MAXWELL McCULLOUGH

Maxwell McCullough, farmer, Crawfordsville, was born in Jefferson Co, Indiana April 6, 1818 and is the s/o James B. and Margaret McCullough. His father was b. in NC his mother in KY. His father was in the war of 1812, a member of the Christian church and first a republican and then a Whig. He was a lover of education, determined, very charitable and benevolent. When the subject of not using whisky in the fields by the hands when at work was first agitated, James B. McCullough was the first to set the example, and the other neighbors followed his wise course. When he settled in this county, in the fall of 1823, it was wild, and inhabitated by Indians, wolves, panthers, wildcats and deer. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood in the midst of this primitive wilderness. He had a good common school education, and lived at home until he was 28 years old, and then began farming for himself, in limited circumstances. He now has 240 acres of good land, on which he has a nice home, 3 miles E. of C'ville on the Noblesville Gravel road. He has also 240 acres in Benton Co. Mr. McCullough was married in Sept. 1846 to Miss Jenetta E. Sidener. She died in 1856, and was a member of the Christian Church. By this marriage 4 children, 3 of whom are living: Martha E, married to CE Gay and lives in Benton Co; William J is a teacher and farmer and lives in Benton Co; Alvin R is a teacher; and James M, deceased. Mr. McCullough was marr a second time in 1857 to Margaret Campbell. Their children are: Elizabeth A. marr. Thomas A. Sheriden; Samuel M; John C. and Henry A. Mrs. MC and three of the children are members of the United Brethren church. Mr. McC was a whig till the birth of the republic party, then became one of its followers; belongs to the detective association, and with several of his sons belongs to the Good Templars, and hates whiskey and tobacco. Mr. McC has traveled considerable in the US has been a hard working man, has extensive information, is a great reader, a member of the Christian church, and an honored and respected citizen.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 166


JOHN MILLIGAN

Milligan, John, PO Waveland, Farmer, son of David and Sarah Wallace Milligan, was born in Cumberland, now Perry Co, PA March 29, 1803 and settled in Union Twp, Oct 1828. Married Lucinda Elmore, Jan 22, 1829. Children: Edwin M, Matilda J, Sarah Ellen, Thomas E, John W, Mary (Deceased), Samuel J, James R, William.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5


SAMUEL MOORE

Moore, Samuel, PO Waveland, Farmer and Dealer in Stock, Sec. 30, son of William and Elizabeth Moore; born in Sullivan Co, IN Dec 12, 1822 and settled in Sec 29, Brown Township with his parents, March 1823. First married Ann E. Fisher in 1847 by whom he had one child, Evaline Penn. Married second Minerva Smock and had 11 children: Elizabeth, Davis, Pinkey, Allen, Harvey, Sallie, Charlie, Henry, Alexander and two who died in infancy.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5


WILLIAM MOUNT

William Mount, retired, Crawfordsville, was b. in Ky, March 12, 1798 and settled in Montgomery Co 1823. Then the country was almost an unbroken, wild, woody wilderness. According to his recollection there were but two houses in Crawfordsville when he came here. He has always been a farmer. He moved to his present residence, in the Eastern suburbs of the city in 1849, since which time he has farmed but little. He was married, the first time in 1826 and the second time, in 1878 to Mrs. SC Cooper. She is a member of the First Presbyterian church. Mr. Mount cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He votes with the democrats for president and is independent in county politics.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 166


MRS. MARTHA MULLEN

Mrs. Martha Mullen was born May 24, 1839 in Montgomery Co. Her father, Zopher Ball was one of the early settlers in this county. Her grandfather was probate judge of the county for several years. She was married Jan 27, 1869 to John Buck. He was b. Aug 24, 1824 and died July 27, 1877. He was surveyor of Montgomery Co 21 year, and was a valuable and efficient officer. In politics he was a Democrat. She has 3 children: Anna, Emma and John. She was married the second time, Jan 14, 1880 to Daniel K. Mullin (sic). He was b. June 22, 1831 and for years was a trader in stock. Mrs. Mullen is an active, energetic woman.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 225


SILAS PETERSON

Silas Peterson, a representative citizen and prominent resident of Sugar Creek Township, has been located in Montgomery County ever since 1830. Growing from childhood to mature years upright and honorable in his daily life, he early gained, and still retains, the confidence of the numerous acquaintances and friends he has throughout the State of Indiana. Occupying various positions of public trust, he has ever discharged the duties of each office with energy and ability.

