RICHARD GUY.
The gentleman whose name introduces this article is one of Kosciusko county's young, energetic and enterprising men, a native born Indianian, having first seen the light of day April 10, 1860, on the farm in Turkey Creek township which he now owns and cultivates. The parents from whom he is descended were Andrew and Rebecca (Stuard) Guy, natives of Ohio and Indiana respectively, the former born in 1821 and the latter in the year 1828. Andrew Guy came from Ohio to Kosciusko county, Indiana, and with his parents, Andrew and Eliza (Lockridge) Guy, when about eleven or twelve years old and spent the remainder of his life in this part of the state. His parents were natives of Virginia and early settlers of Ohio and may also be classed with the pioneers of Kosciusko county.

They had six children: Sarah, Wilson, Andrew, Samuel, William and Harvey.

Andrew Guy, Jr., father of the subject, was a farmer and in many respect a most exemplary and praiseworthy citizen. He stood high in the esteem of his neighbors and friends, was for many years a leading member of the German Baptist church and took an active interest in political affairs as a Republican. He was twice married, his first wife, formerly a Miss Bowers, dying after a brief wedded life, leaving one daughter, Emeline. By his second companion, Rebecca Stuard, he had the following children: Charity A., deceased, Janiza, Richard, George, deceased, and Anna.

Richard Guy, the subject proper of this review, was reared on the farm, educated in the public schools, and has always followed the pursuit of agriculture for a livelihood. After completing the common-school course he entered the high school at Syracuse, where he prosecuted the more advanced branches for some years thus acquiring a good mental discipline -which has enabled him to meet life's duties manfully and transact his business affairs with promptness and dispatch.

Mr. Guy was married March 17, 1889, to Miss Ida Strieby, whose birth occurred in Turkey Creek township on the 9th day of November, 1867. Mrs. Guy is the daughter of John B. and Delilah (Cable) Strieby and the oldest of a family of four children, the names of the other three being Floyd, Alphretta and John F. The Striebys were among the early settlers of Kosciusko county. and always bore enviable reputations. Mrs. Guy is a lady of sound, practical sense and varied intelligence, well qualified to be the wife of such a stirring, energetic husband, and is popular with a large circle of the best people of her neighborhood. She has been her husband's active co-laborer and, besides presiding with ease and becoming dignity over his household, has contributed not a little to his success by her wise counsel in matters of business and other affairs in which they are mutually interested.

Since his marriage Mr. Guy has devoted his attention assiduously to farming and today has one of the best improved and most fertile, as well as one of the most valuable, places of its area within the limits of Turkey Creek township. It contains one hundred and seventeen acres, one hundred of which were originally included in the paternal homestead and the extra seventeen came to him by his wife. The buildings are substantial and sufficiently spacious to meet all purposes for which intended, the dwelling being well constructed and amply furnished, the barn and other structures comparing with the best buildings of their kind in the neighborhood.

Mr. Guy brought to his lifework a physique well developed by healthful outdoor labor and exercise and a mind of which self-reliance, strong will power and a proper respect for the rights of others are prominent characteristics. He cultivates the soil according to modern scientific methods, uses in his labors the best and most approved implements and devices ,and makes agriculture an intel1ectual discipline as well as a series of physical efforts. Financially his success has been most gratifying, being the possessor of a competence which places himself and family in a position of independence as far as any anxiety for the future is concerned.

Mr. Guy has displayed a commendable public spirit in relation to the affairs of his township and county, standing for progress and improvement and ready to lend his influence at all times to further enterprises calculated to advance the country along material lines and develop its resources. In all things he is an up-to-date man, believing in getting all out of life there is in it. He has done much in the way of beautifying his home, as the well-kept lawns, fine gardens, neat shade trees and other accessories of modern life abundantly demonstrate, good taste as well as thrift being one of his predominant characteristics. In politics Mr. Guy is a pronounced champion of Republican principles, believing the policy of the party relative to all great questions to be for the best interests of the American people. He has never aspired to leadership in his party nor asked for honors or emoluments of office at the hands of his fellow citizens, being content to vote his sentiments and work with the rank and file. Personally he is a popular man and the name of his friends is legion. He has shown himself worthy of this friendship, his integrity having never been assailed nor the correctness of his motives called in question.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy's home is made bright by the presence of an interesting daughter of eleven summers, Miss Alda, who was born on the 23rd day of July, 1891. Mr. Guy has an old parchment deed, bearing the date of March 15, 1837, and the signature of Martin Van Buren.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


JOHN STETTLER, DECEASED.
With pleasure the biographer essays the task of noting the salient points in the career of this honorable and honored gentleman, a man who during his residence in this community merited and received the highest respect and esteem of his acquaintances. A man of honest motives, purest purpose and kindliest feelings toward all, he made and retained for himself a host of friends.

John Stettler began his mercantile career in Syracuse in 1874 in company with his wife's brother, Joe Kindig. The latter had been in business for some years prior to this time at the old store known as the Bee Hive and afterward at the corner where William Strieby is now located. In 1878 Mr. Stettler became sale proprietor of the business, but later Professor Dalons was interested with him for a few months. Mr. Strieby entered the store as a clerk and later Mr. Stettler sold him a half interest in the business. Mr. Stettler retained his interest in the business until his death, after which his widow disposed of it to Mr. Miller, of the firm of Strieby & Miller. The concern did a fine business, having been favored with a steady and healthy growth from the beginning. Joe Kindig, who retired from the partnership about 1878, went to Goshen, where he conducted a drug store. Later he removed to Milford and there died about twelve years ago. During his active career the subject gave the larger share of his attention to the mercantile business, also investing quite largely in farm land. However his attention was not given exclusively to business and he kept in touch with the varied interests of the community at large. This was evidenced by his service in the state legislature, to which he was elected as the nominee of the Republican party in 1894 and 1896. In that body he served with distinction and achieved an enviable record for his broad and comprehensive grasp of all questions affecting the public welfare. He was very firm in his views and earnest in his advocacy of measures meeting with his approval. He had been reared a Democrat, but, with three of his brothers, always affiliated with the Republican party. Of the five brothers, three served in the Civil war, one, Ira, losing his life in the struggle.

