Reverend Francis H. Gavisk. An honored and distinguished representative of priesthood of the Catholic Church in the capital city of Indiana is Father Francis H. Gavisk, who is in charge of St. John's Church. He was born in Evansville, Indiana, April 6, 1856, son of Michael and Mary (Tierney) Gavisk, natives of Ireland, both now deceased. Raised and educated at place of birth, then studied at St. Meinrad's Abbey in Spencer county, Indiana, then on May 30, 1885, he was ordained to the priesthood at the hands of Rt. Reverend F. S. Chatard, then the bishop of Indianapolis. He was assistant at St. John's and is now in this parish and has held same since 1890. He was a member of the official board of the Indianapolis Charity Organization Society; the Board of State Charity, being appointed by Governor Hanly in 1908, and a member of the executive committee of Indiana, and of the American Red Cross. He takes a deep interest in all benevolent and charitable work and he holds membership in the Commercial Club, was on the Citizens' Library Committee of Public Library and is also chancellor of the Diocese of Indianapolis.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Bryant Welsh Gillespie is senior partner in the firm of Gillespie, Clark and Beck, livestock commission merchants at Indianapolis. This firm has been in continuous existence for thirty-five years and is one of the oldest commission houses in the state. Mr. Gillespie has long been a veteran figure in the livestock markets of that city and is so known and esteemed not only locally, but by thousands who have patronized those markets from all over the state. He was born in Crawford county, Ohio, January 26, 1863, son of Thomas and Hannah (Welsh) Gillespie. In the fall of 1863 when he was less than a year old, his parents moved to Illinois, first locating at Ridge Farm, near Danville, later at Paris, and still later at Newman. Thomas Gillespie and his wife spent the rest of their days at Newman, where the former died November 22, 1917, and the latter on March 31, 1875. Thomas Gillespie was a stock buyer and dealer and his example was no doubt the chief influence in causing his son Bryant to follow the same vocation. The son in fact as early as thirteen entered the stock business with his father, and on his sixteenth birthday was accorded the unusual honor of being taken into partnership by the elder Gillespie. They were associated together until November 11, 1882, when Bryant W. Gillespie came to Indianapolis to enter the service of a firm at the stock yards. Thus his home has been in Indianapolis for nearly forty-two years and during most of the time his name has been associated with the firm of Gillespie, Clark and Beck. He was for twenty-two years secretary and is now president of the West Side Savings and Loan Association No.2. He was one of the organizers of the Indianapolis livestock exchange in 1887, and has been a member of the exchange continuously. For thirteen years he was on the executive board as he is today and for six years was vice-president, and president for the years 1899, 1922 and 1923 and vice-president of the National Live Stock Exchange 1922 and 1923. Gillespie is past master in the Masonic lodge, also a Scottish Rite Thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Murat Temple of the Mystic Shrine. In politics he is an ardent Republican. Soon after he came to Indianapolis he became affiliated with Roberts Park Methodist Church and for many years he has been a leader in affairs. He is ex-president of the board of stewards and is now a member of the board of trustees and since 1890 has served as superintendent of Sunday schools, for eleven years at Hyde Park, four years at Roberts Park and serving Blain Avenue for six years. His attitude and interests as a citizen have run true to his ancestry. Civic movements of different kinds have enlisted his cooperation and besides giving his two sons to the overseas service he has participated personally in many of the social movements for the prosecution of the war. He was married October 20, 1884, to Laura Ann Milam, of Ellettsville, Indiana. Mr. Gillespie is vice-president of the Indiana Society of the Sons of the Revolution. He has just finished his eleventh year as superintendent of the Roberts Park Methodist Church Sunday school, which made twenty-one years in all as Sunday-school superintendent. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Roberts Park Church. He was president of the Indiana Live Stock Exchange, 1899, 1922 and 1923. His Revolutionary ancestry is through his mother. Hannah Welsh's mother was Jane Bryant, a daughter of David Bryant, being the fifteenth child of David Bryant's family. David Bryant who was thus the great grandfather of B. W. Gillespie, was born in Springfield, New Jersey, in 1756, and was nineteen years of age when he entered the service of the Continental army. He saw service with that army for five years. In 1790, he moved to Washington, county, Pennsylvania, and in 1816 became a pioneer in Knox county, Ohio, owning three farms near Frederickstown. In the summer of 1835, then an old man, he moved to the vicinity of Ft. Wayne, Indiana. David Bryant's youngest daughter, Jane, married Madison Washington Welsh, and their daughter, Hannah, in 1862, became the wife of Thomas Gillespie. One of the most distinguished members of this family was Wm. Cullen Bryant.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Mrs. Laura Ann Milam Gillespie, one of the very interesting women of Indianapolis, is the wife of Bryant W. Gillespie, who is also given individual note at another place in this book, and whose history of Americanism goes farther back into the interesting past than that of her husband. Through several branches she is eligible to membership in the society of Mayflower descendants, and is State Historian for the Indiana Chapter of that organization. Her grandfather, George Milam, married Mary Baird Chipman, who was a daughter of Paris and Nancy (Baird) Chipman, the former serving in the Revolutionary War from Pennsylvania. The Chipmans were an English family. Several towns in England wear the name in one of its forms, Chippenham, Buckingham county and others. Mrs. Gillespie is the ninth generation in direct descent from John Howland, one of the most famous colonial Americans. John Howland was a grandson of Bishop Howland of England. He came to America in the Mayflower, and was one of its passengers who gathered in the cabin of that vessel and signed the "Compact." His wife was Elizabeth Tilley, who was also on the vessel. There is a tradition that she was the daughter of Governor Carver and through various other families she (Mrs. Gillespie) traces her ancestry to at least six if not eight of the Mayflower passengers. Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland, married John Chipman, whose home was at Barnstable, Massachusetts. The Milam family is of Virginia origin and from that state its members spread over the West during that pioneer epoch into Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana and other states. Several of the name have become fixed in history, particularly Ben Milam, one of the most conspicuous heroes of the Texas War for independence in 1836. Milam county, Texas, was named in his honor. Mrs. Gillespie's grandfather, George Milam and his wife, Mary Baird (Chipman), came to Indiana in 1819, and were pioneer settlers at Bloomington, Monroe county. Mrs. Gillespie was born at Ellettsville, a short distance north of Bloomington. She was the daughter of Rev. Francis Marvin Milam and Susannah McNeeley Milam. She is the teacher and was the organizer of the young ladies' Bible class of Roberts Park Methodist Church. From a small number in the beginning the class has grown to one hundred and eighty members. She is a member of the Y. W. C. A., Central W. C. T. U., charter member of the Woman's Department Club (only about sixty charter members left), Seventh District Woman's Republican Club, Propylaeum Club, appointed a member of the Smoke Abatement Committee, Magazine Club, Society of Indiana Pioneers, Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter D. A. R., Vincent C. L. S. c., Service