JACOB ORTEN DEATON.
Clark county, Ohio, became the meeting place of families destined to become united and to be the ancestors of a large and prominent lineage, the Deaton family. Annual reunions of that family are held in Miami county, Ohio, members to the number of three hundred attending, all being the descendants of the great-grandmother, who, a widow, with nine children, came from Botetourt county, Virginia, to Clark County, Ohio, in 1826. William, the eldest of her children, was then aged fourteen, and Levi, the youngest, was but six months old and is now the only surviving member of that family, he still living in Clark county, Ohio. William married Catherine Leffel, of Springfield, Ohio, and their son, George W., married Frances C. Fortney, a daughter of Jacob Fortney, who came into Clark county from York county, Pennsylvania, in 1835, and married into the Knoop family, of Miami county. George W. and Frances C. Deaton were the parents of Jacob O. Deaton, who was born in Clark county, Ohio, August 26, 1858. The paternal and maternal grandfathers of the subject were thus respectively William Deaton, who died in Clark county, Ohio, and Jacob Fortney, who died in Kosciusko county, Indiana, November 2, 1880.

George W. Deaton, the father of the immediate subject of this sketch, may be c1assed among the pioneers of Kosciusko county. He was one of the stalwart figures of his day and aided largely in the development of the beautiful and fertile section of the state. He was born in Clark county, Ohio, October 15, 1833, one year after the close of the famous Black Hawk war, and was reared in his native county, attaining to a sturdy manhood. His early education was of the kind that all boys of his day received, rather limited in its scope, the three Rs comprising the usual curriculum. However, what he lacked in book learning was compensated for by a plentiful supply of energy, determination and good every-day common sense. During the exciting and trying times of the threatened secession the home of George W. Deaton was a meeting place for those loyal to the union and ambitious for the country's good. Under these influences he was imbued with the spirit of patriotism and gave his heart and voice in earnest support of the union. He was delegated to secure substitutes for the army, and in 1862 assisted in raising a company. He had fol1owed farming as an occupation in Clark county until 1863, when he secured a tract of land in Kosciusko county, Indiana, the place which is now the home of his son, Jacob O. With some assistance from his father-in-law he secured two additional tracts, making in all two hundred and seventy-five acres, and, although as a young man he started out with very little, at the time of his death he was in very good circumstances. He was a God-fearing man and of exemplary habits, and his counsel was frequently sought by his friends and neighbors. In religion he was a devout believer in the dogmas and creed of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was liberal in his support of that society. In politics he was a stanch and uncompromising Republican and was earnest in his advocacy of the principles of that party. He died June 30, 1878, and his remains lie buried in Mt. Pleasant cemetery, Clay township. His devoted wife also sleeps beside him in the city of the dead and a beautiful stone marks their last resting place. They were the parents of the following children; William Sabin, who died December 25, 1871; Jacob O., whose history follows; Mary Belle died October l0, 1862; John E., a farmer near Claypool; Sherman S., of Urbana, Ohio, late prosecuting attorney and a member of the state board of pardons; he attended the Ada (Ohio) normal school, was a teacher in Ohio and Indiana, read law and practiced in Ohio and was pronounced a successful prosecutor; Ulysses S. C, a surgeon in the Philippines, stationed in northern Luzon, is a graduate of the Louisville Medical Colllege, he was located in Thackery, Ohio, when he took the examination admitting him as a surgeon to the army, and was one of two out of forty who passed; he was in the Philippines with General Funston, and in 1901 received a wound; Cyrus B. owns the old homestead; Charles G. is a farmer near Claypool.

