Louis C. Huesmann, president and general manager of the Central Supply company of Indianapolis, has for more than twenty years been identified with the active and substantial business life of the city and has always been willing and anxious to aid in those enterprises which have been projected for the upbuilding and betterment of the community. Mr. Huesmann was born in Dayton, Ohio, June 20, 1856. His father was Louis Huesmann, a native of Germany who for many years was a professor of music in Dayton. His mother bore the maiden name of Harriet S. Loury and was a native of Troy, Ohio. Both parents are dead. Of their nine children the subject of this biography is the only survivor. Louis C. Huesmann attended the public schools of his native city and also availed himself of a commercial course. When a young man of twenty-four he engaged in business at Union City, Indiana, remaining there until 1902 when he came to Indianapolis and organized the Central Supply company, becoming its first president, a position he has since continued to occupy. The company as jobbers of plumbing, pipe and steam fitting supplies, has had a steady growth and occupies a large brick building at 210 South Capitol avenue. Mr. Huesmann is also president of similar enterprises at Union City, Indiana, Columbus, Ohio, and Canton, Ohio. Mr. Huesmann is a member of the First Presbyterian Church and in politics is a Republican. He is a Mason and a member of the leading clubs and civic organizations of Indianapolis. During the World War, Mr. Huesmann was an important factor in all war work, performing duties that won him the gratitude of his fellow citizens.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Jesse Lowell Monroe, was born in Indianapolis, April 28, 1890, the son of Walter C. and Elsie (Armacost) Monroe, both natives of Indiana, the former being born in Indianapolis, November 24, 1868, and the latter in Oaklandon, January 16, 1873. John Lowell Monroe, who was of Scotch descent, and Aaron Armacost, who came from Pennsylvania Dutch stock, the grandfathers of Jesse L. Monroe, both served in Indiana regiments during the Civil War. Elsie Armacost Monroe died in October, 1893, when her son was but three years of age and was buried in the family graveyard near Allisonville, Indiana. During the next three years until June, 1896, Jesse Lowell Monroe was cared for by his grandmother who died at that time. He then accompanied his father and others in an expedition through the western states. The journey, which was so dangerous that watch had to be kept during the night to guard against bandits, was made in a prairie schooner, a familiar figure in the West in those days. When the party returned to the East, the Monroes removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where Jesse entered school. This was the time of the Spanish-American War, an event which made the selling of newspapers exceedingly profitable, and the young lad engaged in this work to gain an experience that was invaluable. Jesse L. Monroe then removed with his father to Indianapolis where he developed a newspaper route that often required the help of his father to deliver all of the papers. He completed his education in the public schools of Indianapolis. He then engaged in foundry work and with the assistance of his father became an efficient and skilled mechanic. In this kind of work he remained for ten years, but wishing to go into business for himself, he began an enterprise which proved highly successful. With the outbreak of the war in Europe, he placed his enterprise under the management of another so that he might again engage in foundry work making marine engines and parts for the Emergency Fleet Corporation. When the United States declared war upon Germany, the MidWest Engine company appealed to the draft board for his exemption from military service on the grounds that his skill as a mechanic was essential to the government work which the company then had in hand. Mr. Monroe has been interested in real estate values for some time, and at various times he has bought, sold and built houses. He has recently completed the construction of his own home at No. 2531 N. Delaware street. Mr. Monroe has been actively interested in politics and at one time was elected a delegate to the Republican State convention. On January 1, 1922, he was appointed office deputy to Michael L. Jefferson, assessor for Center township, Marion county, and on January 1, of the following year upon the re-election of. Mr. Jefferson, he was re-appointed to the same post for a term of four years. On March 11, 1911, Mr. Monroe married Anna D. Albrecht, and to Mr. and Mrs. Monroe has been born one son, Lowell W. C., who was born July 14, 1912, and is now attending the Indianapolis public schools. Mrs. Monroe is the daughter of Richard and Martha (Arndt) Albrecht, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in June, 1887, lived for a time in Baltimore, Maryland, and then settled in Indianapolis. Mrs. Monroe was born in Indianapolis, November 28, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Monroe are members of the St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church, while Mr. Monroe is a member of the Republican Club and is an honorary member of the International Molders Union.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Walter H. Montgomery, well-known in the commercial life of Indianapolis as the manager of the Crown Laundry company and the proprietor of the Triangle Laundry company, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, August 27, 1889. When he was still a child, he removed with his parents to Mexico, where he remained until he had attained his tenth year and where he received his education from private tutors. He then returned to the United States, locating at Washingon, D. C., where he completed his elementary education in the graded and high schools. With the completion of his common school education, he matriculated at the University of Cincinnati, and in due course was graduated from that institution with the degree of Bachelor of Science. Soon after leaving college, he was offered the position of manager of the Crown Laundry company in Indianapolis, and his success in that work has left him in that position since the time that he first took it up. He is also the proprietor of the Triangle Laundry company, having placed this company among the leaders in its line of business in a comparatively short while. It is recognized as one of the financially substantial laundry business in the city of Indianapolis and this reputation has been earned through the abilities and energy of Mr. Montgomery. In 1918, Mr. Montgomery was united in marriage with Marjorie Hall, a woman of rare culture and attainments. In fraternal circles, Mr. Montgomery is a popular member of the various Masonic bodies; he being a Scottish Rite Mason and a member of the Murat Temple of the Shrine. He also holds membership in the Hoosier Motor Club, the Indianapolis Athletic, Club, the Chamber of Commerce, the Delta Tau Delta college fraternity, and various other organizations.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Judson D. Moschelle, M. D. , an able arid successful surgeon of Indianapolis, was born near Richmond, Virginia, June 13, 1878. He came to Indianapolis with his parents when he was five years of age, and his early education was obtained in the graded and high schools of this city. Following his graduation from the latter institution, he entered Purdue University, and in 1898 received the degrees of Ph. G. and Ph. C. He then entered the Indiana University School of Medicine, and was graduated a Doctor of Medicine in 1902. During the next year, he served his interneship in the City Dispensary, and later took post graduate work in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He also pursued post-graduate studies in the medical colleges of Harvard and Chicago, making a specialty of surgery, in which he has specialized since he first began practice in Indianapolis. Doctor Moschelle stands high in his profession, and as a specialist in surgery he is not excelled in this city. He maintains offices in the Odd Fellows Building, and his home is at Broadway and Forty-sixth street. In 1904 he was united in marriage with Anne Gertrude Kight, and they have one son, Judson Franklin, who was born September 19, 1907, and is now a student in the Shortridge high school and a cornetist in the Naval Reserve band. Like his father, he is a lover of horses and riding, in which they find a mutual interest arid companionship. Doctor Moschelle is a member of the county, state and American medical associations and of the Phi Beta Pi fraternity. He is a Thirty-second degree Mason, a Knight Templar and a Shriner, and also holds membership in the Indianapolis Athletic, the Highland Golf and Country clubs, and Southern Club. He is also secretary of the American Association for the Study of Goiter.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Owen Morrison Mothershead. Prominent among the native sons of Indianapolis who have gained distinction in business circles, one who has attained a merited place not only in commercial affairs but in the confidence and esteem of his associates is Owen Morrison Mothershead, secretary and treasurer of the Builders Construction company. Mr. Mothershead was born at Indianapolis, August 17, 1880, and is a son of John Leland and Emma (Owen) Mothershead, the latter born at Philadelphia, in 1850. John L. Mothershead, who was born at Indianapolis, in 1843, was engaged in the foundry business during the greater part of his life under the name of MothersheadMorris Stove Foundry, was also connected with the United States Encaustic Tile company, and owned a plant near Anderson, Indiana, where he manufactured chemicals. He was a man of versatile business talents and one who bore an excellent reputation for integrity and for success gained along legitimate channels of trade. A Republican in politics, he took an active and prominent part in city and county affairs, and for four years served in the capacity of county treasurer. He was a Mason and a charter member of the Columbia Club. Owen Morrison Mothershead was given good educational advantages in his youth, first attending the Shortridge high school and then pursuing a course at Cornell University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1902 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. For a time after his graduation he worked in his father's chemical plant, and then had charge of sales for the Premier Motor Company at Indianapolis for four years. In September, 1917, Mr. Mothershead enlisted for service in the army during the World War and became captain of the 311th Ammunition Train, A-6 Division, with which he saw four months of overseas service in France. Discharged in March, 1919, he returned to Indianapolis where he joined the Builders Construction company, of which he has since served very capably in the capacity