Mrs. Stettler, wife of the subject of this memoir, is a daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (Anstine) Kindig, early settlers in York county, Pennsylvania. In 1857 the Kindig family came to Goshen, Indiana, and the same year came to Syracuse, the father passing away about four years later. The Stettlers were affiliated with the English Lutheran church in later years, Mrs. Stettler and her mother being among the first members of the Lutheran society in Syracuse. The latter took an especial interest in her church, giving to it regularly onetenth of her income. She died June 28, 1892, at the age of seventy-five years and one week.

Fraternally Mr. Stettler was affiliated with the Maons, having joined that fraternity at Goshen, Indiana, and for the long period of twenty years was worshipful master of Syracuse Lodge No. 454. Every year he was an attendant at the sessions of the grand lodge. An old soldier, he attended the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic held at Columbus, Ohio, and kept in touch with his old comrades at the reunions of his regiment. He was an omnivorous reader and kept in touch with all the leading questions of the day.

The elegant brick house in which Mrs. Stettler now resides was erected thirteen years ago on the site of her mother's former home, to which she was brought when but eleven years old. Previous to her marriage to the subject she had wedded Martin Weybright, a German Baptist minister, and resided with him upon a large farm two and a half miles from Syracuse. She always maintains a dose interest in her church and assists in whatever way possible in its upbuilding and advancement.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


ANDREW EDMONDS.
The following life story is worth the perusal of every youth, the history of this man's endeavors well illustrating Benjamin Franklin's words, "God helps them that help themselves." Andrew Edmonds, one of the substantial citizens of Kosciusko county and one whose success is distinctly the result of his own efforts, was born in Sweden, July 2, 1848. He received a good education, attending not only the common schools but also the Skara high school, where he took a literary course. His studies in history aroused military and patriotic feelings within him, which led him to read with great interest the accounts of the Civil war in the United States. With a strong desire for adventure and full of the hopes of youth, he determined to come to this country and left school for that purpose with one year of the course unfinished. This move was made with his parents' consent and their kindness and the confidence they had in their son is shown by their giving him five hundred dollars for this, his first journey in the world. Accompanied by a classmate, he landed in New York, at the age of twenty, September 19, 1868. From New York he went to Paxton, Illinois, where he secured work at cutting broom corn. His previous life having been that of a student and he therefore being little used to manual labor, this work proved too hard for him and he set about to learn the cigarmaker's trade. In company with the classmate, who still remained with him, he soon bought a cigar store, but within three months this venture had failed because his partner, who was salesman on the road, did not discriminate in customers and many accounts could not be collected. They left Paxton for Chicago, arriving there with only one dollar and a half between them, but they started out bravely and found a boarding house and when the landlord learned their straitened circumstances he agreed to keep them until they could get work. Three months later Andrew was employed with the Rock Island Railroad Company in the construction of its road in Iowa, where he worked for a year. The first money he received was sent to pay the board bill due the kind-hearted landlord in Chicago, and thus early in his career did honesty, one of the principles which has led to his success, appear. With his knowledge of geometry and other branches of mathematics, the duties of civil engineer were soon familiar to him, making him a valuable assistant, working for various contractors, sometimes as foreman or as timekeeper, and in many states, including Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana. This wandering life brought him many hard experiences, but as the bitter must always be mixed with the sweet, so he found many pleasures with change of scene and new acquaintances.

In 1874, having saved money enough to take him to his old home in Sweden, he spent a year in visiting the scenes and friends of his youth. He found his old classmates prosperous and holding responsible positions, and this determined him to return to America to make a better showing for his own life endeavors. He had come to Kosciusko county with the building of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in 1873, and had charge of some of the work between the villages of Syracuse and Cromwell, Indiana. Upon returning from Sweden, in 1875, he again came to this vicinity and, though having but thirty dollars in money he invested it in a field of wheat. The crop failed and he realized from it but fifteen dollars, half of his investment, his first venture thus proving a failure. He was not the kind of a man to be discouraged by the failure of a single crop of wheat, his energy leading him to take jobs of ditching and c1earing land. Making some progress, he began to get out railroad ties and lumber some four miles east of Syracuse, a business which proved profitable and at which he continued until the timber was exhausted. Having saved some money, he invested in land which he partially cleared and improved by the erection of buildings, and which he then sold. This process was repeated until he had cleared about three hundred acres. He now owns the third farm thus developed, which contains eighty acres.

With the determination to win and the opportunity for endeavor, success crowned his efforts. He took advantage of the condition of the country, which, being low and marshy, had to be drained before it was fit for cultivation, and laid extensive timber ditches, thus enhancing the value of the farms of others as well as his own. As a farmer he has been eminently successful. His farm, lying three and one-half miles east of Syracuse, is a first-class one, with good buildings, and its cultivation has yielded him a handsome return. He has taken commendable pride in the breeding of fine stock, for which he has always found ample demand and ready sale. He has fed cattle, his operations in this line having required the control of several hundred acres at a time, which he has done by renting land near his own. Among the elements contributing to his success were his ability for hard work and the foresight to intelligently conduct his business. His perseverance is one of the fine traits of his character, if one venture failed, without loss of courage he tried another. He has proven that man is not ruled by the circumstances of his life if he wills to be master of them.

On the 25th of December, 1879, Mr. Edmonds was married to Angeline Snavely, daughter of Samuel and Rebecca Snavely, of Turkey Creek township. After years of close attention to the details of the farm, on account of the failure of Mrs. Edmond's health, they moved to their pleasant village home in Syracuse, where they are enjoying a quiet life and the well-earned fruits of their labor. But one child lived to maturity, Myron H., who is now a young man of twenty. He was educated in the schools of Syracuse and is now employed in the cement works.

In 1870, in Butler county, Kansas, when that country was being settled, Mr. Edmonds, in company with three other young men, took a homestead with the intention of receiving naturalization papers, but the crops failed and he gave up his interest. Later, in Warsaw, he applied for and received the papers which made him a citizen of the United States. When a student in the schools of Sweden his admiration for Lincoln led him to accept the principles of that administration and as a citizen of the United States he naturally affiliated with the political party representing those principles. He has never sought public office, but has been busy with the duties of a private citizen. He is the present chancellor commander of Kosciusko Lodge No. 230, K. P., in Syracuse, which lodge is in a thrifty condition, having fifty active members. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in Lodge No. 454 and the chapter at Syracuse.

