MILTON M. BOGGS, M.D., of Macy, was born in New Castle, Henry County, this State, January 10, 1830. He was the second son born to James and Martha H. (Stinson) Boggs, the former a native of Virginia, of Irish descent, and the latter a native of Tennessee, of Scotch descent. While our subject was yet a child, his parents removed to LaPorte County, this State, where they located on a farm. In 1839 they removed to a farm in Kosciusko County. There the death of his father occurred in 1842, after which Milton returned to Laporte County, where he worked on a farm by the month until April 17, 1847, at which time he entered the service of the United States in the Mexican war, from which he was honorably discharged in August 1848. He participated in several small skirmishes, but no important engagements. At the close of the war he returned to Leesburg, Kosciusko County, where he began the study of medicine. After three years of diligent study, he entered upon the practice of medicine at Palestine, that county. He removed to Fulton, Fulton County, in 1854, and in 1859 he located upon a farm which he purchased in Cass County, in the vicinity of which he continued to practice his profession until in August, 1861. At that time he responded to his country's call, and organized Company E, Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry. He served with this company in the capacity of captain until in March, 1862, when, owing to a disability received while in active service, he resigned and returned to his home in Cass County. He located at North Manchester, Wabash County, in 1866; where he practiced medicine until May 19, 1870, when he came to this county and located at Macy. He engaged in the drug business in that place in 1875, since which his attention has been directed between that and the practice of his profession. He has a commodious store room, well stocked, and is doing a good business. In October, 1852, he was married to Emeline Miller, who died in February, 1856. April 8, 1857, he was married to Mary Penrose, who died in January, 1867. He was married again to Mrs. Mary Hanna on the 26th of May, 1870. In all, Mr. Boggs is the father of six children - Emma A., Joseph E., Alice V., Minnie W., Miltie and Myrtie M. The first four were born to his second wife and the last two to his third wife. Of these Joseph E., Miltie and Mrytie M. are deceased. Mr. Boggs is a member of the Christian Church and of the F. and A. M. and G. A. R Lodges. Politically he is a Democrat. He received the appointment of postmaster at Macy in October, 1885, which office he continues to hold. Dr. Boggs is a pleasant, intelligent gentleman, a successful practitioner and business man and a good citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



ROBERT P. BRIGGS, a prominent citizen of Allen Township, is a native of Richland County, Ohio, and was born May 25, 1835. He was the second son born to Robert Briggs, a native of England, who emigrated to America in 1833 and located in Richland County, Ohio. When our subject was two years old his parents removed to Hardin County, Ohio, where his early life was spent upon a farm. In the spring of 1857 he went to Missouri, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1861, at which time he returned eastward to this county and located in Butler Township. He removed to Allen township and settled where he now resides in the fall of 1865. He entered Company D, 99th Ind. Vols., in August, 1862, with which he served in a manner becoming a loyal soldier until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Jackson, Mission Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw, the siege of Atlanta and the battle of Fort McAllister, Ga. At the siege of Atlanta he was struck by a spent ball just over the heart. Oct. 21, 1855, he was married to Mary J. Elder, a native of Hancock County, Ohio, born June 14, 1837. She was the daughter of Jeremiah and Adelia (Miller) Elder, both natives of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs have had nine children: Adelia C., Ruth A., Uala M., James M., Susan A., Albeit M., Avice I., Jennie L. and Elizabeth L., all of whom are living except Susan A, who died in the ninth year of her age. Mr. and Mrs. Briggs are members of the Christian Church. In politics, the former is a Republican. Our subject and his wife are the owners of one hundred and sixty acres of land, one hundred and thirty of which is in cultivation. He is an industrious and successful farmer and a worthy and honored citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



