property upon his father's death. Owing to the new condition of the country his educational privileges were necessarily limited, but he became an extensive reader and thus gained a broad fund of knowledge. His favorite volumes were Paradise Lost, Young's Night Thoughts and Cowper's Task. Of the writings of the prophet Isaiah, he was also very fond, because of their sublime and poetic nature. Later in life much of his leisure was spent in reading religious books and papers, and he also kept well informed on the issues and questions of the day.

He made farming his life occupation and as early as 1822 established a nursery, the first one in this part of the country. His catalogue embraced nearly all the known varieties of fruit of his day, and it was with great joy that he secured a new variety to add to his stock. He continued in the nursery business, in connection with his farming operations, for thirty-two years, and no man in the county was more entitled to honor and respect for his honesty and integrity in business. He was married June 12, 1822, to Mary Kindley, of Waynesville, Ohio, and they became parents of ten children, five of whom are living. His home was always noted for its hospitality, and no needy one was ever turned from his door empty-handed. It was in his church work, however, that the true life of Cornelius Ratliff shone forth with greatest brilliancy. He attended all the meetings of the Friends, and in forty years was never absent from his place in the house of worship except on three occasions, unless away from home. His was a noble Christian life, illumined by all the Christian virtues. During the last six years of his earthly pilgrimage he suffered from blindness, but bore the affliction uncomplainingly. He died June 18, 1890, in his ninety-second year, dropping asleep in the old home where he had resided for four-score years, but his memory remains as a blessed benediction to those who knew him, and his influence is still potent for good.

On the old family homestead, settled by his grandfather and subsequently owned by his father, Joseph C. Ratliff was reared, remaining there until twenty-five years of age. In his youth he attended the district schools of the neighborhood through the winter season, while in the summer months he aided in the labors of the farm. Later he was a student in the Richmond Academy, but in 1848 he put aside his text-books and began teaching, which profession he followed through the winter, and again gave his attention to plowing, planting and harvesting from spring until fall. Desiring, however, to enter another walk of life, he pursued the study of dentistry with Dr. Webster, of Richmond, for a year, after which he took up the study of medicine under Dr. Plummer, of Richmond. In the years 1851 and 1852 he was a student in the Western Reserve Medical College, at Cleveland, Ohio, after which he engaged in the practice of dentistry and surgery in Richmond for two years. In 1854 he became engaged in the manufacture of paper, in company with Miles Jo Shinn and Timothy Thistlethwaite, under the firm name of the Hoosier Paper Manufacturing Company, but the following year traded his interest in the business for a farm three miles west of the city. He next worked at the carpenter's trade for one year, and for a similar period followed the millwright's trade, after which he removed to his farm, comprising eighty-two acres. He transformed this into a very valuable and richly productive tract and carried on agricultural pursuits for seventeen years, or until 1872.

During this period he served as justice of the peace and held other local offices in Center township, Wayne county, and was also an enrolling officer during the war. In 1872 he removed to a farm west of the old family homestead in Wayne township, and there erected a residence and barn and made other substantial improvements, his property eventually becoming one of the best farms of the locality. It continued to be his place of abode until May, 1888, and he managed his business interests so capably that they yielded him a substantial financial income. He was also called upon to settle many estates and act as guardian for many minors. At the time of this writing he is guardian for three insane people and has had several others under his charge.

In 1888 Mr. Ratliff removed to Richmond, and since that time has been actively associated with many of the leading business enterprises of the city. He is now secretary and treasurer of the Wayne Farmers' Insurance Company, of Richmond, was formerly vice-president of the Union National Bank, which he aided in organizing, and was also a director in the First National Bank. For twenty-four years he was president, superintendent and treas¬urer of Wayne County Turnpike Company, which was capitalized for thirty-nine thousand dollars, and which owned the national road until 1894, when it was sold. Mr. Ratliff is a man of splendid business and executive ability and carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. His wise counsel and sound judgment have also been active factors in the successful management of other interests aside from business, and as trustee of Purdue university, of Lafayette, Indiana, he contributed not a little to its success. For seven years he was the efficient and honored president of the board of trustees of that institution of learning and for three years was president of the State Horticultural Society. Through these channels, as well as in other ways, he has promoted the interests of the farmer and fruit-raiser, and at all times he is alert in his efforts to improve the conditions of all lines of business, that the country may thereby become more prosperous and that all people may enjoy more of the comforts of life.

In his political affiliations Mr. Ratliff is a Republican and is a zealous advocate of the policy and principles of his party. In 1875 he was chosen to represent Wayne county in the state legislature, and while acting in that capacity was a member of the committee on education and sinking fund. The cause of education has ever found in him a warm friend and he does all in his power for its advancement. He is a prominent Mason, is past master of Hiram Lodge, F. & A. M.; belongs to King Solomon Chapter, N0. 4, R. A. M., and to Richmond Commandery, No. 8, K. T. He is past grand of White Water Lodge, I. O. O. F., and represented the local lodge in the grand lodge of the state in 1854. He is a member and treasurer or the Indiana Yearly Meeting and one of its active representatives.

The last event to be mentioned, but by no means the least important, in the life of Mr. Ratliff, occurred October 9, 1852, when was celebrated his marriage to Miss Mary F. Crawford, of Richmond, a daughter of Daniel B. Crawford. They had six children, four of whom are living, namely: Horace C., a farmer of Center township, Wayne county; Walter S., who resides on a farm adjoining his brother's; Benjamin S., a confectioner of Piqua, Ohio; and Laura C., at home. A man of domestic tastes, Mr. Ratliff has ever found his chief interest centering in his home and family, and has done all in his power to promote the happiness of wife and children. In every position which in his eventful life he has been called upon to fill, he has been highly successful. As a business man he is upright, reliable and honorable. In all places and under all circumstances he is loyal to truth, honor and right, justly regarding his self-respect and the deserved esteem of his fellow men as infinitely more valuable than wealth, fame or position. In those finer traits of character, which attract and endear man to man in ties of friendship, he is royally endowed. Few men have more devoted friends than he, and none excels him in unselfish devotion and, unswerving fidelity to the worthy recipients of his confidence and friendship.

Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana
Volume 1
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago
1899



Deb Murray