PHILIP Q. CURRAN, merchant tailor, was born in the City of Quebec, Canada, July 12, 1829, and is the third son of Patrick and Mary Curran, natives respectively of Ireland, and Scotland. Mr. Curranís early life was passed in his native city, in the schools of which he received the rudiments of an English education. It may be said with propriety that he is not an educated man in the accepted meaning of that term, yet thoroughly skilled in the details of practical business, such as is acquired only by the experience of years and the active observations of well developed common sense. At the age of twelve he apprenticed himself to learn the tailorís trade, and after serving for a period of three years, during which time he acquired great proficiency, began working for himself in the city of Troy, New York. From there in 1848 he went to Massachusetts, and located at the city of Cheshire, where he opened his first shop, and where he continued with encouraging success for a period of three years. He subsequently worked in various places, and, in 1854, experiencing a desire to move beyond the boundaries of the Eastern States, went to Detroit, Michigan, in which city he was cutter in a large tailoring establishment until the spring of 1858. He then removed to Peoria, Illinois, where he followed cutting principally until 1866, at which time he located in Anderson, Indiana, where he carried on a successful business until he removed to Peru in 1873. On locating in this city he at once took high rank as a cutter, and continued that branch of the trade until 1878, in the spring of which year he opened a business of his own, which he has since successfully operated. Mr. Curran is a wide-awake, energetic man, always alive to the interests of his business and the general prosperity of the city. He has a large and lucrative patronage, and the business, now conducted under the firm name of Curran & Co., is the leading tailoring establishment in the city. Mr. Curran has a military as well as a business record, of which he feels deservedly proud. He entered the army August, 1861, enlisting in the Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and served with the same until honorably discharged October, 1864. He went into the service as first sergeant, but early in 1864, was promoted captain, a position he held at the time of his discharge. In politics Mr. Curran is an ardent supporter of the Republican party, but has never asked official position at the hands of his fellow-citizens. He belongs to the I.O.O.F. and Masonic fraternities, having taken a number of degrees in the latter, including that of Sir Knight. On the 30th day of April, 1850, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Ellen Brazee, of Canada, a union blessed with the birth of six children, only two of whom - Philip H. and James W. - are living. Mr. and Mrs. Curran are members of the Methodist Church of Peru.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



WILLIAM F. DALY, lumber inspector for Indiana Manufacturing Company, was born in North Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, on the 25th day of September, 1842. His father, Dennis Daly, was a native of North Ireland, and his mother, Alvira (French) Daly, was born in the State of Connecticut. Mr. Dalyís parents dying when he was quite young, early threw him upon his own resources and he made his first start in life as a boot black. This employment he subsequently abandoned for mechanical pursuits, engaging at the age of fifteen, to learn the trade of carriage making, which he followed in his native city until the breaking our of the war. In September, 1861, he entered the army, enlisting in Company I, Sixth Regiment Connecticut Infantry, with which he served until honorably discharged three years later. During his period of service Mr. Daly took part in a number of engagements, among which were the following: Fort Wagner, Mackeyís Point, siege of Port Pulaski, sieges of Forts Walker and Beauregard, all the battles around Charleston, Alosta, Fla., and Drury Bluff, City Point, Deep Bottom, Pittsburgh and other of the Virginia campaigns. On leaving the army he returned to Bridgeport and resumed his trade until 1866, when he accepted a position with the Wheeler & Wilson sewing machine company, in their shops in that city. Two years later he took charge of the wood-work department in the Howe machine shops at Bridgeport, and continued as foreman of the same until promoted superintendent of the companyís shops at Peru, Indiana, in 1871. He was identified with the shops here until 1875, when he became foreman of the Muhlfield wagon and dimension works, Peru, the duties of which position he discharged until 1880. In the latter year he engaged with the Indiana manufacturing company, with which he has since been identified, holding at this time the responsible position of lumber inspector. Mr. Daly is a public spirited citizen, takes an active interest in politics, and has been his partyís candidate for different official positions. He served in the Common Council of Peru, and in the deliberations of that body bore a conspicuous part. He belongs to the G.A.R., Masonic, Royal Arcanum, and K. of H. orders; in politics, votes the Republican ticket. On the 25th of September, 1873, he married Miss Hattie M. Scott, daughter of Aaron B. Scott, a union blessed with the birth of two children, one of which, Nellie, born September 23, 1877, is living.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