Star Legion, Chairman of Patriotic Education and Americanization (of the D. A. R.). She is doing much good in this line, working with the settlement workers and many times has to have an interpreter in the meetings called to teach both children and grown ups of the foreign population to respect the flag and laws of America. She was one of five people appointed and who drafted the first Memorial Bill of the World War, the five were: Arthur Brady, Anderson, Indiana; Capt. B.S. Norton, Gary, Indiana; Joseph H. Mills, Richmond, Indiana; Mrs. B. W. Gillespie, Indianapolis, Indiana; and Miss Marguerite Holland, Vincennes, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie have two sons, Boyd Milam Gillespie, a graduate of Shortridge high school and DePauw University, where he was a member of Phi Delta Theta, married Ruth Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Thompson and a granddaughter of Wm. S. Hubbard, one of the founders of the Second Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Boyd M. Gillespie is a graduate of Bradford University. Her husband served with Battery A on the Mexican border, then entered college, and later went with Battery E, 150th Field Artillery to France. He was made corporal and was gassed by the Germans on May 1, 1918, spending several months in a base hospital recuperating as a result. He then was transferred to Battery A where he was engaged in several of the bigger battles on the Lorraine front, Chateau Thierry, Argonne Forest and other battles of the principal engagements. He was the first DePauw student injured in battle. He is now office manager for the firm of Gillespie, Clark and Beck. He is a Mason, belongs to the Second Presbyterian Church, being president of the Young People's Society. His home is at No. 5031 Kenwood avenue. The second son of Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, Bryant Welsh, Jr., attended Indiana University where he belonged to the Phi Delta Gamma fraternity, served with Battery A on the Mexican border, and went with Battery A, 150th Field Artillery to France. He is now a captain in the National Officers Reserve, and is a member of the firm of James W. Hill and company, being their purchasing agent. He is also a Mason, and belongs to the Shrine. He is assistant superintendent of the Roberts Park Methodist Church Sunday school. He married Florida Jane Austin, daughter of C. T. Austin, of Indianapolis, a graduate of Tudor Hall and Western University, and they have three children: Jane, born November 9, 1920; Bryant Welsh, III, July 15, 1922; and Mary Ann, December 5, 1923. Little Mary Ann died, April 23, 1924. His residence is at 2850 Talbott avenue.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Alfred M. Glossbrenner, president and treasurer of the Levey Printing company, The Shield Press, is one of the men of real achievement at Indianapolis. At the head of one of the oldest and most substantial business concerns of this city, his activities have made it a power in the publishing field, while in other directions, politics, philanthropy, public, steadfast, usefulness and community interests of all kinds, his energizing influence has long been felt. He comes of old colonial family settlement and of Revolutionary stock. His father's ancestors came to America in 1750, while his mother's ancestors, Quakers, came from England to Pennsylvania with William Penn, and both families were represented in the Patriot army in the Revolutionary War. His great grandparents were pioneer settlers in Indiana, and his father, who was in the United States mail service for many years, often recalled with interest that in his boyhood, in 1847, he was a passenger on the first railroad train to enter Indianapolis. In 1888, Mr. Glossbrenner became identified with what is now known as the Levey Printing company, which celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1923, having been founded in 1848, by William P. Levey, a practical bookbinder from Philadelphia. A large business grew in those wonderful developing years, from a small beginning, and in 1888 its possibilities and advantages appealed so strongly to the tastes and inclination of Alfred M. Glossbrenner, then a young man seeking a congenial field of effort, that he applied for employment and was engaged as bookkeeper and general office man. Promotions followed, inevitably, and for a number of years Mr. Glossbrenner has been president and treasurer of this organization, which under his guidance was reincorporated in 1919 as the Levey Printing company. He is the originator of the company's surname, The Shield Press, and founder of its publications, The Shield, which has been issued for fourteen years, and Bank Notes, two decades old. He has developed a highly specialized business and at the same time widely diversified, constituted of two main divisions, one being commercial printing and stationery manufacture, and the other the production and marketing of bank supplies. In its employment policy the company operates under what is known as the American plan. As may be imagined, Mr. Glossbrenner has a wide journalistic acquaintance and among his associates and close friends, will be found those who, like himself, are writers and judges of good literature. Early interested in political questions and firm in his convictions concerning them, at the age of twenty-nine years he was elected to the Indiana General Assembly and justified the confidence of his fellow citizens as a statesman. During 1912-13 he served as president of the United Typothetae of America, of which he was vice-president one year and treasurer three years, and it was his proposal, at the Buffalo convention concerning the establishment of a training school, which brought into being the Typothetae School of Printing, now operated as a branch of the Arsenal Technical schools in Indianapolis. In 1917, he was elected president of the Indianapolis Board of Trade and is still a member of its Board of Governors; for some years he was a director of the Indiana Manufacturers' Association, and for twenty years has been a director of the Associated Employers of Indianapolis. Sixteen years ago, he was appointed by Mayor Bookwalter, a member of the board of Sinking Fund commissioners and continues as president of the board. Marion county can easily recall his vigorous and patriotic policy as president of the War Board of Business Organizations of this city, by which the second Liberty Loan campaign was brought to a highly gratifying conclusion, and during the subsequent loan campaigns, he served as one of the three members of the Marion county executive committee. He is a director of the FletcherAmerican company and was a member of the building committee of the new Indianapolis Athletic Club. In private life as well as in public, Mr. Glossbrenner is respected and esteemed, and numerous organizations of the city, fraternal, social and benevolent, have profited by his generosity and public spirit.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


