Albert A. Hollingsworth, M.D. One of the busy physicians of Indiana, Dr. Albert A. Hollingsworth also bears the reputation of being one of the most capable, and during nearly a score of years in which he has been a resident of Indianapolis has built up a large and representative professional business, while at the same time finding leisure and opportunity to engage in such movements as prove attractive to citizens who have the public welfare at heart. Doctor Hollingsworth was born at Plainfield, Indiana, August 7, 1879, and received his early education there. Following his graduation from high school he spent three years at Butler College, and then enrolled as a student of the Indiana Medical College, from which he graduated with the class of 1905, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Immediately he settled down to the practice of his profession, in which he has been active to the present, now having offices at 4119 East Washington street. Sincerely devoted to the work of his calling, he has won much success therein, and has the respect of his fellow practitioners and the confidence and gratitude of his many patients. Doctor Hollingsworth belongs to the American Medical Association, the Indiana State Medical Society and the Marion County Medical Society, belonging also to the Sigma Chi college fraternity and the Phi Chi medical fraternity, and being a Thirty-second Degree Mason and Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is the owner of one of the city's beautiful homes. In 1905 Doctor Hollingsworth married Miss Laura Williams, of Greencastle, Indiana, and to this union there have been born two children: Harold, aged sixteen years, a senior in the Technical high school; and Hilda, aged fourteen years, a junior in the same school.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Jerome Earl Holman, M. D. Both as a physician and citizen, Dr. Jerome Earl Holman of Indianapolis measures up to the highest ideals, and the large practice he is enjoying is but his just reward for he has honestly earned it. He is a carefully trained professional man, and is never backward in tendering his services in behalf of the public welfare. Born in Grant county, city of Marion, Indiana, August 5, 1888, his interest is centered here, and here he has attained his present high standing. The public schools of Grant county, this state, gave him his preliminary training, and, after a year of teaching, he entered the Marion Normal College to pursue his studies further. He was graduated from the teachers training department of that institution in 1906, and for the subsequent four years taught school in order to earn the money to fit himself for a professional career. In 1909 he was graduated from the scientific department of the normal college with the degree of Bachelor of Science, and in 1914, was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine from the Eclectic College of Medicine, of Cincinnati, Ohio. He was house physician at St. Mary's Hospital and an interne at Seton Hospital, both of Cincinnati. His connection with the medical fraternity of Indianapolis dates back to July, 1915, when he established himself in practice at 3315 East Tenth street, and here he has since continued. He also has an office at 523 Bankers Trust Building. During the late war he served as chief examining physician of the Premier Motors company and as a member of the Marion County Examining Board, arid these duties, in addition to his large general practice, entailed much strenuous effort. For some years he has been an active member of the Marion County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Well-known in Masonry, he has advanced through the Scottish Rite in the Council and the York Rite in the Chapter, and also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Optimist Club, the Hoosier Motor Club and the Hoosier Athletic Club also hold his membership. Doctor Holman was married September 7, 1910 to Roxie I. Newson, of Grant county, Indiana, and they have two children: Jerome Earl, Jr., and Rosalie Lucile.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Hon. Martin M. Hugg stands as a worthy example of that element of aggressive and judicious citizens of Indianapolis who have contributed so much to the civic and material advancement of their city and state during the past half century. He has maintained his home in this city for sixty-six years, has gained distinction as a lawyer, commands high esteem, and is numbered among the thorough representative citizens of the community. He has not only achieved success in his profession, but at all times his career has been loyal, and during the many years of his residence here he has wielded definite and benignant influence both as a citizen and as a man of splendid professional ability. Mr. Hugg was born in Indianapolis, March 17, 1858, and obtained his early education in the public schools of this city. His natural predilection being toward that of the legal profession, he entered the University of Michigan, and graduated from the Law School of that institution in 1879. For a time he then read law in the law office of McMaster & Boice, at Indianapolis, and from 1882 to 1885 he was employed as a clerk in the law office of John M. Judah. He then established himself in the practice of his profession, and was appointed by Prosecuting Attorney W. N. Harding as deputy prosecutor in charge of police court cases, and filled this position with efficiency and fidelity until November 1886. In December 1886 Mr. Hugg became associated in the practice of law with Joseph B. Kealing under the firm name of Kealing & Hugg. This alliance still continues and the firm is recognized as one of the strongest and most successful law organizations in the state. From the time of attaining his legal majority Mr. Hugg has been unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican party, in whose cause he has rendered most efficient service. In 1896 he was nominated as his party's candidate for state senator, and was elected, securing at the polls a majority that well indicated the strong hold he has ever maintained upon popular confidence and esteem in his native state. In March 1901, Mr. Hugg was elected county attorney of Marion county and served in that capacity for four years. In 1904 he was again nominated and elected state senator and served during the sessions of the general assembly in 1905 and 1907. In other capacities too, Mr. Hugg has filled numerous positions of trust and honor, and it may be said of him that he never shrank from a duty or proved false to a trust. His strong convictions regarding right and wrong; his opposition to a course which he deems inimical to the best interests of the country and his fearlessness of criticism or public opinion when he believes he is right, are traits which make him a powerful factor in the furtherance of any measure which has for its aim the advancement of the people and the betterment of existing conditions. Thoroughly appreciative of his native city, Mr. Hugg is also loyal and public spirited in his civic attitude, and gives generously of his time and means to charitable movements and all matters tending to the public good. He is prominent in both professional and social circles and is recognized as a man of high ideals. He holds membership in the Columbia Club and Indianapolis Athletic Club and is a Scottish Rite and Knight Templar Mason and a Shriner.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


James H. Hughes. For more than a quarter of a century, James H. Hughes, a representative business man of Indianapolis, has been identified with the Prudential Life Insurance company, one of the strongest old line insurance organizations of the country. He is a native of Indiana, born at New Albany in Floyd county, February 24, 1863, son of Henry and Ann (Glancy) Hughes, both of whom were born in Ireland and came to the United States before marriage. James H. Hughes attended school at New Albany and after graduating from the Parochial school, went to work in the DePauw Glass works and continued there until he mastered the trade and after engaging in various other occupations he took up the life insurance business in May, 1895, in which he had thorough training until promotion well deserved came to him, when he was transferred by the officials of the Prudential Life Insurance company to Indianapolis as their superintendent in this territory in April, 1902. It is a very responsible post, with numerous agents and constantly increasing business. March 26, 1886, he married Miss Laura B. Hamilton, born in Kentucky but reared at New Albany. They have two children: Charles Edgar and Mrs. Mary E. Mansfield. He belongs to the Commercial and Columbia clubs.