JOSEPH HAINES, a farmer of Harrison Township, was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, October 8, 1828, and was a son of John and Susan Haines, natives of Pennsylvania. Of his father's children, William, Robert, Jacob, Samuel, Joseph, Adaline and Julia A. survive. He was reared to manhood in Franklin County, Ohio, where he moved with his parents when a boy, receivin a common-school education. He was married December 9, 1850, in Ohio, to Isabella Gladmen, and they had eleven children, nine of whom are living - Robert, Joseph M., John, Franklin, Jane, wife of George B. Gochenour, of Harrison Township; Amanda, Mary A., Isabella and Susan. In the spring of 1888 Mr. Haines settled upon his present farm on section 22, where he owns eighty acres of good land. He is a member of the Christian church, in which denomination he has for several years officiated as an elder. He is also a member of the Masonic order, is a Democrat in his political views, and has served as school director. He is a liberal contributor to church, and to all other enterprises of a beneficent character.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


WILLIAM HANES is a native of Kosciusko County, Indiana, born on the Hanes homestead, in Seward Township, March 19, 1849, a son of John A. and Catherine (Good) Hanes, who were among the early settlers of the above-mentioned township. The father came from Ohio in 1844 when a young man, and January 6, 1846 was married to Catherine Good, who had come to this county with her parents, Jacob and Hannah Good, several years before. To this union were born the following children Emeline, wife of Emanuel Smith; William the subject of this sketch; George, married three times, his third wife being Sophia Dodd, of Michigan; Mary E., deceased; Leander, married Martha White; and Catherine, deceased. After the death of his first wife Mr. Hanes married Mary Moore, of Fulton County, Indiana, by whom he had six children of whom Elizabeth, John D. and Silas C. are living. John A. Hanes, although one of the most prominent farmers of his township would not allow his name to be used for any position, the only office for which he ever qualified being constable. He is still living on the homestead, where he has made his home since 1846, and is classed among the old and honored pioneers who are fast passing away. Prior to his marriage Mr. Hanes boarded with the family of William Anderson, who were among the earliest settlers of Seward Township, coming from Wayne County, Ohio. Colonel Anderson, brother of William, was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving under General Harrison. The Anderson family are not residents of this county at the present time, but while living in Seward Township they made their home on a part of the present homestead of John A. Hanes. William Hanes, whose name heads this sketch, was reared on the homestead of his father, receiving a good education in the schools of his native county. When but sixteen years of age he enlisted in the defense of his country's flag, but was rejected on account of his age. When a young man he engaged in teaching school, which he followed for ten consecutive years in Kosciusko County, and with the exception of one term taught in Seward Township, he being a successful and popular instructor. He, however, prefers agricultural pursuits to a professional life, and has since devoted his attention to the duties of his farm, which is well improved and under fine cultivation, and is numbered with the active and enterprising farmers and public-spirited men of Seward Township. He was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Stout, in 1874, and of the three children born to them two are living. Luella, the eldest daughter, is deceased.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


David Hamman: The gentleman whose name initiates this article is a native of Ohio, a state which has been the cradle of much of our western civilization and upon which the commonwealth of Indiana has largely drawn for its most enlightened, and enterprising and progressive citizenship. Going still further back in the family history, it is learned that his paternal grandfather in an early day left the vine-clad hill of Germany and joined the tide of emigration to the free land of America, settling in Pennsylvania, where Jacob Hamman, father of the subject, was born and reared. In young manhood Jacob took up his abode in Tuscarawas County, Ohio and there met and married Elizabeth Mock, who bore him eleven children, nearly all of whom grew to mature years and became useful men and women.

In 1849 he came to Kosciusko county and settled in Turkey Creek township, where he purchased a farm upon which he spent the remainder of his life, he and his good wife dying after reaching ages beyond those allotted to the majority of mankind. David Hamman was born February 16, 1829, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and at the age of twenty accompanied his parents to the new home in the county of Kosciusko. Prior to that time he attended such subscription schools as his native county afforded, but after coming to Indiana he received no educational training worthy of note, his time being taken up with such labor as an unimproved farm in the comparatively new country required.

From his arrival in Kosciusko until the present day he has been intimately concerned with the best interests of the country as one of the foremost promoters of its prosperity and substantial development, and he now occupies a conspicuous place, not only as a leading farmer of the community in which he resides, but also as one of Tippecanoe township's estimable and representative citizens.

Mr. Hamman remained with his parents until twenty-nine years of age, meantime, from his twenty-first year, farming the home place for a part of the proceeds and looking after his father's interests. In August, 1860, he was united in marriage to Miss Sarah M. Pontius, daughter of Abraham and Sarah M. (Rolland) Pontius, natives of Pennsylvania, who in the fall of 1844 moved to Kosciusko county and settled in the township of Tippecanoe. Sometime previous to his marriage Mr. Hamman bought a place in Tippecanoe and to it he took his bride and began life in the woods, but little improvement having been made on the farm before he set up his first domestic establishment. By close application he established those habits of industry and frugality which insured his success in later years.