At the time of his father's death Jacob Deaton was in his twentieth year and, the responsibilities of the farm fell upon him and his mother, who was left with two hundred and seventy-five acres of land, but with seven thousand dollars indebtedness. She remained in control, being administrator, and wisely decided to stay on the farm. She was ambitious to educate her children and this appeared to her the best way to provide the means. Due to her good management and the able assistance of Jacob in five years the debt was canceled. The two sons, Sherman S. and Grant, were sent to school, this cutting down the force an the farm to four sons, Jacob being manager. He was well fitted for these responsibilities, for his father had trained him and had placed much confidence in his judgment. He continued in management of the farm for seventeen years. Every means far improvement was practiced, the craps diversified and the farm kept well stocked. The estate grew to four hundred and forty acres of land and three thousand dollars worth of personal property, clear of debt, whi1e at his father's death the seven thousand dollar debt had covered about all, and this is evidence of Jacob's success. The family now desiring a division of their interests, the land was divided into six tracts and an amicable adjustment of all the affairs arranged, Sherman selling his share to Jacob, whose part includes the original tract secured by his father.

In 1868, when Jacob was only a boy, he heard speeches by James A. Logan, which appealed to him with lasting influence and from his first vote to the present time he has been a Republican and a worker along political lines. From 1890 to 1900 his county honored him as central committeeman. On December 3, 1900, he assumed the responsibilities of county commissioner for the southern district of Kosciusko county, his colleagues being David Poor, of Etna township, and Egbert Gawthrop, of Van Buren township.

On the 21st of August, 1883, Mr. Deaton was united in marriage with Miss Mealy Cauffman, the daughter of Rev. John Cauffman, an Evangelical minister who was well known in this county. The latter was born April 15, 1816, and died August 8, 1889, at the age of seventy-three years, three months and thirteen days. Mrs. Deaton was born in Berrien county, Michigan, May 14, 1861, but was reared and educated in Indiana. For almost two decades have Mr. and Mrs . Deaton traveled life's journey together and nobly have they stood side by side in the labor of creating their comfortable home. Mrs. Deaton's home is her paradise and her children are her pride. She is a lady of cordial and pleasing address and her many friends always find a hearty welcome to her home. These parents are endeavoring to give their children good, practical educations. Their children, briefly mentioned, are as follows: George W., the eldest, has finished the common-school course and is now attending the high school. In his school work he is especially strong in mathematics and history. John A. Logan has completed the examination of the eighth grade in the common school. Florence E. is pursuing the studies of the seventh grade and is very fond of music. Fluella Belle is in the sixth grade and is fond of the study of language. Fern C. is in the fifth grade, Sherman Blaine in the third grade, and Ruth Agnes and Oriene Beverage are at home and have not yet arrived at school age.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Deaton are members of the Claypool Methodist church, of which he is treasurer and also a member of the board of trustees. He is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees, Tent No. 83, and has been an active lodge worker. Mrs. Deaton is a member of the L. O. T. M., No. r03, and is court commander.

In the official capacity of county commissioner Mr. Deaton has evidenced his high business capacity and stands well at the front as a successful overseer of the county's interests. During his incumbency there have been erected twenty-five stone arches over the streams of the county, the county buildings have been kept in a most excellent condition and the public highways were never in better condition than at the present time. He is one of the strong men of the county and his influence has been felt in the advancement of the county's interests.

Certain strong characteristics mark the members of the Deaton family, from the great-grandmother, who, with a babe in arms and several small children, braved the hardships of a new country, down through the line of descendants who show by what they have accomplished that they were reared in reverence of home, country and God. The following two obituary notices are here inserted as being especially apropos in connection with this sketch:

"Eva" wife of the deceased Rev. John Cauffman, was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1833, and died at the residence of her son, John Cauffman, in Claypool, Indiana, August 29, 1897. She was the mother of nine children, two deceased, seven living, the names of the latter being Michael, John, Levi, Pierce, Mealy, Navina and Cora. She was converted in early youth and in 1856 united with the church of the Evangelical Association, of which she remained a devoted and faithful member until her death. When she was told that her days were few on earth, she said to her children, 'Be good and meet me in Heaven.' The home and community will miss her. She leaves an aged father, seven children, a number of grandchildren and two brothers and two sisters, besides relatives and friends to mourn her departure. Her remains were interred in Gospel Hill cemetery, by the side of her husband, Rev. James Wales, of Rochester, Indiana, officiating."