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William F. Hughes, M. D., a prominent and successful oculist of Indianapolis, was born in Owen county, Indiana, August 11, 1871. He attended the graded and high schools of his native county and then entered the Indiana State Normal. In due time he was graduated therefrom and for three years taught school part of the time serving as the principal of the Spencer, Indiana, high school. By that time he had decided that he wished to study medicine and accordingly matriculated at Indiana University School of Medicine. He was graduated from that institution in 1902 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine and for a year served as an interne in the City Hospital. He then took up the active practice of his profession specializing in work on the eye. He has gained an enviable reputation among the people of Indianapolis and among his colleagues for the work which he has done. Through the reputation that he has gained he was honored by being made a member of the faculty of the Indiana University School of Medicine and he still retains that position, his efforts in that institution having been attended with signal success. Doctor. Hughes is a member of the staffs of the City and the Methodist hospitals. He maintains offices at 401 Hume-Mansur building. In 1904, he married Alta O. Rentschler, of Patricksburg, Owen county, Indiana. There are three children: Mary Esther, a student in the Shortridge high school; William F., Jr.; and Richard R. Doctor Hughes is a member of the county, state and American medical associations, the Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, and the Nu Sigma Nu professional medical fraternity. He is a Mason and affiliates with the Methodist Episcopal Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Charles H. Hurd has the distinction of being one of the engineers of Indianapolis whose name is associated with some of the most important construction work of this region, in which he has displayed a thorough knowledge of his profession, and accomplished results which speak for themselves. He was born at Rochester, New York, December 11, 1872, son of Franklin and Elizabeth A. (Sharp) Hurd, and grandson of Asa Hurd, a native of Massachusetts. Mr. Hurd comes from a lineage of civil engineers and millers. The records of surveys of land and water grants and original mill stones now preserved at various locations throughout New England, bear witness to the ability and industry of these ancestors. The family of the great-grandfather of Charles H. Hurd of this review settled near the site of the present city of Rochester immediately following the Revolutionary War and the beginning of the last century found them operating one of the first flour mills to be built in western New York. The grandfather, Asa Hurd, born September 18, 1790, served in the War of 1812 under Captain Frederick Rowe. In 1821 Asa Hurd married Louisa Stowell, of Vermont. Twelve children were born to this marriage, all of whom are now deceased, both paternal grandparents passed away before Charles H. Hurd was three years old. The maternal grandfather, John A. Sharp, born January 19, 1811, was a fisherman and boat builder, and a native of Columbia county, New York. In 1837 he married Sarah Whitbeck, and with several "down east" families, mostly relatives, migrated to the shore of Lake Ontario, on Irondequoit Bay just east of Rochester and later removed to Wolcott, New York. Two sons and four daughters were born to John A. and Sarah Sharp, Mrs. Franklin Hurd and one son being the only survivors. Franklin Hurd was born in New York, January 18, 1840, and his widow was born in the same state, March 28, 1842. He died August 8, 1918, being the last of the children of his parents to pass away. Franklin Hurd was by occupation a farmer and fruit grower. He was not a politician, but supported the candidates and principles of the Republican party. Throughout his life he was a lover of nature and the out-of-doors, remaining remarkably active up to the time of his death. During the Civil War he served in the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery, and as the result received a gunshot wound in his right hand in the Battle of the Wilderness. Two sons and a daughter were born to Franklin and Elizabeth Hurd, John A., who died April 16, 1918, Charles H., and Nellie M., who is Mrs. Fred P. Fitch of Rochester, New York. Growing up on his father's farm Charles H. Hurd attended the country schools and the Leavenworth Institute at Wolcott, New York. In 1895 he entered Cascadilla School (Ithaca) preparatory to Cornell University. A few months after matriculating in the university, he was taken seriously ill, and it became necessary to refrain from consecutive study for more than a year. When his strength was regained he first took a summer course at the University of Chicago, later he entered regularly in that institution, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Science in the same year as his original class at Cornell. His training in physical science equipped him particularly for engineering work, and in the autumn of 1901 he was elected professor of experimental engineering at the Armour Institute of Technology, which position he held for two years. In 1903 he was promoted to consulting engineer for Armour and company, in charge of new construction. Following this employment he accepted a professorship at the University of Illinois in the department of applied hydraulics and mechanics, but left that institution in 1906 to engage in general engineering. One of his first important connections was with the Indianapolis Water company in the construction of their present plant. After an absence of a year, in 1906, he re-entered the employ of this company, first as chief engineer and later its vice-president, resigning in 1917. During this period he was instrumental in developing and enlarging the scope and usefulness of this utility, carrying on a construction program involving millions of dollars. While he was accomplishing much as an executive of the Indianapolis Water company, he still maintained an interest in general engineering and was called upon to act in an advisory capacity for other utilities and municipalities. During the late War he rendered valuable service in the sanitary engineering division and following its close, he has given attention to sanitary investigations and surveys, involving water supplies and disposal of sewage wastes for many of the larger American cities. In 1919 he was employed by the Board of Sanitary Commissioners of Indianapolis, as consulting engineer. Since that date he has given his time largely to the design and building of the sewage disposal plant for the Sanitary District of Indianapolis, which when completed, will be one of the largest of its kind and type. Throughout his university career, both as student and instructor, Charles H. Hurd was known to have an analytic mind, capable of solving many of the intricate problems in physical science. His work in engineering has included much scientific research and is conspicuous for its originality; his accomplishments are outstanding landmarks in the field of hydraulics and sanitary science. In politics, Mr. Hurd is Republican. The First Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis holds his membership. Professionally he belongs to the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Association of National Engineering Societies, the American Water Works Association and the American Public Health Association, and is a fellow of the latter. He has been honored by many of the American and foreign scientific societies and institutions; but is not a member of any secret society. June 14, 1899 he was married to Mary E., daughter of Edwin B. and Ida M. (Tinklepaugh) Dowd, of New York, a girl and woman of most lovable character. Mrs. Hurd died in Indianapolis, August 8, 1921, leaving two children: Edwin Charles, who is attending the College of Engineering at Cornell University, and Elizabeth, a student at Shortridge high school, Indianapolis.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Hupp & Hupp, chiropractors, with offices at 5436 East Washington street, are numbered among the most able practitioners of their science in Indianapolis . The firm is composed of Arthur C. Hupp, D. C. and Ph. C., and his wife, Cora I. Hupp, D. C. and Ph. C. Dr. A. C. Hupp was born near Bluffton, Indiana, and he attended the public schools of both Indiana and Illinois. His professional training was acquired at the Palmer School of Chiropractic at Davenport; Iowa, from which institution he was graduated in 1920, and he at once began the practice of his profession at Cincinnati, Ohio. In January, 1922 he and his wife came to Indianapolis, and opened their present offices. They belong to the National Chiropractic Association, the Indiana Chiropractic Association, and the Ohio Branch of the National Chiropractic Association. He belongs to the Masonic order and to the Knights of Pythias. In 1920 he was married to Mrs. Cora I. (Walker) Seaman, a widow with one daughter, Carol Seaman, now thirteen years old. Mrs. Hupp was born in Will county, Illinois. She is a direct descendant of Franklin Pierce, former president of the United States and first attended school at Marseilles that state. Later she attended the DeKalb County Normal School, and subsequently the Kingston, Illinois, high school, from which she was graduated. She also took electrical vibratory special courses under Dr. Anna and Alvin Allguire of Belvidere, Illinois. In 1920 she, too, was graduated from the Palmer School of Chiropractic, and has since then been associated with her husband in practice. Her first husband, the late Charles H. Seaman, of Seymour, Indiana, was born at Indianapolis, and his death occurred at Cincinnati, Ohio, November 15, 1918. For some years prior to his demise he had been accounted one of the successful business men of Cincinnati, and was the founder of the Seaman company, of which Mrs. Hupp is a large stockholder and manager. Mr. Seaman was a member of the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. His business connections led him to unite with, the Business Men's Exchange and the Real Estate Exchange, and he was interested, to a large extent, in realty transaction's.