With the able assistance of his estimable companion he soon extended the area of cultivable land and in due time found himself upon the high road to prosperity with a good farm in his possession and many of the comforts and conveniences of life surrounding him. Mr. Hamman has always followed agricultural pursuits for a livelihood and is regarded as an enterprising and typical farmer. His thorough system of tillage, the good order of his fences, the well-cared-for condition of his fields, the commodious and comfortable buildings all demonstrate his successful management and substantial thrift.

Since his marriage he has lived on the farm which he now owns and his long residence in the community has won for him a very high place in the confidence and esteem of his many neighbors and friends. In every relation of life he has always been regarded as a representative citizen, discharging every duty devolving upon him with commendable fidelity and proving himself worthy the large measure of respect with which he is treated by all who know him. Mr. Hamman has the satisfaction of knowing that every dollar he owns has been earned by his unaided efforts. Having a large family to provide for, his father could do little for his children when they started out to make their own fortunes, consequently each one was obligated to rely entirely upon his individual resources.

Endowed with a liberal share of good common sense and possessing sound judgment, backed by a well founded purpose to succeed, Mr. Hamman has labored with the object primarily in view of making a good home for himself and family and acquiring a competency for his declining years. This laudable desire has been realized and he is now in easy circumstances with a sufficient surplus for the proverbial "rainy day," which sooner or later comes to every individual.

Mr and Mrs Hamman are the parents of six children, namely: Daniel, deceased; Lucinda, wife of William Smalley, of Alexandria, this state; Amanda married John Brown, of Turkey Creek township; William married Dollie Angel and lives on the old farm; Ira married Elizabeth Arnold and follows farming and stock raising in Noble county; and Jesse, a farmer of Tippecanoe township, married Miss Eva Rolston. Having accumulated a sufficiency of the world's goods to render the remainder of his and his wife's days comfortable and free from care, Mr. Hamman turned his farm over to his son and is now practically retired from active life.

He has always been deeply interested in whatever tends to promote the prosperity of his township and county and to him as much as to any one man is the community indebted for the material development for which it has long been noted. He has also used his influence in behalf of all moral and benevolent enterprises, being a friend and liberal patron of the church, which he believes to be the most potential factor for substantial good the world has ever known or will ever know. The German Baptist denomination represents his religious belief, to which excellent body both himself and wife belong.

As a good and intelligent citizen he takes much interest in political affairs, voting with the Republican party, the principles of which he believes to be more conducive to the country's good than those of any other political organization. The life of Mr. Hamman has been an open book, the pages of which are singularly free from blot or blemish. His career has been that of a faithful and devout man, a kind husband, a devoted father and a citizen in whom all repose the most implicit confidence and trust.

Submitted by: Jim Hartline and Gene Andert
4-10-98


Reverend Peter Hamman
Reverend Peter Hamman, pastor of the German Baptist Church, is a native of Ohio, born in Tuscarawas County, September 11, 1818, his parents, Jacob and Mary (Himes) Hamman, being natives of the State of Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood in his native county, being reared to the avocation of a farmer.

He was married in Ohio, December 7, 1837, to Miss Catherine Ritter of Stark County, Ohio, she being a native of Pennsylvania. Of the eleven children born to this union three only are living--Maria, wife of Abraham Ritter, of Plain Township; Abraham, in Tippecanoe Township, and David at home. Mrs Hamman died February 11, 1874, and November 19, 1874, Mr. Hamman married Mrs Sarah (Lutes) Lucas, a native of Wayne County, Ohio and a daughter of Adam and Anna Lutes. By her first husband, James Lucas, Mrs Hamman had eight children, and of this number two are living--Adam and Ella, wife of William Burt of Etna Township.

Mr. Hamman left Ohio for Kosciusko County, Indiana, in the fall of 1842, spending the following winter in Washington Township. He then lived one year in Tippecanoe Township, when he removed to Turkey Creek Township, remaining there seven or eight years. He subsequently spent some two years in Minnesota and in April, 1875, he settled on his present farm in Harrison Township.

Mr. Hamman is one ofthe self-made men of Kosciusko County, he having commenced life a poor man, but being a man of industrious habits and persevering energy, he has become, through his own efforts, one of the well-to-do citizens of Harrison Township. He is always ready and willing to aid in all enterprises for the advancement of his township or county, or in any undertaking that will be of benefit to his church.

He joined the German Baptist church at the age of thirty-three years, and was ordained in that denomination, beginning his ministerial duties at the age of forty years. Mrs. Hamman is a member of the same church as her husband. In politics Mr. Hamman is a Republican. He is of German ancestry, his great-grandfather coming from that country in an early day, and settling in the State of Pennsylvania.

Submitted by: Gene Andert
4/10/98


ELIJAH HARLAN.
By Col. J. B. Dodge

Elijah Harlan was born in Marion County, Ohio, on the 13th of April, 1806. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in the army, leaving his wife and nine children, of whom Elijah was next to the youngest. About the close of the war, she was defrauded out of her farm, that had been left her by her husband, and she, with her family, came to Wayne County, in this State, to make a new start in life. Elijah, before he died, knew that the son of the man who had defrauded his mother out of her home, died in the Poorhouse in St. Joseph County, in this State.