GEORGE W. DEIBERT, assistant general foreman of the Wabash shops, came to Miami County in May, 1854. Was born October 28, 1833, in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and is the second son of Jacob and Rosanna (Zimmerman) Deibert, natives of Pennsylvania, who migrated in Indiana in 1854 and located in Peru. The father, who migrated to Indiana in 1854 and located in Peru. The father, who was by trade a carpenter, died in March, 1881, and the mother and brother - Albert - in 1854, soon after their arrival in Indiana. The subject returned to his native county, and on the 14th of February, 1857, was married to Miss Henrietta Wervert, a native of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, of German origin. They were blest by the birth of five children, four of whom are now living - John, Frank, Florence, Georgie (girl), and Philip (deceased). In May, 1867, the subject returned to Peru and worked at the carpenter trade, which he learned when a boy. In the fall of 1868, engaged with the I., P. & C.R.R. in the car department, and continued until June, 1872, when he assumed charge of that department. He is a Knight of Pythias and also an Encampment Odd Fellow, and was elected by the Republicans to the City Council, serving from 1880 to 1884.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



REV. HERMAN H. DIEMER, pastor St. Johnís Lutheran Church, Peru, and son of Christian Diemer, is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, born on the 26th day of October, 1851. When he was ten years of age his parents left their native country for America, but before the completion of the voyage the mother died and was buried in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The father died shortly after reaching the United States, and Herman, thus early left an orphan, was sent to Perry County, Missouri, where, until his thirteenth year, he attended school at the town of Attenburgh. In 1869, he entered Concordia College, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in which institution he pursued his studies for a period of six years with the object of the ministry in view. After securing a thoroughly classical education he entered Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, which he attended three years, completing the prescribed course in that time. In 1874 he entered upon the active duties of his sacred calling at Elkhart, Indiana, being the first minister of the Lutheran Church to proclaim the gospel in that city. He remained at Elkhart until 1877, at which time he went to Fulton County, Ohio, where he was actively engaged in pastoral work until 1883, moving to Pomeroy, Ohio, the latter year and remaining there until the spring of 1884, when he accepted the pastorate of St. Johnís Church, Peru, Indiana. Rev. Mr. Diemer is a popular pastor and eloquent and forcible pulpit orator, and since locating in this city has made many warm friends irrespective of church and creed. He was married July 6th, 1876, to Margaret Schuster, a union blessed with four children, viz.: Emma, Gerhart, Paul and Martin.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