Mrs. Edmonds is a member of the Evangelical Association, he being in sympathy with the organization and rendering financial and moral support.

A summary of this man's life bespeaks for him these words of praise: He is a fine example of the honest, educated and progressive foreigner, whose wide experience in travel and the ways of men have brought him in close touch with American ideas, making him a genial companion and an altogether popular citizen.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


NATHANIEL CROW.
Among the few gray-haired pioneers of Kosciusko county who are left to weave the thread of personal incident with the fabric of historic fact, whose lives have been inseparably connected with the rise and growth of the country from the time the country was a wilderness to the present time of wonderful achievement in a1l avenues of civilization and enlightenment, the name of the venerable gentleman whose name appears above is conspicuous. Nathaniel Crow is today one of the oldest citizens of the county in point of continuous residence.

Originally the Crows came from Ireland and settled in Virginia, the head of the family in this county being Thomas Crow, the subject's grandfather, who ,,was a native of the Emerald Isle. The date of his arrival is not known, but from most reliable information at hand it appears to have been some years prior to the War of the Revolution. Among the descendants of Thomas Crow was a son by the name of Joseph, whose birth occurred in Virginia and who in a very early day accompanied his parents to Ohio, where he subsequently married Martha Hull. Shortly after marriage he settled in the county of Champaign, Ohio, and there followed agricultural pursuits until his death, which took place a number of years ago. Some years after his decease his widow became the wire of Joseph Longfellow, she and her second husband broth living to be quite old. By Mr. Crow she had children as follows: Ezekiel H., Susanna, James, Thomas D. and Nathaniel. The second marriage resulted in the birth of six descendants, William, Lemuel V., Nathan M., David S., Silas N. and Amos M.

Nathaniel Crow, of this review, was born in Champaign county, Ohio, on the 13th day of October, 1823. His childhood and youth to the age of sixteen were spent on his father's homestead and as opportunity afforded he attended a few months of the winter seasons the subscription schools of his native county, acquiring a fair knowledge of the fundamental branches, spelling, reading, arithmetic and writing. About the year 1839 he left home and went to Madison county, Ohio, where he worked as a farm hand the greater part of the six years following when he left his native state and came to Kosciusko county, Indiana, arriving here sometime in 1845. Desiring to procure a piece of land and not having money sufficient to purchase, Mr. Crow made a proposition to exchange his horse, saddle and bridle for the eighty acres he wished to possess. The trade was finally consummated by the subject paying twenty dollars additional and he thus came in possession of one of the finest tracts of land of its size in the township of Van Buren. Mr. Crow did not settle on this land nor improve it, but held it for some years and then sold it for a good price, investing the proceeds in the farm in section 24, Turkey Creek township, on which he has lived ever since. On the 14th day of October, 1852, he entered into the marriage relation in Elkhart county with Miss Eliza Airgood, who was horn in Germany, September 13, 1832, and came to the United States with ber parents, Frederick and Maria Airgood, when a small child. Mr. Crow immediately after marriage took his bride to the farm where he now lives and together they began life's struggle under circumstances by no means the most encouraging. His land was unimproved and required an immense amount of hard labor to prepare it for cultivation, and for some years obstacles numerous and at times quite formidable beset his pathway. Constant and well-directed labor finally prevailed and in the course of several years the greater part of the place was cleared and in cultivation, better buildings took the place of the former log ,structures and the original eighty-acre tract was gradually increased in area until it included several additional pieces of land contiguous thereto.

Mr. Crow was a good manager and by carefull1y laying his plans became in time one of the largest real estate owners in his township. He watched for favorable opportunities to make investments and seldom allowed one to go by unimproved if he was in any way prepared to take advantage of it. By judiciously managing his farm he came to realize quite a liberal income, which was exchanged for real estate whenever a neighbor wished to dispose of his land. He continued to add to his possessions as the years went by until his estate was increased to its present area of five hundred and fifty acres of fine fertile land, every foot of which was purchased with money earned by himself.

Few men circumstanced as was Mr. Crow when he came to Kosciusko county have overcome the obstacles in their pathway, risen superior to unfavorable environment and accumulated a fortune as he has done. His business abilities have certainly been of a superior order and his judgment and forethought of that high type which grasp a situation easily and seldom if ever are at fault. In the work and management of his farm he has been industrious and systematic and in all of his dealings, straightforward and the soul of honor. It must not be inferred from the foregoing reference to his success in material things that Mr. Crow has been indifferent to affairs pertaining to the public good of his township and county, for such is far from the case. From the beginning of his career in this county his voice and influence have ever been used to advance the material interests of the country and develop its resources and, as stated in the initial paragraph of this sketch, his name has been inseparably identified with the rise and progress of his community for a period of over a half century.

Mr. Crow's nature has been a persevering and indomitable one and he has sturdily held to his course in spite of lets and hindrances. Obstacles he has encountered and some of his best achievements have been wrested from conditions insuring almost certain defeat to one less courageous and resolute. Ability to successfully meet all emergencies has been one of his chief characteristics and now from the topmost round in the ladder of success he can look back over a well-spent life and see in the various objects calculated to hinder and impede his progress the real tests of growth and manhood. Such a record as he has made, both as a progressive farmer and enterprising, wide-awake ,citizen, stands to his perpetual honor and will continue to do so long after the last of the brave army of pioneers has answered the final roll call and joined the ranks of the larger and grander army of honorable men and true who have fought life's battles, won victories and passed to their reward.