of secretary-treasurer. This company had been organized originally in 1916 by Captain Mothershead and Harry R. Fitton, who is now acting as president, and the firm does commercial building and contracting on a large scale, the plant being located at No. 540 North Meridian street. Mr. Mothershead is a Republican and takes a good citizen's interest in civic and political matters. He belongs to the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce, the American Legion, the Columbia Club, the Woodstock Club and the University Club, of which last-named he served as president in 1916. He likewise holds membership in the Delta Kappa Epsilon college fraternity. October 15,1903, Mr. Mothershead was united in marriage with Mary Duncan Wilson, daughter of John R. Wilson, an Indianapolis attorney, and they are the parents of one son: Wilson, a student at Shortridge high school. The family belongs to the Second Presbyterian Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William E. Neal, the state manager for the Union Central Life Insurance company, was born in Warren county, North Carolina, the son of William W. and Delia (Harris) Neal, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. The grandparents of our subject were also old residents of the same state. William W. Neal died in 1908 at the age of seventy-nine years and his wife died when she had attained her seventy-sixth year. They were the parents of four sons, of whom William E. Neal was one. William E. Neal attended the common schools of his home community, giving up his educational career at the age of sixteen years to accept employment as a clerk in a store, a job that he filled until he reached his twentieth year. At that time, he became a commercial salesman on the road for eleven years, but becoming dissatisfied with the work, he decided to go into the insurance business under Carey J. Hunter as agent for the Union Central Life Insurance company for the state of North Carolina. He accordingly worked at this position for a short time when he was in 1899 transferred to New Mexico as general agent, remaining in charge of affairs in that state until 1903 when he was also given the general agency for the state of Arizona as well as New Mexico. Still later he was given a part of the state of Texas, and was transferred to Dallas, Texas, and ably administered the affairs of the company in the large territory under his direction until 1911. At that time he was sent to Indiana as the state agent. When he assumed the duties of his new post, the affairs of the company were in a bad condition, but Mr. Neal's long experience with the company connected with his native executive ability soon made a strong organization of the branch. He is a keen judge of human nature and has gathered about him an excellent force of fifty-seven men whose interests are all for the company for which they work. Mr. Neal anticipates a larger amount of business this year than ever before, and it is this spirit that made the company and Mr. Neal prominent figures in the insurance circles of Indianapolis and the state of Indiana. In 1912, Mr. Neal was united in marriage with Elizabeth Ransom, of New York, who is the center of a wide circle of admiring friends. In political matters, Mr. Neal supports the Democratic party, believing that its principles best serve the public interests.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William F. Off, president of Christian Off & Company, sheet metal workers, was born in Indianapolis in 1868, the son of Christian Off, a native of Germany. Christian Off immigrated from Germany and came to Indianapolis in 1852, where he engaged in the saw and planing mill business. He continued in this work for a time and then opened a retail store under the firm style of Donnan & Off. This store dealt exclusively in stoves and was the last one of its kind to go out of business in the city of Indianapolis. For years, the business was, located across from the court house and in conjunction with the stove selling end of the enterprise, a general tinning and sheet metal business was conducted. The name of the firm was changed to that of Christian Off & Company at the time William F. Off became connected with the firm, and still later when other members of the family became associated with the company, it was incorporated under the same name with our subject as president, a position which he still administers. The selling of stoves was discontinued in 1891, and the company has maintained its place of business for thirty-six years on Washington street and at the present location at 5 North New Jersey street. The company does a general sheet metal business and is recognized as one of the most substantial firms in Indianapolis, where it has firmly imbedded itself in the commercial life of the city. William F. Off was united in marriage in 1904 with Cora Goetz, a woman who is the center of a wide circle of admiring friends. Mr. Off is a popular and valued member of the various Masonic bodies including the Murat Temple of the Shrine. He also holds membership in the Rotary Club, the Indianapolis Maennerchor Club, and the Hoosier Motor Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


George Henry Oilar, one of the best known figures in the furniture trade, has spent his entire business career, from boyhood forward, in this line of endeavor and at present is at the head of an important Indianapolis enterprise, the Oilar Furniture Shops, Inc., of which he is president. Mr. Oilar was born September 18, 1870, at West Lafayette, Indiana, a son of Henry Harrison and Rebecca A. (Lowman) Oilar. His paternal grandfather, Henry Harrison Oilar, Sr., was a pioneer of Tippecanoe county and the first schoolteacher there, later becoming county surveyor and justice, of the peace. Henry Harrison Oilar, Jr., was born at Lafayette, where he is an agriculturist and land owner, and his wife also survives; she being a native of Battle Ground, Tippecanoe county, and likewise a member of a pioneer family. They had five children, of whom two died in infancy, the others being: George Henry, the first born; Rozier D., of Indianapolis, a chemical engineer connected with the American Equipment company, who married Nora Griswold, now deceased, and has one daughter, Miriam Louise, a student at DePauw; and Forrest L., with the Studebaker Corporation at Memphis, Tennessee, who married Hattie Sense, of Lafayette, and has one son, Hal. George Henry Oilar received a country school education at Montmorenci, Tippecanoe county, and at Benton county, following which he pursued a course at Purdue University. He started his business career in 1889 in the capacity of errand boy for the D. N. Foster Furniture company at Lafayette, a branch of the Col. D. N. Foster Furniture company of Fort Wayne. Later in 1893 he was transferred to the company's plant at Fort Wayne, remaining there for ten years and coming in 1903 to Indianapolis as buyer for the W. H. Messinger company. Later he, with his brothers, formed the Oilar Brothers company, buying the furniture business of Iske Brothers, but this they sold in 1903 to the Banner Furniture company. At that time Mr. Oilar returned to Fort Wayne as manager of the D. N. Foster Furniture company, and in 1919 opened the store at Indianapolis under the name of the D. N. Foster Furniture company. This he disposed of in 1922, and in 1923 was the founder of the Oilar Furniture Shops, Inc., which started business the same year at its present location, 231 Massachusetts avenue. Mr. Oilar is president of this enterprise, and associated with him is his son, Millard Y. and his two brothers, Rozier D. and Forrest L. Oilar. The firm features custom-made upholstered furniture, in addition to which it acts as a distributor of all kinds of furniture. The product of this concern has already achieved a reputation that extends over several states, and its policies and principles have gained the enterprise many staunch friends. Mr. Oilar is a man of enterprise and energy and is thoroughly familiar with every angle of the furniture business. He is a member of Oriental Lodge No. 500 Free and Accepted Masons, the Sons of Veterans, the Purdue Alumni Association and the Mercator Club. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the executive committee and board of governors of the National Retail Furniture Dealers' Association; and also holds membership in the Better Business Bureau and the American Furniture Club, the national body. With his family he belongs to the Third Church of Christ Scientist. September 18, 1893, Mr. Oilar married Grace L., daughter of W. H. and Hattie A. Young, of Lafayette, one of the pioneer families of Tippecanoe county. Mr. Young fought as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War. Mrs. Oilar is a graduate of Lafayette high school and a woman of many accomplishments. She and her husband are the parents of two sons. Millard Y. Oilar, the elder, born at Lafayette, is a graduate of the Manual Training high school. He was in his junior year at Butler College when he gave up his education to enter the United States service, joining the Signal. Corps, Company C, Tenth Field Battalion, Seventh Division, with which contingent he was in France for eleven months, being stationed near Metz, at the time of the signing of the Armistice. Since his return he has been associated with his father in business. He is a member of the Sigma Chi fraternal society; Oriental Lodge No. 500 F. A. M., Valley of Indianapolis Scottish Rite, and Murat Temple, Mystic Shrine. The second son of Mr. and Mrs. Oilar, Rozier D. Oilar, was born at Fort Wayne, and now resides at Chicago, where he has made rapid strides in the furniture business, having formerly been assistant buyer for Mandel Brothers, and now being buyer for the furniture department of The Fair department store. He married Miss Ludie Tolson, of Arkansas, and they are the parents of one child, Barbara Jane.