"Frances C. Deaton was born in Clark county, Ohio, May 5, 1835, a daughter of Jacob and Anna (Knoop) Fortner, and died Decemher 12, 1894. She was wedded to George W. Deaton March 9, 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Deaton moved to Clay township, Kosciusko county, Indiana, in March, 1863, and located on a farm, and by industry and economy succeeded in obtaining for themselves and family a comfortable home. The deceased entertained a happy disposition and exerted herself in making everybody comfortable around her. Ere the sunbeams fell aslant from its noonday splendor, June 30, 1878, her husband and faithful companion was called from the active duties of this life. Left as she was with her six surviving sons, she maintained the dignity and sobriety of a mother's station, giving to the needy and contributing to worthy and religious causes. She affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church and was a faithful and consistent member. She bore her sufferings bravely, until she was called upon to lay down the burdens of life. Her sojourn here was but the dalliance of a straying spark, adrift from the central fire of love to which it has returned.

"Though all is hushed in death's black night,
With hands, soft folded, now at rest
In sweet repose upon the breast,
The soul has found the morning's light."

Click here for photo.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


GEORGE L. HUFFMAN.
The problems of clearing the timber from the land and of tilling the soil thus brought out to the sunlight were not the only ones with which the early settlers had to contend. He required lumber-boards for various purposes, and accordingly sawmills were early established in all parts of the state on every considerable stream. It was necessary that the stream should be large enough to afford the necessary water for at least a portion of the year, at which time it was the custom for the farmers to haul their logs to the mills or to sell the logs to the miller and buy the boards. Thus the farmer secured the plank and boards required for fencing, sheds, barns, etc. Later steam mills took the place of the early water mills. The subject of this notice has operated a saw-mill for many years and is thoroughly acquainted with the business. He was born in Wabash county, Indiana, September 26, 1842, and is the son of William B. and Kizziah (Tabler) Huffman. The Huffmans came from Virginia and settled in Ohio in the early history of that state. They removed to Delaware county, Indiana, in 1832, and afterward came to Wabash county in 1842, where a farm was bought near North Manchester. Here William B. Huffman passed the remainder of his days. He followed the occupation of farming and built up a good property and an estimable name. The country was very wild when he first came here, and the wolves and other savage animals often gave him great trouble killing off the small stock and making it very dangerous for children to be abroad, especially at night time. A heavy timber covered the land and his life was spent in clearing it off. He possessed excellent qualities of heart and mind and could, with the proper advantages, have risen to a high position in the affairs of men. He died in 1880, beloved by all. To him were born six sons and six daughters, as follows: Cynthia, the wife of Hiram Elliott, lived in Wabash county, but both husband and wife are now deceased; Nancy, who married Louis Brothers, lived in Wabash county and both are deceased; Henderson J. married in Wabash county, but his wife is deceased, and he now resides in Harrison township; Letha, wife of Abram Baker, is deceased, but lived in Harrison township; Elizabeth, who became the wife of Joab Martin, both deceased, lived in Wabash county; Charles M., who wedded Catherine Cappis, is deceased and his widow lives in Wabash county; Louisa, deceased, was the wife of Peter Kreechbaum and lived in Wabash county; Mary M., who married Perry West, deceased, lived in Wabash county; Albert, who married Nora Dale, lives in Wabash, Indiana; George L., subject; Andrew wedded Frances Steele and both are deceased; William B., Jr., who died in infancy.

George Lewis Huffman spent his youth on his father's farm, and received in the meantime a good education, for he was quick with his books and took delight in learning. He mastered the studies of the common schools and began to teach, having obtained a certificate from the county superintendent. In all he taught four terms and was highly successful. He remained with his father until he was twenty-five years old, but during the four years after he reached the age of twenty-one he rented his father's farm, and during that time was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Murphy, born in Ohio October 30, 1847. To this marriage three children were born: William F., born December 26, 1869, died in 1892; Lillie May, born February 10, 1874, is now the wife of Reuben W. Uplinger and lives in Harrison township; Louretta, born April 13, 1884, an accomplished young lady. Mr. Huffman is in comfortable circumstances. His business is saw-milling, in which he has been engaged since 1870, and this being a heavily timbered country, he has sawed an immense quantity of logs. He came to this county in October, 1869, and here he has since remained. In politics he is a stanch Democrat and takes a keen interest in the success of his party. Fraternally he is a member of Mentone Castle, K. P., and Kosciusko Lodge, No. 62, I. O. O. F., at Warsaw.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