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Edgar Updyke, who is well known in the automotive industry as the sales agent for, the Stutz Motor Car company in Indiana, was born in Front Royal, Virginia, April 5, 1882, the son of Thomas and Mollie (Beaus) Updyke, both natives of Virginia, the former having been born in Warren county and the latter in Lowden county. Edgar Updyke was educated in the country school of his home community and then worked on the home farm until he had attained his twenty-first year. His father was a farmer and dealer in mules and our subject was delegated to accompany a consignment of the animals to their destination. Mr. Updyke came to Indianapolis practically penniless but he soon secured employment as a collector with the Boyd Investment company, receiving three dollars per week as the remuneration for his services. He remained with this company for three years, and with the advent of the automobile industry he decided that he would find congenial employment in such work. For two years thereafter he worked on Massachusetts avenue, learning to be an automobile salesman during his spare hours at night. On his first trip out as a representative of the company for which he worked, he sold a car to Mr. Block of the L. Strauss company. When he was leaving the office to demonstrate the car to Mr. Block, he had an accident that demolished the automobile. The firm, however decided to give him another chance. He sold a second car, but this, too, he wrecked. He struggled along until 1908 when he secured employment with the Conduit Motor company, continuing with that firm until 1910. In that year, he became associated with the American Motor company and held that position until 1914. He then went on the road for the Stutz Motor Car company, and in this work he at last found that he could make a success of life. With the help of his wife, he exercised the utmost economy so that he might save enough to go into business for himself. His first business venture for himself was a deal in second hand cars that netted him one hundred dollars, and with this start he gradually built up a fairly remunerative business. In 1915, he at last got into the automobile business in the right way taking the sales agency for the Locomobile and used cars. In 1916 he took the district agency for the Stutz automobile and was the president of the StutzUpdyke Sales company until 1918. At that time he gave up his business to enter the service of his country in the World War, but with the signing of the Armistice, he returned to Indianapolis in 1919 as the sales agent for the Mercer, Daniels, and Locomobile automobiles, continuing to handle these cars until December, 1922. He then took over the Stutz agency and has continued to distribute that car with great success. The Updyke Auto company is rated as one of the successful and most substantial firms in the city of Indianapolis handling the, Stutz, Rolls-Royce and McFarlan cars. This success has been won through the ability of Mr. Updyke and his perseverance in the face of innumerable disappointments, yet he considers his success as due to the excellent quality of the car which he handles and to the co-operation of the citizens of Indianapolis. February 16, 1910, he married Merle Reif, the daughter of Fred A. Reif, of Indianapolis. Mrs. Updyke has been a material aid to her husband ,giving him her encouragement and assistance in times of need. They are members of the Christian Church. and Mr. Updyke holds membership in the Columbia Club and the Indianapolis Athletic Club.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Harry Ioor, D. C. and Ph. C. The profession of Chiropractic is attracting to it more and more attention, not only because of the excellent work accomplished in healing, but also on account of the character of the men belonging to it, who, by reason of their ability and standing, have added to its prestige, and won for it full consideration at the hands of the general public. One of the chiropractors, whose practice is constantly on the increase, Harry Ioor, D. C. and Ph. C., of Indianapolis, is a man who measures up to the highest ethics of his calling. He was born in this city, April 24, 1883, son of Charles J. Ioor, a native of Louisiana, and his wife, Emma, daughter of William and Theresa Henschen, the former born in 1833, and the latter born at Amsterdam, Holland, in 1839. William Henschen came to Indianapolis in 1842, and his wife was brought to the city when a child, and it was here that their daughter, Emma, was born. The grandmother still survives at the age of eighty-five years, but the grandfather died in November 1923 at the age of eighty-nine years. During his active years he was a hardware merchant. Charles J. Ioor located in Indianapolis in 1876, was married here, and here he is still engaged in merchandising. The Ioor family is of Huguenot-French ancestry, and was established in the American Colonies to escape persecution on account of religious belief. This is the only family of the name in the United States, if not in the world at the present time. Settlement was originally made in Georgia, and the family so prospered that at the time of the outbreak of the American Revolution the paternal great-grandfather of Doctor Ioor was a man of large means. He patriotically placed his wealth at the disposal of the struggling colonists during that conflict, and it is estimated that his contributions amounted to $50,000, which was a fortune of moment in those early days. Doctor Ioor was reared in Indianapolis, and was graduated from Manual Training high school in 1900, and then spent five years traveling in the west, in this connection gaining an experience he later found very valuable to him while serving as a reporter on the Indianapolis Sun, now the Times, and as special correspondent of the St. Louis GlobeDemocrat, the Chicago American and the New York Herald. Taking up the study of chiropractic he was graduated in 1922 from the Palmer School of Chiropractic, and is now actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a member of the several associations of his profession, is an X-ray Technician and Spineographer. The only adult male member of the Ioor family, Doctor Ioor is proud of the distinction of belonging to it, and of its history in connection with that of America. He is unmarried.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Gustavus Brown Jackson, M. D. Both as a medical practitioner and citizen, Dr. Gustavus Brown Jackson is one of the well known figures in the life of Indianapolis, and during the late war he served his country in France. He was born in Daviess county, Kentucky, October 15, 1877, and attended the public schools of his home locality, graduating from the Owensboro, Kentucky, high school. Subsequently he was a student of the University of Virginia, and still later of Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois, and was graduated from the last named in 1902, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For two years he was interne at Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, and then, for eighteen months traveled abroad, studying in Berlin, Germany. In October, 1905, he returned home, and located permanently at Indianapolis, where he has specialized in gynecology and obstetrics, and is instructor of the latter science in the Medical School of the University. Professionally he maintains membership with the Marion County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, and the American College of Surgeons. A Mason he has been advanced in the various bodies of the Scottish Rite through the Thirty-second degree. He belongs to the Indianapolis Athletic Club. In November, 1905, he was married to Miss Lena Bentley, of Syracuse, New York, and they have three children: Jeanette Alice, who is a senior in the Shortridge high school; Mildred Glover, who is also attending Shortridge high school; and Gustavus Brown, Jr., who is attending the grade schools . Doctor Jackson belongs to the Presbyterian Church. In April, 1917, he entered the Medical Reserve Corps of the United States army, andĽ served until September, 1919, when he was honorably discharged with the rank of Major. He was in France and also in Germany as a member of the Army of Occupation, and now holds the rank of Major of the United States Medical Reserve Corps.