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Silas H. Johnson who is now living retired in the city of Indianapolis at 660 E. 46th street is a worthy representative of those hardy pioneers who blazed the trail through the forests, faced the blizzards of the prairies and oft times matched their wits against those of the wily red man that they might found homes for themselves and their descendants. They were the pathfinders for civilization and to them is due the honor of reclaiming the wilderness and making it to blossom like the rose. They were a type of men and women distinctive unto themselves and with their passing the world sustained the loss of the highest type of man and womanhood that modern civilization produced. God-fearing, courageous, self-sacrificing and generous to a fault, they bequeathed to their children a heritage more precious than wealth or power and so long as time shall last their memory will be cherished by those who will follow after them. Silas H. Johnson was born January 31, 1848, in what is now the city of Indianapolis. His parents, Oliver and Pamelia (Howland) Johnson, were like himself, natives of this state and county. The first of the family of whom we have any definite record was Jeremiah Johnson, grandfather of Oliver. He was a native of Virginia, of Irish and German descent. He moved to Kentucky prior to 1795. His son John Johnson, grandfather of our subject, was born in Kentucky in 1798 and was brought to Indiana by his parents in 1805, his father having entered government land, in Franklin county, this state, in that year, and founded what was known as Johnson's Forks. Jeremiah Johnson, greatgrandfather of our subject, was a blacksmith by trade and followed that calling in the village of Brookville. In 1818 he made a journey on horseback to what was then known as the "New Purchase" which is now a part of the city of Indianapolis, and purchased several quarter sections of land, one for each of his children and on one of these quarters the present state fairgrounds are now located. In March, 1822, John Johnson brought his family to Indianapolis and from time to time added to his holdings until he became one of the largest land owners in Marion county and from these holdings his descendants have amassed substantial fortunes. He was a man noted for his integrity and uprightness and enjoyed the respect and esteem of all who knew him. His son, Oliver Johnson, was four months old when the family removed to Marion county and here he passed his entire life. At the time of his death he had resided in this county for over eighty years. His home farm in Washington township was one of the show places of the county. In 1855 he purchased 160 acres adjoining the city for $55.00 an acre, which he developed and on which he erected handsome buildings, the farm home being situated at what is now the corner of No. 4451 Park avenue, and it is still standing. The subject of this mention grew to manhood on his father's farm attending the district school which was built across the road from the old home farm. The old school house is still standing, but has been moved to the rear of our subject's present home. Its first location was at what is now Central avenue and 46th street and on that spot a school has existed through all these years, the present one being known as No. 70. Mr. Johnson recalls many incidents of early school life, one being that a single water pail and tin cup served for all the sixty or seventy pupils attending. The old school house was elevated quite a little distance from the ground and oft times pigs would congregate under the floor in order to keep warm and create such a disturbance that the teacher would appoint one of the older pupils to go out and drive them away. In those days it was a well-founded truth that "to spare the rod was to spoil the child" and the teacher was always armed with what was then known as the "gad" and which he did not hesitate to use when the occasion demanded. School was generally held about three months in the winter, beginning in December and closing by March 1, as the boys' services were needed at home to assist in putting in the spring crop. In 1869 he was united in marriage to Laura A. Wright whose death occurred in 1892. She bore him two children: the elder, Mary Alice, is now the wife of Prof. J. S. Puett of this city; the younger daughter, Olive, is now Mrs. R. F. Shackelford and has one son, Lowell. In 1894 Mr. Johnson contracted a second marriage, the lady of his choice being Ora Etta Atkinson. To this union have been born two children, Howland A. who married Hazel Roudebaugh and who has one son Robert Silas. Mary Esther, the second child, is now the wife of Lieutenant Burton D. Varian, a resident of this city. They have one child Burton D. Jr. Mr. Johnson has devoted his entire life to farming and still owns and operates a large farm near Millerville. In religious matters he and his family hold membership in the English Lutheran Church, located on the Millerville Road which has been the place of worship of the Johnson family for many years. This church was organized in 1823 by twelve families who came from Maryland bringing their minister with them. The Oliver Johnson Woods Addition to the city of Indianapolis lying between Central avenue and College, and 44th and 46th streets is a part of his father's old farm purchased in 1855 and which is now one of the most desirable residence districts in the city. Mr. Johnson has passed his entire life in this immediate neighborhood and has been, like his father, one of the representative and progressive citizens, lending his aid to all worthy projects which would tend to the development of the county and state.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


T. R. O'Donnell was born in Montpelier, Indiana, in 1894, and he received his elementary education in the graded and high schools of his home community. He then matriculated at Notre Dame University where he pursued a course of study for a time and then attended the University of Pittsburgh from which he was graduated in 1917 with the degree of Bachelor of Science, he having majored in Economics. He then came to Indianapolis and organized the T. R. O'Donnell Transfer company, which specializes in heavy hauling. The firm has built up a large volume of business and is already recognized as one of the stronger companies of its kind in the city. It is a growing concern that operates upon a substantial basis. In 1917, Mr. O'Donnel was united in marriage with Vera Moss, and to this union has been born one child, Patricia. In fraternal circles, Mr. O'Donnell is a popular and valued member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and of the Knights of Columbus.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Thomas J. Owens, was born at Kansas, Illinois, in August, 1870, son of Robert and Julia, Ann (Davis) Owens, natives of Missouri. He attended the local schools and was associated with his father in business at Kansas until the latter's death. Later he became traveling auditor for the Arthur Jordan company until 1900, and for three years longer was employed in the company's main office, and for one year was connected with Morris and company, Chicago. In 1905 he became secretary of the Meridian Life Insurance company and continued in that relation until 1916, when he organized the Century Life Insurance company, of which he became president and filled that position until it became consolidated with the People's Life Insurance company, of Frankfort, Indiana. Mr. Owens is also the principal owner and a director of the American Estates company, of Indianapolis, and is numbered among the active business men of the city. In 1900 he married Miss Mollie Laflen, of Danville, Illinois, and they have one daughter, Mary Josephine. Mr. Owens is an active member of the Chamber of Commerce and belongs to the order of Knights of Pythias.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Everett E. Padgett, M.D., well known in Indianapolis as one of its successful surgeons, was born in Carlisle, Sullivan county, Indiana, December 13, 1878. He received his elementary education in the graded and high schools of his home community. After his graduation from high school he attended Vincennes University and the Indiana State Normal, and upon the completion of his work in those schools, he taught for a year. By that time, however, he had decided that he wished to study for the medical profession, and accordingly entered Rush Medical Col1ege, of Chicago, and was graduated therefrom in 1905 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Following his graduation he came to Indianapolis, and at once entered active practice in this city. Dr. Padgett has specialized in surgery, and in this branch of medicine he is recognized as one of the most skillful surgeons in the city. He has earned an enviable reputation among the members of his profession and among the people for the way in which he handles his cases. He is on the teaching force of the Indiana University School of Medicine. He maintains offices at 424 Hume-Mansur Building. He is on the staff of the City Hospital and the City Dispensary in addition to his other work. On June 28, 1905, Dr. Padgett married Teresa Bough, of Pleasantville, Sullivan county, Indiana, and they have one child, Palmer Findley, born November 23, 1908. Dr. Padgett is a member of the county, state, and American medical associations and is secretary of the Indiana division of the American College of Surgeons. He is a Mason and a member of the Marion Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Clyde E. Parsons, the secretary and treasurer of the People's Coal & Cement company, was born in Alexandria, Kentucky, in 1884. He came to Indianapolis with his parents when he was a small boy and received his education in the public schools of that city. With the completion of his tuition days, he took up the machinists' trade but gave up the vocation as soon as he had served his apprenticeship with the Commercial Electric company. Since that time, he has been in the coal and building supply business continuously. After leaving the Commercial Electric company, he accepted a position with the Wales Coal & Lime company as clerk and remained in that work for three years. For three years thereafter, he was associated with the A. B. Meyer company, but gave up this work to become a salesman for the People's Coal & Cement company on January 1, 1911. His work with this firm was of such a nature that he soon won recognition by the officials of the concern for his energy and evident ability in the work. In 1914,therefore, he was made secretary and treasurer of that company and still administers the duties of those offices. He has done much to place the company upon the firm financial basis upon which it operates and the excellent rating that the firm has in commercial circles is due in great measure to his efforts and executive ability. Mr. Parsons is known as one of the representative and substantial business men of Indianapolis where he has contributed much to the commercial advancement of the city. February 8, 1911, Mr. Parsons married Lillian Hameton, of Goodland, Indiana, and to this union has been born one child, Mary Fanchon. Fraternally, Mr. Parsons is a valued member of the F. & A. M., being a member of the Commandery and the Murat Temple of the Shrine. He also holds membership in the Columbia Club and the Indianapolis Athletic Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Robert G. Patterson, was born in Angola, Indiana, August 21, 1891 . He received his elementary education in the graded and high schools of that city and then matriculated at Indiana University, from which he was graduated in 1913 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Following his graduation from the university, he became the manager of his father's department store in Angola because the ill health of the latter made work in the store impossible. With the outbreak of the World War, he entered the service of his country. He entered training at Fort Benjamin Harrison for a commission in artillery. He was duly commissioned second lieutenant in field artillery and was assigned to the 326th Field Artillery, 84th Division with which organization he served throughout the war. He attended the school of fire at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and then went to France with his organization, spending seven months in active service in that country. The 159th Field Artillery Brigade was the only regiment of the 84th Division kept intact until the time of its discharge in the United States. Mr. Patterson with others organized the Continental Motor Parts company, at 409 N. Capital avenue, a replacement organization of which lie is the vice-president. He is president and general manager of Piston Service company, at 442 N. Illinois street. On September 25, 1920, Mr. Patterson married Florence Leeth, of Indianapolis. In fraternal circles, Mr. Patterson is a valued member of the various Masonic bodies including the Murat Temple of the Shrine and of the Phi Gamma Delta college fraternity. He also holds membership in the Indianapolis Athletic Club, the Hoosier Athletic Club, and affiliates with the First Congregational Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


