CHARLES M. FILLMORE is one of our young preachers who is worthy of the highest commendation. He was born in Paris, Ill., July 15, 1860. His father, is well known throughout the church as a pioneer preacher, musical composer and teacher. The son seems to have inherited his father's most striking characteristics. His boyhood life was spent on a farm near Cincinnati. It was his privilege however, to attend the high school in the city, from which he graduated.

He took naturally to music. When he was in the high school a fund was raised sufficient to grant five scholarships to pupils of the public schools. These scholarships were contended for by several thousand pupils. Mr. Fillmore gained one of the five. His purpose was to prepare for a professional musician. He studied under private teachers, and also in two of the music schools of Cincinnati.

He always had a desire to preach, but being of a somewhat timid nature resisted the impulse from fear of making a failure. But when his musical education was about complete, and though he had prospects of a partnership in an excellent music business, he yielded to the persuasion of friends and entered the ministry.

Knowing well the minister's need of thorough training, he entered Butler college, from which he graduated in 1890. He also spent some time in graduate work at the same school. He deserves the credit of "making his way" through college. As a student he was earnest and faithful. He took part in athletics, conducted the singing in the chapel, was one of the editors of the Butler Collegian, and belonged to Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He also preached regularly every Sunday. As evidence of his college standing, many of his most devoted friends to-day are his college companions.

Since graduation he has been engaged in Christian work. In Indiana he has filled several positions of prominence. He left the college and became District Evangelist. In this work he succeeded to the extent that he revived several declining congregations, and organized new ones at Akron and Bunker Hill, Indiana. He then became pastor at the church at Lafayette. He served this congregations acceptably for two years, and then took the pastorate at Shelbyville. He found the church somewhat divided and succeeded in bringing about harmony. Here he began to realize that it is not good for a man to be alone, and while he served his congregation devotedly, he still found time to woo and win a most excellent lady, Miss Maggie Kennedy, whom he wedded October 15, 1892, and who has since been a source of inspiration toward higher attainments.

He gave up his charge at Shelbyville to become the State Sunday-school Evangelist. This place he filled for one year, and showed in the work his usual energy. He was then sent by the C. W. B. M. to Ogden, Utah, for six months, as a supply in the absence of the pastor, John L. Brant, on a lecture tour in the interest of a church building at that place. On returning to Indiana the state board sent him to Peru, to build a congregation from the "ground up." He is now in his third year's work at this place. Here he has shown great courage, sacrifice and devotion to the cause of Christ, as well as successful business management. Though he has been offered larger churches with better salaries, he has chosen to remain with this work. He began with thirteen members and now has over two hundred, and a valuable church property practically out of debt.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


HON. H. V. PASSAGE was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, Dec. 20, 1835. John Passage, his father, moved to Indiana when he was two years old, He is a medical graduate of Rush Medical college, Chicago and Bellevue Medical college, New York. Is a literary graduate of Indiana University. Commenced the practice of medicine in 1857. Was elected to the Indiana legislature in 1884, and again in 1892. Is the author of the law of 1885 compelling corporations to pay labourers monthly and making their wages a preferred claim in case of bankruptcy. His great-grandfather, Bernard Passage, and his grandfather, Henry Passage, came to this country with Lafayette, and at the close of the war his grandfather decided to remain. His great-grandfather was killed in battle. In 1858, Mr. Passage married Martha, daughter of Elijah S. Cooper, treasurer of Hancock county, Indiana.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


CLEM GRAVES, of Deer Creek township, is a rising young breeder of Hereford cattle. He is not only know in his own state, but has gained quite an enviable reputation in neighboring states where he has shown his cattle. Mrs. Graves will say nothing of himself, but takes great pride in examining and talking about cattle of all grades and breeds. The writer and compiler of this history recently visited Mr. Grave's farm and learned something of the Herefords. These cattle are remarkable for the uniformity of their outward characteristics and general attributes. The prevailing color is red, from moderately light to dark in shade, with white belly and bush, and clear white face. This distinguishing feature is indelibly stamped in the breed, forming a striking instance of the remarkable power of long sustained hereditary influence. In conformation, the breed displays nearly as much uniformity as in color. The most striking features of this are their broad, level back, wide chest and brisket, and great wealth of flesh. A most characteristic is that they carry flesh most heavily on the parts of the frame from which the best meat is cut.

The Hereford is pre-eminently a beef animal, unsurpassed as grazers, maturing at a very early age. For crossing with our native cattle there is no better breed.

