A. Hough Adams, one of the representative business men of Indianapolis, for a number of years has been identified with sterling enterprises that have helped to advance the city's commercial prestige. Mr. Adams is proprietor of the Adams Sales company and is president of the Exlo Products company, headquarters of both organizations being at Nos. 10-12 Oriental street, Indianapolis. He was born in Pennsylvania, November 19, 1876 and had educational advantages at Pittsburgh, where he was graduated from the Central high school. Then came two years of preparatory work in an engineering school and a year of study with the United States Steel Corporation, with which great industry he was subsequently identified for fifteen years. For seven years afterward, Mr. Adams was interested in the Keystone Sheet Metal company at Economy, Pennsylvania, of which he was president, manager and part owner. The company had maintained an agency at Indianapolis, and when the Keystone discontinued business, Mr. Adams came to this city, and in partnership with his former agent, Mr. McCullough, organized the Adams-McCullough Sales company, which represented twelve of the largest manufacturing concerns in the United States handling material wholesale for automobiles. In 1913 Mr. Adams organized the Adams Sales company and during the next five years continued his business at No. 201-2 Chamber of Commerce Building, establishing a reputation for business ability and personal integrity that continues to the present day. In 1918 his business was suspended because the United States Government had immediate need of his expert service and technical knowledge. In June, 1918, he was appointed production manager in Indiana for the Ordnance Department of the United States Government and served until 1919, a part of his duty being assisting and directing the work of the factories having government contracts, in the manufacture of rifles, grenades, ammunition and other war supplies. That his services were important and entirely satisfactory, the public records at Washington testify. At the signing of the Armistice Mr. Adams resumed business as before, in 1922 adding to his responsibilities by incorporating the Exlo Products company, of which he is president. A popular product of this company, manufactured and distributed by it, being a, steering control device for Ford automobiles. A broad-minded attitude as well as an appreciation of out-door sports is indicated by his interest in and connection with such social bodies as the Athletic Club of Indianapolis, the Irvington Golf Club, the Ancient Landmarks Lodge and the Little Theater Society. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and the Kiwanis Club, and as a progressive civic undertaking, was foremost in advocating the giving of cash lap prizes for the Speedway races. A Republican in political life, he is noted for his strong Americanism. He married Ann Mary Freinheiser, born in Pennsylvania, and they have two children: William and Jane, both of whom are in high school. Mr. and Mrs. Adams are members of the Presbyterian Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Henry C. Adams. Every branch of business connected with the building industry is important, for the demand, both private and public, is constantly on the increase, and its supplying is furnishing the opportunity for the exercise of abilities in this direction of some of the most energetic and substantial men of the country. Especially is this true in a city of the magnitude of Indianapolis where the needs of its citizens and the requirements of public service, far exceed the capacities of the concerns given over to building activities. One of the men who has made a name for himself in this direction is Henry C. Adams whose large business interests center in the supplying of paving materials of all kinds throughout the city and its vicinity for a wide radius. He was born at Indianapolis, in 1875. His greatgrandfather, Doctor Adams came to Indiana in 1818 and located at New Bethel where, in addition to carrying on the practice of medicine, he became the owner of a large tract of land, much of which still remains in the family. His son, Reuben Adams, grandfather of Henry C. Adams, came to Indianapolis at an early day, and for a number of years was prominent here, and at the time of his death, in 1860, held a court position, which had been his for a long period. The father of Mr. Adams of this review, also Henry C. Adams, was a well-known figure in business and public life here, and for a number of years operated the large stone quarries at Saint Paul, Indiana. Throughout the war of the sixties he served in the Union army. Growing up in the city of his nativity, the younger Henry C. Adams attended its public schools, and later Culver Military Academy, from which he was graduated in 1895. Returning home he went into the stone business with his father, and until 1909 was overseer of the Saint Paul quarries, during this period gaining a thorough knowledge of the business. In 1910 he went into his present undertaking, and has steadily progressed, winning the confidence of the trade and the public. He is a Republican in his political views. Fraternally he has been advanced in the Scottish Rite in Masonry, and he also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the University, Indianapolis Country, Hoosier Motor and Hoosier Athletic clubs. During the late war he devoted two years to Red Cross work. In 1899 he was married to Miss Mary Pickens of Indianapolis, and they have two children: Henry P. and Samuel. Both he, and his wife are valued members of the Presbyterian Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Henry Rihl Alburger, M. D., one of the most prominent physicians of Indianapolis where he is director of the laboratories of the City Hospital, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1874. He attended the Germantown Academy and following his graduation from that institution matriculated at the University of Pennsylvania where he was in attendance from 1889 to 1892. He left school at that time to go into business with his father and for six years thereafter remained in that work. Wishing to become a physician, he entered the College of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania in 1898 and was graduated therefrom in 1902 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. During the ensuing year, he was an interne in the Philadelphia General Hospital. When the period of his interneship had been completed, he began the active practice of his profession in Philadelphia and also entered the department of pathology of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School at the same time. In 1904, he was made the assistant to the professor of pathology in that institution, and in the same year he became the assistant pathologist of the hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