J. Harvey Pearson, superintendent of the Onepiece Bi-focal Lens Company, and interested in other business concerns at Indianapolis, belongs to one of the historical old families of America, his people having come from England with William Penn, late in 1600, and settled first in the great commonwealth that perpetuates his name. Later, the Pearsons moved to Ohio, and from there, finally, Lemuel Pearson came to Indiana. J. Harvey Pearson was born at Fairmount, Indiana, August 18, 1873, son of Lemuel and Angelina (Harvey) Pearson, second born in their family of six children. Lemuel Pearson, born in Ohio, died in Indiana, September 15, 1914, aged seventy-one years. He was a farmer and schoolteacher, and during the Civil War served in the Union army as a member of the 118th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He married Angelina Harvey, who yet survives. Her father, John S. Harvey, came to Indiana from North Carolina, February 21, 1821, and entered land near Fairmount, Grant county. During the Civil War, while she was a student in Earlham College, the institution received a message from the notorious Confederate officer, General Morgan, that he was making a successful raid in Indiana and that it was his intention to dine at Earlham. However, on his raid he never reached that point, and like some boastful, arrogant leaders in the World War on the road toward Paris, with the same announced intention, found unexpected obstacles in the way. Mrs. Pearson taught school in Fairmount township. After attending the public schools and Fairmount Academy, J. Harvey Pearson served a three years' apprenticeship to the trade of molder and machinist, in the Fairmount Foundry & Machine works, then had five years with the Marietta Glass company at Red Key, in Jay county, and six years with the same company at Indianapolis. In 1900 Mr. Pearson made a practical study of the automobile and constructed one which he drove from Red Key to Indianapolis, and commenting on the present almost universal use of cars over that route, says that in the whole distance he met but one car. He worked for the Premier Auto company for two years but since February 12, 1911, has been identified with the Onepiece Bi-focal Lens company as superintendent, designer and builder of special machinery for the manufacture of one-piece bi-focal lenses in this plant, some of which were invented by him and patented in his name. The business is one of great scope and supreme importance. He has additional business interests, being a partner and half owner in Pearson-Scott company, machinists and engineers, at No. 1525 East Washington street. May 13, 1896, he married Rose Mae, daughter of William and Lavina White, of Summitville, Indiana, and they have had two sons: Merrill, born February 27, 1898, died at the age of twenty-two years, at Phoenix, Arizona; and Lloyd, born November 18, 1900. Mr. Pearson and his family are members of the United Brethren Church and active workers in the same, Mrs. Pearson being president of' a Sunday school organization. He has long been deeply interested in the Boy Scouts movement and for a time was scoutmaster of Troop No. 41. In Masonry he is a member of Capital City Lodge No. 312; Indianapolis, and he belongs also to the Hoosier Motor Club and to various local bodies concerned with the city's welfare. The family home is at No. 1210 Tuxedo street, Indianapolis.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John Milton Phipps, M. D. Prominent among the physicians of Indianapolis, who through long, able and conscientious service have won the confidence and gratitude of a large practice is Dr. John Milton Phipps, who is not only well known as a private practitioner, but has also seen service as a member of the U. S. Medical Corps in three wars. Doctor Phipps was, born at Bedford, Indiana, September 22, 1865, and when twenty years of age was graduated from Franklin Col1ege. He then continued his studies at the Hospital School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, being graduated in 1899, and subsequently did post-graduate work in the Medical School of Columbia University and in Europe. Doctor Phipps first saw war service in Cuba, during the Spanish-American War, and later took part in the activities which characterized the Philippine insurrection. Still later he served as a member of the Medical Corps during the Boxer uprising in China. His private practice, except for two years as surgeon for the International Harvester company, has all been at Indianapolis, where he maintains offices at No. 515 Bankers Trust Building, and where he has built up a large and lucrative practice. In former years Doctor Phipps was an instructor in the Indiana University School of Medicine. He belongs to the Johnson County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, is a Thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner and a member of the Knights of Pythias. His religious connection is with the Baptist Church. In 1901 Doctor Phipps was united in marriage with Miss Ethelyn Tracy, of Johnson county, Indiana, and they are the parents, of three children: Louis, a student of Hanover College; and Helen and Lillian, who are attending high school.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Edward Dienhart Pierre, who is one of the architects of Indianapolis, and is located in the Hume-Mansur Building, has won the confidence of the public and the respect of his associates by reason of the artistry of his designs and their practicability with reference to modern requirements. He was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, May 22, 1890, son of Joseph M. and Adelaide (Barbara) Pierre, natives of Fort Wayne and Lafayette, Indiana, respectively, the former born in 1874, and the latter in 1876, and both survive and are living at Fort Wayne. Since reaching man's estate he has been engagedĽ in merchandising at Fort Wayne, and is one of the solid business men of that city. The name is of French origin as the paternal grandfather came to the United States in the later sixties from Asace-Lorraine, and, locating at Fort Wayne, founded the business his son is now conducting. The latter is a man of quiet, retiring tastes, and one who has never cared to actively engage in politics. Seven children were born to him and his wife, four sons and three daughters. After the usual attendance at the parochial schools, Edward Dienhart Pierre attended Valparaiso University where he did preparatory work during 1911-12, and then, going to Chicago, he took up the study of architecture at Armour Institute and the Chicago Art Institute, was graduated from the former with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1915, and won the 1915 prize traveling scholarship, and also won the fourth prize in the 1923 Indianapolis News competition for a small house. His first employer was Albert Kahrn, with whom he remained until 1917, when he entered the service of his country. Commissioned a second lieutenant he was sent overseas, and was assigned to the engineering corps, remaining in the army until after the signing of the Armistice when he received his honorable discharge. Returning to Indianapolis he was with McGuire & Shook, architects, for a short period, and then went into business for himself. He belongs to Indiana Society of Architects; Architects Association of Indianapolis; and the Indianapolis Architectural Club; the Hoosier Ath1etic Club; and he is a director of the Lakes Division of the Architects Small House Service Bureau.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Ed. L. Powers, president of the Powers & Addy Company, Inc., of Indianapolis, is a true example of what may be accomplished in this great American republic, when energy, determination and ambition lead the way. Mr. Powers was born in Fayette county, Iowa, September 8, 1879, and obtained his education in the public schools of his native community. His boyhood days were spent upon his father's farm where he was taught the habits of industry and economy, and the discipline proved a valuable one through the formative period of his life. Early developing an aptitude for business, he secured employment in the Iowa railroad shops, and for a time was engaged in this work. Later he entered the employ of the Chicago Bridge & Iron company, with whom he remained several years and established such a record for efficiency that he was made foreman before he had attained the age of twenty-one. Having decided to engage in business on his own responsibility in 1908, he organized the Powers & Addy Company, Inc., contractors in structural steel work, of which he is the executive head, and which is one of the largest enterprises of its kind in Indianapolis. Under his able management the business has grown to large proportions, and the company now operates throughout Indiana and various other states, and as far south as Texas. Although the scope of his work is broad and he gives attention to his splendid enterprise, Mr. Powers is also loyal and public spirited in his civic attitude and gives his time, energy and means to all matters tending to the public good. He is a member of the Irvington Lodge, No. 666, F. & A. M., and is also a Shriner, and likewise belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. To him and his wife, who was Ella Raney before marriage, one daughter, Marguerite, has been born.