The Graves herd is headed by Columbus No. 51, 875; by Earl of Shadeland 41st, by Garfield. The cows are of the blood of Fowler, Cherry Boy, Anxiety 3rd, Earl Milton and other historical animals, thus combining individual merit with merit by inheritance. In 1895 this herd was exhibited at the Toledo tri-state fair, Michigan state fair, and leading district and county fairs of Indiana, winning forty-five firsts, twenty-one seconds and four grand sweepstakes premiums.

The Herefords won more premiums in grand sweepstakes of beef breeds at the Columbian Exposition than any other breed, and in 1888 won eleven out of seventeen sweepstakes ribbons at fat-stock show, Chicago. On the block they won three out of five prizes. But it is not in the show yard that the Herefords have won their proudest victories. It is with the renter, the small breeder, the great ranch man of the west, in the hands of men, where the economy of production has to do with the value of the product, that they have risen superlative above all competitors.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


CHARLES R. HUGHES, the present clerk of Miami Circuit court, was born in Marion county, Indiana, November 20, 1859, and is the oldest of a family of eight children, five of whom are now living, namely: Mrs. Fannie Dilldine, of Indianapolis; James A. Hughes, of Willows, California; Frank Hughes of Terre Haute, Indiana; and Miss Luella Hughes, of Indianapolis. His parents Isham and Srepta A. (Orm) Hughes, were born in Marion county, Indiana and Kentucky, respectively.

The subject of this sketch wa born and raised on a farm eight miles from Indianapolis, and when about six years old his parents moved there and the father resumed his occupation as an engineer. Mr. Hughes went to the Indianapolis schools, from which he graduated at the age of 16. During vacations and for a short time after graduation he clerked in two of the large dry goods stores of the city and for some time was employed in the law firm of Baker, Horde & Hendricks.

In 1875 Mr. Hughes began in the employ of the old I. P. & C. and continued in the services of that road until he was elected clerk of this county. While Gould had control of the Wabash in connection with the old I. P. & C., he worked on all the lines of the Wabash system east of the Mississippi. He was considered one of the best engineers on the system.

April 19, 1881, Mr. Hughes was united in marriage to Maggie E. Burnett, a very popular and accomplished teacher of the county. She is the daughter of Abaslom and Elizabeth (Baughn) Burnett, pioneers of this county. Their union has been blessed with two children: Fannie May, born May 1, 1883; Charles, August 1, 1886.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


JOSEPH H. LARIMER, ex-clerk of Miami Circuit court and one of the leading members of the Miami county bar, is a native of Deer Creek township, this county, where he was born February 3, 1854, and is the fourth son of Joseph D. and Mary A. (Miller) Larimer, natives of Fairfield and Perry counties, Ohio, respectively. Joseph D. Larimer was born in the year 1826, emigrated to Indiana in 1846, and settled on a farm in Deer Creek township, where his death occurred August 11, 1877.

The subject of this sketch spent his early life on the farm, received in the common schools a good English education, and at the age of twenty, began teaching and followed this profession for six years. During his career as teacher he commenced reading law with John W. Curran, of Kokomo. In 180 he read law with Farrars & Carpenter and was admitted to the bar in October of the same year. He did not at once engage in the active practice of his chosen profession, but took charge of the Bunker Hill Press, a weekly paper, of which he was editor and proprietor from November, 1880 to November, 1881. Severing his connection with said paper, he returned to Peru, where he engaged in the active practice of law, which he continued until elected clerk of the Circuit court. He made the race for this office against one of the most popular candidates placed in the field and after an exciting contest, was elected by a decided majority. He took the office in 1887, was re-elected to the office and served continuously until August, 1895. Since leaving the clerk's office he has been engaged in the practice of law. He and his law partner, David E. Rhodes, are building up a large and lucrative law practice.

Mr. Larimer was united in marriage November 21, 1882 with Miss Lillie M. Bliler, of Cass County, Indiana.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


JOS. A. NICOLES, was born December 29, 1859, on the old homestead by the township housein Pipe Creek township. His father was of English and German descent, born in Virginia, in 1804. He emigrated to Ohio in an early day . He was married to Elizabeth Davidson in 1830 and moved to Indiana and settled near Twelvemile in the 30s. By this union were born four sons and one daughter: Aleniah W., November 18, 1831; Samuel J., October 3, 1833; William H., December 13, 1839; Francis M., March 31, 1841; Susannah, May 25, 1836. Elizabeth died June 11, 1841.

