BARBARA A. MARTIN is a native of North Carolina, and was born December 24, 1828. Her parents (John W. and Mary A. Warren Miller) emigrated to Morgan County, Ind., where, January 28, 1849, she was united in marriage to Dr. Isaac Martin, a native of Monroe County, who died about 1873, having been the father of nine children, four of whom are living--William A., John M., Mary S. (Mrs. Russell) and James L. The parents of Dr. Martin were early settlers of Monroe County, and had traded considerably with the Indians.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA BAKER TOWNSHIP
PAGE 367


BARNARD B. BUSH, of the firm of Bush & Brother, dealers in general merchandise, was born in Orange County, N.Y., on September 18, 1856, and is a son of George B. and Mary (Lyon) Bush, having been the second of their four children. The firm of Bush & Brother does a thriving business, is carrying a stock of $3,000, and trading annually to the amount of $10,000 at Centerton, Ind. Barnard B. was reared on a farm, and attended the public schools a sufficient length of time to enable him to teach. Mr. Bush, Sr., and his wife came to Indianapolis from New York, and from there moved to Centerton. On the breaking out of the war, he went into the service, but never returned to his home. Barnard B. began life for himself at nineteen years of age, at farming, and continued in that pursuit until 1880, when he engaged in the mercantile business, and ever since has been doing a thriving trade in that line at Centerton. Mr. Bush was married, on September 30, 1878, to Emma Ferguson, a native of Morgan County, Ind., and by her he has had two children--May, born May 2, 1880, and Lee, born September 23, 1883. Mrs. Bush is a consistent member of the Christian Church, Mr. Bush is a Republican and holds the office of Trustee of the township, being now in his second term. After his first election, he made a special levy of 35 cents on the $100, for the purpose of building a graded schoolhouse of four rooms. This became an issue in his second election, and he having been successful, the building was completed, and a school is taught there which is a credit to any township. Mr. Bush is a self made man, not having depended upon any one for help in climbing the ladder to prosperity.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
CLAY TOWNSHIP, MORGAN CO., INDIANA
PAGE 260


BARTHOLOMEW SMITH, farmer, was born in Owen County, Ind., Feburary 5, 1837, and is the eldest of seven children born to Marcus M. and Malinda (Pierson) Smith, the former of whom was a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, and the latter of Bourbon County, Ky. They were of English and Irish descent respectively. Marcus M. Smith received only a very limited education in youth, at the rude log school-housed of the Indiana frontier; but by his own exertions, and by the light of a shell-bark fire afterward acquired a fair, practical business education and became of the best historians in the country. After his father's death, in the fall of 1824, the family removed to Owen County, Ind., and settled on some 600 acres of land on the White River, which his father had entered some years before. Here young Marcus learned the miller's trade, which he followed for several years, and here he was afterward married. Later he bought a farm in Owen County, where he still resides, and is engaged in farming and stock-raising. Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church, in which church he has been a minister for more than thirty years. The father of Mrs. Malinda Smith, Bartholomew Pierson, served under Gen. William H. Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe and in that Genreal's other campaigns against the Indians, and his father, Shadrach Pierson, was a veteran of the Revolutionary war, having served seven years, or through the entire struggle. Bartholomew Smith received such an education in youth as could be obtained at the primitive log school-houses of the frontier, and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty-one years old. He was then employed as a salesman for the Turner Scale Company for about two years. In September, 1861, he enlisted in the Tenth Indiana Battery, and served with the same in all its marches and engagements until the close of the war, and was mustered out at Indianapolis in June, 1865. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, and the Atlanta campaign, as well as many other lesser engagements. At Dallas, Ga., he was severely injured by the recoil of a piece of artillery, resulting in partial paralysis. For two years after his return from the army, he was engaged in railroading. He then bought a farm in Ray Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he resided until October, 1876, when he sold and bought another in Gregg Township, where he still resides. He was married, September 21, 1861, to Miss Mary J. Hancock, a native of Franklin County, Ky. Five children, two sons and three daughters, have blessed their union, all of whom are yet living. Mr. Smith is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., and is also a member of the G. A. R. In politics, he is a Republican, and is a respected citizen of Gregg Township.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY GREGG TOWNSHIP
PAGE 348