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Gustavus Henry Voss, (Deceased.) The law is a jealous mistress and exacts from those who would win favor at her hand a full measure of devotion and a life of service, but when such devotion and service has been given, she rewards most bountifully. Among the men who gained distinction at the bar of Indiana few, if any, were better or more widely known than the late Gustavus H. Voss of Indianapolis. For many years he practiced his profession before the various courts of the state and nation. He was well founded in the basic principles of law and evidence, a tireless student and an able advocate of his chosen profession. Gustavus Henry Voss was born in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, on November 14, 1822, and departed this life at his home in Indianapolis, Indiana, March 15, 1883. His parents, Andrew and Jane (Ticer) Voss, were natives of South and North Carolina, respectively. The Voss family are of Holland Dutch and French Huguenot descent, the great grandfather of our subject having come from Holland. He was a West India merchant and owned many ships. His mother's people descended from the Doty family which came over in the Mayflower. His parents were among the early settlers of Cincinnati where the father became a substantial business man. The subject of this mention received his preliminary education in the public schools of Cincinnati, and Woodward College, from which he graduated. He then matriculated in the law department of the University of Indiana and was a member of the first class graduated from that well known university. Shortly after his graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Laws he located at Noblesville where he began to practice his profession and it may be of interest to here note that the first fee received for his services was paid with sheep, the wool from which was manufactured into blankets, some of which are still in the possession of his daughter now residing in Indianapolis. Shortly after his location in Noblesville he was elected prosecuting attorney for Hamilton county and also served as local attorney for the Peru railroad now a part of the Wabash system. He later became a member of the firm of Ray, Voss, Davis and Hollman and continued that association until his removal to Greencastle, this state, where he practiced for six years and where he gained a professional reputation that far transcended local limitations. Seeking a broader field of endeavor, in 1868 he came to Indianapolis and here practiced the remainder of his life. After coming to Indianapolis, Mr. Voss at once became a leader in his profession and identified himself with the civic and social life of his adopted city. He was among the first to be convinced of the future of Indianapolis and invested largely in local real estate, the appreciation of which amounted to a substantial fortune. He was a liberal, loyal citizen ever ready to give his aid and influence in the support of measures and enterprises tending to the advancement of the general welfare and civic progress of his home city. During the dark days of the Civil War he was unremitting in his efforts to uphold the cause of the Union. He campaigned the state making vigorous and fruitful speeches to encourage enlistment and did much to quicken the loyal response on the part of volunteers. During the absence of soldiers at the front he personally provided for many of the families who had thus become dependent and aided in every way possible the furtherance of this righteous cause. Besides attending to his extensive law practice, Mr. Voss also owned and operated a farm near Noblesville, where he indulged himself in the breeding of fine horses for which he had great admiration and fondness. While never seeking political preferment he gave his support to the Republican party and was an able exponent of its principles and policies. In religious matters he was identified with the Second Presbyterian Church, being a devout and zealous member of that organization. He also held membership in the I. O. O. F., besides various social and professional organizations of representative character. In 1845 at New Palestine, Indiana, he was united in marriage with Sarah Ann Evans, a native of Kentucky, of Scotch-Irish and French descent, her ancestors having come to America as early as the sixteenth century. Her parents, Jonathan and Susannah (Barnett) Evans both belonged to pioneer families of Kentucky, her father having been born in that state in 1799. Her mother was the daughter of James and Sarah (Snodgrass) Barnett, who came to Kentucky from Virginia when that state was first opened for settlement and known as the "Dark and Bloody Ground," Mrs. Barnett and her husband making the journey on horseback from Virginia to their new home bringing with them a set of dishes packed in bags and carried across the horse's back. Henry Barnett, the great grandfather of Mrs. Voss, had twenty-two sons, twenty-one of whom served in the American army during the Revolutionary War. Jonathan Evans came to Indiana in 1837 where he entered and cleared a farm in Hancock county and where he prospered to such an extent that he acquired substantial property and became a prominent man in that community having laid out the town of New Palestine on a part of his farm. He later in life removed to Hamilton county purchasing land near the city of Noblesville, and there passed the remainder of his life. To Mr. and Mrs. Gustavus Henry Voss were born five children, named as follows, in the order of their birth: Theresa Herriott, who became the wife of Weller B. Smith of Indianapolis; Corinna, who married Isaac S. Randall, Tarquinia and Jay G., all of whom are now deceased, with the exception of Tarquinia, who now resides in Indianapolis, and is one of the social leaders of this city having taken an active part in its social and civic life and a short mention of whom in this connection will be read with interest by many people throughout the state. Miss Tarquinia L. Voss received her early education mostly in private schools and with private instructors, she later entered Sea Crest Seminary and DePauw University and later was graduated from the Baptist Institute. She still later pursued a course of study in Columbia College, New York, and was for three years a student at Sarbonne University of Paris, France. And during her period of study in that noted institution she made no less than eighteen trips across the Atlantic Ocean. After completing her schooling Miss Voss spent one year in Mexico with the family of ex-Governor Isaac P. Gray, who was then serving as Ambassador to Mexico. Miss Voss has always taken deep interest in the social and civic affairs of her home city and is now serving as Regent of the D. R., and has filled that position for the past twenty-five years. She also represented her native state at the Exhibition at Paris, in 1900, and is at the present time serving as Fifth Vice-President General of the D. R. In early life she was an active member of numerous clubs and social orders but of recent years has taken no active part, due largely to the fact that she has spent most of her time abroad. She was one of the organizers of the Franchise League and was also one of the original members of the Indianapolis League of Women Voters and holds membership in the Indianapolis and Woman's Republican Clubs. Miss Voss never married but has adopted a daughter of her nephew, Lurline Voss, who is now a student in Shortridge high school of Indianapolis. On the maternal side of Miss Voss' family there were many soldiers, a number of whom were West Point graduates. Admiral Evans was a second cousin. Her old home which stood on the site of the present Federal Building, was a social center in the early history of Indianapolis, her parents being social leaders of that period of the city's history, and there originated many of the customs which we still observe, one of which is the hanging of Christmas wreaths, which was introduced by her mother, and which has now come into general use. Her mother was also the first to employ the then famous Henry Hart Orchestra which afterwards became very popular throughout the city. The family have ever been recognized as leaders in their respective fields of chosen endeavor and the old home, which was forced to give way before the rapidly advancing city, is recalled by older inhabitants as the center from which radiated uplifting influences, which tended to establish the moral and social standards of both city and state, and while both parents have passed to their reward, their memory is cherished by those who were fortunate enough to know them, and their influence will be felt throughout the coming years.

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History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John Wilson Puffer, D. D. S. Like so many of the young men of his age, Dr. John Wilson Puffer of Indianapolis, has a fine war record, not only for service in the World War, but also in the Mexican border campaign. He was born on a farm in Calhoun county, Iowa, August 12, 1890, and was reared in his .native state. Its country schools and the high school of Sac City, Iowa, started him on the road of education, and he subsequently attended the Indiana Dental College and was graduated therefrom after three years, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He is now an instructor in the above mentioned college. Upon coming to Indiana he enrolled in the Indiana State Guards, and was sent with his company, in 1916, to the Mexican border, and retained there until in December, of that year, when he was returned home. From then until August, 1917, when he was commissioned a first lieutenant in the regular service, he was engaged in the practice of dentistry, but at that time was called to the colors, and continued in the service until July 21, 1919, being overseas for eight months, during that time being connected with Base Hospital 59, Remicourt, France, as a dental surgeon. In 1918 he was commissioned captain, and was honorably discharged with that rank. Once more he returned to Indianapolis, and resumed his practice in which he is very successful. He is a member of the county, state and national dental associations, of Xi Psi Phi dental Greek letter fraternity and of the Masonic order, having been advanced through the Thirty-second degree, Scottish Rite in the last named. He also belongs to the Mystic Shrine, the Athenaeum Club, the Indianapolis Athletic Club and the Presbyterian Church. Through his membership with Paul Coble Post, Number 26, American Legion, he keeps in touch with his former comrades in the late war. November 13, 1919, he was married to Miss Catherine Logsdon, of Indianapolis, and they have two children: John Wilson; Jr., who was born May 30, 1921; and Joanne, who was born June 16, 1922.