William Herschell, feature writer for the Indianapolis News, was born November 17, 1873, at Spencer, Indiana, the son of John and Martha (Leitch) Herschell. The father was a blacksmith for the Indianapolis & Vincennes railroad and later one of the officials at the State House quarry near Spencer, from which the stone was taken for the present Indiana capitol building. It is interesting to note that this same quarry is now a part of the state park, known as McCormick's Creek Canyon. In this park is a spring called "Long Boy," so named by Richard Lieber, director of conservation for Indiana, Mr. Lieber chose the title name of Mr. Herschell's famous war song, because when a school boy, Mr. Herschell stopped at the spring for a drink every day on his way to the nearby country school. He lived at Spencer for eight years and then removed with the family to Rockport, where the father became connected with the Southern system. Various changes in the division headquarters of the railroad caused the Herschell family to move from Rockport to Evansville, then Huntington, and then later to Princeton. Young "Bill" as he has always been known, learned the machinist trade and worked for six years in the shops, of the American railroad and when the strike was called "Bill" walked out with the rest and that was about the end of his shop work. The strike failed and he went to Canada, then back to Buffalo for a short period in railroad shops in these cities. He then tried the newspaper business next and went into the office of James McCormick, then to the Princeton paper for two years and then the Evansville Journal and in 1899 he joined the Indianapolis Press and was given the police reporter's desk which he held for the duration of the paper. He then went with the Terre Haute Tribune for nine months, but after that was police reporter for the Indianapolis Journal. It was in 1902 that Mr. Herschell was chosen to be a member of the Indianapolis News and at first he was a reporter. He is the writer of "Songs of the Streets and By-ways" of which four books have been written from selections written for this and magazines. The titles of these books are: "Songs of the Streets and By-ways," "The Kid Has Gone to the Colors," "The Smile Bringer," and "Howdy All," the last named being a 1922 offering. His song "Long Boy" was introduced to the American army at the time when marching songs were in demand at the various training camps, and through the immense popularity of this piece he became even more widely known throughout the country. Mr. Herschell married Josephine Pugh, June 3, 1908, and they reside at 958 Tecumseh Place.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Benjamin (deceased) and Susan Howell came to Indianapolis in the year 1876, and purchased the property (a log house) known as 286 and 288 East Washington street, where Mr. Howell kept a general store, and also dealt considerably in real estate. He was born in Dayton, Ohio, September 18, 1845, the son of Wm. Rice Howell, a Methodist evangelist, and Margaret (McClean) Howell. He received his education in the Dayton schools, studied medicine for a while, and assisted his father in evangelistic work. Later he secured a position with a firm of harness makers, where he remained until his marriage to Susan Gaeb, October 20, 1874. He was a direct descendant of Jan Van Cleef, (Van Cleve) who emigrated to America in 1653 from Cleef, in Netherland. Jan Van Cleef was born in 1628 and married Engeltie Lonwerens, daughter of Pieterse Lonwerens, prior to March 10, 1681. He was a farmer in Gravesend in 1656; became a resident of Neu Utrecht (New York City) in 1659; and was a land owner in that town in 1662. He was a member of a church in Neu Utrecht; was the town constable in 1678; and took the oath of allegiance there in 1687. He was still living January 25, 1694, when according to Vol. V, page 6, record of Wills in the Surrogate office, New York City, he took an inventory of the estate of Jacques Cortelyou. He had nine children. One, Ishbrant, was born July 17, 1675, and married Jameke Aertes Vanderbilt, sister of Commodore Vanderbilt's grandfather. Ishbrant was a juror at the session in 1699, but left Neu Utrecht and settled in Monmouth county, New Jersey. He had seven children, one of whom Benjamin, was born December 1, 1712; died July 2, 1775; married successively Sarah (who died) and Rachel Covenhoven, sisters. Married Rachael September 9, 1734, who was born September 7, 1712, died March 10, 1801. They had eleven children, and one was John, whose family became the first settlers of Dayton, Ohio. John was born May 16, 1749, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, served in his father's company during the War of Revolution and was captain and guide in the militia when New Jersey was the battlefield, and served as guide to Morgan's Riflemen. He was a member of the Monmouth county, New Jersey Association to retaliate against "The associated Loyalists." He was in the battle of Monmouth and his home and shop were destroyed that day. On August 1, 1772 he married Catherine Benham. Some years later they moved to Washington, Pennsylvania, and from there down the Monongahela and Ohio rivers to Losantiville, Ohio, arriving there January 3, 1790, the day Governor St. Clair changed its name to Cincinnati. While at work on an out lot June 1, 1791, he was ambushed by Indians, who stabbed him in five places, then scalped him. His friend, Samuel Thompson fought desperately to save him, wounding one of the Indians severely, thereby incurring the vengeance of the tribe. John Van Cleve left four sons and five daughters. His widow later married Samuel Thompson and he and Mrs. Thompson and the children left Cincinnati in a pirogue in the year 1796, landing at what was later known as Dayton, Ohio. Their decision to move arose partly from fear of the Indians, as numerous parties of them were organized for raids on the frontier settlements and were skulking around the Thompson home, watching for an opportunity to kill Mr. Thompson. The Thompson party started on March 21, with the McClure family and about a dozen others on board-a running board extended the length of the pirogue and upon this stood the men who worked the boat, while one steered another shoved a stout pole into the bank or bottom of the stream, then holding the other end to his shoulder walked slowly from the prow to the stern, forcing the craft slowly against the current. Withdrawing the pole he went back to the prow for a new set, repeating this duty hour after hour, while the boat crept at a snail's pace up the river. When shallows were met in the channel a rope was attached to a tree on the bank up stream and all on board would take hold and pull until the craft was even with the tree. It was only a sixty-mile journey but it required just ten days to cover it inch by inch, mile by mile. When they arrived they tied the pirogue to a tree and led by Mrs. Thompson all clambered ashore. They broke up the pirogue and with the lumber built a three sided shack open to the camp fire. They were the first settlers, Mrs. Thompson's son, Benjamin Van Cleve, was the first postmaster. Her daughter, Margaret Van Cleve Reeder was the grandmother of the late Milton Wright, bishop in the United Brethren Church and father of Orville and Wilbur Wright of airplane fame. Her daughter, Mary Van Cleve, was the first white child to step on Dayton soil. One winter night the Indians, who had followed Samuel Thompson, finally located him. They surrounded his cabin and with fierce yells demanded admittance. Fearing the Indians would break in upon them, Mary's mother took her out of bed and put her through a hole in the foundation by raising a board from the floor. While the Indians were raging at the front of the house the little girl ran through the darkness to Newcom's Tavern for help. In her path was a steep gully, filled with stones and briars; it was cold and dark, and with the fearful yells of the savages ringing in her ears, crying and breathless, she reached the tavern. Mr. Newcom carried her home on his shoulder and the rest of the men drove the Indians away. Mary Van Cleve was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1787; was married in 1804, to John McClean, a farmer in Lexington, Kentucky. They had seven children; and one, Margaret, born January 17, 1811, married Wm. Rice Howell, June 12, 1832; died May 14, 1881. They had six children; one, Benjamin, who married Susan Gaeb. Benjamin Howell was also related (on his father's side) to Wm. Dean Howells, the author. Mr. Howell died in Indianapolis, April 2, 1894. Susan Gaeb Howell was born in Dayton, Ohio, July 21, 1848. She taught in the Fifth District school there for seven years. She also taught music, the piano, and was a member of the English Reformed Church, where she taught the infant class for a number of years. She was the daughter of Wm. and Hannah Gaeb. Wm. Gaeb was born in Paris, France, April 21, 1814, and came to America about twenty years later. He settled near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he taught languages. He was a violinist of ability and composed extensively for the violin. He declared he was descended from a noble family but this was never investigated. He married Hannah Cline, a sixteen-year-old country school teacher, June 21, 1835. She was born in Alsace, May 20, 