AARON N. DUKES. The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch is a native of Randolph County, Indiana, and son of William and Matilda (McKim) Dukes, the father born in Maryland, and the mother in the State of Ohio. On the fatherís side he is descended from English ancestors, his grandfather, Isaac Dukes, emigrating from England to the United States in an early day and settling in Maryland. William Dukes in early life moved to Randolph County, Indiana, where for a number of years he was alternately engaged in merchandising, milling and agricultural pursuits. He subsequently disposed of his interests in that part of the State, and in 1846 moved to Miami County, locating near the village of Gilead, where he lived until he removed to a beautiful farm adjoining the city of Peru, several years later. He was a prominent farmer and stock raiser, and deserves mention as one of the successful men of his adopted county. His death occurred in the year 1878. His wife, Matilda Dukes, was the daughter of William and Jane McKim, who came to the United States from Ireland about the beginning of the present century. It is related that on the voyage to the new world, the vessel on which they sailed encountered a terrific storm, which for a time threatened the complete destruction of all on board. The sails were riddled and torn by the fierce gale, and in order to mend them Mrs. McKim spun threads on a little spinning wheel which she was bringing over with her, the Captain holding the wheel and Mr. McKim holding the chair in which she sat. By this means the sails were repaired, and in due time the vessel was enabled to proceed on its course in safety. William McKim settled near Chillicothe, Ohio, but subsequently emigrated to Randolph County, Indiana, where he lived until his removal to Miami County, about the year 1855. He was a farmer by occupation and died in the county in 1862. His wife survived him about eight years, departing this life in 1870. Mrs. Dukes, the mother of our subject, died at her home near Peru in 1874. The following are the names of the children born to William and Matilda Dukes, viz.: A.N., Levi, Lydia, wife of Oliver Wilson, Jane, wife of John McRea, Mary, wife of Mr. Parmley, Emma, wife of James Pugh, John, and Priscilla, wife of Dr. Frank Black. Aaron N. Dukes was born on the 27th day of October, 1834; accompanied his parents to Miami County in 1846, and has been one of its most successful and highly esteemed citizens ever since. He attended the public schools during winter seasons, where he acquired a good practical education, and when acquainting himself with the details of that useful occupation. He remained with his parents until his seventeenth year, at which time he abandoned agricultural pursuits and accepted the position of salesman in the mercantile house of E.H. Shirk, Peru, in which capacity he continued one year, effecting a co-partnership with his employer at the end of that time, in a general store at the town of Gilead. After remaining in the latter place about two years he disposed of his interest, and in 1856 removed to Mankato, Minnesota, dealing in real estate, retaining his connection with Mr. Shirk in the meantime. He returned to Peru, Ind., in the latter year and from that date until 1865 was a partner of Mr. Shirk in the general mercantile business, their house during that period being one of the largest and most successful of the kind in Northern Indiana. He withdrew from the firm in 1865, and in partnership with J.H. Jamison engaged in the grocery and pork packing business, which branches of industry were conducted with financial profit until 1868, Mr. Dukes purchasing his partnerís interest that year. Two years later he sold out and purchased what is known as the Holman farm, adjoining the city of Peru, a part of which he subsequently laid off in town lots, known as Dukesí first and second additions. In the meantime he began dealing in real estate, a business he carried on quite extensively until 1881. In 1877 he was appointed assignee of the Ulrich wagon works of Peru, the duties of which position required the greater part of his time, until the satisfactory arrangement of the business in 1881. In the latter year he was appointed receiver of the Indiana Manufacturing company of Peru, one of the largest manufacturing enterprises of the State, to which he has since devoted his entire attention. Mr. Dukes took an active part in the Sioux war of Minnesota in 1862, having been for some time in command of the military post of Mankato. His has been a very active business life, throughout which he has discharged his duty with commendable fidelity, proving himself worthy the confidence of his fellow citizens and competent to fill responsible positions intrusted to him. He is a Republican in politics, and a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, with which he has been identified since about the year 1854. In September, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Thompson, daughter of Rev. James Thompson, the projector and one of the founders of Wabash College, at Crawfordsville. Mr. Thompson was a man of deep piety and scholarly attainments, and was actively engaged in the work of the Master for over half a century. He died in Minnesota in the year 1876. To Mr. and Mrs. Dukes have been born two children, to-wit: Elbert, born in 1860, and William, born in 1862, died in 1871.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



JAMES S. DURET, Deputy Auditor Miami County, was born in Logansport, Indiana, March 9, 1841, and is the second son of John B. and Elizabeth (Bell) Duret, natives respectively of Canada and Kentucky. John B. Duret accompanied General Louis Cass from Michigan to Indiana about the year 1824, and subsequently in 1827 located permanently in Logansport. He took an active part in the organization of Cass County, and at the first election was chosen Clerk of the same, the duties of which position he discharged for a period of twenty-nine years, or until his death in 1855. He was married in 1828 to a daughter of Major Daniel Bell, who was the first person to make permanent settlement on the present site of Logansport, locating there as early as the year 1826. John B. Duret was a man of fine ability, and is remembered as one of the most accomplished officials of the county, in the welfare of which he took an active interest. James S. Duret passed the schools there until twelve years of age, when he entered Notre Dame University, in which institution he pursued his studies for a period of two years. Subsequently in 1857 and in 1858 he studied telegraphy, and for two years thereafter worked at the same. In May, 1863, he entered the army, enlisting in Company H, Eighty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and in August of the same year was commissioned second lieutenant of his company, and as such served until honorably discharged. Previous to the war in 1859 he came to Peru, and subsequently, in 1863, was appointed Deputy Treasurer of Miami County, the duties of which position he discharged for a period of six years. Then for a number of years he was employed in the railroad business, and held several important positions in that capacity until his appointment as Deputy County Auditor in 1881. He is still connected with the office, and being deservedly popular and possessing unusual ability, may yet serve the public in a wider and more extensive sphere. He was led a remarkably industrious life, full of energy and of great force of character, and as an accomplished business man none in Peru stand higher than he. In January, 1861, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Miller, adopted daughter of James T. Miller, of Peru. He is a Democrat in politics, and in religion adheres to the creed of the Roman Catholic Church.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