JOHN WARREN.
Among the successful stock men of this county is the subject of this brief notice. Having grown up on a farm and handled stock all his life, he is familiar with that class of husbandry. It requires something more than carelessness to select the best animals in any herd and to rear them in such a manner that the best points will be brought out and emphasized. As the best stock brings the best price, the best farmers make it an object to raise the higher grades, knowing that the market will be the better for a given effort and outlay. All these important points are borne in mind by all good stock raisers. Then there are the questions of feeding, watering, salting, stables and the best time to market animals. It is true that the best farmers study the market quotations of stock in the principal cities, and by so doing very often receive the reward of their watchfulness in a much more satisfactory price for their products. This is true of the grain products as well as those of the yards. Subject manages thus to not only get the best stock, but also to get the best price. He was born in Chester township, Wabash county, July 13, 1855, and is the son of Samuel and Maria (Miller) Warren. The family of the Warrens is of German descent and came from Pennsylvania to Ohio in the pioneer period. The Millers were also of German descent and from the same state. The parents of subject grew up in the Keystone state and were there married. Soon after their marriage they determined to come to the great West, where land was cheap and where a home could be built up at the expense of little money and considerable labor. They accordingly put all their possessions in a wagon and drove through to Adams county, Indiana. He rented land for several years. In 1851 or 1852 he removed to Chester township, Wabash county, where he purchased a tract of land and lived thereon until 1864, when he came to this county and bought eighty acres in Seward township. He remained on this farm for ten years and then sold it and purchased another south of Yellow Creek lake, and there lived until his death. His widow survives him and lives on the old place, being yet, at the age of seventy-six years, quite strong and active. At the time of his death, in 1895, he was in comfortable circumstances and was well known and universally respected. He was a successful farmer and an honorable man. For many years prior to his death he was a member of the United Brethren church and was active and consistent in church work. He helped to build the church of that denomination in this neighborhood and was a liberal contributor to all worthy secular and Christian enterprises. Their children were as follows: Sarah J., wife of Reason Rickel, resides in Seward township; Sylvester, who married Jane Pontius, lives in Seward township; William, who married Alice Geich, resides in Wabash county; Robert, unmarried, lives with his mother in this township; John, subject; Mary, the wife of Jefferson Regenos, lives in Seward township; Harriet, deceased, who was the wife of John L. Parker, of Seward township; Ellen, the wife of Sylvester Johnson, resides in Seward township ; Margaret, the wife of Riley Seacore, lives in Franklin township; Eliza, the wife of William Lower, resides in Harrison township.

John Warren was a lad of nine years when he came to this county. He spent his youth on the farm and became familiar with hard work, learning all the details that now serve him so well in his stock operations. Upon becoming a man he married Miss Julia Stoffer, who bore him two children and then passed away. The children are Etta, born August 24, 1880, who became the wife of Frank Hill and lives in Clay township; Allie, born October 4, 1882, who married William Huffman and lives in Seward township. Mr. Warren's first wife died in 1887 and in 1890 he wedded Miss Jane Cuffle and by her has two children: Melissa, who died in infancy, and Henry, who died at the age of eleven years. The subject has made a fine success of life and is in the enjoyment of a competency. He has made farming and stock raising a specialty, and is one of the best stock judges in the county, the most of his money having been made on stock. He makes a specialty of Norman horses, Poland China hogs and shorthorn cattle. He and his wife are people of exceptional worth, and all who have the honor of their acquaintance ascribe to them unusual intelligence and high morals. Mr. Warren is a Democrat and has been active in the councils of his party, having served as delegate to the county conventions, etc. He is a skillful politician and could serve much higher in public affairs. Mr. Warren erected his pretty brick residence in 1895, and the surroundings bespeak the careful and painstaking farmer.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