The subject of this sketch, at a very early age, became almost the sole dependence on which his mother could rely, and it caused him to redouble his exertions, and he was so successful that, when he was eighteen years old, he purchased a tract of land in Henry County, in this State, and at once moved on to it with his mother, and went to work to improve it. On the 21st of June, 1827, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Rumbley, of Henry County. They had nine children, but two of whom, Mrs. B. Thomas and Mrs. H. B. Stanley, both of Leesburg, are now living. Mrs. Harlan is the daughter of Thomas and Tabitha Rumbley, and was born in Himilton county, Tenn., May 1, 1810. She is still living, in the enjoyment of good health, a plentiful supply of this world's goods, and the heartfelt respect of all who know her. In October, 1832, her husband, with his family moved to Elkhart County, near Goshen; where there was a small settlement. At that time, it is not known that there was a single white person living in what is now Kosciusko County, with the possible exception of Dominique Rousseau, an Indian trader, who may possibly have been here. During the succeeding winter, Mr. Harlan "prospected" the country, and concluded to pre-empt the tract of land in Little Turkey Creek Prairie, a couple of miles northeast of Leesburg, on which he lived at the time of his death, and which now belongs to his widow. Having partly built a small cabin, of logs, on the land, he moved into it on the 6th day of March, 1833, and his was the first white family that lived in this county. Before they could get into the cabin, they had to shovel out a large quantity of snow that had blown into it, so that an idea can be had of the kind of a building it was; and there, without a white neighbor nearer than ten miles (except Thomas and Isaac Moore and their families, who moved into the same vicinity on the same day), surrounded by a multitude of Indians, who , at that time, were far from friendly, it being at the time the Black Hawk war was in progress, this hardy pioneer commenced a new home. In a short time, other families moved in, and the country rapidly developed. He was a man of untiring industry, and great energy, and of excellent business qualifications. His wife was a helpmeet worthy of such a man, and success crowned their efforts.

Soon as fine a farm as lies out of doors was improved, fenced and cultivated. Fine buildings took the place of the log cabins, and prosperity smiled upon them and crowned their labors with plenty.

Mr. Harlan departed this life on the 27th of November, 1856, honored and respected by all who knew him. He was one of the very best citizens in this county. A man of unbending integrity, of a kind heart, and a true Christina, his death was a public loss. A short time after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Harlan united with the Christian Church, and were baptized by the Rev. Elijah Martindale. Mr. Harlan continued his membership during his life, and Mrs. Harlan is still a member. He was a man of strong feelings and impulses. Such men are always decided in their political views, and Mr. Harlan was no exception to the rule; but he never would consent to take an office, preferring to see the principles of his party carried out by others.

Source: "Combination Atlas Map of Kosciusko County Indiana" by Kingman Brothers, 1879.
Submitted by: Cheryl Hawley
9/28/98


MATHIAS HARTER was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in the year 1808, his parents being Christian and Elizabeth Harter. He moved from Pennsylvania to Maryland, and from there to Ohio, and then to Indiana. When a young man he worked at the blacksmith's trade for several years. In December, 1831, he was united in marriage with Mary Easterly, born November 27, 1812, in Pennsylvania, and was a daughter of Lawrence and Catherine Easterly, with whom, when sixteen years of age, she emigrated to Richland County, Ohio. To this union were born eight children, of whom the following survive - George W., Henry, Susan, Mathias, William and Catherine. Mr. Harter was a widely and favorably known pioneer of Harrison Township, was highly esteemed by his neighbors, and for a long time was prominent in the local interests of his community. He is especially remembered as an ardent supporter of the Union cause during the late civil war, and was an able and zealous defender of the Government. Four of his sons were in the Union army. One, Jonathan, died in the service, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, July 4,1864. Becoming an ardent member of the United Brethren church, in 1833, he was ever afterward an earnest worker, both by word and deed, in the cause of Christianity. For more than half a century he and his estimable wife shared together the joys and trials of wedded life. On September 10, 1886, he, with his wife and one son, tented on the camp ground at Warsaw, where his zeal kept his feeble frame at work late at night, resulting in the fatal illness which carried him away on the 17th. He was a devoted father and husband, and, above all, a conscientious Christian. The family, the church, and the community at large, in his demise, sustained a great loss. His residence was on section 15, west of Warsaw, where he has developed a splendid farm. George Harter, a son of the preceding, was born in Richland County, Ohio, September 5, 1832. He moved with his parents to Indiana in 1849. At the age of eighteen years he began to learn the carpenter and joiner's trade, which he followed for a number of years. In July, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Seventy-fourth Indiana Infantry, as a private, and upon the organization of the company he was elected Second Lieutenant, and was shortly afterward promoted to First Lieutenant; March 22, 1864, he was promoted to Captain. Being assigned to the Fourteenth Army Corps under General Thomas, he participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, the siege of Atlanta and Jonesborough, Georgia. He was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, and his health so declined that soon after the siege of Atlanta he was compelled to resign November 8, 1864 at which date he returned to his home. Since the war he has been engaged in various enterprises, meeting with varied success. For the last twelve years he has been an invalid. He married Miss Miranda Baker, a sister of Joseph S. Baker, the present popular auditor of Kosciusko County. By this marriage there were two children, one only surviving - Lawrence E., bookkeeper for Beyer Bros., at Warsaw. Mr. Harter is a member of Kosciusko Post, No. 114, G.A.R., and of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in his political sentiments he is a Republican.