Mr. Peterson was elected to the office of County Real-Estate Appraiser in 1868, and devoted himself with impartially to he work. In 1876 Mr. Peterson was the candidate of the Democratic party for State Senator, and was elected by an overwhelming majority. Giving great satisfaction to his constituents by the able manner in which he handled the interests of the district he represented, he was in 1884 unanimously selected by his party for a second term of office, and so great was his popularity, that, although the Democrats lost nearly all the elections that year by the large increase of Republican voters, Mr. Peterson was again triumphantly returned to the Senate.

The Hon. Silas Peterson is a native of Ohio, and was born in 1825. The records of the family history show their name to be well represented in early Colonial times. Before the Revolutionary War there emigrated from Switzerland to America, John Peterson, a man of courage, resolution and integrity, who located with his family in Hardy County, Va., about 1760. In the Old Dominion his son John reared eight children, and founded in the New World that branch of Petersons of which our subject is the direct descendant. The children were Solomon, the eldest-born; Elizabeth, who married William Harpool, of Madison County, Ohio; Martin; Phoebe, who became the wife of Michael Coyner, and died in Clinton County, Ind.; Jonas, who was born in 1800; John; and two who died in childhood.

In 1806 John Peterson and his family removed to Ross County, Ohio, which State had only been admitted into the Union four years before, and was yet scarcely more than a wilderness. The family passed through the privations and stirring experiences peculiar to early pioneer life on the frontier, the sons capturing game and killing wild animals where now stand flourishing towns with a populous country all about them.

Solomon Peterson, the father of our subject, was born in Virginia in 1790, and was therefore about sixteen years of age when the family emigrated to the Buckeye State. He married in Ross County, Ohio, at a very early age, Miss Elizabeth Bowers, who became the mother of five children, all of whom lived to mature years. These sons and daughters were William; Samuel; Mary, wife of Gustin Irwin; Maria, who married William Strong, and moved to Keokirk, Iowa, and still resides there; and Martin, the youngest. The mother of these children having died, the father married Miss Wilmena Walternut, who emigrated from Germany to this country with her parents. By this union Mr. Peterson became the father of Silas, our subject; Phoebe, who married Thomas Gray; and John. A third marriage added two more children to the family. These children were Solomon, and Margaret, who married Louis Cave, who served bravely as a Union soldier in the late war. The two children born after Solomon Petersonís fourth marriage were Martha, now deceased, who married G. W. Wilson; and David.

Silas Peterson when five years old came with his parents to Montgomery County in the year 1830, and received an education in the public schools, which in those days were primitive in their method and number. When Silas Peterson was twenty-five years old, he married Miss Lorinda Dain, a lady highly esteemed by all who knew her. The husbandís possessions were limited to a small tract of land, but through close application to his business, and excellent management, his property increased until he owned at one time two thousand acres of land. In 1888, when he had already served two terms as State Senator, he was nominated again by the Democrats and was defeated only by the redistricting of the district.

Four children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Peterson; John Q., a young and prosperous farmer; Wilmena, wife of George Seybold, a hardware merchant of Waveland; Esther, wife of Rev. W. B. Slutz, a Methodist minister located at Frankfort; and Charles P., a farmer near the old homestead. Mr. Peterson has been identified in the past with Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and his wife are valued members of the Disciples Church, at Darlington. He has always wielded a powerful influence in behalf of religion and morality, and is strongly opposed to the liquor traffic. Mr. Peterson is widely known as a man of broad intelligence, just and generous in his views, and deeply interested in local and national affairs. He has always been specially zealous in all educational matters looking toward progress.

HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY, PARKE AND FOUNTAIN COUNTIES, published 1893. Page 205.