REV. HENDERSON W. BALL.
The ministry is considered the most holy calling to which man can direct his attention. The idea of God, without which idea implanted in the human breast life would be despair, is the most sacred of all our possessions. From savage tribes to civilized peoples the hope of immortality is the star that guides through the stormy sea of life. That hope alone renders life worth living, providing only that it is lived according to the gospel. It is such a life that the subject of this memorial has lived and is yet living, at the age of eighty years. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, September 28, 1822, and is the child of William D. and Margaret (Widner) Ball. The Ball family is of mixed Irish and English descent and hails from the Old Dominion, where William D. was reared and educated. When he reached the age of fifteen years he removed with his father to east Tennessee, but in 1819 the family came to Wayne county, Indiana, though William D. had preceded his father there three years, coming on in 1816, the same year Indiana was admitted to statehood. At that time many portions were wholly unsettled and were very wild, the heavy timber stretching away hundreds of miles with scarcely a clearing and the Indians and wild animals contending for supremacy. William D. had married before coming here and upon his arrival had entered eighty acres in Wayne county from the government, a tract without a stick cut on it and covered with an impenetrable forest of heavy trees, Indian trails ran through the woods in every direction. He went to work and cleared off a spot for a rude log cabin and erected it with the help of the few nearest neighbors. Slowly the forest disappeared before the ax of the farmer and crops of grain took the place of the trees. In time the old log cabin was replaced with a better structure, and steadily the pioneer period, became a thing of the past. He remained in that county until 1837 and then sold out and moved to Delaware county, where he entered one hundred and twenty acres from the government and again prepared to dear off the timber. He remained on this farm with his family until the autumn of 1851, when he again sold out and came to Fulton county and bought sixty acres, partly cleared, and erected a substantial frame house thereon. There the father and mother passed the remainder of their days, the former dying in 1870 and the latter in 1863. The father was an honest, enterprising and industrious man, and had the respect of everybody. He was a member of the Dunkard church. To him and wife nine children were born as fol1ows: John, Calvin, William, Margaret, Henderson, Mary A., Thomas, Aaron and Harriet. Only four of these are living, Henderson, Thomas, Aaron and Harriet, aged respectively seventy-nine, seventy-four, seventy-two and seventy years. Henderson remained on his father's farm until he was twenty years old, attending the district schools and working during the summers on the farm. On September 6, 1842, he married Miss Charity, daughter of James and Sarah (Lumpkin) Ball. To this union two children were born: Sarah J., who died at the age of ten years; and Nancy E., who died in infancy. Upon the death of his first wife Mr. Ball married Freeia Lumpkin and by her has thirteen children: Melvina, born September 25, 1846, died aged six years; Martha A., born November 8, 1847, became the wife of William R. Williams; Lewis Cass, born December 12, 1848, is single and lives with his father; William E., born. April 1, 1850, died in infancy; James O., born September 16, 1851, deceased; Charity M., born July 19, 1853, became the wife of Calvin Noyer and resides in Akron, Indiana; John Milton, born February 27, 1855, married Jennie Meredith and lives in Franklin township; Catherine, born December 18, 1856, is; the wife of George Swick and lives near Akron; Thomas E., born June 25, 1858, married Laura Robinson and resides in Seward township; Laura Alice, born May 24, 1860, became the wife of Almondo Gast and lived in Akron until her death; Diantha V., born February 27, 1862, became the wife of Henry Meredith and lives in Franklin township; Jennie G., born June 1, 1864, is single and resides at home with her father; Robert Nelson, born May 3, 1867, married Miss Hilda Hammon and resides in Anderson. Indiana. Henderson Ball, the subject, grew to maturity on his father's farm. When eighteen years of age he became impressed with the story of the gospels and began to study for the ministry. He was duly licensed in 1840 and was placed in charge of a circuit at once, his first charge being seven miles west of his present place. He remained in active service for twenty-one years. During that time he baptised about two hundred persons, married about one hundred couples, filled appointments at thirty, twenty-four, twenty, twenty-one, fifteen and seven miles distance, preached in one hundred and five different houses and many times in some of the houses, traveled through all sorts of weather, at one time making a ride of thirty miles when the thermometer registered twenty-five degrees below zero at eleven o'clock in the morning. The Baptist church to which he belonged and for which he labored was greatly benefited by his learning, piety, eloquence and tireless energy in the cause of the Master. He is a stalwart member of society and the friend of all reforms. He served as notary public for thirty-five years, during which time he has written much of the legal work for all persons in this portion of the county. He has voted with the Republican party since its organization in 1856. He has been spoken of often in connection with the legislature, and during the Rebellion was frequently threatened by the Knights of the Golden Circle for his outspoken and loyal utterances. His son Aaron served as a private in the Federal army. Mr. Ball is specially distinguished by his honesty, firmness of character, piety and intelligence. He is widely known and has the unlimited confidence and respect of everybody.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