LOUDEN CARL, merchant at Macy, and one of the pioneers of this county, was born in Darke County, Ohio, November 25, 1828. He was the oldest son born to Matthew and Anna (Suffield) Carl, natives of New York and Kentucky respectively. When our subject was about twelve years old his parents came to this county and located in Jefferson Township, where he spent his youth working upon his father's farm. At the age of eighteen he began to learn the carpenterís trade. This received his attention, more or less, for ten years. In 1855 he went to Iowa, but in 1862 he returned to this State and located upon a farm in Cass County. In 1867 he returned to this county and located at Five Corners, in Allen Township. There he was engaged in the mercantile business until 1869. In that year he located at Macy, erected the first business house in the town and continued in the mercantile business. He entered into a partnership with Albert Hawkins in February, 1884. They now have a commodious storeroom, well stocked with dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, and are doing a good business. April 20, 1851, he was married to Caroline Enyart, by whom he has had three children. Their names are Minerva P., Marion B., and Ida E., the last of whom died at five years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Carl are members of the M. E. church. In politics, Mr. Carl is a Republican. While a resident of Iowa he held the office of Township Trustee one term. He has also been honored with the Town Treasurer's office in Macy ever since the town was incorporated. He is a pleasant, intelligent gentleman, an enterprising and successful business man and a No. I citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



ONIS CASE, of Macy, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April 25, 1845. He was the youngest son born to Onis and Sarah (Williams) Case, natives of Wayne and Seneca Counties, Ohio, respectively. Our subject spent his boyhood and youth in his native county working upon his father's farm. In March, 1864, he came to this county and located upon a farm in Perry Township. He enlisted in Company A., 155th Indiana Regiment, in February, with which he served until the close of the war. (It is worthy of note that our subject and his four elder brothers all served in the Union Army and that all are still living). He resided in Perry Township until 1876. At that time he located in Macy and engaged in the hardware business. This has received his attention ever since. He now has a commodious little store room, well stocked, and is doing a good business. January 1, 1868, he was married to Rhoda A. Dukes by whom he has had two children, Rollie and Ethel, both of whom are living. Mr. Case is a member of the M. E. Church and of the F. & A. M. Lodge. In politics, he is a Republican. In 1882 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and was re-elected in 1886. He is an enterprising and successful businessman and a good citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



ISAAC CAULK, a prominent citizen of Allen Township, was born in the city of Philadelphia, March 27, 1831. He was the only son born to Oliver and Rachel G. (Cox) Caulk, both natives of Maryland, but of English descent. When Isaac was a youth of thirteen years, his parents came to this county and located upon a farm in Allen Township. There the father and mother spent the rest of their lives, their respective deaths occuring in October, 1869, and December, 1885. At the time of their deaths the father was seventy-eight and the mother had reached the advanced age of ninety-four. Our subject remained upon the farm, engaged in agricultural pursuits, until the fall of 1873, at which time he located in the town of Birmingham. Since then his attention has been given to the grain business, and to mercantile pursuits. October 15, 1873, he was married to Lunetta A. Fobes by whom he has had five children, Oliver M., Nellie A., Harry P., Lunetta Grace, and Fred G. The second, Nellie A., died in the fifth year of her age. By virtue of his birth, Mr. Caulk is a member of the Friends' Church. Politically, he is a Republican. He has held the position of postmaster at Birmingham since July 28, 1869. He has also held the Railroad Agency for the same length of time. He is an enterprising and intelligent man, and a worthy and honored citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



JOHN CHAMP - Farmer and tile manufacturer, at Macy, was born in Piqua County, Ohio,,April 8, 1830. He was the son of Joseph and Martha Ann (Baggs) Champ, natives of Kentucky and Virginia respectively, the former of Scotch-Irish and the latter of German descent. The father of our subject died when the latter was but seven years old. When he was ten years old his widowed mother and five children came to this county and first located at Peru. That was in 1840. Five years later they located upon the present site of Somerset, Wabash County and erected the first house in that place. In about 1848 they returned to Peru. They removed to a farm in Kosciusko County in 1850. About two years later they removed to Cass County and located in the vicinity of the Huldah Iron Works, four miles east of Logansport. John took a position in that establishment which he continued to hold four years. In 1856 he and his mother located upon a farm in Adams Towship, Cass County, In 1864 he moved to a farm which he had purchased in Fulton County. In February 1865 he enlisted in Company F, 151st Indiana Volunteers, from which he received an honorable discharge in the following November. In the spring of 1876 he again came to this county and this time located at Macy. He owns a farm adjoining that place which he suprintends, and in connection with this he is engaged quite extensively in the manufacture of tile, having entered into a partnership in that business in 1878, with Peter Carvey. June 23, 1859, he was married to Sarah M. Scott, a native of Preble County, Ohio, born March 18, 1839. She was the daughter of Daniel and Ellen M. (Dilhorn) Scott, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the former of Scotch and the latter of English descent. Mr. and Mrs. Champ have never had any children of their own, but are foster parents of eight children, six of whom are living. Our subject and his wife have been members of the Chrisitian Church over thirty years. The former is a member of the F. & A. M. and G. A. R. Lodges and a Prohibitionist in politics. In the fall of 1876 he was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace and served one term. He is an industrious and successful farmer and business man and a worthy and honored citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