1819, the daughter of Philip and Christena Cline. They emigrated to America in 1823, bringing their little four-year-old daughter with them. Florence W. Howell, daughter of Benjamin and Susan Howell, was born in Indianapolis. She never attended school, receiving her entire education from her mother. She began the study of music under her mother at the age of three, and composed and published a waltz at the age of twelve. She traveled extensively with her mother from 1906 to 1912, and collected during that period over two hundred pieces of Japanese ware, some of which are rare specimens. Upon her return she spent her entire time for six months investigating factory conditions and making a close study of the various types of industrial workers. She was secretary of the Nature Study Club of Indiana, from May 23, 1914, to January 5, 1917, and secretary and treasurer from January 5, 1917, to January 4, 1919. She is a life member of the Woman's Department Club, was elected vice-chairman and served as chairman of the Psychical Research Section during 1922-23, is a life member of the Little Theatre Society, a life member of the Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, a member of the Indianapolis Matinee Musicale, organized a business and professional woman's section for the League of Women Voters in 1923, and is a member of Christ Episcopal Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Mrs. Charles Edward Kregelo was known as "Little Mother" to countless numbers of soldiers throughout army camps in the United States and overseas during the World War, and that name typified her, for she was, indeed, a little mother to the boys in khaki. Her maiden name was Laura Jane McCune, and she was born in Mercersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, the daughter of James and Susanna Katherine (Will) McCune. The McCune family settled in the Keystone State at an early date in its history, and in his work on Pennsylvania, Doctor Eagle says "Pennsylvania owes much to the sturdy Scotch-Irish McCunes who helped to settle it." At the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, there is a memorial hall given by the McCunes. The first county auditor, the first school teacher and the first banker of Franklin county all bore the name McCune, and the family military record is enviable, Mrs. Kregelo's paternal great grandfather, Robert McCune, having been a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, and his son, also named Robert, was an officer in the army during the War of 1812. Mrs. Kregelo's parents came to Middletown, Indiana, and there her father engaged in the manufacture of carriages and farming machinery. Fifty-two years ago she came to Indianapolis as a bride. Her husband, Charles Edward Kregelo, now deceased, lived in this city all his life, having been born here, the son of David Kregelo, a distinguished pioneer citizen of the capital city. Charles E. Kregelo was a remarkably successful business man, and a well-known fraternalist, having been a Thirty-second degree Mason, a member of Marion Lodge, F. & A. M., Murat Temple Of the Shrine, Olive Branch Chapter of the Knights of Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His social connections were with the Woodstock and Columbia clubs. He was a good citizen, a genial man and one of the best beloved citizens Indianapolis has ever had. His death on August 22, 1905, was sincerely mourned by a host of friends. He was a life-long friend of John Holliday and other benefactors of the city. He engaged in the undertaking business throughout his active life, and also was the organizer of many successful business enterprises, notably among which was the Bird Transfer company. He and Mrs. Kregelo had three children, all of whom are now deceased. Carrie Wilson Kregelo died in early womanhood, and a son, Charles Wilbur; died at the age of two, while Mrs. Katherine Louise (Kregelo) Beckwith passed away in 1918, leaving four children. As a member of Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter of the D. A. R., Mrs. Kregelo was first vice-regent for eight years; was regent three years of Oliver Perry Morton Chapter, Daughters of the Union; is president of the Pioneer Mothers' Association and is now interested in getting a monument to the pioneer women; was the second president of the Indiana Historical Society; the Meridian W. C. T. U. was organized at her home forty-five years ago, and she is still a member of it; was first president of the Equal Suffrage Club of Indianapolis ; was on the board of the Propylaeum Society when it was organized; served over twenty-five years on the board of the Katherine Home for Aged Women; for an equal period was active on the Flower Mission; has long been a member of the Second Presbyterian Church; and was made an honorary member of the Y. M. C. A. for her work in the World War. Her efforts in that last named direction brought her the love of thousands of soldiers and their families, and holidays and birthday anniversaries she receives great floods of greetings, telegrams and gifts from all parts of the world -the boys have never forgotten the service she rendered them. Every Christmas a box of holly and mistletoe is sent her from South Carolina. One officer wrote, "Cordial Greetings to the Little Mother of the largest family I know." Another wrote his appreciation at the close of the war, "It was that kind of work which only God can comprehend and reward accordingly." The general secretary of the National War Work Council at Fort Harrison praised the efficient and faithful manner in which Mrs. Kregelo ministered to the needs of the soldiers because of the very practical things she did. She conceived the idea of forming the "Good Service Club" which was designed to promote the interests of soldiers and sailors by uniting them socially. It was the custom for her to open her own spacious and comfortable home to the soldiers, and little formality was observed on such occasions, often several hundred coming in a single day. Following the signing of the Armistice, she received numerous radio messages, cablegrams and special delivery messages daily, and her home became a halfway station for returning soldiers. At Fort Harrison she took the boys to her heart, supplied their needs, and was really their "Little Mother" during the influenza epidemic, and for many she made their last days on earth brighter. One soldier wrote, "May He who never slumbers, nor sleeps, guard you and shower your path with sunshine and flowers as you are doing for others, is my earnest wish." She finds her reward in all the heartfelt tokens of appreciation which come to her. All her life she has been a politician, and even remembers persuading her father, a Democrat, to vote for Lincoln. She, herself, has always been a staunch Republican. Although she has passed her seventy-ninth birthday, the spirit of youth is strong within her. In April, 1924, she went to Washington as a delegate to the D. A. R. convention, and while there visited the United States Senate. She has thousands of friends in all walks of life, and her intimates have included such prominent personages as Frances Willard, Mrs. Fairbanks (wife of the vice-president), Belva Lockwood, James Whitcomb Riley and many others of national reputation. History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Mamie de Sales Larsh, chairman of the Business Women’s Department of the Woman’s Department Club, of Indianapolis, holds an important position in the law office of Samuel Ashby, with whom she has been associated in business for over ten years. Miss Larsh was born in Richmond, Indiana, the daughter of Henry Clay Larsh, also a native of Richmond, his father, Leroy, having been a pioneer settler of this state. The founder of the family in Indiana established the then well-know Larsh flour mills when he came hither from Ohio. The family is of French origin, the name originally having been de Larsh, but Miss Larsh's grandfather dropped the "de." Henry Clay Larsh married Mina Mendenhall, also a native of Richmond, her family having been of English descent and tracing its line back to the Eleventh century. Some of Miss Larsh's ancestors came over