Eight children have been born to Nathanie1 and Eliza Crow, of whom but two are living: Nellie, who married George Dull and resides in the old homestead, and Mattie M., who is still with her parents; the following are the names of those deceased: George W., Sarah J., Benjamin B., Lucy A., Charles S., and Nathaniel L.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


DAVIS TEEPLE.
If one desires to gain a vivid realization of the rapid advance in the civilization which the last few decades have brought, he can listen to the stories that men who are still living among us and by no means overburdened with the weight of years can tell of their early experiences when the country was new and social conditions in this part of the Hoosier state were in their formative period. The little town of Milford is now the abiding place of a number of old settlers who having spent the vigor and strength of their manhood in carving from the wilderness homes for themselves and their posterity, are now in the evening of life, when the shadows are growing dim and the past gradually receding from view, spending their declining years in rest and quiet, surrounded by neighbors and friends who honor and revere them for the good work they did in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which the community's prosperity has been bui1ded. Conspicuous among these silver-haired veterans of a period long past is the venerable and highly respected citizen, now living a life of honorable retirement, to a brief review of whose career the following lines are devoted.

Davis Teeple is a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, where his birth occurred on the 6th day of April. 1831. His parents, Peter and Peggy (Fleming) Teeple, also natives of the above county and state, were among the early settlers of Stark county, Ohio, moving there when the subject was a small child. In the year 1838 they came to Kosciusko county, Indiana, and purchased a tract of government land in Jefferson township, from which in due time a farm was developed, upon which they spent the remaining years of their lives, both dying after reaching a ripe old age. Davis and Peggy Teeple had eleven children, whose names are as follows: Belia S., John, Joseph, Isaac, Rebecca, David, Sarah, Catherine, Benton, Martha and Melissa.

Davis Teeple, the direct subject of this review, was reared on a farm and from early boyhood followed agriculture for a livelihood. In a little log cabin, sparsely furnished with backless benches and a rough board around the wall for a desk, he obtained a meager knowledge of the fundamental branches, his education such as it was being acquired under many adverse circumstances. Methods of instruction at that time were of the most primitive character, teachers being required to impart to the pupils under their charge but a smattering of the three fundamentals, "readin', ritin' and 'rithmetic." Young Teeple availed himself of such opportunities as presented themselves, but did not long attend school, his services as soon as he was old and strong enough being required an the farm.

Mr. Teeple was seven years old when his parents moved to the new home in the new and sparsely settled township of Jefferson and from that time to the present, a period of sixty-four years, he has been an honored and respected citizen of Kosciusko county, actively interested in the growth and development of the county and in every respect an enterprising and busy man of affairs. He assisted his father until attaining his majority and at intervals for several years thereafter contributed to the family's support by working, at home and by turning over his earnings to the common fund when laboring elsewhere. On the 22nd day of October, 1857, he was joined in the bonds of wedlock with Miss Martha Hughes, a native of this county and daughter of Thomas and Peggy Hughes, who were among the early pioneers of this part of the state. Shortly after his marriage he moved to a farm in the township of Jefferson, which he had purchased in 1854, the land at that time being an unbroken forest, from which hardly a stick of timber had been removed.

Blessed with good health and rugged physique, he set manfully to work to dear his place and in due time his labors were rewarded, the forest growth gradually disappearing before his strong strokes, and within a few years the wilderness gave place to a very garden of plenty. Here Mr. Teeple spent the best and, in many respects, the happiest years of his life. He developed one of the finest and most valuable farms in the community and as a tiller of the soil achieved a reputation such as few attain. Industrious and economical, he prospered when many failed and as the years went by found himself the possessor of a competence which placed him in independent circumstances. He continued to prosecute his labors with liberal financial results until 1890, in which year he turned his agricultural interests over to other hands and took up his residence in the beautiful little town of Milford, where he has since lived a life of retirement.

In common with the major part of poor humanity, Mr. Teeple's pathway has at times led through sorrows, and the deep waters of bereavement. On the 13th of June, 1887, his faithful wife, who had shared with him the vicissitudes and hardships of life and later rejoiced with him in the success which crowned their mutual labors, was called to the other world. Subsequently, May 6, 1890, he chose for a companion Susan Bortz, who was born in Marshall county, Indiana, July 24, 1842, the daughter of Michael and Catherine (Clark) Bortz. These parents were early settlers of Marshall county and lived there a number of years, later moving to the county of Kosciusko, where the father died September 15, 1886, at the age of eighty-seven, and the mother, February 7, 1892, when eighty-five years old. They had a family of eleven children, viz.: Benjamin, Harriet, Maryann, Levi, Daniel, Susan, John, Hannah, James, Sarah and one that died before receiving a name. Neither of Mr. Teeple's marriages resulted in offspring. Not being blessed with children of his own, he has always been mindful of the children of others and in many ways has demonstrated his interest by kindly acts of benevolence and charity to worthy families in needy circumstances. He has been liberal in the expenditure of his means to promote all worthy objects and by actions as well as by words has done much to advance the material and moral interests of the town of which he is an honored and enterprising resident. With prudent forethought, he accumulated a liberal share of this world's wealth, owning at the present time a finely improved farm of one hundred and thirty-six acres in this county, a number of lots in Milford, besides a valuable personal property and a handsome bank account. Mrs. Teeple has a farm in Van Buren township and a third interest in her father's estate, which is large and valuable. In politics Mr. Teeple has always been an unswerving Democrat.

Those who know Mr. Teeple best know him to be a man of good ,common sense, keen of judgment, spotless integrity, possessing strong attachments for friends and bearing the truest and deepest affection toward those who have claims upon his friendship. In all he has been a just man and his deeds are the best line by which to measure his life; in the end his works and wholesome influences will makeĽ his enduring monument.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


MOSES F. LENTZ.
Moses F. Lentz, whose life is given in the following sketch, and his partner, M. P. Wright, ,are the proprietors of the Milford Planing Company. This business was established in 1899 with about ten thousand dollars invested. The plant is supplied with machinery for making all kinds of building material and furnishings for offices, business houses and churches, including altars and seating for churches and public buildings. They also manufacture onion crates, this branch of the business alone requiring from eighty thousand to one hundred thousand feet of timber of each year. These bushel crates are used in handling and shipping the large onion crop grown in this section. From three to twelve men are employed in the plant and the value of the annual output amounts to about fifteen thousand dollars. The entire business is under the direct management of Mr. Lentz, who is one of the thoroughly reliable men of Milford and who enjoys the confidence of his fellow citizens.