BARTLEY SELLERS, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Guilford County, N.C., October 21, 1830, and is the second of nine children born to Jordan and Mary (Mason) Sellers, natives of Virginia and of English and Irish extraction. Mr. Mason was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. Bartley's parents came from north Carolina to Indiana in the fall of 1850, and located in Brown Township, in this county, where they remained until Mrs. Sellers' death, in 1856. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Sellers, Sr., is also a member of that church, and he is now residing with his son Peter, in Hendricks County. Bartley was reared upon a farm, received limited schooling, and at nineteen years of age began life in dependently in North Carolina, and when he had earned money enough for the trip, he came to Indiana in 1851, and located in Morgan County with $1 in his pocket, engaged in farming, and worked at $15 per month. August 12, 1855, Mr. Sellers was married to Mary a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth Wright, and a native of Morgan County, by whom he has had three children--Andrew, John and an infant unnamed. Mr. Sellers and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He owns and manages a farm of 140 acres of well-improved land, all cultivated. His farm is supplied with a fine orchard and a commodious residence, and stocked with horses, hogs, cattle and sheep. Mr. Sellers is engaged extensively in shipping stock to Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Pittsburgh. He belongs the A. F. & A. M. Lodge, No. 78, Mooresville, Ind., and has had three brothers who were in the late war. Mr. Sellers has built up his own fortune, has had no assistance whatever from anybody except his industrious wife, and the couple are rewarded by the possession of their comfortable home.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
CLAY TOWNSHIP, MORGAN CO., INDIANA
PAGE 268


BENJAMIN CORNWELL was born in Oldham County, Ky., December 3, 1844, and is the eldest of the five children of John and Minerva (Williams) Cornwell, natives of Kentucky, who located in Washington County, Ind., where our subject grew to manhood and obtained the common education the schools afforded. During boyhood, Benjamin learned the blacksmith trade, at which he labored until August, 1861, when he enlisted in Company K, Fifty-third Indiana Volunteers, and served actively at Vicksburg, Black River, Bolivar, Jackson, Shiloh and on other fields; received an honorable discharge in 1864, and afterward engaged at farming for one year, then resumed blacksmithing, at which he has since continued. November 16, 1865, he wedded Vernilla Ludlow, of this county, and they have become parents to five children, three of whom are living - John Milton, Altha and Levada. Mr. Cornwell is an excellant man and a patriotic citizen. Like all the soldiers, glory nestles around him and shows him worthy of confidence and support. He is an esteemed citizen, and Mrs. C. is a member of the Christian Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA GREGG TOWNSHIP
PAGE 343


BENJAMIN DESSAUER is the fifth son and eighth child in a family of eleven born to Aaron and Fannie (Goldsmith) Dessauer, natives of Germany. His parents married in Baltimore, Md., in 1836, where his father followed his vocation as merchant tailor; thence he removed to Missouri; remained until in 1842, and then went to Ohio; located in Cincinnati, and engaged in the clothing business. In 1852, he embarked in the general booking business, and was thus engaged for eight years, when he retired from business. He died November 16, 1866; his wife on October 29, 1866. Benjamin Dessauer was reared in Cincinnati, obtained a good education in the graded schools of that city, and when eighteen years of age took a complete course in Nelson's Commercial College. When twelve years of age, he began clerking in a general merchandise store in Thorntown, Ind.; then clerked at various points until 1875. He then came to Martinsville in September of that year, and formed a partnership with his brother David in the clothing, boot, and shoe business, in which they have been so successfully engaged, their business rooms being two of the largest in the town. On June 10, 1879, he was married to Rebecca Kronenberger, daughter of Max Kronenberger, a native of Germany. Mr Dessauer is a member of the K. of P. Lodge, No. 89.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 182


BENJAMIN FRANKLIN JONES, carriage-trimmer and harness-maker at Mooresville, Ind., is a native of Warren County, Ohio; is the youngest of ten children, four sons and six daughters, of Nathan and Margaret (Hawkins) Jones, natives of New Jersey and Ohio, and of Welsh and English extraction respectively, and was born May 9, 1846. He was reared upon a farm, and at the public schools of Ohio acquired a good English educational September 2, 1864, he enrolled at Waynesville, Ohio, in Company B., One Hundred and Eightieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served to July 25, 1865, when he was honorably discharged with the rank of Duty Sergeant on account of cessation of war. While in the service, he participated in the battle of Kingston, N.C., and a number of skirmishes. Soon after enlistment, he was detached and put into garrison duty. Mr. Jones came to Mooresville in November, 1870, and took service with Dorland & Gregory, dealers in hardware and agricultural implements. In January, 1873, he began the trade of harness-maker and carriage-trimmer, and, in 1876, set up in business on his own account. April 26, 1876, he was married at New Albany, Ind., to Emma Thompson, a native of Indiana, and daughter of Rev. I. N. Thompson, and by this marriage he has had born to him one child--Betram T. After returning from the army, he was engaged in the dry goods business at Lebanon, Ohio, during the year 1867 and a part of 1868, and, in 1869-70, he was at Oskaloosa, Iowa, in the grocery business. Aside from a small inheritance from the estate of his father, he has worked for what the has, and owns a nice residence property and the splendid brick building in which he carries on his business. In politics, he is a wide-awake Republican, a temperance man and an advocate of prohibition. From 1879 to 1882, he carried on the manufacture of carriages and buggies in addition to his other business, and altogether his industrious efforts have proved satisfactorily remunerative. He is a highly respected citizen and a reliable business man. In 1876, he was Town Clerk of Mooresville, and as such wrote and compiled the town ordinances. The father of our subject died in August, 1865, at the age of sixty-eight years. His mother yet lives at the age of about seventy-eight years, and makes her home with him.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 227