JONATHAN P. ROBINSON.
One of the most evident things to the thoughtful farmer is the fact that life at no stage is a bed of roses. There are thorns, and many of them, along the path of farming life, and the lucky ones are they who are pierced by the fewest and avoid the most. It will probably not be disputed that all persons' should keep in view the important duty of pulling out the thorns from the feet of those who are less fortunate. They may thus not only lay up treasures for themselves, but help strew the pathway of some less fortunate mortals with roses or some other flower agreeable to sight and smell. After a short time this important duty will become a pleasure and then the whole world, ,in all its harshness and with all its thorns, will begin to blossom in real earnest. The subject of this sketch is one who believes in the motto, "Live and let live." He does not care to rise if he has to walk over the bodies of others to do so. He believes in honest emulation and fair competition and is willing to march side by side with his fellow creatures and take his chances with the rest, giving them their dues and taking his own. He was born in Seward township, Kosciusko county, Indiana, December 21, 1854, and is a son of George M. and Sarah (Luce) Robinson. The Robinson family came to this state from Kentucky in 1826 and located in Clinton county, where the grandfather, William Robinson, entered a tract of land from the government. He was of Irish descent and a mart of much force of character, and was in all things a typical pioneer. There he resided in the deep woods until 1836, when he sold out and came to section 9, Seward township, Kosciusko county, and entered a heavily wooded tract of one hundred and sixty acres. At that time this portion of the state was a howling wilderness, filled with wild animals and scarcely less wild Indians. Immense forests stretched out in all directions and were infested with wolves, bears, foxes, panthers, etc., and it was very difficult to keep sheep and other smal1 stock. He built a log cabin, placed his little family therein, and began to clear off the trees and brush and soon to plant the crops. He was the first settler in this part of the county to plant out an orchard, and to this day some of the trees then planted are living and bearing. To him and wife these children were born: Henry, William, Robert, John, George, Samuel, James, Andrew, Anna, Eliza and Sarah. George M., the father of subject, was twenty years old when he came to this county. He took part in all the pioneer doing of the times, often met the Indians and became a good hunter. His education was received at the old subscription schools during the winters and his work was hard and steady in the heavy woods and among the stumps during the summers. He married Miss Sarah Luce, and they became the parents of the following children: Harvey C., who married Miss Rosella Flenar, and upon her death he married a second time and now lives in Marion, Indiana; Catherine became the wife of A. M. Black and lives in Fillmore county, Nebraska; Jonathan P., subject. The latter grew up on his father's farm and secured a fair education. Upon reaching maturity he wedded Miss Effie F. Hosman, daughter of Charles Hosman. She is a native of this county, born April 15, 1866, and received in her youth a fair education. She has presented her husband with two children, as follows: Alzadie D., born August 5, 1881, who has been well educated and fitted to teach school. She has taught in this township, is a finished scholar, holds a state teacher's certificate, is unmarried and resides at home with her parents. Raymond M., born September 1, 1885, engaged in farming with his father. He also has a fine education; indeed the whole family takes easily and naturally to learning and instruction. At the time of his marriage subject diet not have much of this wor1dís goods, but he went to work to get what would be sufficient to support his family and educate them, and has more than succeeded. He has a small but excel1ent farm, with good improvements. In politics he is an unflinching Republican, and takes great interest in the success of his party's tickets, being one of the party's best workers in this part of the county. He is often mentioned in connection with some of the county offices and would be a credit to any such position. The family are intelligent, progressive, moral and have the highest confidence and respect of all who come within the bounds of their acquaintance. Mr. Robinson is at present secretary of the Seward Detective Association of this township and has been since its organization. He is also vice-president of the Kosciusko Detective Union of the county. The purpose of the organization is to protect its members from horse thieves, counterfeiters, and house and barn burners. Any constable of the organization is empowered to arrest without a state warrant. Mr. Robinson is prominent in business and politics and in all matters affecting this community.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902