In these capacities he served until 1907 when he went to Bloomington, Indiana, to fill the chair of professor of pathology in Indiana University. His work there, which lasted until 1911, only served to increase the renown that he was beginning to earn as a pathologist. He came to Indianapolis in 1911 when the department of pathology was moved to that city and at that time he became pathologist of the Methodist Hospital and of the City Hospital. By 1914, his work had become so heavy that he was forced to sever his connection with Indiana University and devote all of his time to his growing practice. He conducts a general practice but specializes in diagnosis, in which field he has come to be recognized as one of the most reliable members of the medical profession in Indianapolis. In 1922, Dr. Alburger was again called to assume the duties of director of the pathological laboratories of the City Hospital, a position which he still ably fills. In 1900, Dr. Alburger married Maud Bechtel, of Philadelphia. In 1916, he again married, taking for his second wife Miss Mary Littlefield, of Marshall, Illinois. To Dr. and Mrs. Alburger have been born three children: Mary Margaret, Joan, and John Thomas. Dr. Alburger holds membership in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the county, and state medical associations, the Phi Gamma Delta college fraternity, and the Alpha Mu Pi Omega professional medical fraternity.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William S. Allen. Among the realtors of Indianapolis who have come to the forefront through dealings of sufficiently important character necessary to gain distinction in a city of a third of a million souls, one who has proved more than ordinarily successful is William S. Allen, head of the William S. Allen Company. Mr. Allen was born June 28, 1876, and is a son of Henry Clay Allen, who came to Indianapolis in August, 1876, and is still engaged in the practice of law, being one of the well known and greatly respected legists of the capital. After attending the grammar school, and the Manual Training high school, William S. Allen accepted a position as agent for the New York Life Insurance company, ,with which he remained for six months. His next position was as salesman for a garment company, but this employment did not satisfy him long, and in 1901 he opened the real estate department of the Union Trust company, on the present site of the Commercial Bank. In 1902 he entered the Indianapolis Engraving and Electrotyping company, of which he served as treasurer for eleven years, at the end of which time he disposed of his interests and opened a real estate office at 1019 Hume-Mansur Building, where he has since been engaged in dealing in all kinds of realty, making a specialty of the suburban district extending along the Bluffs of White River from Riverside Park to Broad Ripple. He has engaged in various large and important transactions, and among his deals have been the location of the Highland Golf and Country Club, the Broadmoor Golf and Country Club, and most of the high class suburban homes which have been built in this district. The Highland is located north of the river, east of Michigan Road, while the Broadmoor is west of the Michigan Road on Kessler Boulevard. Mr. Allen, bears an excellent reputation in realty and other business circles as a man of honorable dealing, and has also won the confidence of those who have formed his clientele. In his political views he adheres to the principles of the Republican party. He is a Mason and holds membership in the Columbia Club, the Indianapolis Athletic Club, the Hoosier Motor Club; the Athenaeum, Chamber of Commerce and Indianapolis and Indiana Real Estate Board. Mr. Allen married Miss Lillian Krauss, of Indianapolis and they have two children: Charles, and Louise Allen. The pleasant and hospitable Allen home is located at Cold Springs Road and Thirty-eighth street.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Uryal C. Ambrose, M. D., one of the skilled physicians of Marion county, is engaged in the practice of his profession at Cumberland. He was born at Warsaw, Kentucky, March 3, 1863, a son of Hon. Clements Roger and Martha (Boian) Ambrose. The paternal grandfather, a native of England, was a Baptist clergyman and a farmer; the maternal grandfather, William Boian, was a tanner upon an extensive scale, and also the owner of 2,200 acres of land in Kentucky, although he was a native of Virginia. Clements Roger Ambrose was born in Kentucky, where his father had settled upon coming to this country from England, April 13, 1830, and his wife was born in the same state September 30, 1832. For many years he was engaged in practice as a dentist. For some years he was county judge, and up to his death, which occurred in 1920, he was a recognized factor in local politics, although he was then ninety-one years old. His wife died many years before him, passing away in 1886 at the age of fifty-two years. Their children were: Annie, Thomas W., Joseph, John, James, Uryal C, William B., Hannah, Nancy, Henry H. and Martha. Doctor Ambrose attended the public schools of Kentucky, and as soon as he could, began teaching in order to earn money to pursue his studies further. In 1886 he entered the Chickering Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, and two years later matriculated at the Louisville Medical College. Following his graduation therefrom, he spent eleven years at Connersville, Indiana as a general practitioner; and in 1911 came to Cumberland where he has since remained. During the years which have intervened, he has gained public confidence and a large clientele. June 21, 1887, he was married to Nancy L., a daughter of Matthew and Elizabeth (Moore) Gordon, of Scotch-Irish extraction and residents of Kentucky. Dr. and Mrs. Ambrose have one daughter, Emma, who is now Mrs. Gise, of Rushville, Indiana. Dr. Ambrose is a York Rite Mason and belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Charles Richard Ammerman, a leading Consulting Engineer of Indianapolis, whose name has been connected with the construction of power plants and heating and ventilating, sanitary and electrical systems in school and public buildings and other large structures for a number of years, has gained his present high record and prestige through hard and faithful work and notable achievement. Mr. Ammerman was born March 8, 1880, in Calhoun county, Michigan, and the four branches of his family (Ammerman, Chapin, Bryan and Mann) came to America during an early period of its history. The last to come were the Ammermans, who arrived in this country in 1650, and his great-grandfather, Richard Ammerman, served as a soldier of the War of 1812, while his great-great grandfather, Samuel Bryan, fought with the Continental forces during the War of the Revolution. Charles R. Ammerman received his early education in his native county and then entered Albion College, from which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1900. Going to Detroit he, became a consulting engineer as a member of the firm of Ammerman & McColl, which subsequently acted as consulting engineers in the construction of a number of buildings in this state, including the Washington Hotel, Indianapolis; the Gymnasium at Indiana University; the Armory at Purdue; the Girls' Dormitory at DePauw; Robert W. Long Hospital and the Medical School of Indiana University at Indianapolis. He was consulting engineer for the Board of Education of Detroit for ten years, during which period over 75 school buildings were constructed. In 1920 Mr. Ammerman located at Indianapolis, and since that time has been consulting engineer for Indiana University; the James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Hospital and the central power plant in connection with same; the Indianapolis Athletic Club; the J. F. Wild & Company bank and office building; the Continental National bank building; the new Butler College, and much schoolhouse heating, ventilating, sanitary and electrical work in various parts of the state. He also designs refrigerating systems, and in all branches of his highly specialized calling is accounted to be a leader. Mr. Ammerman is a member of the Kiwanis Club of Indianapolis; the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce; the Indianapolis Athletic Club; the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers; the Indiana Engineering Society; and is a Thirty-second degree Mason, being a member of King Palestine Lodge, and King Cyrus Chapter, Detroit, Michigan; Indiana Consistory of Indianapolis, and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, Murat Temple, Indianapolis. In politics he is a Republican. During the World War he was a captain in the construction division, serving at Camp Custer eleven months as Officer in Charge of all Heating and Refrigerating Equipment. He is public spirited in a high degree and lends his support to all worthy civic movements. Mr. Ammerman married Miss Mabel Adams of Detroit, and they are the parents of two children: Helen Elizabeth and Dorothy May. The family belongs to the Central Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