His father remarried in October 23, 1842, to Mary E. Maxey. By this union were born Mariah E., August 11, 1843; James C., November 18, 1844; Jacob N., November 3, 1846; Gorege J., November 9, 1848; Jos. A., December 29, 1850; Desdemona A., March 24, 1853; Nathaniel A. and Arthur D., May 19, 1855; Thomas A., October 23, 1858. In 1848 he moved to Pipe Creek township, on the farm now owned by Wm. Tillett where he remained till his death, which occurred November 21, 1878. His father's second wife May, died June 8, 1877. Jos. A., received his education principally at the home district school. He attended the spring term of 1872 at the state normal and took a course at the Terre Haute Commercial college the same year. He clerked in a grocery owned by Wm. Hensel, of Terre Haute, for eight months - during the spring and summer of 1873, then clerk for T. H. Riddle during the summer of 1874, who carried in stock notions, millinery, jewelry and fancy goods. Then he took up school teaching which he followed for a period of four years. Having taught four terms in Indiana and one term in Illinois. The Illinois school was a spring term. These terms were in 1875, 76, 77 and 78; spring term in 1876. He was married to Amanda J. Erbaugh on April 12, 1877, - a daughter of Philip Erbaugh. To this union four sons are born: Pilney C., February 9, 1878; Arthur W., September 3, 1884; Claud E., January 22, 1887; Warren E., April 4, 1896; Amanda J. was born September 22, 1857.

Jos. A., has been engaged principally since marriage, in farming, however in the spring 1888, he engaged in the hardware and grocery business, having bought out a stock of hardware owned by B. Sullavan & Son, of Bunker Hill and a stock of groceries of Jacob Apgar. In the fall of the same year he added dry goods and continued in the business until the spring of 1890, closing out on account of poor health. He sold the hardware and implements to John Isler and the dry goods and groceries to R. Miller & Co. Mr. Nicoles was elected trustee of Pipe Creek township April, 1890, and served in that capacity with credit and honor to himself and his constituents.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


THE REV. B. F. CAVINS, D. D., the pastor of the Baptist church at Peru, was born in Bloomfield, Indiana, March 25, 1838. He attended college at Greencastle, Indiana, and graduated form the law department of the State University at Bloomington in 1859. Immediately thereafter he located in Nebraska City, Nebraska, where he remained in the practice of law until the war of the rebellion broke out. He early enlisted in the service of the 2nd Indiana Cavalry and remained in service until the close of the war. In 1869 he united with the Baptist church and was ordained to the ministry in June, 1870. In June, 1871, he became pastor of the Baptist church at Vincennes, Indiana. After remaining there nearly two years, the church at Madison extended him a call to be its pastor, which call was accepted. After being at Madison several months the Baptist church at Greensburg, Indiana, offered him the pastorate of that church. Accepting this call he remained pastor for seven years. In March, 1882 he received and accepted the call to become the pastor of the First Baptist church of Peru, where he has continued to work up to this date. He found the church small in members, but with many earnest workers, so that from a babe, the church has grown to be a giant. Under this pastorate the old house was torn down and the present magnificent structure reared.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


JOHN H. RUNKLE, the present county superintendent of schools, and author of the chapter on school history of this book, was born near Macy, Miami county, Indiana, October 20, 1861. His father, Jacob Runkle, was a native of Perry county, Ohio, and his mother, Mary (Leyse) Runkle was a native of Switzerland. She, with her parents, emigrated to this country in 1852. They made the voyage in a sail boat, taking 26 days to cross the Atlantic. Mr. Runkle, the subject of this sketch, lived on the farm with his father until he was 21 years of age. He received a common school education at Germany school house in Allen township and attended his first county normal under the supervision of W. C. Bailey in 1883. He taught his first school at the Zartman school house in the fall and winter of 1883-84. Mr. Runkle is that the American people call a "self-made man." By his own individual energy and will he has ascended to the important position which he so successfully maintains. Being limited in means he taught in the winter and attended school at Valparaiso in the summer. He was elected trustee of Allen township over an opposing party majority in 1890, and in the winter of 1890-91 taught school at Gilead and attended to the duties as trustee at the same time. In the spring of 1891, he resigned his office as trustee of Allen township to run for county superintendent and was elected to this office in June of that year on the 86th ballot. He was re-elected in June, 1893, and again in 1895.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


CHARLES W. PALMER, the subject of this sketch, and author of the history of Allen township, was born on October 8, 1866. He is the son of Wilson and Nancy E. (Packard) Palmer, the former a native of Holmes county, Ohio, and the latter of Indiana. Mr. Palmer was reared on a farm, and until he reached his majority attended the district schools of the township in winter and worked on the farm in summer. After graduated from the graded schools of Macy he took up the avocation of teaching, and has taught successfully for the past ten years, which fact is verified by his having only been employed in three different schools in that time. Mr. Palmer having a taste for legal knowledge employed his spare time in the study of law, and is at present the deputy prosecutor of Allen township. Besides looking after violators of the criminal law in his locality, he enjoys a good civil practice and if no unseen circumstances appear to bar his progress will in the hear future be one of the leading attorneys of the county.