ARTHUR SMITH.
This is an age in which the farmer stands pre-eminently above any other class as a producer of wealth. He simply takes advantage of the winds, the warm air, the bright sunshine, the refreshing rains, and with God's help and by virtue of his own skill in handling nature's gifts he creates grain, hay, live stock and vegetables, all of which are absolute necessities to the inhabitants of the world. The commercial system has come to recognize his importance at last and has surrounded him with many conveniences and utensils unthought of one hundred years ago. The inventor has given him the self binder, the riding plow, the steam thresher and many other labor-saving devices. And the farmer has not been slow to take advantage of these blessed improvements. He everywhere has utilized them and made them add to his wealth and his comfort. It has been thus with the subject of this sketch, who stands among the county's best and most progressive farmers. He was born on section 10 Seward township, Kosciusko county, Indiana, December 18, 1857, and is the son of Mark and Nancy (Garvin) Smith. He was born and reared on his father's farm and began to learn from the start the art of husbandry. His education was somewhat limited, but he has since made the most of his strong mind and excellent judgment, reading a great deal and assimilating what he reads. He remained on his father's farm until he had attained the age of twenty-eight years, but before this, when he had reached the age of twenty-two years, he began to lay aside money for himself. He tilled a portion of his father's farm on shares and steadi1y contrived to get ahead in this world's goods. The most important event to him up to this time, except his birth, was his marriage, which occurred March 22, 1886, the lady of his choice being Miss Semantha J., daughter of G. W. and Mary (Horn) Herald, of Franklin township, her birth having occurred December 17, 1860. Her father was an old settler, having come to this county fifty-five years ago. He was a typical pioneer and saw the country at its newest. The land at that time was covered with its heavy coating of forest trees, which stretched away in every direction in an almost unbroken expanse. Here and there the rude log cabins clotted the small clearings, and the wolves and other wild animals contended with man for the occupancy of the deep woods. But her father reared his family to good health and sound morals despite the wildness of the early surroundings. To the subject and his wife two children were born, as follows: Warden I., born October 15, 1888, and Cleo A., born May 22, 1891, both bright and interesting children. About the time of his marriage Mr. Smith became interested in a brick and tile factory on the farm and one at Silver Lake, and he followed this business for seven years. He made considerable money, but in the spring of 1888 he sold out and returned to the farm, and here he has staved ever since. In connection with his farm he has conducted several other enterprises. He has operated a threshing machine for four seasons and has made money by that venture. He now owns ninety acres of well cultivated land and has a barn, built a short time ago, which, with his pretty residence, cost him three thousand dollars. He is a Republican in politics and one of his party's leaders in this part of the county. In 1898 he, at the solicitations of his numerous friends, made the race for nomination for county recorder, but after the second ballot in the convention withdrew his name from the contest. He is the present chairman of his precinct and is watchful of his party's interests. He is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees at Claypool and of the Knights of Pythias of Silver Lake. He is also captain of the Seward Detective Association, an organization formed to prevent horse stealing and kindred crimes which affect the farmer. He is one of the strongest characters in this part of the county.

Progressive Men and Women of Kosciusko County, Indiana
B. F. Bowen, Publisher
Logansport, Indiana
1902



Deb Murray