Mr. Lentz was born in Elkhart county, seven miles northeast of Milford, November 28, 1860. His father, Cyrus Lentz, was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, coming to Indiana at the age of eighteen, and was soon married to Mary Whitehead, of Elkhart county. He became an extensive land owner, improving the farm where his son was born, and later owned other land and was living on his third farm, four and a half miles southeast of Milford at the time of his death, September 27, 1900, being but sixty-six years old. He had lived in Kosciusko county twenty-five years and was well known over the north part of the county as a business man.

Moses remained with his parents until he was past twenty-one. At that age he married Miss Anna M. Ward and took charge of the farm, his parents moving to Milford. Six years after their marriage his wife died and his parents returned to the farm, remaining with him until his second marriage, to Miss Emma Dubbs, daughter of John Dubbs of the vicinity. At the end of ten years on the farm he came to Milford, where he worked with the butter and cheese company as an expert butter maker, remaining with them until the factory closed. He and A. J. Young had taken a mortgage on the plant for a loan of money and when the company failed Mr. Lentz took the buildings to secure himself. With Mr. Young as a partner, he continued to make butter for several years, but not finding it particularly profitable they sold the machinery ,and replaced it with the planning mill outfit. Mr. Young remained a partner for a year and was then succeeded by M. B. Jones, who held his interest for three years and then sold to M. P. Wright. Since that time Mr. Lentz has been in personal charge of the plant. The mill is doing an extensive business, due to the enterprise of Mr. Lentz and his partner.

In the fall of 1900 Mr. Lentz was elected township trustee on the Democratic ticket in a township with a close Democratic majority, but his popularity carried him twenty votes ahead of the ticket. He is active in political affairs, takes a prominent part in conventions and is a member of the party who may always be depended upon. He has attended to the township's interests with commendable care; two-thirds of the roads are graveled and the township schools are in good condition. The township pays one-sixth of the school expenses at Milford, making its advantages free to all the pupils of the township.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Lentz are members of the Progressive Brethren church, he being one of the local trustees. They have three children, Mary F., aged seven, Paulinme, aged three, and Elden J., the youngest.

Mr. Lentz is connected with Milford Camp No. 6373, Modern Woodmen of America., and with Tent No. 71, Knights of the Maccabees. At the death of his old partner, A. J. Young, who was also a member of the Maccabees, he was made administrator of the estate. He has been a man of many business cares, and has discharged them all with faithfulness, establishing a firm reputation for integrity.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


GEORGE R. OGDEN.
The "Purity" brand of flour is one of the favorite products of northern Indiana and is manufactured by George R. Ogden at Milford, Kosciusko county, where its reputation has been steadily maintained for the past fourteen years as being one of the most superior and uniform in quality of any flours placed on the markets of that section of the county, or perhaps of any other section.

George R. Ogden was born in Otisco, Ionia county, Michigan, October 18, 1858, and in 1859 was taken by his parents to Homer, Calhoun county, in the same state. George R. worked in the Homer Flouring Mills until nineteen years old and became a thorough miller. He then worked as a journeyman in Kalamazoo one year, and at Marshall, Michigan, eight years as head miller, and was then placed in charge of Ward & Sons' mills at Battle Creek, Michigan for some time and then came to Milford, in company with a Mr. Servoss, who died soon afterwards.

In the fall of 1888 Mr. Ogden, in company with James M. Secross, erected the present mill at a cost of fourteen thousand dollars. This is a seventy-five-barrel roller mill and is constructed on the Nordyke-Marmen system. An elevator, constructed by William Faulkner, has been added and donated to the firm. In 1890 James M. Secross retired from the firm and P. F. Miles assumed his interest in the firm, under the name of Odgen & Whetten Company, carried on the business for three years. Then R L. Miles became a partner and the business was carried on three years longer, when Mr. Ogden became the sole operator, although Mr. Miles owns one-half interest in the real estate. Mr. Ogden employs three hands, the elevator has a capacity of eight thousand bushels and eighty to one hundred thousand bushels are handled annually. The mill is a custom or local mill and does an exchange and feed-grinding business outside of the manufacture of its famous "Purity" flour.

Mr. Ogden was reared a Republican, but the tariff agitation of 1880 resulted in his casting his first presidential vote for General Winfield Scott Hancock, the Democratic nominee for the chief magistracy of the United States, and he has since been loyal to this party. In 1890 he took an active part in various committees, was later elected delegate to sundry conventions, and was finally elected chairman of the Democratic county central committee in 1900 and still fills that very onerous and exalted position. A radical change has taken place in Kosciusko county politics since 1890. Mr. Ogden was nominated, for instance, for county commissioner in 1894, but the Republican majority was still too large; but now, of the seventeen township trustees in the county, nine are Democrats, although the usual Republican majority throughout the county had been about one thousand.

:Mr. Ogden was married August 31, 1881, to Miss Nora R. Bennett, of Homer, Michigan, and a family of five children is the result, viz.: Arba J., George B., Bruce, Bertha L. and Russell, all of whom are at home with their parents, the eldest son being an assistant of his father in the mill.

Fraternally Mr. Ogden is connected with the Masonic order, belonging to Lodge No. 418, in which he has filled all the chairs and represented it in the grand lodge, and to Chapter No. 160, Order of the Eastern Star. In the Independent Order of Odd Fellows he belongs to Lodge No. 478 at Milford, Indiana, in which also he has passed all the chairs and represented it in the grand lodge to Encampment No. 242; Canton NO.4, at Manhall, Michigan, and to Lodge No. 460, Rebekahs, at Milford. He is also a member of Lodge No. 451, B. P. O. E. at Ligonier, and Tent No. 170, K. O. T. M., at Milford. Mrs. Ogden is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, in which she is now holding the office of worthy matron.