HENRY DUTTON, was a native of Schoharie County, N.Y.; was born June 25, 1824, and was a son of Julius Dutton, a native of Connecticut. At the age of fifteen he came to Fort Wayne and secured an engagement as clerk in a dry goods store, where he secured the greater part of his education. He then engaged in the retail dry goods business, in which he continued until the latter part of his life, when he emerged into the business of private banker and broker, which avocation he pursued during the eighteen years preceding his death, which sad event occurred in July, 1877. Mr. Dutton was elected County Treasurer on the Democratic ticket and was re-elected to the same office. He manifested a deep interest in the success of his party. Remaining at Fort Wayne for a number of years, he then came to Peru and resumed his former occupation - the dry goods business - in 1847. Was married in New York City July 20, 1847, to Miss Nancy M. Moore, daughter of John and Nancy (Wicks) Moore, natives of Duchess County, N.Y. To this union there were born four children, two of whom are living, viz.: Mrs. Emma McWhinney, now residing in Richmond, Henry D.D., born November 9, 1855, now a resident of St. Joseph, Missouri. Those deceased are: Mary M., born September 9, 1849, and died in 1877; Lillie D., born February 10, 1868, and died in 1877. Mrs. Dutton was born in Schoharie County, N.Y. The subject of this sketch was a delegate to the National Convention at Baltimore which nominated Stephen A. Douglas for the Presidency, and was also for many years chairman of the Democratic Central Committee for the County of Miami.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



RICHARD A. EDWARDS, cashier First National Bank, son of Prof. Richard and Betsey (Sampson) Edwards, was born in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, November 9, 1851. Richard Edwards, Sr., was born in Wales, and came to the United States in 1832, settling originally in Ohio. He subsequently moved to Massachusetts, where for a number of years he was principal of the State Normal School at Salem, in the organization of which institution he took an active part. In 1859 he went to St. Louis, Missouri, to take charge of the City Normal School, a position he retained until 1862, at which time he accepted the presidency of the Illinois State University. He held the latter position for a period of sixteen or eighteen years, and was for some time pastor of the First Congregational Church at Princeton, Illinois. In 1886 he was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction of Illinois, and is the present incumbent of that office. Prof. Edwards is a man of brilliant attainments, and as an educator ranks among the first in the country. He is the father of eleven children, nine of whom are living, the subject of this sketch being the second in number. Richard A. Edwards received his elementary education at Normal, Illinois, and subsequently attended Princeton and Dartmouth Colleges, graduating from the latter in 1876. His literary education then completed, he accepted the position as instructor of Latin and Greek in the Rock River Seminary, Morris, Illinois, and two years later became Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in Knox College, Galesburg. He held the latter position three years, and at the end of that time severed his connection with the college, and in 1881 came to Peru, Indiana. He entered the First National Bank in this city as assistant cashier in 1882, and in June, 1886, became cashier, a position he holds at this time. On the 1st of June, 1880, he married Miss Alice Shirk, daughter of the late E.H. Shirk, of Peru. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards have four children, viz. - Richard E., Milton A., Mary A. and Clara E. Politically, Mr. Edwards votes with the Republican party, and in religion adheres to the creed of the Congregational Church. Mrs. Edwards is an active member of the Baptist Church of Peru.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