In 1887 Mr. Palmer was married to Ettna E. Collins, and to them have been born two children: Walter S. and Doris F., Walter S. dying in infancy.

Mr. Palmer is a member of the I. O. O. F. and F. & A. M. fraternities, having been secretary of the former for more than four years. He is a member of the Christian church and a democrat in politics, having for many years taken a deep interest in both religious and political matters.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


COL H. F. UNDERWOOD, the writer of the military history in this book, was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, Oct. 3, 1843. He was brought up on a farm, worked nine months in a year and attended school in a log school-house the balance of the year. During said school period he had to perform the necessary morning and evening work on the farm.

In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, 43rd regiment, Ohio volunteers. In October, 1862, at the battle of Corinth, Miss., he was wounded, resulting in the loss of his left hand. He was discharged and attended school for one year at the Fairfield Union academy at Pleasantville, Ohio, when he returned to the army, in the transportation department, at Chattanooga, Tenn., where he remained until Aug. 1, 1865.

In April, 1866, he came to Miami county, Indiana. He was absent for a time at Oberlin, Ohio, attending school, returning in the latter part of 1867. On the first day of August, 1868, he commenced to read law in the office of Shirk & Mitchell at Peru, and was admitted to practice at the bar in 1869. At that time and for many years he gave his attention to the practice in the departments at Washington, D.C., in which business he is still engaged.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


DR. JAMES A. MEEK, writer of the history of Bunker Hill in this book, was born in Lexington, Scott county, Indiana, August 18, 1828. His parents were Robert and Lydia B. (Haas) Meek, and were natives respectively of Ohio and Virginia. At an early age he was left by the death of his father to rely on his own resources for a living. At the age of 20 he began the study of medicine at Laporte, Ind., in the office of his uncle, Dr. T. D. Lemon. After dilligent study for two years and attending a course of lectures from the Laporte Medical college, he began the practice of medicine in New Marion, Ripley county, in 1850. On the first day of March, 1852, he, with others, left for the gold fields of California, making an entire trip with ox teams, and the last 100 miles leaving their worn-out and broken-down teams and traveling over the Sierra Nevada mountains on foot, carrying their blankets and other camping utensils, reaching Placerville, or Haughton as it was then called, in four days. In the fall of 1854 he returned to the states ans was married to Matilda E. Davis, of South Bend, Ind., Dec. 25, locating in Peru two days later. In 1856 he was elected recorder of the town of Peru. In 1858 he removed from Peru, locating in Bunker Hill, where he has since resided.

Mrs. Meek died Dec. 9, 1866, leaving two children, Mary L. Hartman (deceased) and Tomas E. Meek, of Chicago. In 1868 the doctor was united in married to Mrs. Mary B. Gilmore, widow of Dr. A. W. Gilmore, who was the mother of two children, Daniel T., of the state of Washington, and Mary F. Bolton, of Chicago. Mrs. Mary B. Meek died Oct. 2,1 891. In 1859 the doctor was appointed the first postmaster of Bunker Hill, and is now holding the office, having been appointed in 1893.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


JAMES L. KLING, the veterinary surgeon, was born in Lancaster county, Ohio, Jan. 25, 1852. His parents moved to the county when he was about two years old and located in Waupecong. They remained there for about four years, and then moved to a farm southwest of Waupecong. Here the subject of our sketch grew to manhood and developed a hardy, rugged constitution. While quite young he was engaged in assisting his father in managing and operating one of the old horse-power threshing machines, and, when older, he and his brothers bought and operated the first steam-power thresher in that section of the county, in which business they have had a continuous interest. Now the firm of Kling & Sams own three first-class traction engines and threshing outfits, also a heavy portable saw mill.

Mr. Kling was married to Sarah C. Strebin, Jan. 27, 1877, to which union one son was born, which died in infancy.

During his boyhood Mr. Kling developed a love for horses and domestic animals, and soon learned the art of castrating, a business he has successfully followed for over eighteen years, during which time he developed himself by reading and assimilating the best standard works on veterinary practice until with the knowledge thus acquired he has taken a thorough course of study at the Chicago Veterinary college, from which he lacks only a few weeks of graduation. He is at present engaged in practice at his home two miles south of McGrawsvil,e spending Fridays and Saturdays at Converse.

Mr. Kling is a thorough citizen and is very highly respected by his large acquaintance, which extends throughout this and adjoining counties.

History of Miami County by John H. Stephens
Published by John H. Stephens Publishing House, Peru, IN
1896


Deb Murray