Source: Biographical & Historical Record of Kosciusko Co., IN.; Lewis Publishing Co., 1887
Dated: August 28, 2000


Frederick Hartline & Pete Smith
An excerpt from Frederick Hartline's diary recounts this trip:

24 March 1873: "Pete Smith, myself and Rose Mock started out for Columbia City. We went about 2 miles and then turned back again. I gave Rose Mock $1 for a present. I then went to Elias Fashbaugh's and took dinner there and returned back to my Father-in-Law's again. I stayed at Pete Smiths tonight again. More sleet and ice and snow."

25 March 1873: "This morning we took a fresh start for Columbia City in Father-in-Laws Old Gypsy Wagon and we got there by 10pm. Paid cash to artist for 2 gems for Rose Mock $1. Paid cash for same of 1 gem of Pete Smith and myself taken together on one plate for 50 cts. Paid cash for 2 drinks of whiskey 20 cts. Paid cash for 1/2 pint of whiskey 25 cts and bid goodbye to Pete Smith and Rose Mock and left to take the 3 o'clock local for Coesse. But it did not come. So I did #2 slow train afoot. I stayed all night in Coesse at a No. 1 Hotel."

Pete Smith and Frederick Hartline were brother-in-laws, married to Phoebe and Lovina Fashbaugh. When the Fashbaugh family migrated to Kosciusko County in 1849, Frederick and Lovina Fashbaugh Hartline stayed in Tuscarawas County, OH to make their home. Lovina and Phoebe were daughters of Jacob and Katie Mock Fashbaugh. Lovina was born 1831 Tuscarawas Co, OH and d 1915 Tuscarawas Co, OH. Lovina and Frederick were married 11 Feb 1849. Phoebe Fashbaugh was b 1839 Tuscarawas Co, OH and d 1927 Kosciusko Co, IN. She married Pete Smith 4 Jan 1862. Peter Smith was born Sept 1836 in Ohio, but his death date is unknown.

Submitted by: Jim Hartline and Gene Andert
4/16/98


WILLIAM CLARK HARVUOT, proprietor of Harvuot's livery stable, at Pierceton, was born in Ashland, Ashland County, Ohio, May 8, 1843, a son of Joseph and Margaret (Greer) Harvuot, natives of Ohio, the father being of French and the mother of Irish descent. The father died a short time before the birth of our subject, the date of his death being April 26, 1843. He was an extensive farmer of Ashland County, Ohio. He was a member of the Christian church. Twelve years after the death of Mr. Harvuot his widow married John Encill, when they settled in Osceola, Crawford County, Ohio. They subsequently removed to Fairfield, Huron County, Ohio, where the mother died September 20, 1885, aged sixty-nine years. When our subject was twelve years old he accompanied his mother to Crawford County, Ohio, and there he grew to manhood. When twenty-two years of age, in 1865, he went to West Mill Grove, Wood County, Ohio, where he carried on a general store, removing thence to Kosciusko County, Indiana, in 1867, when he engaged in the grocery and provision trade at Pierceton till 1869. He then sold out his business at Pierceton, and traveled as a salesman for a crockery and glass house of Cleveland, Indiana, until 1878, when he engaged in the hotel business, keeping the Central House at Pierceton, and in 1880 he established his present livery stable. In 1881 he discontinued hotel-keeping, and has since devoted his entire time to his stable, and by his strict attention to his business, and genial and obliging disposition, he has succeeded well in this enterprise, and has gained the confidence and respect of all who know him. Mr. Harvuot was united in marriage March 1, 1865, in Huntington, Huntington County, Indiana, to Miss Isa M. Best, daughter of William W. and Sarah (Warren) Best, and a native of Kentucky. Of the eight children born to this union six are living - Charles, Myrtle, Grace, Harry, Lewis and one unnamed. Two children died in infancy. In politics Mr. Harvuot is a Republican, casting his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He belongs to the Odd Fellows' order, a member of the lodge and encampment of Pierceton, and has passed all the chairs of the former, and for one year served as secretary of the subordinate lodge.