Mr. Ogden is regarded as one of the enterprising citizens of Milford who has done much to advance the prosperity of the village and who has been active, ever since he settled here, in doing his part, financially and otherwise, toward bettering the condition of public works and conveniences such as conduce to or are necessary for the comfort and health of the community. He is recognized as a gentleman of strict integrity and business honor, and his social standing and that of his wife and family is with the best people of Milford and the surrounding territory.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


WILLIAM C. DAVISSON.
The gentleman whose name appears above is a retired farmer living in Milford, one of the worthy old citizens of Kosciusko county. The mantle of a well-spent life hangs comfortably about him and as the evening of his earthly pilgrimage is passing calmy away the hallowed recollections and tender memories of other days, when he was wont to mingle in the busy affairs of life and bear his part amid the ceaseless activities of the farm and business, come back to him in his hours of quiet to cheer and make bright the remainder of the pathway leading onward to the twilight and the journey's end. Mr. Davisson was born in Preble county, Ohio, December 12, 1833, the son of Absalam and Balinda (Adams) Davisson, the father a native of Virginia and the mother of New Jersey. The father and mother, with their respective parents were among the pioneers of Ohio and their marriage took place a number of years ago in Preble county. The mother died there in 1846 and later Absalom Davisson chose for his companion Huldah Benson, whose people were also early settlers of the county of Preble. By occupation Mr. Davisson was a farmer and followed his chosen calling until his death, which occurred in the year 1873. By his first wife he was the father of children as follows: Josiah, John, William C.; Eliza J., George, Mary, Allen, Samuel, Levi and one that died in infancy. His second marriage resulted in the birth of two children, Balinda and Johia1.

The childhood and youthful years of William C. Davisson were spent on the old homestead in Preble county and his early educational training was limited to a few months' attendance each winter upon the indifferent subscription schools which were prevalent throughout the Buckeye state fifty and sixty years ago. By far the greater part of his instruction was of an intensely practical nature, received from active contract with the rude implements of husbandry in general use when he was a lad. Later, by associating with his fellow men in various business transactions he laid by a store of valuable knowledge which has enabled him to discharge successfully the duties of a very active life. Mr. Davisson remained with his parents until attaining his majority and then started into the world for himself as an agriculturist a vocation which he carried on with enterprise and success until advancing years and sufficiency of worldly wealth rendered future active labor unnecessary.

On the 22ndof March, 1857, Mr. Davisson was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Wehrley, of Preble county, daughter of John J. and Margaret Wehrley, both parents natives of Virginia and among the pioneers of Ohio. They moved in 1865 to Kosciusko county, Indiana, and here the rest of their lives were spent, both dying at ripe old ages. Their children's names were as follows: Sarah, Eli, Nelson, William Wesley and John, of whom the last named and William are deceased.

In 1862 Mr. Davisson moved to Darke county, Ohio, where he purchased land and followed agriculture until 1865, at which time he sold his farm and, coming to Kosciusko county, Indiana, bought a place in the township of Van Buren, moving to the same in the spring of the following year. On this farm he lived and prospered until the spring of 1885, when he discontinued agriculture temporarily and took up his residence in Milford, which place he made his home about one year. Returning to the farm at the expiration of that time he resumed his chosen calling and continued the same with most encouraging results until 1889, when, finding himself the possessor of a comfortable fortune, he wisely concluded to rent his land and spend the remainder of his days in honorable retirement. Mr. Davisson arranged his affairs satisfactorily and, moving to Milford, has since spent his time practically retired from active life, though still looking after his large agricultural and other interests and in many ways keeping in touch with the business world. He has been remarkably fortunate in a financial sense and has long been counted one of the large land owners of his township, as well as one of the most successful agriculturists of Kosciusko county. At the present time his real estate interests are represented by three hundred and twenty acres of fine farm lands, containing many valuable improvements, also a beautiful home and number of lots in Milford, all of which came with his possession as a result of his industrial and superior management. While actively prosecuting his agricultural interests there were few men the equal of Mr. Davisson as a farmer and none his superior. Devoting himself assiduously to his vocation, he rarely failed to reap abundant harvests, while his various other business enterprises were uniformly successful. His sound judgment, wise forethought, quiet manner, and unexcitable temperament, which left the mind unbiased and free to act, were largely the secret of his success and made him known and felt in the busy affairs of life. In every relation with his fellow man he is a model of kindness and generosity. His home has always been open to his many friends and the stranger never failed to share his entertainment when such was requested. His name has been identified almost without exception with every undertaking calculated to foster the growth and develop the resources of his township and county and improve the condition of the citizens in public improvements of which all classes alike reap the benefit and in the promotion of industries which furnish employment to many and thus stimulate the energies of the people. In his business matters he is sagacious, prompt, diligent and thorough and not a shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil has ever rested upon him. Socially he is a genial and intelligent companion, in his domestic relations a model husband and father, his home life affording rare pleasure to those who have enjoyed its comfortable and cheerful atmosphere. Mr. Davisson has been a Republican since the organization of the party and believes its principles, although. not entire1y free from fault to be on the whole better than those of any other political party in this or any other country. Taking an active interest in the party's success, he is by no means a politician, preferring the quiet life of private citizenship to the annoyances and distraction which necessarily come to the professional partisan or office seeker.

Mr. and Mrs. Davisson have had five children born to them, viz.: Anderson L., deceased; John F., a farmer of this county; Margaret J., wife of Wesley Webster; William O., also an agriculturist of Kosciusko county, and Charles M., a resident of Milford.

In the foregoing lines have been briefly set forth the salient facts and some of the leading characteristics in the life of one of Kosciusko county's most enterprising and highly respected citizens. Commencing with a limited capital, but with an inborn determination to succeed and paving the way to prosperity only with the solid rocks of honest industry, true stability of character and correct conduct, he has achieved success in the face of every obstacle and won a name which when transmitted to posterity will ever shine with a radiance emanating from a life of honor and integrity.

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Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


SYLVESTER HALL.
In this sketch is given a brief synopsis of the life of one who holds precedence as one of the oldest living settlers of Kosciusko county. So far as active and consecutive effort is concerned, he has been closely identified with this part of the commonwealth since the early pioneer days, when were essayed the initial efforts looking to a reclamation of the country from its sylvan wilds. His long residence in the county and the conspicuous part he has taken in all work and important movements for the advancement of the general good and the development of the country's resources have gained him a personal acquaintanceship that makes his name a familiar one in every household in the community. His active connection with the history and growth of Kosciusko transcends the limits of sixty years and within this time he has been not only an eye witness of the many remarkable changes that have taken place, but an active participant in the same, nobly bearing his part in winning for the county a proud position among the most enterprising and enlightened sections of the Hoosier state.