with William Penn, and the Gardner family of the Mayflower were ancestors on her mother's side. Another branch of the family, the Crows, were related to General Winfield Scott. Her maternal grandfather, Dr. Bentley Mendenhall, was a soldier in the Civil War; was in many battles; became ill from exposure and was transferred to the hospital department. Miss Larsh is the only child of her parents, and has been living in Indianapolis since her father's death . She received her early education in Richmond, and then attended high school in Bartow, Florida, and Miss Hanna's School for Girls at Atlanta, Georgia. When her father's death occurred she came to Indianapolis, and since that time has been employed with Mr. Ashby, as above stated. Most of her time is required by her business duties, but she nevertheless finds opportunities to engage in outside activities. She is a member of the Woman's Department Club, for three years having been chairman of the Business Woman's Department; member of Program Committee of National Federation of Business and Professional Women's clubs; belongs to the Woman's City Club; the Republican Women's Club; and has served on election boards. She is much interested in politics, but is unable to take a very active part in such affairs. In order to perfect her knowledge of law, and fit herself for higher positions, she has taken the course offered at night by the Benjamin Harrison Law School and is now a senior. As a reader she has, no mean, reputation, and formerly was one of the members of the Indianapolis Dramatic Club. During the late war she was on the local recreation committee, and helped furnish entertainment for the soldiers, both at Fort Benjamin Harrison and in the city. Her religious affiliation is with Christ Church, in the affairs of which she takes a deep interest.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Ralph A. Lemcke, son of Julius A. and Emma (O'Reilly) Lemcke, was born February 5, 1880, in Evansville, Indiana; where he spent the first seven years of his life. In 1887, he came to Indianapolis with his parents, for his father at that time became treasurer of the State of Indiana. After attending the public schools in Indianapolis for four years, he went abroad, where he continued his schooling for four years, both in Germany and Switzerland. Returning to the United States, he entered St. John's Preparatory School at Lawrenceville, and later attended Princeton University. He is trustee and manager of the Lemcke estate. In 1911, he erected the Lemcke Annex Building, a fifteen story structure intended for offices, now known as the Consolidated Building. From 1911 to 1919, he was president. of the R. A. Lemcke Realty company. He is active in the Chamber of Commerce and the Board of Trade, of which he was a member of the Governing Committee for seven years. He holds a controlling interest in the Children's Aid Association as well as the Indianapolis Telephone company. His chief hobby is golf and is a member of the many different clubs, namely: Columbia, University, Woodstock Country, Hoosier Athletic, Indianapolis Athletic, Dramatic, Indianapolis Country clubs, the Atpenaeum, the Mystic Tie Lodge and the Elks. He was also a member of the Welfare Commission of the city of Indianapolis. Mr. Lemcke married Cornelia Cunningham, January 6, 1904, in Evansville, Indiana, and they have three children: George A., Cornelia C., and Ralph A., Jr.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Robert W. McBride, born January 25, 1842, at Richland county, Ohio, was the son of Augustus and Martha A. (Barnes) McBride. His early education was received in that locality, and he was yet young in life when he became a soldier in that costliest of civil conflicts, the War of the Rebellion, in which he was a member of the Seventh Independent company of Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, known as the Union Light Guard or Abraham Lincoln's Body Guard. He enlisted in 1863, and was in the service until 1865. Two years later he was admitted to the bar at Auburn, Indiana, and he practiced law at Waterloo, from 1867 to 1882, he was then elected judge of the Thirty-fifth Judicial Circuit, which position he held from 1882 to 1888, was then appointed to serve the unexpired term of Hon. J. A. S. Mitchell, as member of the Supreme Court, which terminated in January, 1893. Mr. McBride is one of the most eminent of Indianapolis lawyers and is counsel for the Loan Department of the State Life Insurance company and is the only remaining member of the original board of directors of that company. On September 27, 1868, he took for his life partner, Ida S. Chamberlain, of Waterloo, and they have had four children to cheer the home, Daisy I., Catherine M., Charles H., and Herbert W. Mr. McBride is a member of the Central Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, vice-president for Indiana of the Indiana State Bar Association, and a life member of the Indianapolis Bar Association, also member of the Indiana Academy of Science, Indiana Audubon Society, Indiana Nature Study Club, Columbia Club, and Century Club. He affiliates with the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Past Eminent Commander of the Republic, Department of Indiana, Past Senior Vice-Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, Judge Advocate General and Adjutant General of the Grand Army of the Republic, and No.2 in membership of the Scottish Rite in Indiana.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Dr. Carleton Buel McCulloch, physician, surgeon and medical director of the State Life Insurance company; was born at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, July 30, 1871, son of Reverend Oscar and Agnes (Buel) McCulloch. At the age of seven he came to Indianapolis and went through school here, then deciding on civil engineering but after one year determined to practice medicine and in 1895 graduated from Chicago Homoeopathic Medical College, then began his practice in this city. In May, 1917, he was commissioned captain in the United States Army Reserve Corps, and in December, was promoted to adjutant of Lilly Base Hospital, which was later called United States Army Base Hospital No. 32 and went overseas. Was then major and transferred to Mobile Hospital No. 11 and was decorated with the Croix de Guerre, then promoted to lieutenant colonel and is now a colonel in United States Reserve Corps. In politics he is a strong Democrat and in 1920 was candidate for governor. Mr. McCulloch belongs to the following: Contemporary, Country, Indianapolis Athletic, Indianapolis Literary, Indiana Democratic, Indianapolis Dramatic, Woodstock and University clubs and resides at last mentioned, and is also a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the Military Order of Foreign Wars.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Uz McMurtrie, president of the Robbins Body corporation and for a number of years prominently identified with public affairs of Indianapolis, was born July 12, 1884, at Attica, Indiana, the son of William and Elizabeth G. (Starr) McMurtrie. He received his early education in the public schools of Attica and Marion, Indiana, after which he attended Indiana University at Bloomington, graduating in 1918; with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi, and also president of his class at graduation time. He then became deputy treasurer of Grant county, in which office he served for five years, then in 1912 he was elected treasurer of the same county, serving four years, was then elected to treasurer of State and served four years in same. He was the main instigator in the forming of the corporation of the Robbins Body corporation of which he is the president, was also foremost in the forming of the American Finance company, of which he was treasurer and now is the president. Mr. McMurtrie is a member of the Highland Golf and Country Club, Columbia, Indianapolis Athletic, Marion and Hoosier Motor clubs; and in fraternal circles he is a member of Samaritan Lodge No. 105, F. & A. M. and the York Rite bodies at Marion, Indiana, the Scottish Rite bodies at Indianapolis and the Murat Temple of the Mystic Shrine. On February 11, 1914, he married Elizabeth Hogin, at Marion, Indiana, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Hogin, the former being prominent in business and banking circles at Marion, Mr. and Mrs. McMurtrie have one son, William Hogin.