Source: History of Kosciusko County
Date Posted: September 16, 2000


WILLIAM HAYES, M.D., one of the oldest practitioners of Kosciusko County, Indiana, was born on his father's farm in Coshocton County, Ohio, November 20, 1811, his parents being natives of Ireland, the mother being of Welsh origin. The father, Jeremiah Hayes, immigrated with his parents to America in his boyhood, and with them settled in Virginia, where he was married. He left Virginia about 1811, and located in Coshocton County, Ohio, about the time that county was organized, and there his wife died about 1836. In politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat. He was the first sheriff elected in Coshocton County. He died on his farm in that county in 1824, aged forty-five years. William Hayes, our subject, is a member of the same family of which ex-President Hayes is a descendant. He was reared to the avocation of a farmer, and in his boyhood received the rudiments of an education in the subscription schools of that early day, but in after years he educated himself by private study. For his wife he married Miss Amelia McCoy, a native of Coshocton County, Ohio, and to this union were born six children - two children died in infancy; S. M. died January 18, 1876, aged thirty-six years, and at the time of his death was serving his second term as treasurer of Kosciusko County; George W., who died at Clayton, Michigan, February 27, 1879, was a grocer and druggist at Clayton; Henry W., carrying on a restaurant at Pierceton, and Jacob C. P., an inmate of the Insane Asylum at Indianapolis. In 1844 Dr. Hayes began the study of medicine privately, and in 1348 he took a course of lectures at the medical college at Cleveland, Ohio, completing his course during the winter of 1859-'60 at the Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which institution he graduated as M.D. February 8, 1860. To defray his ex_penses while pursuing his medical studies he followed boating on the Ohio Canal until coming to Indiana in 1853. He located at Pierceton, Kosciusko County, in March, 1854, where he has since practiced his profession with the exception of the time spent in attending medical lectures. When he located at Pierceton it was a hamlet containing but five or six families, and with one exception their houses were built of hewed logs. At that time the prevailing sickness was of a malarial form, such as bilious, intermittent and chill fevers. In 1878 the doctor lost by fire a frame business block, consisting of five business houses, and his residence. He soon after built on the same site the brick block known as the Hayes Block. Dr. Hayes was bereaved by the death of his wife May 14, 1884, she being seventy years of age. From her girlhood she had been a member of the Christian church. In politics the doctor was formerly a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has voted that ticket. He is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' orders, belonging to their respective lodges at Pierceton.

Source: Biographical & Historical Record of Kosciusko Co., IN.; Lewis Publishing Co., 1887
Dated: August 28, 2000


T.J. HEAGY, Washington Township

Theodore J. Heagy, son of John and Sarah Heagy, was born October 6, 1832, in Cumberland County, Penn. His father was a well-to-do farmer, and the subject of this sketch was early instructed in the details of that occupation. During the winter, he attended the common school near his home, where he acquired a good English education. At the age of seven years, he removed with his parents to Montgomery County, Ohio, and, several years later, again removed with them, settling in Wayne County, Ind., where he grew to manhood

In 1865, he rented a farm in that county, saving a little each year, until he had accumulated a sufficient sum to purchase a farm for his home. August 17, 1856, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. Barnes, a native of Wayne County, Ind., and, in 1858, purchased a farm in that county, upon which he continued to reside until the fall of 1872, when he came to Kosciusko County and purchased the farm upon which he now resides

He has always been a good manager, and, by industry and economy, has accumulated a comfortable estate. In 1878, he was "made an Odd Fellow" in Pierceton Lodge, No. 257, and is an active member of that fraternity. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and a consistent Christian. During his residence in the township, he has gained many friends, by whom he is known as an upright and honorable man.

His wedded life was blessed by seven children, viz., Sarah E., Henrietta E., John F., William M., George E., Homer E. and Minnie O., all of whom now survive.

Submitted by Cheryl Hawley
Printed in Combination Atlas Map of Kosciusko County Indiana, Kingman Brothers, 1879, Page 70.


ALFRED HOOVER, an enterprising farmer of Washington Township, is a native of Indiana, born near Richmond, Wayne County, March 8, 1811, a son of Henry and Susan (Clark) Hoover, both natives of North Carolina. The parents were members of the Society of Friends at the time of their death. Their family consisted of eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom Alfred was the eldest son. He was reared on the farm where he was born, remaining there till attaining the age of twenty-six years. February 9, 1837, he was married to Miss Mary Allsed, a native of Ohio, but reared in Wayne County, Indiana, her parents having settled in that county when she was but a few months old. Her parents, Thomas and Margaret (Allsed) Allsed, were both born in North Carolina, and removed from that State to Ohio about 1808, when they settled on the Miami River near Hamilton. The father served in the war of 1812, and after the war came with his family to Indiana, and settled in Wayne County, where he and his wife lived till their death, both living to be over eighty years of age. In their religious views they were Baptists of the Alexander Campbell school. To Mr. and Mrs. Hoover were born ten children, as follows - Ann, wife of Charles Hayden, of Whitley County, Indiana; Franklin and Thomas, both of Kosciusko County; Mrs. Martha Cone, of La Grange, Indiana; John C., of Oxford, Kansas; Mary L., wife of Rev. M. H. Smith, of the Northern Indiana Methodist Episcopal Conference; Mrs. Gertrude Snyder, wife of J. F. Snyder, postmaster of La Grange and editor of the La Grange Democrat; Henry, of Whitley County; Mrs. Lillie M. Bradwick, of Licking County, Ohio, and Alfred, who died in 1861, aged five years. After his marriage Mr. Hoover settled on a farm in Center Township, Wayne County, Indiana, where he followed agricultural pursuits until 1853. He then sold his farm and removed to Kosciusko County, when he settled on land in Washington Township which he had purchased from the Government in 1837, his land consisting of 320 acres. His land at that time was covered with a heavy growth of timber, mostly poplar and walnut, all of which has since been cleared, and is now the well-improved and highly cultivated farm on which he now resides. Since coming to Kosciusko County Mr. Hoover has held the office of trustee of Washington Township several terms. In his political views he is independent. Although belonging to no religious denomination, he adheres to the doctrines of the Friends. Mrs. Hoover is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