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Thomas M. Quinn, who with Jacob H. Wolf owns the White Furniture company, was born in Indianapolis, July 20, 1882, and was one of twelve children, nine boys and three girls, horn to his parents, Michael T. and Bridget (Ward) Quinn, both of whom were born in Ireland. Michael Quinn and his wife immigrated from Ireland when the former was twenty-six years of age in 1865 and settled in Indianapolis. For seven years he worked on the railroads and then entered the employ of the Kingan & Company, packers. For fifty years he continued with this company, working with the firm until his death which occurred on New Year's Eve, 1922, at the age of eighty-three years, his wife haying preceded him in death in 1900. He was highly thought of by his employers and was one of the substantial citizens of the city in which he had made his residence for fifty-seven years. Of the twelve children that were born to him and his wife, only five are still living: Thomas M., the subject of this review; Dr. P. E. Quinn, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Winifred Dugan, of Indianapolis; Mrs. John E. Lynch, of Indianapolis; and Edward T., also of Indianapolis. Thomas M. Quinn received his education in St. John's school and the Manual Training high school of Indianapolis. Upon the completion of his tuition days he secured employment in the mailing department of the Indianapolis Journal continuing with this paper until after the Indianapolis Star had bought out the interests of the owners of the Journal. He became president of the Mailers Union, while he was working with the Star, which he left. For a year thereafter he was a helper on the wagon for the National Furniture company. With the expiration of that time, he was offered a position as salesman with that same concern, which he accepted. He continued in the employ of this company, being promoted at different times until he was the sales manager at, the time he left the firm. In 1920, he and Jacob H. Wolf, whose review appears elsewhere in this work, bought the White Furniture company, under which name they continue to operate 'the business today. The business is rated as one of the financially secure enterprises in the city of Indianapolis. Mr. Quinn was married February 5, 1908, to Margaret Mullen, the daughter of John and Catherine (Finn) Mullen, the former of whom was born in Indianapolis and the latter was a native of Ireland. To Mr. and Mrs. Quinn have been born four children: Thomas M., Jr., aged fourteen years; John J., aged twelve years; Margaret M., who is ten years of age; and Alice Claire, a child of three. Mr. Quinn is a popular and valued member of the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Chamber of Commerce, and he supports the principles of the Democratic party, believing that its platforms best serve the interests of the public welfare.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John Paul Ragsdale, of the firm of Ragsdale & Price, funeral directors, was born in Johnson county, Indiana, July 23, 1890, the son of A. M. and Fidelia (Morgan) Ragsdale, both of whom were natives of Johnson county, the former being born there November 10, 1854, and the latter born there March 21, 1857. John T. Ragsdale, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was, born in Indiana where he was engaged in the undertaking and saw milling business during his entire life. A. M. Ragsdale was raised in Franklin, Indiana, and during his residence in Johnson county, he was very active in politics, being elected to various county offices. In 1896, he gave up his real estate business in Franklin and came to Indianapolis where he started the, firm of Ragsdale & Snow, undertakers, continuing in this work until his death, which occurred in 1920, his wife dying two years later. They were the parents of five children: John Paul, Mrs. J. W. Price, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Ernest L. Foley, Alpena, Michigan, Mrs. R. L. Kaylor, also of Indianapolis, and Mrs. W. B. Eggleston, Detroit, Michigan. John Paul Ragsdale received his elementary education in the graded and Shortridge high schools of his home community, graduating from the latter in 1908, and he then matriculated at Butler College, where he pursued a three year academic course. With the close of his tuition days, he went into the undertaking business with his father, continuing in this work until 1917. With the outbreak of the World War, he offered his services to the government, being first accepted for the first reserve officers training camp. He was commissioned first lieutenant and assigned to the machine gun company with the 168th Infantry in the famous Rainbow Division. He participated in all of the major offensives, winning his promotion to the rank of captain and appointment as regimental adjutant, and was cited for gallantry in action, being recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross. He returned to Indianapolis after his discharge from the service, and on July 26, 1919, he was married to Louise Rumpler, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Rumpler, of Indianapolis, and to this union have been born two children, John Paul, Jr., and Edward Mayfield. Since the war he has followed his chosen business of undertaking, operating under the firm style of Ragsdale & Price, which has an excellent reputation throughout the city of Indianapolis. Mr. Ragsdale holds membership in the Masons, the Service Club of Indianapolis of which he was one of the organizers and the first president, the Bruce Robison Past of the American Legion, serving as the post commander of that organization and as chairman of the Marion County Council for the same association. He is secretary of the Indiana Funeral Directors Association, secretary and treasurer of the State Board of Embalmers, chairman of the Executive Board of the National Embalmers Examining Board, a member of the Irvington Dramatic Club, secretary of the Associated Service Clubs, Incorporated, a national organization, and belongs to Oriental Lodge, F. & A. M., Oriental Chapter, R. A. M. and DeMolay Commandery, Knights Templar. Although he is one of the youngest undertakers in Indianapolis, he has acquired an enviable reputation in the line of work in which he is engaged.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Charles A. Rector, D. O. Endowed by nature with those talents which are of a material aid to him in his profession, and possessed of carefully trained abilities, Dr. Charles A. Rector, of Indianapolis, has steadily risen until today he is recognized as being one of the leading osteopaths of the Capital City. He was born in Scotland county, Missouri, April 28, 1878, and was graduated from the Missouri State Normal School. Later he took up the study of osteopathy, and was graduated, in 1899, from the Columbian School of Osteopathy. For the following year he was engaged in the practice of his profession at San Jose, California, and then, in 1900, came to Indianapolis, where he has since been actively engaged as an osteopath, and he now maintains offices at 405 I. O. O. F. Building. Believing in the efficacy of united action he has affiliated with the local, state and national associations of osteopaths. The Second Presbyterian Church of Indianapolis is his religious home. High in Masonry he has been advanced clear through the various bodies of the Scottish Rite, and he also belongs to the Mystic Shrine. The Optimist Club holds his membership. March 21, 1900, he was married to Miss Edith Preston of La Platte, Missouri, who died in 1923, at the age of forty-five years.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Charles A. Reeve, one of the representative citizens of Indianapolis is a native of Indiana, and was born near Plainfield, this state. He received his elementary education in the Fairfield school and in the Plainfield Academy and then matriculated at Earlham College. His attendance at this institution was somewhat irregular, however, having taught in the rural schools of Indiana and worked on his father's farm during the time intervening between his periods of attendance at Earlham College. In 1900 he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science and for a time thereafter taught schoo1. He was not satisfied with this work, however, and secured a position with the Mooresville State Bank where the remained for a time, but in 1902, came to Indianapolis, where he accepted a position as clerk with the Ballard Ice Cream company. His efficiency and close application to business soon found favorable recognition by his employers, and he was subsequently admitted to partnership in the firm. He has continued in this work since then and has been one of the active factors in making the Ballard Ice Cream company what it is today. The concern is recognized in commercial circles as one of the leading enterprises of its kind in Indianapolis, and enjoys an extensive trade throughout Indiana and neighboring states. Mr. Reeve is deeply interested in the affairs of the Friends Church. He is a member of the board of the Wheeler City Rescue Mission, the board of the Bertha Ballard Home, and the board of Southland College. He is also a member of the Exchange Club, the Indianapolis Board of Trade, and the Chamber of Commerce. In 1906 he was united in marriage with Miss Katherine Osborne, of Wilmington, Ohio, and they maintain a pleasant home at 4626 Washington boulevard.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John Floyd Rigg, M. D., one of the skilled surgeons of Indianapolis who is meeting with notable success in his profession, was born at Grinnell, Kansas, September 15, 1893. His early education was obtained in the public schools of Park county, Indiana, to which county his mother had moved when he was in early boyhood, his father having died when Doctor Rigg was about eleven months old. He later attended the Bellmore and Rockville high schools and was graduated from the latter with the class of 1912. In 1918, he took the degree of Bachelor of Science from the University of Indiana, and in 1920 that of Doctor of Medicine from the medical school of the same institution. For the ensuing six months he served as an interne in the Wichita (Kansas) hospital, and then came to Indianapolis, where he established himself in the active practice of his profession, specializing in surgery. He is a deep student, and keeps in close touch with all that research is bringing to light in the field of scientific knowledge. As a member of the Indianapolis Industrial Clinic, at 220 Peoples Bank Building, he is active in the organization, and is recognized as a man of ability. He is also a member of the Marion County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. In September, 1917, he enlisted in the medical corps of the United States Army for service in the World War, and received his honorable discharge in December, 1918. Doctor Rigg was married June 6, 1920 to Elizabeth Jane McAllister, of Bloomington, Indiana, and they maintain a pleasant home at 315 North Hamilton avenue. His private offices are at 2208 East Washington street.