George Amt. The distinction of being the oldest business in point of service in any given community of a large city is in itself a badge of merit, inasmuch such long service to the public is indicative of integrity and honorable dealing no less than of good business management. When, added to this, an individual is also known as one of the oldest grocers in the city, he can feel his reputation established as a citizen of worth and one who has the confidence of his fellows. Such is the standing of George Amt, of 351-55 Virginia avenue, who during the many years which he has spent at Indianapolis has formed a wide friendship and drawn to himself a host of friends. Mr. Amt has seen Indianapolis grow and develop into one of the leading cities of the country. He was born in this city, in a little log cabin on State street, October 17, 1866, and here received his education in the public schools. When he was only sixteen years of age he secured a position as driver of a grocery wagon for the early-established firm of Surbey & Baker. Subsequently Mr. Baker disposed of his interests to Mr. Surbey, and in June, 1892, Mr. Amt acquired a half interest by purchase in this business, located at 351 Virginia avenue. He became sole proprietor of the business when he bought Mr. Surbey's share, and this he has continued to conduct as a first-class establishment. In 1903 Mr. Amt extended his holdings when he purchased the William Sockwell grocery, located on North New Jersey street. The high esteem in which Mr. Amt is held by his fellow-business men is shown in the fact that he is treasurer of the Grocers' Association. In politics he is a Republican, and belongs to the Herron Art Institute, the Hoosier Motor Club and the Indianapolis Maennerchor, now called the Academy of Music, in which last named he has held membership for the past thirty years. Mr. Amt married Miss Malinda Frick, of Indianapolis, and they reside at 3326 Ruckle avenue.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John H. Anding Company. F. William Anding, proprietor of the John H. Anding company, the oldest house of its kind now in existence in the downtown district of Indianapolis, is recognized as one of the solid and responsible business men of his city, and one to whose good judgment and honorable methods is due the present prosperity of his undertaking. He was born at Indianapolis, August 24, 1883, a son of John H. Anding, and his education was acquired in the public schools of his native city. In 1898 his father bought the business still bearing his name, which had been established in 1863, at 340 East Washington street, by Edward Mueller, and it was in this house that F. William Anding received his commercial training. At the death of his father Mr. Anding became owner of the business, and he is at present handling foreign and domestic food specialties and cheeses and beverages, and manufacturing mayonnaise and Thousand Island dressing. His trade is both wholesale and retail and he specializes in supplying restaurants, hotels and clubs, both locally and throughout Indiana. In his beverage department, alone, he handles tons of supplies annually. In 1910 the business was moved to the present quarters, 219 East Ohio street, where ample accommodations are afforded for the storage of the large stocks carried. Mr. Anding is a Republican, but his participation in politics is confined to his exercising his right of suffrage. The Marion Club and the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce have his membership and active support. A Mason he belongs to Mystic Lodge Number 398, F. & A. M., and he has been advanced in this order through all of the bodies of the Scottish and York Rites. He also belongs to Murat Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., and is an officer of Murat Arab patrol-one of the best drill teams in Shrinedom.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Vincent Gregg Clifford. Few attorneys have left a more lasting impression upon the bench and bar of Indianapolis than the late Vincent Gregg Clifford. He was born in Glenwood, Indiana, May 14, 1857, and was a son of John Clifford and Nancy (Hall) Clifford. His father was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, in 1800, and his mother in Brown county, Ohio, in 1815, and both died in 1886. His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native county, but later was graduated from Shortridge high school, Butler College and the American Central Law School. He was admitted to the bar in 1883, and at once established himself in the practice of law at Indianapolis. In 1900 he served as census supervisor of the seventh Indiana district, and in 1905 was elected a member of the Indiana Legislature. In 1914 he was elected judge of the Superior Court of Marion county and was reelected to the same office in November, 1918, and served in that capacity until the time of his death. It was while on the bench that Judge Clifford's legal talents became most effective and were shown to the best advantage. His ability to grasp a multitude of details and show their general bearings on the points at issue, and a patient and courteous attitude toward all who came before him, with a broad knowledge of the law and promptness of decisions when both sides to a controversy had been heard, were traits which made him a popular and honored judge. His decisions were always carefully considered, and were based upon the facts and the law applicable to them. He never forgot nor disregarded the dignity of his position or the high purpose of the court, and as a judge he endeavored, not to make, but to declare and apply the law. He was a close observer of its unwritten code of ethics and his course as both practitioner and judge was marked by inflexible integrity and honor. He questioned the good citizenship of any man who either joined a mob to usurp the functions of the courts or who sought to shield others guilty of such an offense. Above all, he condemned any lax administration of justice by the courts and others charged with the execution of the laws, and the disposition sometimes observed in such officials to excuse or palliate gross and willful violations of the law. Thoroughly appreciative of the city of his adoption, Judge Clifford was loyal and public-spirited in his civic attitude, and gave generously of his time and means to charitable movements and all measures tending to the public good. He was kind, helpful and compassionate to the weak and unfortunate, and, while he did not believe in an indiscriminate giving which promotes vagrancy and idleness, there were few who responded more readily to the needy. He had a great capacity for friendship, which was always founded upon frankness, yet was thoughtful and kind, and his death, which occurred March 11, 1921, removed from Indianapolis one of its most valued citizens. Upon the death of Judge Clifford scores of his friends and associates, including the bench and bar, were replete with tribute to his successful career and noble character, and the county courts were all adjourned until the following Tuesday. Members of the Indianapolis Bar Association at a memorial meeting paid tribute to his memory, and a resolution was adopted pointing out the sterling qualities of Judge Clifford as a man and as a lawyer and judge. Talks were made by numerous attorneys and judges who had been closely associated with him during his life, and the resolutions adopted at the meeting, in part, were as follows: "Judge Clifford was naturally of reserved disposition and quiet demeanor, but he had a high order of courage, both physical and moral, and a wrong aroused both in him. He countenanced no evil or wrong and was quick to combat both in a quiet but firm and determined way. He was considerate of the opinions of others, but steady in his own convictions.