DANIEL HOOVER, son of Henry Hoover, was born June 19, 1827, in Wayne County, Indiana, and passed his early days after the ordinary manner of farmer lads, attending the common schools during the winter and working on his father's farm during the remainder of the year. Here he acquired a practical knowledge of the art of farming, which art in later years proved his road to competency. March 11, 1852, he was united in marriage with Miss Henrietta Heagy, daughter of John and Sarah Heagy, of Wayne County, who was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1830, removing to Indiana with her parents in 1846. In the fall of 1854 they removed to Kosciusko County, and located on 160 acres of unimproved land in Washington Township, from which he developed his present farm. As the products of the farm began to return him a good income he wisely invested his means in other land, and at present is the owner of 218 acres, of which 175 acres are in the finest state of cultivation. He has been industrious and enterprising all his life, and while never less generous than his neighbors in contributions to deserving objects, has yet been careful to provide a "good foundation against the time to come," and has accumulated a sufficient amount of this world's goods to maintain him in old age, and an inheritance for his loved ones who shall survive him. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and tries to live a peaceable, quiet life with all men, taking the golden rule as his text. He was made an Odd Fellow in 1866, in Pierceton Lodge, No.257, and after passing through the various degrees and chairs of the lodge became a member of the Enterprise Encampment. Politically he is a Republican and has always acted with that party. In 1800he was elected trustee of Washington Township, and filled that office for three years. He has served as assessor for his township two years, and is now serving as commissioner of the middle district of the county. He is one who has few enemies, and is universally esteemed by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. His wedded life was blessed with three children - Emma J., the wife of Dr. C.K. Long, of Pierceton; Minnie H., wife of F.D. Stewart, of South Whitley, and Ellen Grace living at home.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


HENRY HOOVER, deceased, was born in North Carolina, the date of his birth being September 22, 1788. In 1807 he came West with his father, Andrew Hoover, who settled with his family in Wayne County, Indiana, where our subject subsequently married Susannah Clark. Like the sons of most of the early settlers, his educational advantages were limited, but by reading and study at home he became well fitted for the duties and responsibilities of after life. In 1825 he became a member of the first Legislature that convened at Indianapolis. In 1832 he was appointed by General Lewis Cass, Secretary of War, as secretary to the commission appointed to hold two Indian treaties. After his marriage Mr. Hoover settled in White Water, Wayne County, and in 1830 removed to a farm he had purchased at Nolanís Forks, in the vicinity of Washington, Wayne County, where his wife died August 9, 1853. In December, 1854, he was married to Mrs. Lydia Z. Vaughan, and in 1855 he removed to Richmond, Wayne County, where he made his home till his death, which occurred July 23, 1868, in his eightieth year. He was reared a Friend, but while living at Nolanís Forks he united with the Methodist church, of which he was an active and devoted member, but being trained from childhood in the simpler forms of worship, he was pained at the introduction of organs and choirs, and withdrew from the church, and during the last years of his life was a member of the Fifth Street Society of Friends, of Richmond. He was the father of seven children - Alfred, of Kosciusko County; Mary, deceased, wife of David Culbertson, of Mount Vernon, Iowa; Ann, wife of Thomas Harvey, of Wayne County, Indiana; Martha, wife of Daniel Culbertson, of Wayne County; Allen, deceased, late of Mount Vernon, Iowa; Daniel, of Kosciusko County, and Henry, deceased, who was also a resident of Mount Vernon at the time of his death.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


ISAAC B. HIRE is one of the oldest native sons of Kosciusko County still living, and has spent his life actively and prosperously as a farmer and stockman. He is now living at Burket.

The first stock buyers operating on an extensive scale through this section of Indiana were his father, Rudolph Hire, and Washington Bybee. Long before railroads were built and when the only known means of getting livestock across the country was by driving these men were among the chief drovers from this section of the country. They frequently drove their cattle and other livestock to market at Cleveland. The business, still one of large proportions, was acquired in 1864 by Allen Bybee, and Milton E. and I. B. Hire under the firm name of Hire, Bybee & Company, and they continued buying and shipping hogs, cattle, sheep and horses for nearly forty years. Their operations were on a large scale, and while there were of course many transactions which did not yield a profit, the business on the whole was a prosperous one. They bought livestock all over Northern Indiana and Ohio, and in this way Isaac B. Hire came to be a well known figure to the stock raisers throughout many counties. Mr. Hire was also solicitor for passenger traffic on the New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad for fifteen years.