WALTER H. EMSWILER. MR. Emswiler was born in the city of Peru, May 10, 1858 and is the second son of John H. and Sarah E. (Miller) Emswiler, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Indiana. The father came to Miami County in a very early day, was for many years one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Peru and departed this life September, 1884. Walter Emswiler received a good practical education in the city schools and at the age of twenty began life for himself as clerk for his brother Charles, in the mercantile business, with whom he remained until his twenty-fourth year. In 1883 he became a partner with Schuyler Mercer in the livery business and subsequently purchased the entire interest which he still controls. Mr. Emswiler has already a well established business reputation and is meeting with encouraging success as a liveryman. He was married March 2, 1881 to Miss Rose Fisher, daughter of Joseph Fisher, one of the substantial residents of Jefferson Township, this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Emswiler have been born one child, Joseph, whose birth occurred September 2, 1883.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



JOHN J. ENGLISH. The subject of this biography is a native of Miami County, born in Peru Township on the 6th day of April, 1848, and is the eldest son of Benjamin and Mary E. (Baker) English, of Licking county, Ohio. The father came to Miami County in 1846, settled in Peru Township, and finally purchased a home in Richland Township, where he is at this time living. John J. English remained at home until his motherís death, which occurred when he was eighteen years of age, at which time he abandoned the farm and took up the carpenterís trade. He served a four years apprenticeship at the same under W.D. Allen, of Richland, after which he began working for himself, and subsequently, August 27, 1877, accepted a position as skilled mechanic in the coach department of the railroad shops (I., P. & C.) at Peru, which he still retains. He is one of the substantial employees of the company with which he is identified, and ranks among the best mechanics of Peru. His marriage with Miss Mary C. Bouslog, daughter of R. Bouslog, of this city, was solemnized on the 29th day of October, 1878, a union blessed with three children, viz.: Nellie D., Hazel B., and John W. English. Mr. English is a Democrat in politics, but in no sense of the word a partisan.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



JOHN L. FARRAR, prominent member of the Maimi County bar, was born in Jefferson County, New York, April 29, 1824, and is the eldest son of Lloyd and Rachel Farrar, natives respectively of Vermont and Rhode Island. The family came to Miami County, Indiana, in 1847 and settled in Butler township, where for a number of years the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. Lloyd Farrar was a man of local prominence, served as Justice of the Peace for Butler Township for a series of years and departing this life in 1864. John L. Farrar spent the years of his youth and early manhood as a farmer, and received in the common schools the elements of an English education, supplemented by a course in a college at Kalamazoo, Michigan where he pursued his studies for a limited period. At the age of twenty he engaged in teaching, and during the time he contined at that profession, read lawy under the able instruction of Hon. Charles E. Stuart, of Kalamazoo, who at one time represented the State of Michigan in the Senate of the United States. After acquiring a partial knowledge of the legal profession, Mr. Farrar was admitted to the bar in 1852 and at once entered upon the active practice in the courts of Miami County, where his real ability as a criminal lawyer soon won for him a conspicuous place. He has practiced his profession in Peru continuously since 1852, and in addition to his large and lucrative business in Miami County, is frequently employed in important cases in various parts of the State. He is, without doubt, the most successful criminal lawyer in northern Indiana, and few attorneys in the State have presented the result of more labor and research in behalf of their clients than he. As a public speaker Mr. Farrar is forcible and logical, bringing his cases before the court with much kill, and in his addresses to the jury analyzing the testimony and conducting it upon the point at issue. In early life he was not favored with any peculiar advantages and his professional success must be attributed to the indomnitable will and energy which he has displayed in all his undertakings. He takes an active interest in politics, voting in conformity with the Democratic party, but is not a partisan in the sense of seeking official position. Mr. Farrar was married on the 26th of March, 1848 to Miss Everisa Foster, of Vermont. The issue of this union was one child, Arnold, born May 29, 1857. Arnold Farrar was a young man of much more than ordinary intelligence. He received a good literary education, early began the study of law with his father and subsequently graduated from the law department of ths State University at Bloomington. Before commencing the practice, however, he met with a violent death, having been accidentally shot in the year 1877.

From History of Miami County, Published in 1887 by Brant and Fuller in Chicago - Peru Township



Deb Murray