He was imbued with a high purpose of life and its responsibilities. He was more than a good resident; he was a good citizen, because he took an active interest in public affairs. He was always ready to assist with practical suggestions and good judgment in public matters, and all recognized his practical common sense. He was always helpfully interested in things that pertained to his profession and believed in and actively assisted in maintaining high standards for lawyers and judges. As a lawyer he was industrious, faithful and efficient and devoted to his work. As a judge he was honest, high minded, able and desirous of doing justice. Whether or not one agreed with Judge Clifford in his judicial opinions, we always felt that the opinions were honest and that they were careful and well meant efforts to do justice, Judge Clifford discharged every obligation and duty of life, whether domestic, professional or public, with courage, fidelity and integrity. At the time of his passing he was engaged on one of the most difficult cases which has arisen in the state for many years. He died while serving his state and his community in a fine administration of justice. Never did Judge Clifford shrink from the performance of his full duty as he knew it, with an honest, intelligent mind and a courageous and kind heart. So long as men of his type are chosen as our public servants we need have no fear for the future of the state. In his death the public has lost the service of an able justice, a patriot and honest and upright citizen; the courts and lawyers a kind, helpful friend and an honored member. Happy the state that has no public servant but such as he." Besides his professional and judicial connections, Judge Clifford was also prominent in social and fraternal circles, and had hosts of warm friends. While in college he became a member of the Beta Theta Pi, and always took an active interest in the fraternity. He was likewise a member of the Oriental Lodge, F. and A. M., of which he was a Past Master, and was also affiliated with the Christian Church. Judge Clifford was married October 16, 1895, to Miss Augusta G. Austin, of Loda, Illinois, a daughter of Algernon S. and Catherine (Watson) Austin, and they became the parents of two children: Vincent A. Clifford, and Miss Catherine W. Clifford, both of whom were liberally educated, the son now being an attorney in Indianapolis, and the daughter a teacher in the Indianapolis schools. Mrs. Clifford still maintains her home in Indianapolis.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Carl N. Angst, the secretary and treasurer of the Pitman-Moore company, was born in Seven Mile, Ohio, January 31, 1881. He attended the public schools of his home community and then pursued courses of study in the Eastern Indiana Normal and the Ohio Normal at Ada, Ohio. With the completion of his tuition days, he decided to teach school and for two years followed that time honored profession in Ohio. By that time the work was found to be not to his liking, and in 1904 he secured a position as bookkeeper with the Pitman-Moore company, manufacturing chemists of Indianapolis. He continued to work for this firm and his energy and ability were their own reward, for he was made an officer in the organization, at the present time being its secretary and treasurer. He has done much to place the company on the firm basis upon which it operates, and the reputation of the company as a substantial institution is of the best. The Pitman-Moore company has made an enviable niche for itself in the commercial life of Indianapolis. In 1908, Mr. Angst married Margaret Treat, of Indianapolis. He is a member of the Rotary Club, Indianapolis Athletic Club and the Chamber of Commerce.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


A. Wesley Antrim. In many lines of business, Indianapolis has become recognized as an important manufacturing center. Its various products have been approved over a wide territory for a number of years, and it now enters the field in the manufacture of ice cream, with one firm alone, the Jessup & Antrim Ice Cream company, manufacturing and distributing 400,000 gallons yearly. A. Wesley Antrim, one of the organizers and incorporators of this enterprise, was born near West Newton, Indiana, May 10, 1869, son of Joseph and Mila (Edward) Antrim, the father, a farmer all his life in Indiana, and the mother born in Chatham county, North Carolina. Mr. Antrim grew up on the home farm and attended school at West Newton, in 1889 graduating from the high school. He came then to Indianapolis and entered the employ of R. W. Furnas, in the ice cream business, but shortly afterward took a course in stenography that prepared him for an office position, becoming secretary for O. W. Lamport, at Wabash, on the Elkhart Division of the C. W. & M. Railroad. Mr. Antrim was about twenty-six years old when he decided to return to the ice cream business, at that time entering into partnership with Mr. Jessup, under the firm name of Jessup & Antrim, the business being incorporated in 1908 as the Jessup & Antrim Ice Cream company. It has been developed into one of the most prosperous concerns of its kind in the Middle West, where a great demand has been created for its' "Velvet" brand. Mr. Antrim has some associated interests but the greater part of his time is given to the affairs of his Indianapolis plant. September 26, 1895, he married Miss Geneva McLain, of Southport, Indiana, and they have one son, Harold C. Antrim, who is secretary of the Jessup & Antrim Ice Cream company. Mr. Jessup has, additionally, an ice cream plant at Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Antrim and his family are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, and is a Shriner, is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Kiwanis Club, Columbia Club and Indianapolis Athletic Club. Although never unduly active politically, he has definite convictions and performs every duty demanded by good citizenship, faithfully and fearlessly.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William T. Bailey, lawyer, philanthropist, Assistant City Attorney of Indianapolis, whose life story offers at every turn convincing proof that courage and perseverance can bring about great results, was born at Decatur, Illinois, September 16, 1876, second youngest of ten children of Alfred S. and Mary (Taylor) Bailey. His father a native of Virginia came to Illinois in early manhood and for a number of years was in the bakery and cafe business at Decatur and died in 1895. He married Mary Taylor who was born near Salem, Illinois, where the Lincoln family settled. She knew Abraham Lincoln well, and survived until 1918. William T. Bailey attended the public schools at Decatur, has been self supporting since fourteen (14) years of age and was 19 years old when he came to Indianapolis, with the expectation of entering Butler College where he hoped to prepare himself for a course in law. But finding his funds inadequate, abandoned this plan for the time being and solved the problem by hiring out as a waiter in an Indianapolis restaurant for his board until he secured a position as shipper for the Western Salvage Wrecking Agency of Chicago and later became a member of the merchant police force, served as such for one year with such merit that at the solicitation of men of high standing Mayor Thomas Taggart recommended his appointment as a member of the city police force. As a member of this department he assisted in several important captures of criminals and throughout reflected credit on the organization. He had not, however, forgotten his early professional ambition and while performing his duties as a police officer, took advantage of every period of leisure to apply himself