He was born in Franklin Township of this county April 28, 1844, a son of Rudolph and Hannah (Linsey) Hire. Rudolph Hire was born in Ross County, Ohio, April 2, 1817, and his wife was born in Indiana in 1825. He was a small boy when his parents moved to Elkhart County, and from there he came to Prairie Township of Kosciusko County. He and his wife married in Franklin Township and they then located in that region, but eventually moved to Burket. Rudolph Hire was one of the leading citizens of the county and was so esteemed at the time of his death in 1889. His widow survived until April 4, 1911. Both were members of the Dunkard Church and he was a democrat. They had eleven children, including: Milton E., deceased; Isaac B.; Nancy A., widow of John Jones; Mary, who married Orlando Sludy, and both are now deceased; Eliza, deceased, wife of George Melons; Susan, was the wife of Alonzo Study; Lillie, wife of Charles Eggleston, living in California: Alpheus, of Warsaw; and Allen, deceased.

Isaac B. Hire grew to manhood on his father's place in Franklin Township and was given such advantages as the local schools could afford. At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Maria Warren. To their union were born five children, and the only one living is Norma H. Hire of Blue Springs, Missouri. On April 24, 1891, Mr. Hire married for his second wife Amanda Wirick, who was born in Richland County, Ohio, May 21, 1852, and was brought to Kosciusko County at the age of two years. Mr. and Mrs. Hire have no children of their own and a nephew lives with them on their home place of seventy acres. Mr. Hire also owns 640 acres of good land in the State of Texas. In addition to farming and the stock business he has readily enlisted his energies and influence in behalf of every community undertaking. For two years he served as assessor in Franklin Township, and while in that office he set the record for speed in compiling the assessment roll, doing the entire work in twenty-two days. Mr. Hire is a democrat in politics.

Submitted by: Cheryl Hawley
Source: History of Kosciusko County
Date posted: 12/6/98


WILLIAM H. HORICK was born in Ohio, March 1, 1840, on the old Wyandot Indian reservation. His parents were John and Mary (Grimes) Hor_ick, the former of whom is deceased. When four years of age he removed with his par_ents to Wyandot County, just across the line, where he was reared to manhood. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His mother was of Scotch-Irish descent. They were the parents of seven children, five of whom are living - Washington, living in Wyandot County, Ohio; Harriet, wife of George Sigler, of Crawford County, Ohio; James, residing in Wayne Township; Stephen and William H., Jefferson and Nancy are deceased. In 1865 the family came to Kosciusko County, and settled upon what is now known as the Hor_ick homestead, on section 19, where the father died in October, 1884. His widow resides on the home farm. He had served in various township offices in Ohio, and was a man very much respected. Politically he was formerly a Whig, and latterly a Republican. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and after Fort Sumter was fired upon, April 19, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Fifteenth Ohio Infantry, for three months, serving in West Virginia, under General McClellan. He participated in several small battles and skirmishes, and was discharged the following August. In November, 1868, he was sworn in as fusilier, his main duties being to repair bridges and roads, in which he was engaged six months. He then came home and remained three days, when he again re-enlisted May 2, 1864, in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-fourth Ohio Infantry, and served in the Army of the East. He fought at Monocacy Junction and Perryville, having been engaged with Mosby, under General Wallace. He was finally discharged September 1, 1864. He then returned to Ohio, and the following year came to this county. February 5, 1865, he was married in Ohio to Margaret Start, of Wyandot County. Two of their three children are living - Ambrose L. and Orvilla. He settled upon his present farm in the spring of 1867, where he has since resided. He owns sixty-three acres of well-improved land. He is a Free Thinker in religion, and a Republican in politics. In 1886 he was elected trustee of Wayne Township, and two years previous had served as assessor. In 1882 he was elected road superintendent for two years, but served only one year, the Legislature having abolished the office. Mr. Horick is a member of Kosciusko Post, No.114, G. A. R., at Warsaw.

Source: Biographical & Historical Record of Kosciusko Co., IN.; Lewis Publishing Co., 1887
Dated: August 28, 2000


RUDOLPH HUFFER, an old settler of this county, was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1831. His parents, Daniel and Sarah Huffer, were also natives of Pennsylvania. They had ten children, of whom six survive - Daniel, a resident of Prairie Township; Rudolph; Mary, now Mrs. East; Sarah, wife of Amos Garrett, of Wells County, Indiana; Lydia, wife of Isaac Knobenshue; Maria, wife of Daniel Barkett, of Prairie Township. When Rudolph was four years of age, he was brought by his parents to Fairfield County, Ohio, and was there reared to manhood. In 1854, he came to this county, first settling in Warsaw. He lived there two years, and carried on blacksmithing, a trade he learned in Circleville, Ohio. From Warsaw he removed to Prairie Township, where he was engaged in farming about eight years. After a few months' residence in Monroe Township, he settled upon his present farm on section 28, Harrison Township, where he found considerable timber. His first purchase was 160 acres. He has since added to it until now he owns 200 acres of as good land as can be found in the township. When he came to this county, $530 constituted his worldly possessions. For several months he served as township trustee, having been elected for two years, but resigned on account of ill health. He has also served as school director in his district. Politically he is a Republican. He was married in this county October 11, 1855, to Miss Sarah Staymates, daughter of Jacob Staymates, an old settler of Harrison Township, now deceased. To this union were born eleven children - Jacob D., Horton C., of Kansas; Sarah C., wife of Charles Vandermark, of Harrison Township; Gertrude, wife of James Fawley, of Seward Township; Sherman, Charles, Lawrence, Joseph, Jane, Edmund R. and Pearly. Mr. Huffer was formerly prominently identified with the Kosciusko County Agricultural Society.