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Elias J. Jacoby, Vice-President and Attorney of The Railroadmen's Building and Savings Association, a lawyer of substantial reputation and one of the best known fraternalists in Indiana, whose home is in Indianapolis, was born on a farm near Marion, Ohio, January 18, 1855. As a lad he went to the country schools in the vicinity of his home and when eighteen years of age began teaching. In this way and with his work upon the farm he was enabled to complete a course at the Ohio Business College, Delaware, Ohio. This was followed by a four years course at the Ohio Wesleyan University from which he was graduated in 1881 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and that university conferred upon him in 1887 the degree of Master of Arts. On May 30, 1883, immediately following his graduation from law school of Cincinnati College, with the degree of LL. B., he was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio and the United States Court for the Southern District of Ohio. Immediately following his admission, he located in Indianapolis, on invitation of Mr. Charles W. Fairbanks, later U. S. Senator and Vice-President of the United States, with whom Mr. Jacoby was associated continuously, until January 1, 1900. In 1884 he became Assistant General Attorney of the Indiana, Bloomington and Western Railway company and its allied lines of which Mr. Fairbanks was General Attorney, and continued as such until those lines merged into what is now the New York Central Railway in 1892. From 1888 until 1893 he was General Solicitor (being General Attorney) of The Terre Haute and Peoria Railway company at the end of which period that line was merged with the Pennsylvania line. From the spring of 1890 to January 1, 1900, he was connected with manufacturing interests in Springfield, Ohio, and was president of two such companies from 1895 until 1900. He was a director of the C. H. and D. Railway company, (Indiana Division) from 1892 until 1905 and was its local attorney in Indianapolis for the most of that period. He was State Trustee in all the C. H. and D. mortgages until they were taken up in 1907. He was one of the original organizers of the Railroadmen's Building and Savings Association and has been its only attorney from August, 1887, when it was organized, to the present time and has been also vice-president of that Association since the death of Mr. Mansfield, about seventeen years ago. Mr. Jacoby has been very active in the Masonic fraternity and the Order of the Mystic Shrine. He was High Priest of Keystone chapter, R. A. M.; Illustrious Master of Indianapolis Council, No.2, R. and S. M.; Eminent Commander of Raper Commandery, Knights Templar. He served as Illustrious Potentate of Murat Temple Of the Mystic Shrine from December, 1906, to December, 1912, and served ten years through the official line of the Imperial Council of the Mystic Shrine for North America and was Imperial Potentate of that body from June, 1918 to June, 1919, and presided as such officer at the session held in Indianapolis, June 1919. Since he retired as Imperial Potentate, he has been continuously serving on important committees in the Imperial Council. He was the Charter Viceroy or second officer of St. James Conclave, No. 16, Knights of The Red Cross of Constantine in Indianapolis, the only Conclave in the state, and served as such four years, and followed that service four years as Grand Sovereign, or first officer of that Conclave. For eight years he served in various offices of the Grand Imperial Council of the Red Cross of Constantine for the United States and in the natural course became the Grand Sovereign of that body in June, 1924. In his earlier years, Mr. Jacoby was in politics a Democrat, but in 1896, during the free silver agitation, he affiliated with the Republican party and has remained with that party ever since. For many years he was a member of most of the leading Indianapolis clubs but in the last few years has ceased to be active in them. On June 12, 1884, Mr. Jacoby was married to his former college classmate, Miss Julia L. Eaton, at Delaware, Ohio, and has one daughter, Miss Helen Eaton Jacoby, who was graduated from the University of Chicago with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. This daughter is an artist of more than passing note, whose work has called forth much commendation.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Parker H. James, who occupies a position of importance in business circles at Indianapolis, as president and general manager of the Indianapolis Glass company, has been identified with substantial business concerns ever since leaving school. He was born at, Williamsport, Wayne county, Indiana, July 18, 1892, son of William P. and Mary E. James, and has two brothers, William A. and Frederick R., of Indianapolis. The father of Mr. James was born in Ohio, came to Indiana in early manhood, and for a number of years was in business as a manufacturer of beverages. Later he located at Hoopeston, Illinois, and his death occurred there in 1908. He was active in Democratic political circles. The mother of Mr. James survives and resides at Indianapolis. After his public school course, Parker H. James completed a college preparatory course, afterward attended a business college, and when but seventeen years old was engaged to teach penmanship in Grand Prairie Seminary at Onarga, Illinois. When he retired from that position, he accepted one as traveling salesman, for two years representing the Kirk Soap company, later being connected in a sales capacity with the Manhattan Soap company. Having met with success as a salesman, when he reached his twenty-first year, Mr. James felt encouraged to embark in a business of his own, at Mitchell, Indiana, but seven months later discontinued it in order to accept a promising position in, the sales department of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass company. He remained with that corporation for seven years, enjoying promotion from time to time and, in 1919 was made resident manager in recognition of unusual business capacity. In June, 1920, in association with H. H. Woodsall, he organized the Indianapolis Glass company, of which he continues president and general manager, Mr. Woodsall being its secretray and treasurer. They have a well equipped plant and do business over a wide territory. This is the second enterprise of its kind to be established here and its outlook is bright. In political life Mr. James is a Republican. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, Indianapolis Athletic Club and is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Presbyterian Church. March 1, 1917, he married Doris M., daughter of C. L. and Laura Underwood, of St. Louis, Missouri.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Frank P. Johnson, who is known throughout the country as one of the most successful men in the poultry breeding business, was born January 14, 1850, in a log cabin which stood at the corner of Illinois and Forty-eighth streets in Indianapolis. Jeremiah Johnson, the great-grandfather of our subject, was of Scotch-Irish descent coming to this country in the early part of the eighteenth century to settle in Virginia. He then removed to Kentucky and after a time came to Franklin county, Indiana, to conduct a crossroads blacksmith shop at Andersonville. When the capital was changed to Indianapolis, he came to this city where he entered several sections of land; one for his son John which is now occupied by the fairgrounds, one tract for his son Thomas located east of the present Morton Place, and a third adjoining the latter on the north for, his son Jeremiah. Two sections of land on Eagle Creek he entered for his two daughters, who married two brothers named Harding. When he returned home and told of the land he had pre-empted, the family was angry with him for spending his hard-earned money for apparently worthless land. In 1822, two years later, he brought his family to Indianapolis and took possession of the land which he had secured. John Johnson, the grandfather of our subject came to Indianapolis at the same time. The eldest son of John Johnson was Oliver who was born in Franklin county in 1821. In 1843 he was united in marriage with Pamelia Howland by the Reverend Henry Ward Beecher. Pamelia Howland was the daughter of Powell Howland who was born in Saratoga, New York, in 1799. In 1839, he came to Marion county, Indiana, and purchased the farm of Benjamin Purcell on the Noblesville road. He was elected county commissioner and was chosen to represent the county in the State Legislature. He was the first in his neighborhood to propose the construction of a schoolhouse and he donated a half acre of his own land for this purpose . Frank P. Johnson received his early education in Washington Township school No.6, which was built in 1855 and is still intact, being now in use as a garage at the home of one of the brothers of Mr. Johnson. Mr. Johnson attended the Ebenezer Union Sunday school on the Millersville road near the cemetery in which all of his ancestors are buried. Attaining man's estate, he decided to follow farming in which he has since been