THOMAS CLEMANS, a venerable and aged citizen of Allen Township and pioneer of the county, was born in Champaign County, Ohio, November 10, 1811. He was the fifth in a family of eleven children born to Isaac and Elizabeth (Carpenter) Clemans, who were natives of New Jersey and Virginia, respectively. he chose for his life work the occupation of a farmer. As early as 1835, he came to this county and settled in the woods of Allen Township, where the deer, wild turkeys and Indians were plenty. He immediately set about clearing a farm, and to do this, naturally devolved upon him a great deal of hard work. His strong constitution and iron will, however, proved equal to the emergency, and these coupled with an indefatigable pluck and energy, enabled him to convert his wilderness home into beautiful and well-tilled fields. Unlike most of the early settlers he did not stop at one conquest over the forest, nor two, but for a third time he settled down in the woods and experienced the hardships of the sturdy pioneers. Three of the best farms in Allen Township were placed in a state of cultivation through labor performed by his own hands. He was not only courageous but fearless as well. Nothing will serve better to illustrate his bravery than the following incident, which occurred one day while he was riding on horseback, in the vicinity of his habitation, with some loose horses that belonged to him in his advance. His attention was suddenly attracted by the yell of an Indian, whereupon he faced about and two Indians, armed with guns and tomahawks were seen approaching him some two or three hundred yards distant. They ordered him to wait which he did until they came up. One of them approached a loose horse, adjusted a rope around its neck in a manner indicating that he intended to take possession. An exclamation of "Let loose that horse,Ē from Mr. Clemans failed to cause the Indian to desist, where-upon the former bounded to the ground, gathered a well seasoned club and, drawing it over the Red-skin's head, repeated the command. The Indian, not yet ready for a journey to those Happy Hunting Grounds, immediately obeyed and, joining his companion, walked peaceably away. On the 18th of January 1836, Mr. Clemans was united in marriage to Delilah Wildman. She was born in Jefferson County, this State, June 24, 1820, being the daughter of Joseph and Mary (Underwood) Wildman, who were respectively natives of Virginia and Kentucky. For more than half a century Mr. and Mrs. Clemans have stood side by side, administering to each other's wants and sharing, alike, each other's sorrows and pleasures. They are the parents of twelve children - seven sons and five daughters. Their names are James, Mary, Joseph, David, Samuel, John, Elizabeth, Eliza J., Thomas A., Catharine, Silas and Maggie, of whom James, Joseph, Samuel and Eliza J. are deceased. Our subject and his wife are members of the M. E. Church. In politics the former is a Republican. They have a comfortable home where they are spending the decline of life in a quiet, happy way. They are among the worthy and honored citizens of the township.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



EPHRAIM B. CLENDENNING, a native of this county, and at present one of the leading business men of Macy, was born in Union Township Feb. 16, 1841. He was the oldest child born to Robert and Cynthia (Clymer) Clendenning, the former a native of Ireland, born Oct.15, 1810; emigrated to America in 1835 and to this country about 1837; the latter was a native of Ohio, born Feb. 22, 1817; came to this country about 1837 and on the 8th day of December, 1839, was married to Robert Clendenning. She died in this county March 14, 1863. When Ephraim was about eight years old his parents removed to Richland Township, where he grew up to manhood working upon his father's farm. He remained at home until July 26, 1863, at which time his marriage occurred with Martha E Bell. She was born in Wayne County, Ohio, April 22, 1838, being the daughter of Eben and Elizabeth Bell, natives of Ohio and New Jersey, respectively. After his marriage Mr. Clendenning engaged in farming for himself. That was in Richland Township. In 1866 he returned to his native township, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until in February, 1874, when he located at Macy and engaged in the mercantile business. This has received his attention ever since. He is now the senior member of the firm of Clendenning & Waite. They have a good storeroom well-stocked with dry goods, groceries, boots, shoes and general merchandise, and are doing a profitable business. During his early life Mr. Clendenning acted in the capacity of a school teacher for eight years. He is the father of six children: Mary A., Amanda E., Alabama E., Lydia A., Viola B., and Laura M. Of these Amanda E. and Viola B. are deceased. In politics our subject is an ardent Republican. In September, 1874 he received the appointment of postmaster at Macy in which capacity he acted until September, 1885. As such he discharged his duties with credit to himself and satisfaction to the public. He is an industrious and successful business man and a good citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