Source: History of Kosciusko County
Date Posted: September 16, 2000


JOHN W.V. HUMBLE, farmer, Tippecanoe Township, owns 120 acres of land on section15, and 175 acres on section 22, making a total of 295 acres. He was born in Madison County, Ohio, October 7, 1826, and when seven years of age removed by to Shelby County, where he lived until he reached his majority. He has been twice married. He was first married December 12, 1847, to Harriet P. Bothel, who was born and reared in Shelby County. She died in October, 1849, and was buried in Plattsville cemetary. She left one child, Margaret Ann, who is the wife of John Stewart, a resident of this county. He married his second wife June 16, 1850, who was Fannie Marie Miles, also a native of Shelby County. She died Novemer 16, 1883, and is buried in North Webster cemetary. Her parents were John and Polly (Stoker) Miles. Her grandfather Stoker was born in Germany, and came to America when a young man, and died in Montgomery County, Ohio. Her father was born and reared in Virginia. Mr. Humble was the son of Cornelius and Anna A. (Vance) Humble. His father was born in Kentucky, June 16, 1791, and when a young man came to Ohio, where he grew to manhood, and was married near Sandusky. He died in March, 1874. The mother was born in 1801, in Ohio, where she was reared and educated. She died at the age of fifty-five years. The Humbles are of English origin, and first settled in Kentucky. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Uriah Humble, and his grandmother Humble was formerly Miss Kane. His grandfather Vance settled where Cincinnati now is, when that great city was a wilderness. From there he moved to near Sandusky, where he passed the remainder of his days. The Vances are also of English origin. Mr. Humble's first wife was the daughter of William Bothel, who was born in Ireland, and came to America when four years of age. His father died on the ocean and was buried in the sea. The mother afterward married a man named Snyder. William Bothel was the only child of his father. Mr. Humble came to Noble County, Indiana, in the spring of 1851, and settled upon a farm near Cromwell, where he lived nine years. It was then a wilderness. He went to work to make him a home, then sold out and purchased a farm three miles from Leesburgh. After living upon it three years he exchanged it for his present farm. It is well improved, with a good house and a good frame barn with an underground stable. He started in life with no help except his own strong hands, and now has a competence for his declining years. The best wages that was paid to farm hands was $10 per month. The average farm hand received from $6 to $9 a month. Mr. Humble came to Noble County in August of 1847, with Thomas H. Bothel, and assisted him in building a saw-mill on Turkey Creek, a dam being built between two lakes, one of which was called Nine-mile Lake. Mr. Humble has served as township trustee three terms. In politics he is a Republican, having come from the old-line Whigs. Both himself and wife were members of the Church of God. The children of J. W. V. and Fannie Marie Humble are - Amanda C., wife of C. D. Rippey, lives in Leesburgh, Indiana; Mary J.,wife of J. W. Ritter, living in North Webster, Indiana; S. F. Humble, married and living in North Webster; Lida C., wife of A. B. C. Warner, of North Webster; Hattie P., wife of C. L. Weaver, of Chicago, Illinois; G. Mead Humble, married and resides in Wolf Lake, Indiana; Rose Elma and Jessie May at home.

Source: "History of Kosciusko County"
Date Posted: January 29, 2001


S. F. HUMBLE, proprietor of steam, saw and feed-mill at North Webster, was born in Noble County, Indiana, June 9, 1856, son of John W.V. and Fannie Humble, who removed to this county when our subject was a child. They first settled in VanBuren Township, on an improved farm, where they lived a few years, then removed to their present home, one mile and a quarter of North Webster, where the father still resides. The mother died November 16, 1884. S. F. Humble was married in Tippecanoe Township July 31, 1879, to Miss Alice C. Warner, who was born and reared in North Webster, the date of her birth being February 7, 1860. They have three children - Edith O., Gracie E. and J.W.V. Mr. Humble and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics he is a Republican. He is conducting a successful business. He keeps flour to exchange for wheat, but does not manufacture flour. He purposes to put in a shingle-mill during the coming fall. He built a part of his mill in 1885 and a part in 1886.

Source: Biographicah & Historical Record of Kosciusko Co., IN.; Lewis Publishing Co., 1887
Dated: August 28, 2000


Deb Murray