JOHN M. REMLEY

Remley, John M. PO New Market, Farmer, Stock Raiser and dealer, son of John and Sarah Remley, who settled in this county in the Spring of 1825; was born Dec. 15, 1833 and settled on Sec. 2 of this township in the Fall of 1870; Jan 30, 1868 married Margaret E. Gilliland and have one child, Lilly May.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5


JAMES M. SELLER

James M. Seller, attorney, Crawfordsville, native of Va went to Ky then came to Mont Co In 1827. Mr. S. had been a Capt. in the Black Hawk war. He first came in the spring and started the clearing and planted a small crop, then ret. to Harrison co KY hiring a man to erect a hewn-log cabin of fair size and two stories high. This cabin is now owned by Marshall H. Seller, E. of C'ville. It has been boarded and ceiled. Into this M/M Seller and four children moved in the f all of 1827. They bought 280 acres. Mr. S. became quite an active man in politics, first as a whig and later a republican. He was co. commissioner for sev. years and in the winter of 1843-4 he represented the co. in the state legislature. He d. Dec 24, 1874 and his wife is still living. He was an elder in the Presby. church of which Mrs. Seller is also a member.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 375


JAMES M. SELLER

James M. Seller was b. Dec 20, 1845 in Montgomery Co. He derived his education from the common schools and academy. In 1869 he began the study of law with James McCABE of Williamsport. He further studied with John M. BUTLER of C'ville. After studying one year he went to ILL where he was engaged in teaching for 3 years and at the same time pursued his studies. ret. to In he assoc himself with John W. SMITH for the practice of his profession, in 1872 in Williamsport. In 1874 he located in C'ville where he has become established. In 1876 he formed a partnership with James WRIGHT and this firm still continues to do business under the firm name of Wright & Seller. Mr. S. is a staunch democrat and in 1880 was a candidate for the state leg. Mr. S. was marr. May 1,1877 to Laura Heaton d/o James Heaton Sr one of the oldest settlers in the co. She was b. May 1, 1846. They have had two children: William b. June 9, 1878 and an inf, dec. The Heatons are related to Gen. WS Hancock, and figure din the Revolution. Mr. Seller is a Mason, and an active temperance worker. Mrs. Seller is a member of the Methodist Church.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 375


MARSHALL H. SELLER

Marshall H. Seller, farmer, Crawfordsville, a respectable and good-natured gentleman, was born Oct 26 1826. He has been raised in the Presbyterian faith and in politics is an ardent republican. His father, James Seller, was b. Harrison Co Ky Jan 31, 1795. He lived near Dayton, Ohio awhile, and settled in Montgomery Co IN Oct 1823. The country was then new and undeveloped. He first about 240 acres of land, and when he died (1875) owned 480 acres. Mr. Seller was one of the active men who built up this county and made the civilization which we now enjoy. He came from Ky in a wagon and was 17 day son the road. They traveled about 10 miles a day and endured the hardships of emigrating to a new country through forests and swamps without roads. Mr. S. was county commissioner at an early day. The first time he ran for the state legislature he was defeated, but the next time was elected and served one term as Rep. of this county. He took an active interest in all measures for the good of the people, and was an intelligent and efficient representative. Mr. Seller was a Cap. in the Black Hawk War, a Whig in politics and elder in the Presbyterian Church. He was marr. in 1820 to Mary D. Johnston who was a member of the Presbyterian church and was b. in 1800. She has had 6 children and they are all living: John M, William A, Thomas P, Marshall H, Eliphalet D. and Elizabeth J. Mrs. Seller and her son live together on the old homestead.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 175


WILLIAM A. SELLER

William A. Seller, whose home is on section 4, Walnut Township, has long been associated with agricultural interests of Montgomery County as a well-to-do farmer. He was born in Harrison County, Ky., September 20, 1825, a son of James Seller, who was an early pioneer of this county, and one of its foremost farmers and public men in his day. James Sellerís father who died when James was a small boy, was an early settler of that part of Virginia in which his son was born, and he was a soldier in the War of 1812. The family removed to Kentucky, and there James grew to manís estate, and was married to Mary D. Johnson, a daughter of William Johnson, a Kentucky farmer. Mr. Seller continued to live in Harrison County after his marriage until 1827, when he left Kentucky to found a new home in Indiana, He bought land east of Crawfordsville, and spent the remainder of his life, thereon, dying December 24, 1874. His pioneer labors were abundantly blessed, and he became the possessor of a large and valuable farm of four hundred and forty acres, although he had begun life in poverty. He was a conspicuous figure in the civic and military life of the county, as he was a man of marked force of character, and was sensible, clear-headed and business-like in his dealings. He was Commissioner of Montgomery County for several years, and he also represented it in the State Legislature in 1843 and 1844, showing excellent powers of statesmanship. He was sent there by the Whig party, of which he was an ardent supporter until its demise, and he then cast in his lot with the Republicans. He was often called upon to act as administrator of estates, such was the confidence reposed in him. He was a Captain in the State Militia, and bore an active part in the Black Hawk War. He was of great assistance in the upbuilding of the Presbyterian Church, of which he was an Elder, and was a zealous worker in its behalf up to the time of his death.