continuously engaged. The expansion of the city has crowded him off two of his farms. When he was only eight years of age, his grandfather imported some Shanghai chickens, the first thoroughbred poultry to be imported into the county. Some of these chickens he gave to Mr. Johnson, and since that time he has been engaged in breeding fancy poultry. He is believed to be the oldest actual breeder of thoroughbred chickens now living. For fifty years, Mr. Johnson has specialized in the breeding of Light Brahmas, and the success with which he has met in the work is attested by the number of honors that he has won. He has exhibited all over the country and he and his wife have travelled over the entire United States and a few years ago they took a trip to Alaska. For twenty years, Mr. Johnson has won first place for having the best display in Chicago. He has won several national cups, medals and ribbons. He won the Ford cup at Baltimore, which was offered by Charles F. Ford, the son of the owner of the theater in which Lincoln was shot, and the prize winner in this show he named Lady Ford. Mr. Johnson first exhibited at the Indiana State Fair In 1869 and since that time he has been a constant exhibitor making him the oldest, it is thought, in the country. Mr. Johnson married Georgia Pursel, of Tuscola, Illinois, the daughter of Thomas Pursel, and to this union have been born two sons, Howard and Francis H. Mrs. Johnson was born at Metamora, Indiana, October 31, 1852. They were married November 14, 1871 and when they celebrated their golden wedding in 1921 over two hundred and fifty friends attended. Howard Johnson was born May 22, 1873, and on his twenty-first birthday married Minnie C. Fessler, of Indianapolis. To them were born a son and a daughter, Franklin Fessler Johnson and Alice Pamelia, the former of whom married Helen Morris in June, 1920, and was the father of one daughter, Virginia Alice, who died at the age of two years. Francis H. Johnson, was born August 8, 1876, and married Georgia Farmer of Indianapolis, who died in 1909 leaving one son Robert H. In 1911 he married Eleanor Johnson and they have one daughter Eleanor Jane, who is a student in the high school. Mr. Johnson is a life member of The American Poultry Association, the largest live stock organization in the world, the Indiana State Association and the United Brahma club. He has shipped birds to all parts of the United States and Canada and is now sending a trio of birds to Barcelona for the World's Poultry Show, being one of two breeders chosen to represent the United States at that exposition. Mr. Johnson is now one of the few pioneers left. He did his first farming with an ox team and he and his brother one year hauled their entire crop of wheat with an ox team a distance of eight miles to the old Carlisle mill in Indianapolis from the home farm.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Colonel John T. Barnett, who is actively identified with the real estate, loan and insurance business of Indianapolis is a scion of prominent old established American families which date back to the colonial epoch in our nation's history, and his career is one that reflects honor upon his native state. He was born three miles west of Danville, in Hendricks county, Indiana, September 2, 1851, a son of William and Nancy (Buchanan) Barnett, and comes, of most honorable and distinguished ancestry. His mother was a direct descendant of George Buchanan, eminent as a Scotch scholar, historian and poet. Colonel Barnett's maternal great-grandfather, Alexander Buchanan, was born in Scotland, a member of the old Buchanan Clan, and on emigrating to America became identified with the colonial cause in the war for independence and saw active service in a New Jersey regiment throughout the Revolutionary War. Colonel Barnett's father was a native of Virginia. The record of the family there begins with John Barnett, who died about the beginning of the Revolutionary War. His son James, grandfather of Colonel Barnett, moved to Kentucky in 1808, and died in Shelby county, that state. William Barnett, father of Colonel Barnett, came to Indiana in 1833 and was a pioneer in Hendricks county, where he acquired land from the government, and it was on that farm that Colonel Barnett was born. William Barnett was unusually well educated for his time and was a teacher as well as a farmer. He gave each of his children the best obtainable educational advantages and did much for the general cause of educational enlightenment in his community. He was also active in civic affairs and was recognized as a man of high ideals. Colonel Barnett has the distinction of being the first Hendricks county boy to graduate from the United States Military Academy at West Point and he saw much active service as an officer of the regular United States Army in the far west when that section of the country needed the constant vigilance and protection of the military forces. He also has the distinction of being the second man of Hendricks county to command a regiment in a war, and was the only Democratic Colonel in the Spanish-American War from the state of Indiana. As a boy Colonel Barnett attended the public schools of his community and also the old Danville Academy, after which he engaged in teaching for a time. In 1871 he matriculated at Asbury, now DePauw University, and as a member of the class of 1875, completed his freshman year in that institution. About that time upon the recommendation of General John Coburn, then a congressman from his district, he was appointed to a cadetship in the United States Military Academy at West Point. Entering the Academy in June, 1873, he graduated in June 1878, although his course had been interrupted for a year on account of serious illness from typhoid fever. On his graduation he was assigned as Second Lieutenant in the Fifth United States Cavalry. After his leave of absence he joined his regiment October 1, 1878, at Fort D. A. Russell; near Cheyenne, Wyoming, and it will serve to indicate the period in which his military services were rendered when it is recalled that only two years before his graduation had occurred the tragedy of the Custer massacre in the northwest, and for nearly a decade thereafter there was more or less constant danger of Indian uprising. In addition to this special service the United States troops were kept almost constantly on duty as a primary source of law and order in territories and domains where white settlers were just beginning and where the conditions of the border still prevailed. Colonel Barnett was an active officer in the regular United States Army for nine years, and was stationed at various posts and on detached duty both in Wyoming and Texas. On account of disability incurred in the line of duty he was compelled to retire in 1886, and his name has since been on the retired list of the United States Army. On leaving the army Colonel Barnett located at Danville, Indiana, but in 1893 removed to Indianapolis. In 1894 he became principal owner, president and manager of the Barnett Hardware company, at Piqua, Ohio, which he successfully conducted until 1899, when he disposed of his interests in that enterprise and returned to Indianapolis. Here he was engaged in the pharmaceutical business until forced to give it up on account of ill health. Later he engaged in the real estate loan and insurance business, which he still continues under the name of John T. Barnett and company, with offices at 155 East Market street. In1893 Governor Matthews appointed him assistant inspector general of the Indiana National Guard, with the rank of Major, but he resigned in 1894 on account of his absence from the state at that time. At the beginning of the Spanish-American War, Colonel Barnett tendered his services to the secretary of war and to the governors of Indiana and Ohio. His offer was gladly accepted by the governor of Indiana, who appointed him Colonel and Commander of the 159th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Following his appointment in May, 1898, Colonel Barnett took his regiment to Camp Alger, Virginia, where the regiment was stationed and also at Thoroughfare Gap in the same state and at Camp Meade, Pennsylvania, throughout the following summer. The regiment was mustered out at Camp Mount in Indianapolis about the last of November, 1898. During about half of this time Colonel Barnett was Commander of his brigade, and while at Camp Alger for a short time he commanded the Second Division of the Second Army Corps. Colonel Barnett is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, has served as president of the Indiana Chapter, and has also been a member of the Board of Managers. He is likewise a member of the Military Order of Foreign Wars, Spanish War Camp and has been commander of all these organizations. As a member of the Chamber of Commerce of Indianapolis he has served as chairman of its military committee and is active in that organzation. While at DePauw University he was affiliated with the Sigma Chi Greek letter fraternity, and was president of the Alumni Chapter at Indianapolis. He has been a Mason since the age of twenty-one; is a member of the Democratic Club and of the Central Christian Church. He is loyal and public-spirited in his civic attitude and gives generously of his time and means to all measures tending to the public good. His charities extend to all worthy enterprises, and his high-minded conception of a man's duty to his fellow man and his quiet and unswerving allegiance to the principles of good citizenship are traits which especially distinguish him. Colonel Barnett was married December 18, 1879, to Miss Emma Charlotte Peirsol, only daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Peirsol, a prominent family of Hendricks county, Indiana, the father being a successful merchant and banker at Danville. Mrs. Barnett who died in May, 1892, was the mother of two sons; William P., who died at birth, and Chester P., who was born January 14, 1887. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, with class of 1910 and was assigned with the rank of Second Lieutenant to the Fifteenth United States Cavalry. In July, 1916, Governor Ralston of Indiana appointed Chester P. Barnett, Major of the Third Battalion with the Third Regiment of the Indiana National Guard for service on the Texas border. He was mustered out of that service in March, 1917, and soon afterward, with the outbreak of the war with Germany, was appointed Major in the Adjutant General's Department Bureau of the Department of the East in the latter part of June, 1917. From those duties, continued until the middle of December, 1917, he was ordered to France as adjutant general of the Second Brigade of Field Artillery of the Second Division of regular troops, and was on duty with the Expeditionary Forces under General Pershing. He married Katherine D. Brown granddaughter of U. S. Senator Henry G. Davis of West Virginia . They have one child, Davis T. Barnett, born February 13, 1913. In 1893 Colonel Barnett was united in marriage with Miss Cora B. Campbell, a daughter of L. M. Campbell, a successful and well known attorney of Danville, Indiana.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Guy K. Jeffries, general superintendent of the Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern Traction company, with offices in the Traction Building on Illinois street, is one of the practical railroad men and efficient executives of Indianapolis, whose results in office speak for themselves. He was born near Milan, Ripley county, Indiana, July 9, 1866, son of Dr. William E. and Olive (Knowlton) Jeffries. The father was for a number of years engaged in the practice of medicine in Indianapolis in which state his birth and death occurred. The mother, a native of Ohio, is a resident of Indianapolis, and has passed her eighty-first birthday. During the war between the North and the South, Doctor Jeffries served in the Lower Mississippi Squadron of the United States Navy, as pilot on a gunboat. Later on in life he was secretary of the Indianapolis Board of Health for some years, and he always took great interest in sanitary improvements. Attending the public schools of Milan and Indianapolis, Guy K. Jeffries was graduated from what is now Shortridge high school in 1884. During his vacation periods he studied telegraphy, and upon leaving school was able to take a position with the Big Four Railroad as operator at Shelbyville, Indiana. Later he was transferred to Indianapolis as train dispatcher for the same railroad, in whose employ he remained for six years. Going then with the Erie Railroad, he was train dispatcher at Huntington, Indiana, and, during the Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893, was sent by that road to Chicago, and made chief train dispatcher, which position he continued to hold until 1900. In 1901 he went back to Huntington as trainmaster and so continued until 1903, when he went to Lebanon, Indiana, as superintendent of the Indianapolis & Northwestern Traction company. This position he held from September, 1903 to February, 1906, at which time he went to Greenfield to assume the responsibilities of the position of superintendent of the eastern division of the Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern Traction company. In 1907 he was promoted to be superintendent of the three divisions, Eastern, Brazil and Danville, of the same road, with headquarters at Indianapolis, and his final promotion to the position of general superintendent came in the fall of 1909. He maintains his residence at 19 North Audubon Road. June 15, 1892, he was married to Augustine, daughter of Peter and Clementine Routier, both natives of France. Mr. Routier was a general contractor and had the contract for all of the woodwork on the present state house. Both he and his wife are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Jeffries have one daughter, Lorena M., who was born at Chicago, October 30, 1893. She was graduated from Butler College, is a member of Alpha Beta Kappa, and is quite active in the Alumni Association of her alma mater. Mr. Jeffries belongs to Irvington Lodge No. 666, A. F. & A. M.; the Chapter and Council of Huntington; Scottish Rite, Valley of Indianapolis, in which he was advanced through the Thirty-second degree. He is also a member of Murat Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., the Hoosier Motor Club, of which he is past president, the Traffic Club, of which he is second vice-president, the Columbia Club, the American Electric Railway Association, the Central Railway Association, and the Exchange Club, which he assisted to organize, and of which he is past president, and he is also national president of this organization.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Allison Coupon Company. The system of using coupons instead of cash in the purchase of merchandise, is so well known today as to need no comment. Yet it was totally unknown forty years ago, and it was not until 1888 that this system came into being in its first primitive form. Its ramifications are now numerous and it has been developed into a recognized industry, in which one of the principal manufacturers of these slips and of similar articles is the Allison Coupon company, of Indianapolis, which has the credit of being the first in this field. This company had its origin at Indianapolis, in February, 1888, and was founded for the purpose of manufacturing and marketing the Allison Coupon Pass Book, the idea, conceived by Noah S. Allison, being that a book of coupons enabling customers to receipt to the merchants for goods received on credit would not only eliminate bookkeeping and collecting expense, but also do away with lost accounts and disputes with customers over alleged errors in weekly and monthly statements. The first one hundred books were purchased by John C. Reiley, a retail grocer of Greencastle, Indiana, who found the system so satisfactory that he continued its use right up to the time of his death, several years ago. Mr. Allison died early in life, leaving the new company in the hands of his widow and family of industrious boys, through whose efforts, under the guidance of John S. Berryhill, it has become a monument to the honored memory of the founder. By growth and expansion it now occupies a spacious home, with more than 30,000 square feet of floor space, equipped with specially built machinery of the most modern type for the manufacture of Allison Coupon Books for all conceivable purposes, and for all lines of merchandising, printed in five different languages and shipped to all quarters of the globe. The general managership of the company is in the hands of George F. Jones, who was born February 25, 1870, at Indianapolis, a son of Thomas E. Jones, who was at first a successful farmer at Lafayette, Indiana, and later the proprietor of a thriving grocery business at Indianapolis. George F. Jones received a public school education at Indianapolis, and was first employed as a laborer with the Giesendorf Woolen Mill of Indianapolis. For six years he was attached to the office force of the Diamond Printing company, and in 1890 joined the Allison Coupon company as a pressman. He was then promoted to foreman and later to superintendent, and in 1917 became general manager. He has assisted materially in the advancement and development of this concern and is recognized as being one of the most capable men in his line. He maintains Republican views as to politics and is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and a charter member of Home Presbyterian Church. He has several connections of a military character, a brother, Harry A. Jones, having served in the Spanish-American War, while his father, Thomas E. Jones, served throughout the Civil War as a Union soldier. Thomas E. Jones passed to his final rest September 29, 1918, while Mrs. Jones died July 13, 1892. November 23, 1892, George F. Jones was united in marriage with Miss Birdie G. Canada, of Cincinnati, Ohio, and to this union there was born one daughter, Hazel M., now Mrs. William Crossmyer.