to the study of law in the office of Chas. W. Moores and finally completed his law course in the Indiana Law School, having during the two years course missed but one lecture and only one night's work in the police department during that period. He resigned from the police force in 1905 and opened a law office in partnership with Wm. E. Clampham an instructor in the Indiana Law School and formerly an instructor of law at Indiana University. After one year Mr. Bailey continued in practice alone with an office in the Indiana Trust Building until January 1, 1922, when he was appointed Assistant City Attorney with office in the City Hall. The Chief City Executive, Mayor Shank, has not only found in, Mr. Bailey a keen, capable lawyer, but an invaluable coadjutor in perfecting and carrying out various admirable charities and schemes of great civic benevolence. No resident of Indianapolis can be ignorant of what is termed Mayor Shank's Ready Relief Fund, the distribution of which has been operative for over two years, in which period over 1600 needy families to date have been provided with emergency relief upon reports furnished by police officers, City firemen, Free Tuberculosis nurses, Visiting School nurses, Social Service Department nurses, Sanitary inspectors of the City Board of Health and members of other Departments of the City Government. With the aid of these agencies all of these families have been immediately relieved of distress from this fund without red tape or expense, the money is raised by the Mayor's annual ball on St. Valentine's day under the management of Mr. Bailey, and so ready was the response of citizens when tickets were offered for sale that in, 1922 the receipts amounted to over $6,500, and in 1923 aggregated $4,090. The third event of this kind held on the evening of March 25, of this year was a pronounced success. These funds are obtained and distributed with practically no expense. The magnificent Police and Fireman's Band of fifty pieces fully equipped with new uniforms and adequate instruments was organized and equipped through the tireless efforts of Mr. Bailey. This organization is one of which the city may well be proud, welcoming its presence on every occasion of civic celebration. He enjoys the confidence and respect of his fellow citizens in every walk of life and has the love and admiration of all the children for whose pleasure and benefit he never seems tired of working, even on occasions throwing open his own home and beautiful grounds for their entertainment. Through his efforts the Christmas entertainments for the children of the city in the thirty-two fire stations were made a great success and have become a custom. An enthusiastic friend has said of him, "he is always thinking for the good of the other fellow, he seems to get more real enjoyment out of life doing good for others rather than accumulating wealth." November 16, 1896 Mr. Bailey married Miss Eva Fesler, daughter of Thomas and Mary Fesler of Indianapolis. They have no children of their own, but have in the past years given a home and parental affection to children of others. Mr. Bailey is a member of Broad Ripple Lodge 643, F. & A. M. Lodge No. 56, Knights of Pythias; Shambah Temple No. 139, Knights of Khorassan; Marion Club; The Meridian Heights Civic Club and the Marion County Bar Association.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Joseph Baptist, D. C. and M. C. Numbered among the most successful chiropractors of Indianapolis, Dr. Joseph Baptist; senior member of the firm of Baptist & Clark, is an able exponent of his profession, and a citizen of standing in his home city. He was born in the Azore Islands, July 27, 1878. His early education was acquired in the Lincoln school of San Francisco, California, and he later took a commercial course in one of the business colleges of that city. Subsequently he became a student of Ross School of Chiropractic, from which he was graduated, May 1, 1918, following which he opened his offices at 409 Massachusetts avenue. His business grew, so rapidly, however; that he had to seek larger quarters, and is now at 333 North Alabama street where he has every necessary equipment for his work. In 1923 he took Dr. Benjamin Franklin Clark into partnership, and the present firm name came into being. Doctor Baptist is a Blue Lodge and Chapter Mason, maintaining membership with the latter body in San Francisco, and the former in Indianapolis. He is also a member of the Art Institute of this city. August 22, 1904, he was married to Miss Ade Peacock, a native of Charlesworth, Michigan, and they have one son, William Peacock, born April 22, 1909, who is a student of the Benjamin Harrison School of Indianapolis. In religious faith and membership, the Baptist family are Methodists.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Eleanor P. Barker, one of the most successful attorneys in Indianapolis today, was born in Petersburg, Indiana, the daughter of James Breckinridge and Mary Adelaide (Tislow) Barker. The great grandparents of our subject were among the earliest residents of the state of Indiana, the Osborne family coming to this state in 1818. James Barker, the paternal grandfather of our subject served for three terms in the Indiana legislature soon after Indiana had become a state. The maternal grandmother of our subject, was the first teacher in the state, conducting a subscription school, a type familiar to the old settlers of the country. James B. Barker and his family came from Virginia, the grandfather of our subject being one of five sons, all of whom left Virginia and settled in different states. He owned much land in the southern part of the state, and it was on the farm there that James B. Barker, the father of our subject was raised. He began the practice of law at Petersburg when he was twenty years of age, but poor health forced him to give up the work and move to Colorado where he died very suddenly in 1891. With the death of James B. Barker, his wife and daughter removed to Louisville, Kentucky, where they lived for a time with our subject's grandmother. Mrs. Barker wished to study medicine, however, and they came to Indianapolis so that she might receive her training there. In 1900, she received her degree of Doctor of Medicine and is still practicing, being a specialist in the diseases of women and children. Eleanor P. Barker attended high school in Indianapolis and then took a preparatory course at Park College at Parsons, Kansas. She then matriculated at Western College, from which she was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Desiring to study for the legal profession, she returned to Indianapolis and entered the Indianapolis Law School where she won first scholastic honors in her Junior and Senior years. In 1914, she was admitted to the bar and began practicing law immediately after that. She was later associated with W. A. Bastian although she had practiced alone when she had first began her active practice. She now has an enviable clientele which she has built up principally through her own efforts. Miss Barker has been exceptionally active in suffrage work in the state. At one time she was a director of the Old Franchise League; she organized the Congressional Union for Women; she was president of the Federation League; she held the office of state chairman of the Women's party when that organization was first established; and she is a charter member and one of the board of directors of the Women's Rotary Club and the Monday Club. Miss Barker is widely known throughout the state and in many of the western states for her speeches made in behalf of the woman suffrage amendment. When the United States declared war on Germany in 1917, she promptly offered her services to the government. She