William Seller was four years old when his parents came to this county. He is one of six children, all of whom grew to maturity. His brother, John M., is a farmer in Franklin Township; Thomas P. is a physician at Mt. Jackson; Marshall H. resides on the old home place; Eliphalet D. and Elizabeth J. are twins. The former is a farmer in Hendricks County, and the latter, the widow of Joseph Ellis, lives in Tippecanoe County.

Our subject was reared amid pioneer scenes, when this county was but little better than a wilderness, wherein the Indians still made their home, and wild animals, such as foxes, deer, etc., roamed at pleasure. He gained the necessary experience to make him a good farmer on his fatherís farm, which he helped to improve after he became old enough to be of use. After his marriage he rented a farm in Walnut Township, and he and his bride began housekeeping in a little old log cabin. They lived there but a short time, however, and then removed to Franklin Township. Three years later he bought the Wilson Airs place in Walnut Township, and still makes it his home. He erected a substantial house, and has made nearly all the improvements on the place, which is in fine order, and is a highly productive farm of two hundred and twenty-eight acres of well-tilled land. He devotes it to general farming, and has it well stocked with Norman Horses, Jersey cattle and Poland-China hogs of the best breeds.

October 10, 1844, Mr. Seller and Miss Elizabeth Wilson were united in marriage, and for nearly half a century have lived happily together. They have two children, James Milton and Louisa Jane. James was born December 20, 1845, and is a well-known lawyer at Crawfordsville. He married Miss Laura Heaton. Louisa, who was born March 23, 1848, is at home with her parents, and is the stay of their declining years.

Mrs. Seller was born in Miami County, Ohio, November 24, 1824, was four years old when the family came to Delaware County, this State, and was fifteen when they came to Montgomery County. Her parents were Adam and Margaret (Logan) Wilson, natives of Ohio, the former born in Miami County. Her mother was a daughter of John Logan, a Kentuckian, who died in his native State, and his wife then removed with her children to Ohio.

Our subject is one of the oldest residents of the county, and is one of its solid men, financially speaking. His property has been mostly acquired through his untiring diligence, foresight and good management. He is a sincere Christian, his everyday life guided by high moral principles, and the Presbyterian Church finds in him a useful member. Politically, he is a Democrat, by he has never aspired to office.

HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY, PARKE AND FOUNTAIN COUNTIES, published 1893. Page 281.


WILLIAM A. SELLER

William A. Seller, son of the above, was b. Sept 20, 1823; in Harrison Co KY. He was marr. Oct 10, 1844 to Elizabeth Wilson who was b. Nov 24, 1824 in Miami co Ohio. They farmed one year in Walnut Twp, then two years in Franklin and in 1849 they bought 20 acres of land and added to this till they now own 230 acres. Mr. S. was first a wig, then democrat and now a national. They have two children: Louisa J, now Mrs. Peterson and James M.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 375


WILLIAM T. SERVIES

Servies, William T. PO New Market, s/o Anderson and Eliza Pilcher Servies, who were natives of Ky; the former being b. 1808 and the latter 1810/ were marr. 1827 and in 1830, located in Brown Twp, this county. M/M Servies d. in 1846 and 1837 respectively. William T. was b. in Shelby Co KY March 4, 1830 and in consequence of the death of his parents, had to earn his own living by farm work at $7 or $8 per month. Jan 4, 1853, he was married to Nancy C d/o John and Phebe Jones, who was b. in this township, Aug 15, 1837. Children's names: John A; Henry D; Mary Ann (now Mrs. WH Martin); America E; Charlie M; and Maggie G. By industry and economy, M/M Servies have been able to surround themselves with much that tends to comfort and happiness; a view of their fine residence appearing in the Atlas. Their 3 oldest children are happily marr. and pleasantly located in this county. Mr. S. owns 500 acres of land and is a dealer in and raiser of all kinds of stock.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 52