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John K. Jones now living retired at his home, 1932 North Delaware street, Indianapolis, is a scion of one of the oldest families of America. Mr. Jones is a native son of Indiana having been born at Centerville, Wayne county, February 8, 1844. His parents, Oliver T. and Mary (King) Jones were natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. Oliver T. Jones was born in Virginia on September 19, 1810. He was one of the pioneers of Indiana having removed to this state in company with his father in 1815, settling near Centerville, Wayne county, where he became a man of prominence and influence. He was what you would term a self-made man in the fullest sense of the word. He educated himself after his removal to Indiana and later became an instructor in the small academy located at Centerville. He was associated with Professor Hushhour a widely known minister of the Christian Church of that day. He early realized the fact that land in that vicinity would increase in value rapidly and became the owner of a large tract of farm land in Wayne and adjoining counties. He was also one of the pioneer bankers of that section and one of the founders of the first banks at Centerville of which he acted as cashier for a number of years. He was a man who took an active interest in the political life of his county and during the Civil War was elected to the position of Commissioner of Wayne county, a position that was highly responsible and important at that time. In the campaign of 1860 he was chosen to represent his county in the state legislature and was reelected in 1862. That was a trying period in political history of Indiana and he rendered faithful service to his state at a time when she needed the support of every loyal man within her borders. He continued to serve as a member of the legislature until the close of the extra session of 1863 when he resigned and returned to private life at Centerville. He became the father of twelve children, the names of whom are as follows: Joseph, who died at the age of nineteen years; Jane who became the wife of J. M. Eliason; Elmira, married John Russell, a prominent man in that section; John K., the subject of this review, Martha, who married Samuel C. Smith; Lucinda, who became the wife of Joshua Eliason; Levi M. married Alice Crawford; Annie E., who became Mrs. Lewis Shute; William, who married Dora Lewis; Emily, who became the wife of William Shute; Charles, who married Jennie Elliott; and Lincoln, who married Ada Edwards. The father died December 16, 1874 and the mother March 18, 1896. The subject of this brief review was educated in the district schools of his native county and Centerville Academy of Centerville, Indiana, and completed it by a course of study in Earlham College. After completing his education he secured a position as teller in the First National Bank of Centerville, Indiana, in which he continued for a number of years and by hard work and close application to duty was later made cashier of the bank. In 1885 the bank was reorganized and moved to Richmond, Indiana, where it was operated under the name of the Union Bank. Mr. Jones continued to serve as its cashier until his retirement from active business life in 1893. In 1896 he became a resident of Indianapolis where he now resides. On April 11, 1878, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Addie Stigleman, the daughter of Henry and Caroline (Lewis) Stigleman, who resided at Centerville, Indiana, at the time of their marriage. Mrs. Jones, like her husband, is a descendant of the early pioneers of America. She was the eldest of four children born to her parents, the others being: William, now deceased; Flora B., an artist at Long Beach, California; Olive, the wife of Professor Murray S. Wildman of Leland Stanford University. They have one daughter, Mary. Mrs. Jones traces her ancestry back to the Boyd family of Revolutionary War fame, a brief mention of whom will not be out of place here. James Boyd, the founder of the family and the father of Samuel Boyd, was of Scotch descent. He was the father of six sons and two daughters and gave his life in defense of his country as he and one son died in a Tory prison during the Revolutionary War. Samuel Boyd enlisted in the American Army at the age of sixteen years and suffered the loss of one eye from a bullet fired from a Tory gun. On December 12, 1785, he married Isabella Higgins, also of Scotch descent and a distant relation of Robert Burns, the poet. She took an active part in the social life of her period and often related to her descendants the fact that she had danced with President Andrew Jackson when she was a young woman. Samuel Boyd and his young wife and child removed to Kentucky in 1788 where he continued to reside for twenty-three years. In November, 1811, he crossed the Ohio River into Indiana and purchased a tract of 160 acres of land two miles north of Jacksonburg on Martindale Creek, Wayne county. His first home consisted of a crude shelter constructed from the bark of the trees which gave them protection until a more substantial home could be erected. He continued to reside on this land until his death which occurred November 2, 1835, at the age of seventy-two years. As early as 1801 he became a minister in the Christian Church and during the remainder of his life labored faithfully for the promotion of the church's best interests. He was widely known as an animated speaker for one with so limited educational advantages. His wife survived him a number of years, her death occurring October 30, 1852, having reached the ripe old age of eighty-eight years. They were the parents of ten children, all of whom lived to marry and settle in Wayne county, Indiana. Nine heads of these families had ninety-two children and in 1871 the children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren were estimated to be five hundred and fifty in number and at a reunion of the Boyd family held in 1861 two hundred and seventy-four were present, while one hundred and fifty were unable to attend. One son was born to the union of our subject, Percy O. whose birth occurred September 13, 1881. He continues to reside with his parents and fills a prominent position with the S. W. Strauss Bond & Investment Co. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, while his mother is a member of the Caroline Scott Chapter of the D. A. R. The family hold membership and affiliate with the Christian Church. John K. Jones has now reached the evening of life and is enjoying a well earned rest after a busy life and enjoys the respect of the entire community. The Jones family did its full share in reclaiming the wilderness and helping to make Indiana the great state which she now is. They endured all the hardships and privations of pioneer life and in that connection it is well to note that Lewis Jones, an uncle, carried the first mail on horseback from Centerville to Indianapolis, in April, 1822. They have never shrunk from public duty when called upon and left to their descendants a name to be revered through all time.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


August Julian, the president of one of the finest tailoring establishments in Indianapolis, was born in Italy November 14, 1873, the son of John and Gaetana (Josue) Julian, the former of whom was a wheat buyer near Naples, Italy, and served in the Italian army. August Julian was educated in the public schools of his home community in Italy, and when he had attained his twelfth year, he emigrated to the United States with a brother, to be followed later by three brothers and a sister. For seven and a half years after his arrival in this country, he worked in New York City, but at the end of that time he went to San Francisco. There he remained for six and a half years to learn the tailoring trade. He applied himself to his chosen profession with assiduity and learned every phase of the work. He then returned to New York City and for a time followed the trade of tailor in that city. March 5, 1899, he came to Indianapolis, believing that here was a town of excellent opportunities for the ambitious man. At that time, he accepted a position with A. J. Treat & Son and continued to work for that firm for a period of over six years. By the expiration of that time, his capital was sufficient to allow him to go into business for himself. The Fletcher National Bank Building had just been completed and he accordingly established himself in that building. There he remained until September 1, 1914, when the extraordinary expansion of his business necessitated a removal to larger quarters and at that time he secured a new place of business in the Odd Fellows Building. Under his careful direction and because of the exceptional quality of the tailoring work which he produced, the business continued to grow so that a second removal to still larger quarters was found to be imperative. In 1923, therefore, he moved the business to the When Building where he has a fifteen year lease on rooms that comprise a total of five thousand square feet of floor space. Mr. Julian, as president of the company which he founded, has won a place as one of the most successful business men in the city of Indianapolis and his business is regarded as one of the most substantial enterprises of its kind in the city. Mr. Julian was