was made county food administrator, and in county council of defense work, she visited all the counties in the state to aid them in their work. She was the state chairman of the committee on Women and Children in Industry and it was during this time that the first survey was made by the Washington and state committees. The fact that she was later connected with the National Food Administration, was due in a large measure to her work in North and South Dakota, where she was sent by the government shortly before the war to make speeches in the attempt to persuade the farmers of those states to release the wheat that they were holding back from the market. She later was sent into Ohio on the same mission. The government presented to her a certificate of commendation for her excellent work in this line. Although her family has been Democratic for generations, Miss Barker is a Republican. She was the city chairman for the Women's Republican party and has done much work in various primaries. In the last national election she did more speaking in campaigns than anyone except Thomas Watson. Miss Barker is a devout member of the St. Paul's Episcopal Church and takes an active interest in all its affairs.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Irving A. Barker, well known in Indianapolis as the head of the Barker Coal & Block Company, was born in Decorah, Iowa, January 10, 1872. His public school education was received partly in Michigan and partly in Missouri. When he had graduated from high school, he matriculated at the Free Thought University at Liberal, Missouri, after which he pursued a course of study in a commercial college. His father was a farmer in Missouri and was the secretary of the first county fair that was held in his county. For a time after leaving business college, Irving Barker worked as a farmer in Missouri, but he soon tired of the work. He then went to Tennessee where he engaged in the lumber business with considerable success. In 1905, he came to Indianapolis where for a time he followed the vocation of teaming. In 1913, having become dissatisfied with this means of earning a livelihood, he entered the retail coal business under the firm style of the I. A. Barker & Son. Such success attended his efforts in this new line of work that he has continued to engage in the business since that time. He has developed the firm, which now operates under the name of the Barker Coal & Block company and of which he is the virtual owner, to a point where it is rated as one of the most substantial concerns of its kind in the city of Indianapolis. This reputation is due directly to the efforts of the founder of the company who has won the name of one of Indianapolis' ablest executives through his achievement. May 10, 1894, Mr. Barker married Anna Palmer, and to this union have been born four children as follows: Lee, Harold, Dell and Irving.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Frank M. Dilling, prominent in the candy manufacturing business not only in Indianapolis but also throughout the United States, was born in Hagerstown, Indiana, March 31, 1867. He received his education in the public schools of his home community and then went to work on a farm when he had completed his educational career. For a time thereafter, he worked as a railroad section hand at one dollar and thirty cents a day, and then assisted his father in the management of the latter's drug store. He next learned the baker's trade but soon gave it up in favor of candy manufacturing. Like nearly all great men, he started in a very small way in 1887 by making butter scotch to be sold in the stores of his home town and in the surrounding villages. The almost universal approbation with which his efforts were attended encouraged him to seek a larger field, and he accordingly went to Marion, Indiana. There he began the manufacture of candy in a basement where he ate and slept as well as worked. The excellence of his product soon was acclaimed by the town and the business that started in a basement grew to one of the most successful enterprises in Marion by the end of the eighteen year period that Mr. Dilling spent there. At the end of that time, he came to Indianapolis where he established the Dilling Company for the manufacture of the candy that had become so well known in Marion and the vicinity. The success that had attended his venture in Marion was duplicated in Indianapolis where he and his associates have built up one of the largest candy manufacturing businesses in the country. The company has over four acres of floor space and land to the amount of twenty-two acres. The plant is one of the most complete in the United States, for it has a factory for the manufacture of its own paper boxes, a saw mill to cut the lumber for the shipping cases, and a well equipped printing plant. Three hundred and fifty people are employed, and every kind of candy is manufactured. Nine branch houses are maintained, they being located at the following places: Terre Haute; Vincennes; Newcastle; Muncie; Marion; Kokomo; South Bend; Decatur, Illinois; and Princeton, Indiana. Such a concern has not only won the reputation for its founder as one of the ablest executives in the city but has also contributed much to the commercial prestige of Indianapolis. Mr. Dilling was first married in 1889 and by this marriage he has two daughters, Mildred and Charlie. On July 30, 1914, he was again married, taking for his second wife, Mary D. Whipple. Fraternally, he is a member of the ScottishRite, the Shriners, Masons, and the Elks.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John F. Barnhill, M. D. Among the men prominently identified with the medical profession of Indianapolis few have gained so high a reputation for ability and fidelity as has Dr. John F. Barnhill, specialist in the treatment of the diseases of the ear, nose and throat, and of the surgery of the head and neck. Though not a native of Indiana, he is a scion in the fourth generation of the family in the commonwealth with whose annals the name has been identified since the early pioneer epoch. The lineage of the Barnhill family is traced back to ancient and patrician Irish stock and, more remotely, to Scottish origin. The only authentic family records, extending from 1691 to 1863, were retained long after the establishing of the line in America and were finally and, unfortunately, destroyed through the capricious enmity of the second wife of John Barnhill, who was the founder of the family in America. From this progenitor the next in line of descent to Doctor Barnhill was John Barnhill (II), who removed to North Carolina after his marriage and whose sons, Samuel and Robert, eventually removed to Kentucky. Robert Barnhill, the younger of these sons, married Sarah Morrison and they resided in Georgetown, Kentucky, for some time, finally removing thence to Butler county, Ohio, and later took up their residence in Indianapolis, Indiana. Their son Robert, grandfather of Doctor John F. Barnhill, was born in Kentucky and came with his father to Indianapolis in 1820. Here they purchased government lands and had the distinction of assisting in the erection of the first log cabin in the future capital of Indiana. The land which they purchased at that early date is now in very heart of the city. Robert Barnhill (II) married Jane Stoops, whose family was related by intermarriage with that of Ex-President Roosevelt. They became the parents of eight children and both continued to reside in Marion county, Indiana, until their death. He lived to the remarkable age of ninety-two years. Robert Barnhill (III), son of Robert and Jane (Stoops) Barnhill, was a native of Indianapolis and the major portion of his active career was devoted to agriculture.