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Frank P. Manly, founder and president of the Indianapolis Life Insurance company, was born at Rushford, Minnesota. His education was received in the Rushford public schools and at Valparaiso University, from which he graduated, then took up studies at Northwestern University oŁ Law, and then for a number of years he was in the insurance business in Chicago. Mr. Manly was made Indiana state manager of the Prudential Insurance company, in 1902. Three years later he organized the Indianapolis Life Insurance company, of which he was president. He is considered as one of the leading life insurance men of the day and has spent all his time since his college days in that line. Mr. Manly is an active citizen of the community and assisted in organizing the first Rotary Club in Indiana, was president of the Indianapolis Rotary Club in 1915-1916 and was also district governor of the Illinois-Indiana Rotary District and is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Indianapolis Athletic, Woodstock and Meridian Hills clubs and the Masonic bodies. He is a member of the Indianapolis Park Board. Mr. Manly married Elena McNellis, of Lexington, Kentucky, and they have one daughter, Mrs. Jack Gould.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Henry A. Mansfield, son of Martin H. and Anna (Saiger) Mansfield, was born at Ashland; Ohio, on November 16, 1868. The father was a man of outstanding mechanical ability and, as the inventor of a clover huller, engaged in the manufacture of clover hullers at Ashland, Ohio, for many years prior to his death, which occurred in 1879. The mother survived a number of years and of the eleven children only six are living. Mr. Mansfield received, his early education in the public schools of his native town, after which he secured employment in the engineering department of the Pennsylvania railroad at Richmond, Indiana. In 1886, he was transferred by, the company to Indianapolis, where he has since maintained his home. In November, 1890 he severed his connection with the Pennsylvania railroad, having been elected to the responsible office of city engineer of Indianapolis and though but twenty-two years of age at the time and the youngest man ever chosen to this position in the Indiana capital, filled the office efficiently and capably during the four years administration of Mayor Thomas L. Sullivan. The present sewerage of Indianapolis was under the direction of Rudolph Hering, consulting engineer of New York City, laid out and devised by Mr. Mansfield, and it is of interest to know that the general engineering plans of the city are still those which were formulated by him. Upon the completion of his term of office as city engineer he engaged in the engineering and contracting business along general lines, and in this enterprise he has been identified with many of the large contracts of work of Indianapolis. Mr. Mansfield is owner of the Mansfield Engineering company and has all the controlling of same. He is also secretary-treasurer of the Cumberland Hydro-Electric Power project which developed into the largest hydro-electric power plant in the Middle West. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, Columbia, Hoosier Motor, Kiwanis, Indianapolis Athletic, and Highland Golf and Country clubs, Scottish Rite Mason and a Shriner of the Murat Temple. Mr. Mansfield was married in 1891, to Ada F. Freeland, of Spencer, Indiana, and they have one child, Freeland.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Jesse Cameron Moore, son of Cameron and Jennie Webber Moore, was born in Delphi, Indiana, September 24, 1868. His early education was received in the graded and high schools of Delphi, one year in the high school at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and then through the literary and law courses of the University of Michigan, receiving the degrees of Ph.B. and LL.B. Was also a student at Harvard for a time. He came to Indianapolis in 1894, and was engaged in the law practice until 1900. Then in 1896, he, through his power as attorney, incorporated the Columbia School Supply company and became its secretary and treasurer, in which capacity he has been ever since but later on he and his brothers, bought out the other stockholders, and he gave up his law practice to take active charge of the corporation, which was then in a small leased room and only employed twelve men but now it occupies its own buildings at 314-334 West Seventeenth street, and employs one hundred and twenty and up as high as two hundred. The products manufactured by them are the supplies for the schools all over the world and also supplies for hospitals. These are sold through catalogs, which eliminates the excess expense of the traveling man. He is also president of the Investors' Realty company, and secretary-of the Standard Coal and Supply company, both realty holding companies. By reason of these connections and his individual interests, he has been enabled to locate a number of business enterprises, especially those needing freight terminal facilities. Since 1899, he has been a trustee and secretary of the board of the First Baptist Church, is president of the board of Crawford Baptist Industrial School for Orphans, near Zionsville, and a trustee of Franklin College. Mr. Moore belongs to the Chamber of Commerce, Hoosier Motor, Woodstock, Century Literary Clubs, and is a Thirty-second degree Mason. He was married June 3, 1903, to Frances Hershey, of Sterling, Illinois, who was a graduate of Wellesley College.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Dr. Albert E. Sterne; chief of the staff of "Norways" Sanatorium for Nervous, Diseases and General Diagnosis, was born April 28, 1866, at Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Chas. F. Sterne, a manufacturer of Peru, Indiana, founder and owner of the Peru Woolen Mills and Eugenia (Fries) Sterne. His father came to Indiana, in 1828, from Wurtenberg, Germany, and his mother from Furth, Bavaria. Doctor Sterne's maternal grandfather, a man of high intellectual attainments, was knighted by the King of Spain for discoveries in chemistry. Doctor Sterne received his education in the public schools of Cincinnati, Peru and Indianapolis, until his eleventh year. At the age of eleven he became a student under Professor Kinney at Cornell School, Ithaca, New York, then took four years at the Mount Pleasant Military Academy at Sing Sing, New York; at seventeen he matriculated in the literary department of Harvard; University, graduating as a member of the class of 1887, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, cum laude. In 1887; Doctor Sterne went to Europe to further his studies successfully, returned to America in 1893 and soon afterwards established a practice in Indianapolis. In 1898, he purchased the old Fletcher homestead at 1820 East Tenth street and there established the "Norways" Sanatorium. This institution is widely known throughout the country for its success in the treatment of nervous and mental diseases and, even more, for its thorough work in research diagnosis in medicine. It is primarily a hospital for general diagnosis. In 1894, he was appointed to the chair of: nervous and mental diseases in the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons. He assisted in the effort to unite the medical schools of Indiana and has held the professorship of nervous and mental diseases continuously. At present he occupies this position in the Indiana University School of Medicine. He is consulting neurologist in the Indianapolis City Hospital and City Dispensary (now a part of the Indiana University School of Medicine), at the Flower Mission and other Indianapolis hospitals. During these years he has been an active contributor to medical 1iterature, author of many monographs, and has been an associate editor of the Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, published in New York; for several years was editor of the Medical Monitor. Governor Winfield T. Durbin, at the time of his administration, appointed Doctor Sterne Assistant Surgeon General of Indiana, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel . The activities of Doctor Sterne in medical circles brought him many honors, as evidenced by his election in 1910, to the presidency of the Ohio Valley Medical Association, and presidency of the Mississippi Valley Medical Association in 1913. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the Medico-Legal Society of New York, the Mississippi Valley Medical Association, the Indiana State Medical Society and the Indianapolis Medical Society and several other scientific bodies. Doctor Sterne is a member of the Columbia Club, the University Club, the Harvard Club, the Highland Golf and Country Club, the Chamber of Commerce and the Athenaeum. In politics he is a Republican. On March 4, 1905, he married Laura Mercy Laughlin, daughter of James A. and Mary (Carey) Laughlin, of Walnut Hills, Cincinnati. Mrs. Sterne died May 25, 1909. October 18, 1913, he married Stella Gallup Pickrell, daughter of Walter L. and Ella (Hunt) Gallup, of Evanston, Illinois. Their home is at 1834 East Tenth street. Miss Genevieve Pickrell is their daughter. During the great war Doctor Sterne served as a member of the National Council of Defense, Medical Section, and as chairman of the Committee on Classification during the entire period of U. S. participation.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Harold Taylor, son of Napoleon B. and Catherine (Brown) Taylor, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, January 22, 1862. His father was in the practice of law in Indianapolis, being admitted to the bar in 1844, and was judge of the Marion County Superior Court for three terms, during the last term of which he passed away in August, 1893. Harold Taylor received his early education in the private schools of Indianapolis, including college preparatory work in the Boy's Classical school, after which he attended Wabash College and was of the class of 1882, from which he graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and later the honorary degree of Master of Arts. After completion of the college course, he was for eight years an official court reporter of State Courts of Indianapolis, until 1890, when he entered the law school at the University of Michigan, graduating in 1891, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. The same year he was admitted to the practice of law before the State and Federal Courts in Michigan and Indiana, since which time he has continuously devoted himself to his profession, including practice before the Supreme Court of the United States. Mr. Taylor belongs to the following: University, Indianapolis Country, Indianapolis Athletic clubs, Indianapolis, Indiana State and American Bar associations, college fraternity Phi Gamma Delta, legal fraternity Phi Delta Phi. He also holds membership in the Episcopal Church.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


Charles Stewart Voorhees (deceased). The name of Voorhees has added lustre to the political record of the nation in a measure seldom equaled in our history. Daniel W. Voorhees, the "Tall Sycamore of the Wabash," needs no special mention in the pages of this work, for his accomplishments are familiar to all who have made the most cursory study of American history. Born in Camden, Butler county, Ohio, his early youth was passed on a farm near what is now Veedersburg, Indiana, educated at old Asbury College, now DePauw, he quickly won renown as an orator and lawyer. His appeals to juries were invincible, and have come down as the most brilliant of his time. In 1858, he was appointed United States District Attorney by President Buchanan, and in 1860, was elected to Congress, as he was also in 1862, 1868 and 1870. He was then elected to the Senate, where he was undisputed leader of the Democratic party until the time of his death in 1897, at the age of seventy years. His son, Charles Stewart Voorhees, was born in Covington, Fountain county, Indiana, in 1853, and assumed a place of political prominence only less eminent than that of his father. He was given excellent educational advantages at both Wabash College and Columbia University, where he studied law, and in 1875 was admitted to practice before the Terre Haute bar. He was recognized as a young man of brilliant future throughout Indiana, but in 1882 went to Washington territory with his life long friend, afterwards, senator from the State of Washington, Hon. John L. Wilson; deciding to cast his lot in the new country. Settling at Colfax, Washington, he was in the same year elected prosecuting attorney from Whitman county. He rapidly took the lead in Democratic political matters in Washington, and was elected as territorial delegate to the 49th and 50th United States Congresses, serving with marked ability from March 4, 1885, to March 3, 1889, his father having been senator from Indiana during the same years. He was subsequently given the complimentary vote of his party for the United States Senate, and during his life maintained a leading position in political affairs of the State of Washington. He spent the closing years of his life, which was cut all too short, in Washington, passing away December 26, 1909, at Spokane. He married Fanny Vajen, the daughter of John Henry Vajen, a leading citizen of Indianapolis, and a member of Governor Morton's Staff during the Civil War. Mrs. Voorhees is now living at 1321 North Meridian street. Their daughter, Annabelle, is the wife of Austin Hayward Brown, Ill., the son of William J. and Cordelia (Garvin) Brown, and a grandson of that Austin H. Brown who was one of Indianapolis pioneers. She maintains a membership in the Woodstock Club, life membership in Matinee Musicale and has numerous other social and civic connections.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


W. B. Hiner. The largest organization of its kind, the Red Ball Transit company, was organized in Indianapolis by W. B. Hiner. Although he has been a resident of the city but a relatively short time, he has earned an enviable reputation as a man of determined, enterprising character and keen prevision along commercial lines. He was born in Sedalia, Indiana, May 19, 1880, the son of John A. and Hester (Miller) Hiner, both natives of Indiana, the former being born March 26, 1844, and the latter, October 26, 1848. The paternal great grandparents of our subject came from Virginia to settle in Indiana in the early part of the Nineteenth century and, the maternal great grandparents came from Ohio to settle in the same section of Indiana about the same time. The grandfathers of our subject on both sides were born in the same county, the paternal grandfather being born in 1816 and the maternal grandfather in 1808. John A. Hiner was a pioneer farmer of the section in which he lived throughout his life and he was also a squire of his community for over twenty years, an honor which was accorded to but few in those days. W. B. Hiner was educated in the public schools of his home community until he had completed the fourth grade, when he gave up his educational training to work on the home farm until he was old enough to go into business for himself. His first business venture was as the proprietor of a restaurant, but in a short time he abandoned this enterprise to buy and sell livestock, continuing in this work for a period of four years. He then went to Oklahoma and engaged in the real estate business for three years. In Oklahoma City, he was responsible for the organization of the first livestock commission in the stockyards of that city, and during the first year, he acted as president of the Live Stock Exchange. Then came the big real estate boom in Oklahoma City, and Mr. Hiner lost everything in a series of unfortunate investments. Looking for a new field of operations, he went to Texas where he organized a messenger service in the cities of Dallas, Ft. Worth, and Houston. Operating this service with such success that he was employed by the Western Union Telegraph company, with whom he was offered