married November 19, 1898, to Teresa Venturia, who was born in Milano, Italy, and came to the United States when she was a girl of six years. To Mr. and Mrs. Julian has been born one son, Arthur Edward, aged twenty-one years, who was educated in the graded schools of Indianapolis and in the Culver Military Academy. In fraternal circles, Mr. Julian is a valued and popular member of the Masons, he being a member of the Blue Lodge. He also holds membership in the Marion Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Raymond A. Bulstra, the president of the East End Milk company, was born in Holland, April 21, 1887. He was educated in the country of his birth and there engaged in the milk business with the completion of his school days. When he had attained his twentieth year, he emigrated to the United States and came direct to Indianapolis, where he took up the business which he had learned on the continent. About ten years ago he decided to go into the milk trade, which he accordingly did, the business being a small one operating under the name of the Raymond A. Bulstra company. He was moderately successfui in this u,ndertaking, but desiring a larger enterprise, he organized the East End Milk company in 1919. At the time of the organization of the firm, the present two story building was erected at 1016 Kealing avenue, and it is thoroughly modern in every respect. Mr. Bulstra has been the president of the company since its inception, and the other officers are: Geo. Madinger, vice-president; and James R. Stewart, secretary and treasurer. The knowledge of the milk business that Mr. Bulstra has gained through his life-long connection with it, has brought his company into the front rank of the firms in that line and has made it one of the most substantial ventures in a financial way in Indianapolis. February 28, 1914, Mr. Bulstra was united in marriage with Ida Offringa, a native of Holland who came to the United States at an early age. In fraternal circles, Mr. Bulstra is a popular and valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the various Masonic bodies, he being a Scottish Rite Mason of the Brookside Chapter and a member of the Murat Temple of the Shrine, and Indianapolis Athletic Club.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Leo Kahn. The name of Kahn has been known for nearly sixty years in business circles of Indianapolis, where it has always been indicative of progressiveness, integrity and energetic following up of legitimate opportunities. This name is now represented by Leo Kahn, president of the American Sanitary Lock Corporation, a concern which has enjoyed a wonderful growth during recent years and which now has its agencies in various parts of this and foreign countries. Mr. Kahn was born June 18, 1884, at Indianapolis, and is a son of Nathan and Hannah Kahn. His father was one of the well-known business men of Indianapolis, who opened the first department store south of Washington street in 1865 and was favorably considered in business circles for many years thereafter. Leo Kahn received his education in the public schools of Indianapolis and at a manual training school in the same city. At the time of entering upon his career, he joined the Lockland Mills, at Cincinnati, but in 1903 returned to Indianapolis to take over the business of his father, who had died, his mother surviving until 1921. Mr. Kahn continued to conduct the same business personally until the fall of 1915, and still owns it, but in the year mentioned became the organizer of the American Sanitary Lock Corporation, of which concern he has since been president. This business consists of the manufacture of coin controlled locks, for telephones, lavatories, etc., and during the eight years that it has been in business has grown to such an extent that it now has twenty-two branch offices, of which one is in Paris, France, and the other in London, England. As the head of this important concern, Mr. Kahn has shown himself an energetic business man, of acumen, foresight and resource, and one who has gained public confidence and that of his associates through the following out of honorable policies. He is an active member of the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce, and in politics has Republican views. He belongs also to the Elks, the Masons, the Indianapolis Club, the Indianapolis Athletic Club and the Hoosier Club. December 28, 1919, Mr. Kahn was united in marriage with Bertha, daughter of Abraham Cohen, a horseman of Indianapolis, and niece of Nathan Morris, a well-known citizen of the capital.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Delbert Oscar Kearby, M. D., who has high standing in the medical profession at Indianapolis, both in practice as a specialist in diseases of the ear, nose and throat, and as an instructor in the Indiana University School of Medicine, is a native of this state, born in Lawrence county, December 31, 1878. He was reared at Orleans, in Orange county, and attended the public schools there and was graduated from the Orleans high school, subsequently attending the Normal School at Paoli, and the Southern Indiana Normal School. During the next three years he was engaged in educational work, teaching school in different sections, at the same time devoting his leisure to the preparatory study of medicine. In 1906 he was graduated from the Indiana Medical School of Purdue University, soon afterward establishing himself in the practice of medicine, in the state of Washington. While residing in Washington he became so well and favorably known that he was elected to the General Assembly there as a representative from Kittitas county. The demands made upon him, however, in the political field as well as in the care of a heavy medical practice, proved too much for his own health, and as a precaution, he retired from all active effort for two years. Realizing that a change of climate would be beneficial, he returned to his native state and in 1918 opened an office at Indianapolis, in the Central Life Building, as a specialist in diseases of the ear, nose and throat. His professional skill has been recognized not only as a private practitioner, but his name and scientific services add to the prestige of the staff of the City Hospital and to the Indiana University School of Medicine. He belongs to many scientific bodies, including the Marion county, the Indiana State and the American Medical Associations, a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Dr. Kearby is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and belongs to the Columbia, the Highland Golf and Country, and the Indianapolis Athletic clubs. December 12, 1909, he married Miss Alice Albertson, of Orleans, Indiana, and they have one daughter, Frances, aged eleven years, who is attending school in this city.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Bert C. Keithly. In brokerage circles of Indianapolis, Bert C. Keithly is well known as an energetic and reliable operator, and since making his permanent headquarters at this city in 1912, has built up a substantial enterprise which is recognized as one of the city's firmly established concerns. Mr. Keithly was born in Ralls county, Missouri, February 17, 1879, and is a son of Robert L. and Kathryn (Coons) Keithly, the former of whom came from pioneer Missouri stock, and the latter from residents of Virginia and Kentucky. Robert L. Keithly, who died in 1923 at the age of seventy years, survived by eight brothers and sisters, followed farming in Missouri, and was also greatly interested in stock raising. He was active in the work of the Christian Church, and his political tendencies made him a Democrat. Mrs. Keithly survives he husband at the age of sixty-eight years, and is the mother of two sons: Bert C.; and Kenneth, of Abingdon, Virginia. Bert C. Keithly attended the graded and high schools of his native locality, and after his graduation from the latter in 1899 took a special business and scientific course at Valparaiso University, being graduated in 1900. He went then to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where for one year he taught in a business college, but gave up educational work in 1904 and went to St. Joseph, Missouri, where for a short time he was connected with a wholesale dry goods concern. The year prior to the World's Fair at St. Louis, he went to that city and there for four years was engaged in sales work with the brokerage firm of J. K. Armsby company. His next connection was with the Wheeling Can company, of Wheeling, West Virginia, as a salesman until 1909, having Indiana territory. He then took up the brokerage business again, and in 1912 embarked in business on his own account, incorporating his concern January 1, 1922. He now carries on a high class general brokerage business and his clientele includes some of the leading people of Indiana. Mr. Keithly is connected with several fraternal and civic bodies, is a Mason and a member of the Christian Church. June 22, 1903, he was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Cole, of Vienna, Illinois, daughter of Mrs. N. J. Benson.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924