His wife, whose maiden name was Angeline Shirts, was a native of Noblesville, Indiana, and her parents were numbered among the first settlers of that place. Robert Barnhill (III) subsequently moved to Flora, Illinois, but he later removed to Indiana and settled at the village of Nora, where he died in 1881. His wife survived him until 1907, when she also passed away. They were both members of the Christian Church and were frugal, enterprising and law-abiding people. They were the parents of eight children, namely: Henry, George, James, Nancy, Melissa, John F., Sarah and Charles. Doctor John F. Barnhill was born at Flora, Illinois, January 2, 1865, and was about two years of age when the family removed to Indiana. His educational advantages were those afforded by the public schools of Marion county and the Central Normal College, Danville, Indiana . For several years he engaged in teaching school, but soon after his graduation from the Union high school at Westfield in 1885, he began the study of medicine with Doctor H. S. Herr, of Cleveland, Ohio. Later he continued his studies under the preceptorship of the late Doctor Joseph Eastman of Indianapolis with whose hospital he was identified for three years, during which time he assisted in many notable operations, gaining much valuable clinical and technical experience. In 1888 Doctor Barnhill was graduated from the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons, Indianapolis, Indiana, and had the distinction of winning the faculty gold medal for the highest average scholarship. In the same year he passed a competitive examination for the position of interne in the Indianapolis City Hospital and was given the choice of place in that institution. His first year of active professional work was in connection with the Indianapolis City Dispensary, after which he located in Irvington, the college section of Indianapolis, where he continued in active and successful practice for eight years. In 1895 Doctor Barnhill decided to withdraw from the general practice of medicine, in order to devote his attention to the branches in which he had become especially interested. He passed the subsequent year in New York City and London in study, having passed six months in the New York Polyclinic, the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary, and six months in the Central London Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital. To further his education, Doctor Barnhill made a second trip abroad in 1899, where he took a course in operative ear diseases, under Doctor Jansen, a celebrated specialist of Berlin. He then went to Vienna, where he took a special course in ear diseases under Professor Adam Politzer. At various times since, Doctor Barnhill has studied in London, under Doctors Lennox, Browne and Dundas Grant. In 1900 Doctor Barnhill returned to Indianapolis, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, as specialist in affections of the ear, throat and nose, in which he is a recognized authority, being called upon for consultation by representative practitioners of the Central West. He has also accomplished much as a teacher and writer on medical subjects. For three years he was a lecturer in the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons; professor of physiology for several years, and from 1898 to 1905 he held the chair of diseases of the ear, and was also secretary of the college. In 1906 the State College of Physicians and Surgeons was organized and affiliated with Indiana University, and in this, the Indiana University School of Medicine, he accepted the chair of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. In 1923 he was elected to a professorship and head of the department of surgery of the head and neck, Indiana University. He is a member, and in 1903, was vice-president, of the Indianapolis Medical Society and is at present time president of this society (1924). He is also a member of the American Medical Association and the Indiana State Medical Society. From 1901 to 1903 he was secretary of the Section of Laryngology and Otology of the American Medical Association, and in 1903 was elected chairman of the same, acting as such at the Atlantic City meeting in 1904. He is a fellow of the American Society of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology; a fellow of the American Otological Society; fellow of the American Laryngological Society; a fellow of the Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology and of the Mississippi Valley Medical Association. He is the principal author of a complete text-book on diseases of the ear, as well as of monographs and many valuable papers pertaining to diseases of the ear, nose and throat. He is consultant in diseases of the ear, nose and throat at the, various hospitals of Indianapolis and has appeared before many county societies to lecture and exhibit specimens and drawings in order to further his plan of disseminating special knowledge of those organs among the members of the profession. Doctor Barnhill is essentially progressive and public-spirited as a citizen and, while all other interests have been subordinate to his devotion to his profession, he has not failed in any civic duties. He was married February 13, 1889, to Miss Celeste Terrell, of Lynchburg, Ohio, a daughter of Benjamin West Terrell and Asenath (Johnson) Terrell, the former of whom was a relative of the famous artist, Benjamin West. Mrs. Barnhill is a descendant of three of the distinguished patrician families of North Carolina and Virginia, the Wests, Stanleys and Tyrells, and is a woman of sterling qualities and much beauty of character. Both she and the doctor are members of the Meridian Street Methodist Episcopal Church and he is a Thirty-second degree Mason.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Harry Philip Bartlett, of the firm of Elmer E. Dunlap & company, of Indianapolis, is one of the skilled and efficient architects of this city who has gained distinction in his profession through his own efforts. He was born in Plainfield township, Will county, Illinois, in 1886, and is a son of Harry A. Bartlett and Elizabeth E. (Wertzbaugher) Bartlett. The father was also a native of Illinois, and was born on a farm in that state in 1865. The mother's birth occurred in October of the same year, and she was born on the same farm as that of her son, Harry P. Bartlett. Although the father died in 1897, when only thirty-two years of age, he had already made a name for himself in various fields of activity and was a man of marked inventive and initiative ability. A civil engineer by profession, he did valuable service as a surveyor on the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railroad, and was also connected with what is now the American Steel & Wire company. Interested in mechanics, he was so encouraged by being able to invent, in the early nineties, a machine that made more than one nail at a time, that he concentrated all of his time and efforts to invent a machine that would make four nails at once, and lived to succeed in this undertaking. To him and his wife were born two sons: Harry Philip and Robert Franklin, the latter of whom died in 1910. The paternal grandfather of Harry P. Bartlett settled in Illinois in 1820. He took up government land there and became prominently identified with early civic and political annals of that commonwealth. The Bartlett family dates back to the Colonial epoch in American history, and some of them have belonged to the state bodies of military defense. The maternal grandfather was also an early settler of Illinois, and was a farmer by occupation. Harry P. Bartlett obtained his education in the public schools of his native town, and soon after his graduation from the high school there in 1904, he began his business career. Having lost his father when eleven years of age, he has had to make his own way in the world since early boyhood, and his record is one of which he has a just right to be proud. By thrift and industry he accumulated sufficient means to enter Armour Institute, but his plans were interrupted soon afterward by a serious illness, and he was compelled to abandon his studies. He later went to live with an uncle on a farm, and for a time engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1906 he became associated with a firm of architects in Chicago, but subsequently went to Joliet, Illinois, and for five years was employed by different firms. Going then to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he worked for the Milwaukee Bridge company. Still later he returned to Chicago and was connected with different concerns, his object being to gain a varied experience. His labors took him to different cities, and he also had some experience in contract work for railroads and track elevation. In the spring of 1910 he came to Indianapolis and took a position with the Dunlap & Van Arman company, which later became Elmer E. Dunlap & company. He was placed in charge of the draughting department and rendered such efficient service in this connection that he was admitted to partnership in the firm in 1913, and has since been one on the active partners in this organization. He is a man of high ideals, a splendid organizer and is loyal and public spiritedĽ in all matters tending to the public good. As a member of the board of trustees of the Tenth Methodist Episcopal Church, he is active in all good work of that organization. He is also a member of the Oriental Chapel, S. R. M., of the Irvington Lodge F. & A. M. and Columbia Club. Mr. Bartlett was married August 31, 1910, to Miss Millicent I. Dixon, of Joliet, Illinois, a daughter of Samuel A. and Amelia (Chissus) Dixon, and to this union have been born three children: Robert D., Shirley E., and Ruth G.