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Miss Fredonia Allen, Ph.B. In the year 1902 there was founded at Indianapolis what was destined to become an educational institution of national reputation, one giving a broad general culture course and one that really teaches it pupils to study -Tudor Hall School for Girls. From its opening in September of the year mentioned it has been under the supervision and personal direction of its present head mistress, Miss Fredonia Allen, Ph.B. The aim and purpose of the school is to prepare girls for the leading colleges for women and to provide a liberal education for those who do not wish to pursue a college course. From 1902, the school occupied the buildings at the corner of Meridian and Sixteenth streets, but in September, 1917, having outgrown these quarters, removed to its new and present location at Meridian and Thirty-second streets, the site being in one of the best and most beautiful residential sections of the city. Several large building lots adjoining each other afford ample room for the two buildings and a commodious campus. The residence and school buildings are both constructed of light buff brick, with stone trimmings, in the English style of architecture, the school occupying the building on the corner and the residence directly to the south, the buildings being connected by a covered passageway, pergola style. The school building is fire-proof, with steel stairways, heated by steam and lighted by electricity. In the lower school there are three assembly rooms, while the large academic assembly hall is of sufficient size to accommodate the entire school on special occasions. All of these rooms, together with the class rooms that accommodate the recitation work are well heated and lighted with ample window space. The Science and Domestic Science Laboratories are equipped for individual work. The large gymnasium has its apparatus so arranged that the room may be used for formal entertainments, dramatics and dancing parties. One of the newest and most pleasing features of the entire building is the roof playground, where open air exercises can be given every day throughout the entire year, independent of weather conditions. This roof arrangement is not only a splendid way to secure vigorous and healthy exercises, but affords charming possibilities for open air festivities. A studio for music and art, an occupation room for primary grades, form two other interesting features of the school. The residence is also fire-proof, heated by steam and lighted by electricity, and the entire arrangements of the building are spacious and cheerful. The entrance hall in the center of the building is a well-appointed, dignified room, connecting the two wings of the building. The students' living room, 25x35 feet, with its large fire-place, its artistically arranged window places, its comfortable furnishings and its well-chosen library, forms the center of student life. The lower floor, the entrance and reception hall, the students' living room and the teachers' reception room, can, by an artistic arrangement of French doors, be thrown together, affording ample opportunity for social gatherings of the school. A large well-appointed dining room is not only adequate for the residence, but gives opportunity for the affairs of the school. The bed rooms are all located on the second floor. These are large, averaging 14x20 feet, and are well ventilated and lighted. Each bed room has the sun part of the day; each student has her own bed, bureau and chest, and ample accommodations for baths, including shower baths, are provided on the bath room floor. For a city school, the grounds are extensive. In front, well-selected flowers and shrubs and a large space of lawn give the building a suitable setting, while the playground presents tennis courts and a basketball and field-day grounds for other outdoor sports. The school uses the certificate privilege wherever it is granted by higher institutions. It has the right of admission upon its certificate to the Universities of Chicago, Cornell, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana and California and state colleges. Pupils are successfully prepared for Radcliffe, Bryn Mawr and College Board examinations. The school ranks among the first in the country in scholastic standing and the high quality of the work has been recognized by educators, being accredited by the Indiana State Board of Education and by the Northern Central Association of Schools and Colleges. Graduates of Tudor Hall who have entered colleges show their thorough preparation by their good standing, and alumnae of this school will be found among the successful undergraduates and graduates of Vassar, Wellesley, Smith, Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Wells, Sweet Briar Western Woman's College of Baltimore, and the Universities of Chicago, Indiana, Illinois, Northwestern; DePauw, Michigan and California. Tudor Hall held the right to certification to Smith, Vassar, Mount Holyoke and Wellesley Colleges, until the certificate privilege was abolished for all schools, private and public. Since that time Tudor Hall students have taken the examinations of the College Entrance Board. The school has had the following candidates: 1918, 20; 1919, 26; 1920,42; 1921, 53; 1922, 75; and 1923, 85. Special preparation is given for Bryn Mawr College. Attention is called to the fact that Bryn Mawr now permits its matriculation examinations to be taken in three divisions, but that there are explicit restrictions placed on the manner in which these examinations may be divided. The faculty of Tudor Hall is as follows: Fredonia Allen, Ph.B., Cornell University, Principal; Hazel Dunlap McKee, A.B., A.M., Vassar College, Head of Latin Department and Assistant Supervisor of Senior Academic; May Orme Mackenzie, M.A., Aberdeen, Scotland, Head of English Department, Diploma in Theory and Practice of Education, Cambridge, England, Reader of English, College Examination Board; Miss Zillah Sherman, A.B., Bryn Mawr, English and History; Geneva Carpenter, A.B., A.M., Smith College and Columbia University, Head of History Department; Pauline Wilson, B.S., Teachers' College, Columbia University, Mathematics; Emily Rood, A.B., A.M., Mount Holyoke College, Science and Mathematics; Ethel Anne Potter, A.B., Smith College, Latin and History of Art; Zillah Sherman, A.B., Wells College, graduate student of Universities of Chicago and Columbia; Ida Urech,Brevet, Ecole Gymnasiale, Brevet, Ecole Normale and La Sorbonne, French; Lea Binand, Brevet Superieur, Lycee d' Amiens, French; Eleanor Kirby, Bible; Burnita Norman, Mathematics; Idette Meyer, Brevet, Paris, French; Grace Clark Pierce, Graduate School of Expression, Boston, Student, University of California, Voice Culture and Dramatic Art; Winifred Allen, Mount Holyoke, Graduate New Haven School of Physical Training, Graduate Miss Faulhaber's School of Aesthetic Dancing, Boston, Physical Training and Aesthetic Dancing; Elizabeth Chipman, Graduate Indianapolis Normal School, studied at Harvard University and Columbia University Summer Schools, Supervisor of Junior Academic and Intermediate Departments; Bertha Raymond Ellis, A.B., Vassar College, Intermediate Department; Lillian Reeves, Graduate Teachers' College, Indianapolis, studied at Columbia University and University of Wisconsin Summer Schools, Primary; Martha Gill, Graduate Teachers' College, Primary; Sarah L. Kirlin, Supervisor Study Hours; Gladys Denney, Drawing; Grace Trimble, Associate Director of the Residence; Helen Pracht, Associate Director of the Residence; Frances B. Spencer, Piano; Susan Richardson, Piano; Carolyn Leckner, Voice; Bertha Schellschmidt, Violin; Rudolph Heyne, Director of Choral Class; and Sylvia G. Goold, Secretary. Principal Allen, who has become one of the best-known woman educators in the state, is a member of the National Head Mistress' Association, the Middle West Head Mistress' Association, the American Historical Society, the Mississippi Historcal Society and the Contemporary and Fortnightly clubs, of which last-named she is an ex-president and present honorary member.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William A. Ringo, D. C., D. M. T., one of the successful chiropractors of Indianapolis, is a man whose standing in his city and profession is unquestioned. He was born in Union county, Kentucky, July 26, 1871, and in that county acquired his preliminary schooling. While still a lad he moved to Crittenden county, Kentucky, where he completed his attendance on the public school sessions. For twelve years he was profitably engaged in work as a photographer, and then he began the study of mechano-therapy, and was graduated in that science at Chicago, in 1912. In 1914 he came to Indianapolis, and began his practice. Subsequently he branched out and took up chiropractic, and in 1918 was graduated from the National School of Chiropractic at Chicago. He returned to Indianapolis that same year and since then has practiced as a chiropractor, his offices being at 3320 Massachusetts avenue, where his equipment is admirably fitted for his purposes. He belongs to the Indiana Chiropractic Association, and while the Indianapolis Chiropractic Association was in existence he served as its vice-president. Fraternally he is a Royal-Arch Mason, and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Dramatic Order Knights of Khorassan. In 1923 he represented the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at the Grand Lodge of that order. Doctor Ringo was married in 1898 to Miss Eva Higginson, who was born in the vicinity of Morganfield, Union county, Kentucky, and they have four children: Agnes, who was educated in the public schools of Kentucky and Indianapolis, married Robert Lesher, a railroad conductor of Indianapolis, and they have two children, Bettie and Dorothy; Alice Lucile, who is a graduate from the Indianapolis Technical high school; Nellie B., who is a graduate of the grammar schools and is now a student in the Indianapolis Technical high school; and John Albert, who is just commencing his educational training.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Marshall V. Robb, who has been officially identified with numerous leading business interests of Central Indiana for a number of years, since 1922 has been one of the vice-presidents of the Central Indiana Power company, with offices on West Washington street, Indianapolis. He was born in February, 1879, in Ohio, son of John W. and Martha V. (McMechen) Robb. His father was born in Ohio in 1851, and for a number of years has been general manager of the Wabash Valley Electric company and resides at Clinton, Indiana. His mother was born in Ohio in 1854, and died at Clinton in 1911. Marshall V. Robb was educated in the public schoo1s at Clinton; and Wabash College; and at the close of his school life decided on a business rather than a professional career. For about thirteen years he was interested in the insurance business, and later was connected with the Clinton Electric Light & Power company, and the Sullivan County Electric company. July 18, 1922, he was made one of the vice-presidents of the Central Indiana Power company, and additionally he is vice-president of the First National Bank of Clinton, Indiana. Public confidence is with him as a man of wide business vision tempered by sound judgment. In 1906 he married Miss Virginia A Hutchinson, of Rockville; Indiana, and they have three children: Jane Seymour, Katharine Marshall, and Mary Van Meter. Mr. Robb belongs to the fraternal order of Elks, and is a member of the Columbia and Indianapolis Athletic clubs, and the Clinton Country Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