Sylvester Hall is the son of Isaac and Prudence (Huff) Hall, the father a native of Ohio and the mother born in York state. These parents were married in Knox county, Ohio, about the year 1833 moved to the county of Seneca, where they resided till 1837, in June of which year they loaded their household effects and a few agricultural implements on a wagon and started for northern Indiana, their objective point being Kosciusko county. After a trip of over a month's duration, attended with many difficulties and hardships, they finally reached their destination and located temporarily with a family by the name of Tusong, living about three miles south of Warsaw. For some weeks thereafter Isaac Hall traveled over the county quite extensively in search of a favorable location, and finding the land in Jefferson township coming nearest his ideal concluded to purchase a farm there and make that section his home. In due time he invested in a tract of one hundred and sixty acres and as soon as he could conveniently do so moved his family to the same and at once began improving the land, in which he was assisted by his older sons. He cleared and developed a good farm and lived upon the same a number of years, later purchasing a place in the township of Van Buren to which he changed his residence. Here, about 1864, the wife died and a few years later Mr. Hall chose for a companion a Mrs. Baker, of Milford, moving sometime thereafter to Marshall county where he spent the remainder of his life, dying there in the year 1869.

Isaac Hall was the father of the following children: John, deceased; Sylvester, whose name introduces this review; Lorenzo; Charles M., deceased; Richard H., a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, killed at the battle of Chickamauga; Sarah, deceased; George, deceased; Eliza, deceased; Elizabeth, widow of the late Cyrus Fuller; Isaac B. and Isaac H., the last two dead, and one that died in infancy.

Sylvester Hall was born October 2, 1825, in Knox county, Ohio, and accompanied his parents to Indiana when twelve years of age. From that time until reaching the years of manhood he bore his part in clearing and fitting the farm for cultivation and early learned by practical experience the true meaning of honest toil. Reared amid the stirring scenes of the pioneer period, he had little time for acquiring an education, his training in that direction being confined to a couple of months attendance of winter seasons upon such inferior subscription schools as the country at that time afforded. He remained with his father until twenty years of age and then took up carpentery, in which he soon acquired great proficiency and for a period of sixteen years thereafter worked at the trade in various parts of the country, husbanding his earnings with the most scrupulous care, with the object in view of ultimately purchasing a farm and engaging in agricultural pursuits.

In 1858 Mr. Hall bought one hundred and sixty acres of woodland in section 9, Jefferson township, but did not immediately move to the same, continuing at his trade until about the year 1862 when he began his first efforts towards making a home. At that time his place was thickly covered with tall forests and dense undergrowth and the outlook was anything but encouraging. Strong arms, backed by a strong and determined will, in due season overcame the difficulty and within a few years Mr. Hall found himself the possessor of a good farm, which, gradually increasing in value, with the enlargement of its tillable acreage, in time became one of the best and most desirable places in the township of Jefferson. To his original purchase he afterwards added forty acres adjoining and at the present time the two hundred acres in one body is one of the best cultivated and most highly improved places of the same area in the county.

Mr. Hall has been twice married, the first time, April 1, 1847, to Miss Mariah Swihart, who was born in Ohio about the year 1823. She came to Kosciusko county with her mother and grandmother in 1836, her father having died in Ohio some years prior to that time. Mrs. Hall bore her husband five children and departed this life in the year 1855. The names of the children are as follows: Milton, deceased, Simon, Sarah, Emmeline, deceased, and Isaac. On the 2nd day of February, 1857, Mr. Hall married his present companion, Harriet Landis, a union blessed with the birth of six children: Elizabeth, Lucy, Emanuel, Richard, Caroline and Lorenzo, all living at this time.

As a farmer Mr. Hall early took high rank and sustained the reputation of an enterprising and successful man until advancing age admonished him to retire from active labor. From the time when he knew full well what it was to have a home far removed from other settlers, in the midst of a dense forest, through which wolves prowled and deer roamed, to the date of his retirement, his life was characterized by industry and consecutive toil, and his energies, directed and controlled by correct judgment, gradually materialized into the comfortable fortune which he today enjoys. He continued actively engaged in the management of his agricultural and other business interests until 1895, when, finding himself in possession of more than a sufficiency of this world's goods to render the remainder of his life free from care or anxiety, he rented his place and since then has been enjoying the restful quiet which only such as he know fully how to appreciate. He now has a beautiful and comfortable home situated on two acres of ground in the village of Milford, where, surrounded by all that is calculated to make existence agreeable and happy, he is passing the evening of life at peace with the world and his Maker, receiving day by day the congratulations and well wishes of his many friends, all of whom desire that he may be spared many years to bless the world with his presence. In such lives as that of Mr. Hall there are no startling incidents nor any eccentricities of character . In a quiet manner he has pursued the even tenor of his way, content to cultivate his acres and reap therefrom golden rewards for labors bestowed, taking little part in the active, hustling affairs of the busy world. Recognizing the fact that every citizen is under certain obligations to society and the state, he has kept in touch with public affairs to the extent of exercising the elective franchise and using his influence to promote all movements and enterprises having for their end the advancement of the community along social and moral lines. He is a man who strongly attracts the best elements in the community and when he makes friends they are for a life time. Mr. Hall is a zealous Christian and, with his good wife, belongs to the German Baptist church. His long and useful life has been fruitful in good works and his name will long be remembered as one of Kosciusko's most exemplary characters and popular citizens.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


CURTIS C. FARBER.
By reason of the official position which he has held for a number of years, as well as on account of an unblemished record as one of the brave boys in blue who responded to their country's call in the dark and troublesome days of the Rebellion, the subject of this sketch has become well known. As an official he has earned more than a local reputation, and as a soldier, who became the target for the missiles of treason on many bloody battle fields, his career was such as to place his name high on the roster of the country's gallant and patriotic defenders of the national Union.

The Farbers were among the early settlers of Ohio, from which state came many of Indiana's most enterprising and substantial pioneers and citizens. Lewis Farber, father of Curtis C., came with his parents to Jay county, Indiana, when twelve years old and was reared to maturity on a farm. He was the first mail carrier from the village of College Corners, Jay county, where his father was postmaster, and shortly after his marriage, which was solemnized with Miss Martha Clark, he entered the ministry of the United Brethren church, to which holy calling the residue of his life was devoted. Lewis and Martha Farber were the parents of twelve children, Mary A., Benjamin. Margaret, Curtis C., William, Caroline, Nancy, Ellen, David, Augustus, Markwood and George W.