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Walter R. Beard. The history of the solid furniture house now owned and operated by Walter R. Beard, is one which shows the results of honorable dealing and good business judgment, through which its proprietor has been able to gain and retain an enviable position among the business men of Indianapolis. He was born at New Vienna, Ohio, December 1, 1865, and there he received his preliminary educational training, but completed his studies at Adrian College. His introduction to business life was gained through his association with A. J. Conroy & Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, and for two years he represented that concern as a traveling salesman. His faithful services in this connection led to his appointment as manager of the Indianapolis branch of the company, and he held this responsible position from 1887 until 1895, resigning from it to establish an agency for the handling of specialties. Subsequently he added other goods, and finally developed into a furniture dealer. His initial quarters, opposite the jail, soon proved too small for the business which developed rapidly, and he moved to North Delaware street. Still later he established himself in the Coblin Building where he remained until 1913 when once more removal was made necessary because of the need for additional floor space, and the present commodious quarters were secured where there is afforded 8,000 square feet for the display of the fine stock of furniture handled. His trade is a large one, and comes from discriminating people who recognize the value of the service he is rendering. That he is recognized to be a man of high principles and excellent judgment is shown in the fact that he has served on the grand jury. In addition to his furniture business he is president of the Castle Hall Association. During the construction of Castle Hall, all of the members of the association, including its officials, with the exception of the secretary, worked without remuneration, which display of public spirit resulted in the erection of a magnificent building at a low construction expense. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias, and Indianapolis Lodge Number 13, B. P. O. E. He also belongs to the Marion Club and the College Avenue Civic League. During the late war he was very active in behalf of local war work, and cherishes a medal bestowed upon him by the Government for his efforts in behalf of the Liberty Loans. He married Miss Cornelia Grace Platt of Niagara, Canada, and they became the parents of two children: Roan Platt, who died at the age of eighteen months; and Jeannette Platt. The Presbyterian church holds the membership of Mr. and Mrs. Beard.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Thomas J. Beasley, M. D.M, one of the foremost specialists in tuberculosis in Indianapolis as well as in the state of Indiana, was born in Valley Mills, Indiana, December 19, 1881. At the age of fifteen years, he removed to Indianapolis where he attended the Manual Training high school. With the outbreak of the Spanish-American War in 1898, he enlisted in the hospital department of the army. He was sent to the Philippines with his organization and served in that territory for thirty-three months. His experience in the medical corps of the army convinced him that he wanted to be a physician, and as soon as he was discharged from the army, he matriculated at Leland Stanford University, of San Francisco, in the College of Medicine. He studied there for a year and then returned to Indiana where he entered the medical department of Purdue University. From that institution he received his degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1907. Doctor Beasley claims the distinction of being the first doctor to open an outdoor sanitarium for the treatment of tuberculosis in the state of Indiana. This sanitarium was called the Rockwood Sanitarium, and since the opening of that institution, Doctor Beasley has specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. He has been very successful in the handling of the cases which have come under his care and he has come to be recognized as one of the most able physicians in Indianapolis in the treatment of this disease. On December 12, 1907, Doctor Beasley married Nellie Loomis and they have two children: Helen, aged eleven years; and Thomas J., Jr., aged six years. Doctor Beasley is a Mason and a member of the county, state, and American medical associations and of the National Association for the Study of Tuberculosis. He maintains offices at 427 Bankers Trust Building.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Raymond Cole Beeler, M. D., one of the foremost authorities in the use of the X-Ray in Indianapolis, was born in Charlestown, Clark county, Indiana, January 20, 1888. He was graduated from the Charlestown high school in 1905 after which he matriculated at Indiana University. He received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from that institution in 1910 and in the same year entered the Indiana University School of Medicine. He was graduated therefrom in 1912 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine and during the ensuing two years, he was an interne in the City Hospital. Wishing to have further study before going into active practice, he took post graduate work in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. When this work had been completed, he returned to Indianapolis to become associated with his uncle, Dr. Albert M. Cole. He had joined the medical reserve corps and when the war with Germany was declared he was called to the colors. He was first ordered to Cornell University with the X-Ray service, but soon after he was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison to be attached to Base Hospital 32. In December, 1917, his organization was sent to France and for eighteen months he served in that country with Base Hospital 32 in the advanced X-Ray section. In 1919, Dr. Beeler was returned to the United States with the 30th Division and received his discharge from the service in the same year. Following his discharge, he returned to Indianapolis and resumed his interrupted practice. He is considered to be one of the most skillful men in Indianapolis in the use of the X-Ray and he has gained such a reputation in that work that he has been placed in charge of the X-Ray departments of the Methodist and Robert Long Hospitals. He was further honored by being called to fill the chair of Roentgenology in the Indiana University School of Medicine, and as professor of that subject has won marked success. Doctor Beeler maintains offices at 712 Hume-Mansur Building. In 1915, Doctor Beeler married Myra Watson, of Rensselaer, Indiana, and they have one son John Watson who was born July 2, 1921. Doctor Beeler is a member of the county, state, and American medical associations, the Roentgen Ray society, and the Radiological Society of North America, the Phi Rho Sigma professional medical fraternity, and the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity. He also holds membership in the Indianapolis Athletic Club and in Posts 26 and 42 of the American Legion.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Albert F. Bernd, head of the Peter Bernd & Son, company, wagon manufacturers, was born in Indianapolis, October 15, 1882, the son of Peter and Catherine (Thomas) Bernd. The parents of our subject were born in Germany, whence they immigrated and located at Indianapolis in 1873. Two years later the father established the firm of Bernd Brothers in partnership with George Bernd for the purpose of manufacturing wagons. The firm continued successfully with an ever increasing volume of business and a later reorganization of the company was made when Daniel Bernd was taken into partnership. In 1904 the existing partnership was dissolved, and at that time, Albert F. Bernd, who had completed his education in the graded and Manual Training high schools of Indianapolis by that time, entered the firm with his father, the company assuming the firm style of Peter Bernd & Son. This partnership continued until November 26, 1921, when the death of Peter Bernd occurred. The mother is still living. The founder of the firm had never cared to enter political or club activities, devoting all of his time to his family and to his business. Although the firm still continues under the same name, Catherine Bernd and Albert F. Bernd have assumed ownership of it. Wagons are still manufactured by the company, but in these days of automotive transportation, wagons are in comparatively small demand. The firm devotes most of its attention, therefore, to the construction of truck bodies, and in this line of work, it has gained a reputation for the excellence of its product that is unexcelled. Twelve men are employed in the plant which has a floor space of ten thousand square feet. Under the direction of Mr. Bernd, the company has come to be recognized as one of the most substantial firms in Indianapolis where it has played a prominent figure in commercial circles for such a long time. On September 21, 1910, Mr. Bernd was united in marriage with Laura Lanz, of Bloomington, Illinois, and to this union have been born two children, Robert Thomas and Dorothy Margaret. Mr. Bernd is a valued and popular member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Athenaeum, and the Hoosier Motor Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924