ANDREW S. SHANKLIN

Andrew S. Shanklin, farmer, Crawfordsville, was the eldest in a family of 4 sons and 4 daughters reared by John & Elizabeth (Kiggins) Shanklin. His grandfather, John Kiggins, was serving as a teamster in the war of 1812 when he was killed by the enemy.; His grandfather Shanklin emigrated from Va to Ky. in the early settlement of the West. The parents of our subject left Bath Co, in that state in 1823 or 1824 and coming to Lawrence co, Indiana lived there till 1828. It was there that Mr. Shanklin was born on Jan 6, 1825. The family removed to this county and made their home on Sec. 25 in Wayne Twp. the first three years, but in 1831 changed to Sec 9, where the father passed the remainder of his useful life, dying April 1,1 880 at the advanced age of 78 years. Mr. Shanklin spent his youth farming and clearing land, and in winter attending the district school; and at the age of 23 celebrated his marr, which took place April 27, 1848 with Miss Catherine Lowe. She was b. in Bath Co, Ky June 24, 1829. The succeeding year her father came to Montgomery Co, and after raising a crop returned late in the season and brought his family & settled permanently in Union Twp. Her grandfather Lowe was b. in 1789 and died at her house in 1880. Mr. Shanklin and his wife are zealous and efficient members of the Methodist Episcopal church of long standing, he having united some 30 years ago and she 7 or 8. He is earnestly devoted to the principles of the Republican party. His farm of 95 acres lies 7 Mi. NW of Crawfordsville and is worth $5,000. In Oct 1869 he moved with his family to Ks and returned in exactly two years from that date. This excellent couple have had 5 children bless their marr. union: Elizabeth Ann, now Mrs. Joseph R. Vance was b. April 10,1 849; Lavina Ellen, b. March 11, 1853 died Jan 22, 1854; Emily Alice, born May 19, 1855, wife of John McIntyre; John William b. March 6, 1857, married Dec 7, 1876, to Emma L. Arheart; and Charles Elmer, b. July 6, 1862.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 188


HOWARD W. SMITH

Howard W. Smith, liveryman, Crawfordsville was born in Montgomery Co March 30, 1849. He had a common school education and attended college one year. He always lived on a farm near Crawfordsville until 1875, when he came to the city and engage din his present business. He has a large stable and a good stock of horses and buggies. He was married Nov 1877 to Miss Laura M. Hall, daughter of Thomas and Nancy J. Hall.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 245


STEPHEN A. STILWELL

Stephen A. Stilwell, Deputy City Treas, Crawfordsville, was born in Montgomery Co March 22, 1838 on a farm near Crawfordsville. His father, Jeremiah Stilwell , came from Ky and settled in his county in 1820, and assisted in laying out the city of Crawfordsville. He is still living, at an advanced age, an honored and highly respected citizen. His mother's name was Didama. He lived upon a farm until he was 23 years of age, and obtained such an education as might be obtained at the district school. When the call was issued asking for brave men to defend our country, Mr. Stilwell enlisted in co C, 40th Ind Vol. Inf, Nov 15, 1861 as a private. For 3 years he served his country and was then mustered out. He again enlisted and gallantly fought until the struggle closed, coming home as Capt, given him as a reward for his courage, participating in Bowling Green, Perrysville and Crab Orchard.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 162