James B. Roberson, now practically retired, who has been a resident of Indianapolis for the past twenty-four years, assisting in the city's growth and substantial development, is a native of Indiana and a descendant of old and representative American families. He was born in 1857, on his father's farm lying three miles west of Indianapolis, on the National Road, the great highway to the West at that time, and he recalls among other boyhood recollections, the passing of the covered wagons of the pioneers on their way to Kansas. He came of sturdy stock, originating in the Highlands of Scotland, and was one of a family of four sons and two daughters, all but one of whom survive. His father, William N. Roberson, was born near Jonestown, Washington county, Tennessee, October 23, 1816, and died October 22, 1913. In 1832 he accompanied his parents, David and Mary (Roberts) Roberson, to Indiana, the journey being made by wagon drawn by oxen, and spent the rest of his long and useful life in this state. The Scotch are proverbial lovers of learning, and although William N. had learned to read and write in Tennessee, he was very ambitious to continue his studies, but for some time he found very limited opportunity, but when occasion did finally come, he made great progress, surprising his teachers by his facility in mathematics. For several years he worked on an Indiana farm for a wage of $8 a month, then obtained a sub-contract to dig a state ditch and afterward secured the contract to dig a half mile of the old Central canal. In purchasing land in Wayne township, he displayed excellent judgment, it now being a part of West Indianapolis. At the time of purchase it was covered with timber and later he engaged in a sawmill business with Andrew Wilson which proved profitable. In the meanwhile he bought other tracts of land and continued an active business man into advanced age. James B. Roberson, the second born of his parents' children, grew up on the home farm and obtained his education first in the Mount Jackson school and afterward in the Roberson school which was built on his father's land. Like the majority of country youths at that time, the greater part of school attendance was during winter seasons, Mr. Roberson giving help on the farm at other times. Agricultural pursuits continued to claim his attention for many years afterward, but in 1900 because of somewhat impaired health, he came to Indianapolis to live, at that time erecting his comfortable residence at No. 2315 West Washington street, and has been identified with the best interests of this city ever since. A few years since, the old farm was laid out in lots, the city having encroached, and much of the entire area has been built upon. October 19, 1881, he married Mary E., daughter of Thomas Kempton, a contractor and farmer. Mrs. Roberson's maternal ancestors, the Mays, came to the American colonies from England, on the Mayflower. Her death occurred December 1, 1918, two daughters and one son surviving: Bessie M., who is the wife of Seely Williams, a contracting engineer at Indianapolis, and they have two sons, James and Seely Williams; Mary Elsie, who lives with her father; and William Cleveland, of Indianapolis, who married Charlotte Lowe and they have three sons, James Russell, Richard and William Roberson. Mr. Roberson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which the family has belonged for generations. In political sentiment, the Robersons have generally been Democratic, but he takes satisfaction in maintaining an attitude which permits entire freedom of political action.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Clyde E. Robinson, president of the Marion County State Bank, is one of the reliable bankers of Indianapolis who has risen to high executive position from the bottom of the ladder of fortune, his successive promotions having been given him because he earned them by faithful performance of the duties assigned him. He was born at Westport, Decatur county, Indiana, July 3, 1896, son of T. W. and Frances (Newhinney) Robinson, both of whom were born in Indiana. Both of the grandfathers served as members of Indiana regiments of infantry during the war between the North and South. For nine and one-half years T. W. Robinson served as postmaster of Westport. Of the two children born to his parents, Clyde E. is the younger. He attended the common and high schools of Westport, and was graduated from the latter in 1913. For two years thereafter he was a student of the Central Normal School at Danville, Indiana. Eight years ago he entered the Marion County State Bank as messenger boy, and from that day, October 15, 1915 to the present, he has never ceased to be actively interested in the welfare of this institution. Almost at once his ability was recognized, and he was promoted from one position to another until, in 1923, he was made the chief executive of the bank. He is also a director of the James H. Weyer Insurance company, with offices in the City Trust Building. This concern is state agent for the Hartford Fire Insurance company, and other old-line companies. Well-known in Masonry, he belongs to Westport Lodge No. 52, A. F. & A. M., and has been advanced through the different bodies of the Scottish Rite, through the Thirty-second degree. He also belongs to Murat Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Indianapolis, is treasurer of Indianapolis Lodge No. 13, B. P. O. E., and belongs to the Hoosier Motor Club and to the Hoosier Athletic Club.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Julia A. Roll, was born in Indianapolis March 25, 1839, the daughter of Ephraim Colestock, a native of Germany. Her mother was Hannah Boone a relative of Daniel Boone. Her parents died while she was a child and she was adopted by a family named Naugle. The father of our subject immigrated from Germany at an early date and came to the United States. He married a woman of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and then removed to Indianapolis of which he was one of the early residents. He was a carpenter and a contractor by vocation and he it was who built the present Marion County Infirmary, a building that is eighty-five years old. He secured the contract for the present Marion County Courthouse during the construction of which he died from injuries received in a fall while he was superintending the work. Julia A. (Colestock) Roll received her education in a seminary which was located where the present Capitol theater now stands. April 16, 1860, she married William H. Roll, a native of Ohio, and the couple went to New York on their wedding trip, which was considered a long journey in those days. Shortly after the marriage, Mr. Roll enlisted in Harvey Bates' regiment for service in the Civil War, 132nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company D, and with that organization he served until the cessation of hostilities. He returned to Indianapolis following his discharge from the army and engaged in the carpet and wall paper business. He located his store on South Illinois street where for thirty-three years he was successfully engaged in his work. His industry and close application to the affairs of his concern won for him the reputation of being one of the shrewdest and most capable business men in the commercial life of Indianapolis. He died in 1919 at the age of eighty-four years. Mr. and Mrs. Roll were the parents of three children, as follows: Harry W., Nellie, and Edward Palmer. Harry W. Roll resides at 2062 Park avenue, Indianapolis, and his married daughter is the mother of one daughter, thus making Mrs. Julia Roll a great grandmother. Nellie Roll married a Mr. Greyer who is now dead and she has one daughter, Mrs. E. L. Donahue, and lives at 1719 N. New Jersey street. Edward P. Roll is employed by the Pillsbury Flour company at Boston, Massachusetts. Mrs. Julia Roll is a member of the Meridian Street Methodist Church of which Mr. Roll was also a member. Mr. Roll devoted much time after he retired to Home Mission work and held meetings at the jail and the workhouse. In her younger days, Mrs. Roll was the intimate friend of Fannie Vandergrift, the wife of Robert Louis Stevenson. Mrs. Roll has seen Indianapolis grow from a small town to the status of one of the large cities of the United States.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Henry Rosenberg, the president and treasurer of the Indianapolis Excelsior Machine company, was born in Indianapolis, January 12, 1864, the son of Samuel and Anna (Intleman) Rosenberg, the former of whom was born in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1828. Samuel Rosenberg travelled over the entire world, coming at last to Indianapolis where he engaged in the hat business at the present site of the Indiana Trust company. For a number of years, he remained in this work but gave it up to go into railroad work with the Big Four railroad. He continued in this work until his death which occurred in 1905 at the age of seventy-seven years. His wife, who was born in Germany in 1846, died in 1915. Henry Rosenberg received his education in the common schools of Indianapolis, and at the end of his tuition days, he became a machinist apprentice with the Indianapolis Bolt & Machine works, remaining in the employ of that firm from 1879 to 1892. For a few years thereafter, he was in the employ of the Sinker-Davis company, but he returned then to the plant of his former employers. In 1903; he purchased the Indianapolis Excelsior Machine company, a firm that was established forty years ago by Jesse B. Johnson, from whom Mr. Rosenberg bought the business. The company is one of the most successful in its line in the city of Indianapolis where it has taken such a prominent place in the commercial history. Although it has been identified with the business life of the city for many years, Mr. Rosenberg has been largely instrumental in establishing it more firmly in this respect. Its business has enjoyed a most gratifying and steady increase under his experienced direction, and the firm is rated as one of the most financially secure in the city. Mr. Rosenberg was married September 24, 1890, to Emma Decker, the daughter of Conrad and Elizabeth (Enners) Decker, old residents and pioneers of Indianapolis. To this union has been born one daughter who is now the wife of Leroy Clements, of Indianapolis. In political matters, Mr. Rosenberg supports the Republican party, believing that its principles best serve the interests of the public welfare.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924