THOMAS D. COFFING, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Allen Township, was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1828. He was the youngest son born to Joshua P. and Mary (Davis) Coffing, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Dutch and the latter of Irish descent. When Thomas was eight years old his parents came westward to Ohio and located in Knox County where his youth was spent, working upon his fatherís farm. There on the 29th day of April, 1848, he was married to Sophia McDaniel. She was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1826, being the daughter of Joel and Catharine (Smith) McDaniel who, also were natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Irish and the latter of Dutch descent. Immediately after his marriage, Mr. Coffing and wife removed to Delaware County, Ohio. There they resided on a farm about eighteen months. They then returned to Knox County, but a year and a half later they located upon a farm in Defiance County, Ohio. They came to this State and located where they now reside in the fall of 1866. The chief occupation of Mr. Coffing has been that of a farmer and breeder of fine stock. He owns a handsome farm of 160 acres of land, fitted up with good fences and buildings, and altogether a very desirable location. He has always taken especial pains to secure the best grades of stock possible. He now has some excellent specimens of Cotswold sheep, Berkshire hogs, Clydesdale and Norman horses, and his large herd of Devonshire cattle is the finest of the kind in Northern Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Coffing are the parents of seven children, Joshua P., Mary E., Joel, Susan C., Isabel A., Lucy A., and Jackson. Of these Mary E., Joel, Isabel A. and Jackson are deceased. Mr. Coffing is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, and independent in politics. He is also a member of the American Devon Cattle Club. He is an industrious, pushing and enterprising farmer, and a worthy and honored citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



JOSHUA COFFING, one of the enterprising young farmers of Allen Township, was born in Delaware County, Ohio, November 9, 1849. He was the oldest in a family of seven children born to Thomas D. and Sophia (McDaniel) Coffing, who are now prominent citizens of Allen Township. When he was five years old his parents located in Defiance County, Ohio, where his boyhood and early youth were spent working upon his father's farm. At the age of seventeen he accompanied his parents to this county and located with them where the latter now reside in Allen Township. There he continued to work on the farm until he reached the age of twenty-three, when, on the 22nd day of December, 1872, his marriage with Cynthia Ann Burket occurred. She was born in Tipton County, Indiana, January 29, 1855, being the daughter of Asa and Lucinda (Fouts) Burket, now of Allen Township. That marriage resulted in the birth of five children. The first was a daughter that died in infancy, unnamed. The others were Effie E., Edger E., Arthur E. and Emma J. On the 17th of August, 1881, Mr. Coffing suffered the bereavement of losing his first wife, and the 4th of April, 1882, he was married to Mrs. Jane Lichty, daughter of Jeremiah and Barbara Ann (Study) Rigel, natives of Pennsylvania. She was born in Defiance County, Ohio, September 28, 1853. This latter union has resulted in the birth of three children: Mary E., Joshua D., and a daughter that died in infancy. Joshua D. also died in infancy. Mr. Coffing is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, the F. & A. M. Lodge, and independent in politics. At the time of its organization he was chosen secretary of the Macy District Fair Society, which position he has filled in a creditable manner ever since. He is an industrious farmer and a good citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