WILLIAM A. STILWELL

William A. Stilwell, deceased, was born Jan 19, 1828, in Montgomery Co, near Brown's Valley, where his father had come from Ky. in a very early day, entered land, and settled, with wife and one child. His father still lives with his children, at the age of 84, and owns the land he entered. William was one of 9 children, all but one born in Montgomery Co. William was raised on a farm and educated in the schools of the day. He was married June 12, 1851, to Mary J. Gott, and the same year began merchandising in Waveland, and then to Annapolis, and in 1856 to Crawfordsville. Here he remained one year, and in April 1857, went to Linn Co, KS and the following July his wife and two children, Wallace A. and Josie, joined him. Mr. Stilwell was a man loyal to the Union and opposed Southern Slavery/ About one o'clock in the morning, May 22, a party of pro-slavery murderers form Mo.entered the "Trading Post," situated on the military road leading from Ft. Scott to Ft. Leavenworth, where it crosses the Osage river about 3 mi. from the state line. They emerged unseen, rode up to the store and took GW Andrews & John Campbell prisoners. They then started on the road toward Kansas City, overtaking William A. Stilwell from Sugar Mound, who was going up the river for a load of provisions; they took him prisoner and ordered the other two men to get in his wagon and ride. They continued their marauding until they had 12 men in custody. On arriving at a deep ravine in a skirt of timber, the commander, the notorious Capt. Hamilton, called a halt. The prisoners were formed in line, about 5 years in advance of the horsemen. The command was given to "Present arms! Fire!" every man dropped and all were killed or severely wounded but one man, who fell for purposes of effect. Four were instantly killed, among whom was brave Stilwell, who, when he found he must die, cried to the villains: "If you are going to murder us, for God's sake, take good aim." He fell, having received a charge of buckshot in his left breast. The ruffians then ransacked the pockets of their victims, and one poor fellow, who seemed little hurt, received a shot from a revolver, through the head, while one escaped observation and as soon as opportunity offered conveyed the news to the post. For further information of this human slaughter the reader must search the records of those times. John G. Whittier has immortalized the massacre in one of his vigorous and true pen pictures, printed in the Atlantic Monthly soon after the tragedy occurred, entitled "Le Marais Du Cygne" (this too is enclosed, but for lack of space, it is not included on this web site) . William A. STILWELL was a Mason, and he thought this would save him, but, so inhuman were the villains that it was said a Freemason (Dr. Hamilton) killed him. He left a wife and two children, who soon returned to Indiana. They lived with his father till 1861, when Mrs. Stilwell removed to Crawfordsville and supported her children with the profits of her needle. She did not neglect their education. Wallace A. Stilwell was b. Sept 19, 1854 in Alamo, Montgomery Co Indiana. He attended the public school, and from 1869 to 1873 was a student at Wabash College. Leaving school, he learned rosewood graining in oil and worked at the coffin factory for some time; but invention depriving him of his trade, he applied himself to sign painting, in which he has excelled. He now has a shop in the basement at the corner of Main & Green Streets.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
History of Montgomery County, Indiana, HW Beckwith Reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Ind p. 241


DR. J.W. STRAUGHAN

Straughan, Dr. JW Po Parkersburg, Farmer and Physician son of Nathaniel Sanford and Mary Brewer Straughan; was born in Shelby Co KY Oct 8, 1831 and settled in Scott Twp, April 1852. On the 1st of Feb 1853, the Dr. was united in marriage with Sarah Josephine Harrison by which union he had had 3 children: Robert Sanford, Elisha Kent Kane and Mary Ida May. Dr. S. attended the Indiana Central Medical College, Indianapolis in 1851 and 52 and University Medical College, NY City in 1853 and 54. Commenced practice of medicine at Parkersburg, In 1852 where he continued successfully for 14 years. In March 1866 a terrific cyclone swept through that portion of Montgomery Co and completely swept away the residence of the Dr, then located on mile North of town, carrying his daughter, Ida some 40 rods and so severely injuring her that her life was despaired of; by careful nursing heal returned. Immediately after this, the Dr. disposed of his property in Scott Twp, and purchased a farm on Sec 35, Brown Township, where he was again a sufferer by fire in 1872. Nothing daunted by loses, the Dr. built his present commodious and attractive house -a view of which is in the Atlas --where he now lives surrounded by everything necessary for comfort and happiness, enjoying the confidence and friendship of all who know him and the fruits of an extended practice.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5


JAMES G. SWEARINGEN

Swearingen, James G., PO Waynetown, Farmer s/o John and Mary A. Swearingen, who settled in his county Oct 1822; was b. near Yountsville Aug 15, 1830; settled on Sec 2,(Ripley Twp), Feb 24, 1857; marr. Mary J. Herron at the residence of her father, Feb 22, 1853. 3 children: Emma V; James P and Ella F.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 52


WILLIAM J. SWINDLER

Swindler, William J. PO Browns Valley, Sec 22, Farmer and Mechanic, son of Thomas and Jane Swindler, who settled in the county 1826; was born on Sec 15, Brown Twp, Nov 19, 1827. Married Sallie A. Hulse Jan 5, 1865 and has two children, Albert b. March 18, 1866 and Martha L, Oct 14, 1870; is a carpenter and cabinet maker by trade.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5


ISSAC S. TODD

Todd, Isaac S, PO Browns Valley; Farmer and Stock Raiser, son of Johnson and Ruth A Todd who settled in this county 1837; was born on Sec 16, this township in 1845. Married Miss Delia J. Maddox Jan 30, 1868.

Submitted by: Karen Zach
Atlas of Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: Beers, 1878) p. 5