Curtis C. Farber was born in Jay county, Indiana, September 18, 1846, and spent his childhood and youth at the various places where his father was stationed while an itinerant preacher. The common schools afforded him the means of a fair English education and his early life was spent pretty much like that of the majority of village and country lads, alternating between labor and attendance at school. He remained with his parents until about seventeen years old, meanwhile looking after their interests and contributing with the older brother and sisters to the maintenance of the family. At the breaking out of the great Civil war, when a wave of patriotic enthusiasm spread throughout the North, calling upon the brave and sturdy yeomanry to maintain unsullied the national honor, young Farber became imbued with the prevailing spirit and as soon as old enough tendered his services and, if need be, his life to the end that the Union might not be disrupted. It was while his father was stationed at Dunkirk, Ohio, that he entered the army, enlisting September 8, 1863, in Company A, Twelfth Ohio Cavalry, for three years' service or during the war; he lacked ten days of his seventeenth year when his name was enrolled as a volunteer. His command was first assigned to duty in Virginia and the first engagement of any importance in which he participated was at what was known as the Salt Works in that state. Subsequently he took part in a number of battles, minor engagements and skirmishes, among which were Wytheville and Orb Oaks, Virginia, Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, and Salsbury, North Carolina, the last-named place being where the Twelfth Cavalry was detached for the purpose of assisting in the pursuit and capture of the president of the Southern Confederacy, Jefferson Davis. Mr. Farber was within less than a half mile of Davis when the latter was captured and, with others of his command, assisted in guarding the noted prisoner and accompanied him until he was placed in the care of another escort. Mr. Farber saw a great deal of active service and shared with his comrades the excitement and dangers of war in many thrilling situations. He participated in a number of gallant charges, during which the air around him resounded with the awful shrieks of bursting shells, mingled with the weird hum of the deadly musket and rifle balls, when it seemed impossible for anyone to emerge alive from the terrible ordeal of death. Twice he had two horses shot from under him, and throughout his entire career as a soldier his conduct was an that a brave man's could be. At the close of the war he was mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tennessee, his discharge bearing the date of November 14, 1865. By reason of duty faithfully done and broken health, superinduced by exposure and hardships while in the service, he is now the recipient of a monthly pension of sixteen dollars, a sum far too small in view of the vicissitudes he endured while giving the best years of his life that the government should remain as the fathers founded it.

While in the army Mr. Farber's father was transferred to a church in Jay county, Indiana, and thither the subject proceeded immediately after his discharge. For some months after his return he worked as a farm hand for his uncle, Curtis Clark, and later engaged in the insurance business in Portland, Jay county's seat of justice. He remained at that place for a period of fourteen years, seven of which were spent with Gen. J. P. C. Shanks, one of Indiana's leading military men and noted jurists and for some years a representative in the United States congress. He did a thriving business in different lines of insurance and continued to remain in Jay county until 1891, at which time he became a citizen of Kosciusko.

Shortly after coming to this county Mr. Farber was appointed justice of the peace to fill out an unexpired term, and at the next election was chosen to the office by the vote of the people of Plain township. He has served continuously to the present time and as a justice has become widely and favorably known, many important cases having been tried in his court and much business brought to him from various parts of the country. He possesses a judicial mind, his decisions have invariably been characterized by fairness, and but little dissatisfaction has ever resulted from his manner of adjudicating cases involving complex technical points and a sound knowledge of the law.

Mr. Farber was married March 23, 1891, to Mrs. Laura Mahoney, widow of William Mahoney and daughter of Robert and Lavina (Saxon) Michaels. Immediately thereafter he purchased property in the village of Oswego, Plain township, where he has since lived. He has a pleasant home and is comfortably situated, his place being neat and attractive in appearance, bespeaking the presence of people of cultivation and taste. Mr. Farber is an enthusiastic worker in the Grand Army of the Republic, being a charter member of Sylvester J. Bailey Post, No. 154, at Portland. He served as officer of the day four and a half years, two years as adjutant, and was also commander for a considerable length of time. For four years he was second lieutenant in Company A of the state militia and it is conceded by those capable of judging that he is one of the best posted men in military affairs, as well as one of the most thorough drill masters, in this part of the state of Indiana. At the present time he is commander of William McLaughlin Post at Milford and his services as such have been eminently satisfactory and greatly appreciated by every member of the organization. By reason of his affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic Mr. Farber has become widely known throughout the state and he enjoys the high esteem and warm personal friendship of many of the leading members of the order in Indiana and elsewhere. To meet with his old comrades and recount the thrilling scenes of yore, when the country was in the throes of rebellion, he deems among his most pleasant and agreeable experiences and wherever he sees a worthy soldier he greets him as a brother, bound by no ordinary ties. Mr. Farber is a man of wide and varied intelligence, a great reader, especially of historic and political subjects, upon all of which he has deep and sound convictions. He is a stanch supporter of the Republican party, the principles of which he believes to be for the best interests of the country; consequently he is ever ready to put forth his best efforts in behalf of the ticket and deems no activity too great if thereby its success may be promoted.

Since his twenty-first year Mr. Farber has been in office almost continuously and that he has been so long thus honored is proof that his duties have been discharged in a manner highly creditable to himself and satisfactory to the public. Although not a member of any religious organization, he is a liberal contributor to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife is an active member, and to all matters of charity and benevolence he gives with a free and open hand. As a man he is a creditable representative of the highest order of American citizenship and in every relation of life his conduct has been that of a liberal minded, intelligent and courteous gentleman. In brief, he is a type of the strong and virile class through whose efforts the great commonwealth of Indiana is indebted for its splendid achievements of the past and for the large measure of success and prosperity which it enjoys at the present time.

Mr. and Mrs. Farber have two daughters, Ethel, born August 3, 1895, and Susanna P., whose birth took place March 30, 1899. By her previous marriage Mrs. Farber is the mother of a son, Luther Mahoney, who was born on the 14th day of September, 1884.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


Deb Murray