a position in New York City. His work with this company was not to his liking, however, and he returned to Indiana, going to work in a cabinet factory at Frankfort for one year. For two years thereafter he engaged in the automobile insurance business. While he was engaged in this work he conceived the idea of organizing a long distance trucking service. With this end in view, he came to Indianapolis and on March 13, 1920, organized the Red Ball Transit company. The work was at first confined to Indianapolis and the immediate vicinity, although the establishment of the office here was the first step in an overland truck transportation. In March, 1921, the first branch office was located at Columbus, Ohio, making the first step toward expansion of the company. Offices were soon opened in Chicago and Detroit and within four months after that enlargement; additional branches were established in Dayton, Cleveland, and Cincinnati, Ohio. In February, 1922, the New York City branch was opened to be followed in quick succession by the branches at Philadelphia, Washington, Boston, Baltimore, and Buffalo. In this way the expansion continued until at the present time the company has twenty branch offices between New York and St. Louis. The phenomenal growth of the company necessitated a reorganization which was effected January 7, 1922, the present officers, of the company being as follows: W. K Hiner, president and treasurer; C. M. Gentry, vice-president; and Robt. L. Hiner, his son, secretary. In June, 1923, the company purchased the plant of the Stewart Wire Wheel company at Frankfort, Indiana, where all the trucks of the company are manufactured. Besides his interests in the trucking business, Mr. Hiner devotes part of his tireless energies to the operation of truck freight lines, operating in different cities under the name of Red Ball Express company. Mr. Hiner was married May 1, 1901, to Vienna Fleming, of Sedalia, Indiana, and to this union have been born three children: Robert L., aged twenty-one years; Doris, who is nineteen years of age; and Richard, a boy of ten years. In political issues, Mr. Hiner supports the principles of the Republican party, believing that its doctrines best serve the interests of the people. Although the Red Ball Transit company is only four years old, it is the largest organization of its kind in the United States, standing as a monument to the commercial genius of its founder, who has rendered an indispensable service to the city of Indianapolis by adding such a successful and growing concern to the business life of the community.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


John A. Brown, secretary of the Board of State Charities, was born in Harrison, Ohio, January 31, 1874, the son of Henry T. and Louisa (Kerner) Brown, both of whom were natives of Indiana. With the exception of two years spent in Ohio, Henry T. Brown has always been a resident of Indiana. He was a farmer, brick mason, and contractor, but he died in the prime of life when his son was six years of age. He was the father of three children: Clara B.; Henry O.; and John A., the subject of this review. John A. Brown was educated in the graded and high schools of Brookville, Franklin county, Indiana, where his parents had moved shortly after his birth, and completed his educational career by pursuing courses in Indiana State Normal School and in Indiana University. When he had completed his studies, he returned to his home community to teach school, and he remained in Brookville until 1910, when he left there to assume the duties of agent of the children's department of the State Charities at Indianapolis. In this line of work he found a congenial occupation and he applied himself to it with such assiduity that he was advanced through all the departments of the office. In January, 1923, his faithfulness and abilities were rewarded by his appointment as secretary of the Board of State Charities, a position that he has since filled capably and efficiently. Mr. Brown was married August 20, 1902, to Nelle May Smith, of Franklin county, Indiana, and to this union have been born two daughters: Marjorie May and Miriam Nelle. In fraternal circles, Mr. Brown is a valued member of the Masons, and he is also a member of the Phi Kappa Psi college fraternity. He and his wife affiliate with the Presbyterian Church of which he is an elder. The Board of State Charities' duties are multifarious: General supervision of the public charities and the charitable and correctional institutions of the state is maintained; supervises the care of dependent and neglected children; licenses all child caring institutions and agencies; supervises out-door poor relief; administers the deportation of certain non-residents; reports on the work of these organizations are made annually; complaints of mismanagement are thoroughly investigated; and duties of a similar nature are performed by the board. Although its work as defined by the original act of 1889 has never ceased to be other than those of supervision of the system of charities and correction, various other duties have been named by the legislature, which were more or less administrative in character. Charitable organizations have become an indispensable part of our present social system. The efficient operation of these institutions is insured state supervision, and this work is entirely under the Board of State Charities. Mr. Brown is a member of the National Conference of Social Work and secretary of its division on Public Officials and Administration. He is also a member of the American Prison Association and serves on one of its important committees.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924


E. E. Flickinger, the state agent for the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance company, of Boston, was born in Willoughby, Ohio, April 7, 1862, the son of Bishop D. K. Flickinger, of the United Brethren Church of the United States, who had his headquarters at Dayton, Ohio. The father of our subject was born in Ohio in 1824, and died in that same state in 1911, at age 87 years and 3 months. His wife was born in 1829 and died in 1901, at the advanced age of 72 years. They were parents of eight children. Elmer E. Flickinger was raised in Willoughby, Ohio, where he received his elementary education in the public and high schools. He then matriculated in Otterbein College, following which he studied medicine at the Cleveland Medical College, graduating from that institution with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For a time thereafter, he engaged in the active practice of his chosen profession, and then went to Emporia, Kansas, where he remained for three years, and then he returned to his home in Willoughby and practiced medicine until 1891, when he became associated with the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance company of Boston, Massachusetts, serving as district agent for one year. At the end of that time he was appointed general agent for Indiana for the same company. Among the John Hancock forty agencies the Indiana agency is one of the leading ones of the company. Since his advent into Indianapolis on September 1, 1892, Mr. Flickinger has been prominently identified with the insurance business of this city, as well as in the state. He is well known throughout insurance circles of the state, and is recognized by his fellow citizens as a man of the highest ability and integrity. He has four children: Beulah, the wife of Barrett Russell; Florence, the wife of Herman Wolff; Daniel W.; and Ray. Mr. Flickinger is a member of the United Brethren Church, and also. a member of the Board of Trustees. He is also a trustee of the Indiana Central College. The prominent place that the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance company plays in Indiana insurance business life, is due almost entirely to the efforts and ability of Mr. Flickinger, who is regarded as one of the substantial business men of the city of Indianapolis.

History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922
With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV
by Logan Esarey
Dayton Historical Publishing Co
1924