M. LEW. ENYART, editor and proprietor of the Macy Monitor, is a native of Cass County, this State, and was born June 22, 1840. He was the youngest son in a family of six children born to Benjamin and Mary (McColla) Enyart, the former a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, of French descent, and the latter a native of Clark County, West Virginia. At the tender age of three years our subject was left without a mother. Owing to a physical disability he was unable to help his father upon the farm and was in consequence kept in school. At the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to Thomas Bringhurst, of Logansport, with the view of learning the printer's trade. During the winter of '56-7 he taught school in Fulton County. In the spring of 1857 he went to Waterloo, Iowa, where he entered the office of the Cedar Valley Register. Here he remained about six months. In the following fall he returned Fulton County and taught another term of school. In the spring 1858 he again returned to Waterloo, Iowa, and began the study of law under Judge L. D. Rannalls. In the spring of 1861 he again returned to the home of his father in Fulton County, and, feeling some desire to enter the army but refused admission on account of the deficiency in his leg. He then went to Logansport and read law under Judge Chamberlain one year. August 2, 1862, he again made an attempt to enter the military service, and this time was successful. He entered Company K., 5th Cavalry, 90th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, from which, owing to his physical weakness, he received an honorable discharge in December following. On leaving the army he returned home and again took up teaching. In 1865 he again began the study of law; was admitted to the Rochester bar in 1867. At that place he formed a partnership with Col. K. G. Shryock, with whom he practiced law two years. In 1869 our subject entered upon the practice of law at North Manchester, Wabash County. A year later he came to this county and located at Lincoln (now Macy). In 1875 he located at Twelve Mile, Cass County. He went to Wolcott, White County, in the spring 1876, and in the following fall he returned to Logansport, and engaged in the real estate business. In 1879 he engaged in the same business in Peru. To promote his interests in this he published for a time The Real Estate Review, and it is worthy of note that Mr. Enyart became the most successful agent of that kind that has ever done business in the county. In March, 1885 he returned to Macy, and on the 16th day of May, following, the first issue of the Macy Monitor went forth with the name of M. Lew Enyart as editor and proprietor. He took into his employ Mr. David O. Huffman, who has acted in the capacity of publisher ever since. June 14, 1868, he was married to Sophia M. Knight, a native of Sandusky County, Ohio, born Aug. 6, 1840. She was the daughter of George and Elizabeth (Jones) Knight, the former a native of New York and the latter a native of Piqua County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Enyart have had four children. The first was an infant son that died in infancy unnamed. The others are Ora M., Orpha E. and Edwin K., all living. Mr. Enyart is a member of the F. & A.M. Lodge, and an ardent Republican in politics. He was honored with the office of Justice of the Peace in Allen Township one term, at the close of which he declined the nomination of both political parties. Mr. Enyart is a pleasant, intelligent gentleman and a good citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



WILLIAM MUSSELMAN, one of the prominent farmers and stock-raisers of Miami County, and one of the industrious and influential citizens of Allen Township, was born in Lancaster Pennsylvania May 22,1844. He was the second son born to Joseph and Mary (Krider) Musselman, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. When William was ten years old his parents came to this county and located in Richland Township, where he spent his youth working upon his fatherís farm. At eighteen years of age he entered the Union army, enlisting in Company I, 99th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he did faithful service for his country from August, 1862, until the close of the war. He participated in the siege of Atlanta, the March to the Sea, the siege of Vicksburg, the battles of Jackson, Miss., Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and some others on the Atlantic Coast. At the close of the war he returned to the home of his father in Richland Township. There he farmed upon the old home place until 1872, when he located where he now resides in Allen Township. March 18, 1869, he was married to Susan E. Kiem, a daughter of Samuel and Mary (Derk) Kiem, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. Musselman lost his first wife in March, 1872, and on 5th day of December, 1873, he was married to Priscilla C. Foor, a native of this county, born July 7, 1855. She is the daughter of Stephen and Hannah (Runkle) Foor, who now reside in Allen Township. By his first wife Mr. Musselman had two children, Samuel H. and Mary E. He and his present wife have had but one child, Franklin D. Mrs. Musselman is a member of the Church of God. In politics, Mr. Musselman is a Republican. He has a beautiful home and a handsome farm of 256 acres of good land, about 200 of which is in a high state of cultivation. His farm is fitted up with good fences and splendid buildings, and is one of the most desirable locations in Miami County. He is an industrious and successful farmer and an honored citizen.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Allen Township



Deb Murray