BENJAMIN F. TROGDON, farmer and stock dealer of Brown Township, Morgan County, Ind., second of the twelve children of Joel J. and Sallie I. (Julian) Trogdon, was born in Randolph County, N.C., February 15, 1847. His parents emigrated from Carolina to Missouri, and from there came to Indiana in 1865, our subject having at that time been in Morgan County about five years. Benjamin grew to manhood on a farm, and at the common schools acquired the rudiments of an English education. On February 9, 1864, he enlisted in Company L, Twenty-first Regiment, First Indiana Heavy Artillery, and served until January 10, 1866. August 17, following, having laid aside the accouterments of war, he donned those of a true civilian, and forgetting not the many pretty promises he had made, and remembering the heart that beat most wildly as two tearful eyes glanced over the dispatches that told of the booming of the cannon at the siege of Mobile, he led to the altar Elmira J. Moon, and there took upon himself the obligation which enrolled him again in the service of his country, and through his commission entitles him not to gilt bands and epaulets, he is nevertheless captain of the host which to the time of sweetest music engendered by happy hearts goes marching on, making the world better for having lived in it. Mr. and Mrs. Trogdon are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They have had born to them four children--Ada B. (deceased), Lena D., Glenney V. and Ida May. Mr. T. is a self-made man, and there is nothing in his make-up that he need be ashamed of. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 242


BENJAMIN HENRY PERCE, M.D., prominent physician and surgeon of Mooresville, Ind., is eldest of five children of Prosper and Mary O. (Robinson) Perce, natives of New York and New Hampshire, and of English and Scotch-Irish extraction respectively, was born in St. Joseph County, Mich., June 27, 1838. His father having died in 1854, leaving the family in somewhat straitened circumstances, the subject of this sketch was thrown early in life upon his own resources. He had acquired some knowledge of sign writing and ornamental painting, and did considerable work in that line, by which he accumulated a small sum of money, the most of which he liberally gave to his mother and young sister, and with $3 in his pocket and his extra wearing apparel rolled up in an old silk handkerchief, young Perce left the place of his nativity, and took up his marching search of a livelihood. Trudging onward, stopping occasionally to saw wood for bread, he arrive finally at the crossing of the New Albany & L. S. R. R. Footsore, tired, hungry and discouraged, he thrust his cane into the sand and allowed its falling to decide the course of his further travel. It bent its head to the south, and in the year 1857, after sleeping in fence corners and feasting off dry crackers alone as sable night spread her wings over hill and dale, our subject landed at Greencastle, Ind., the sole possessor of but 25 cents. He retired without supper and began work before breakfast, so that when dinner arrived--a good one to which he was kindly invited--the manner in which he attacked the eatables, made the eyes of his generous host and hostess stand out from very wonder. He alternated the two succeeding years between Greencastle and Plainfield in following this trade, and in the spring of 1859, came to Mooresville, and a year afterward formed a partnership with a Mr. Mitchell in the manufacture of carriages and buggies, which enterprise failed in the following year. As "journeyman," he followed his old trade at different places up to the summer of 1862, when he raised a company preparatory to entering the army, and drilled it, but declined a commission as its commander in favor of Capt. Peoples. In August of this year, he entered as a Corporal in Company E, Twelfth Indiana Volunteer Infantry,and served up to June, 1865. In July, 1864, at Marietta, Ga., he received a sunstroke which resulted in the destruction of his right eye. In October, 1864, he was placed upon detached duty as Hospital Steward in the provisional division of the Army of the Tennessee, going from there to Washington the same capacity in the Auger General Hospital, and here received his final discharge. Dr. Perce is a self-educated man, having attended school but about eighteen months of his early life. His first ideas of medicine were acquired while in the army, and in the winter of 1872-73 he took a course of lectures at the Indiana Medical College, where the following winter he held the office of Prosector of the Chair of Anatomy. At the end of this session he graduated as Doctor of Medicine, and in February, 1879, took Ad Eundem degree at the Medical College of Indiana. In the spring of 1873, he began the practice of medicine at Mooresville, and, growing rapidly into popularity, he to-day (December, 1883), ranks among the foremost in his profession. May 14, 1867, he was married at Mooresville to Eunice Ann, daughter of Jacob and Jemima Coombs. By this marriage he had born to him two children--Henry (deceased in infancy), and Elsie Gertrude. The mother of these children died September 18, 1874, and in April, 1876, the Doctor married at Plainfield, Ind., his present wife, Elvira, daughter of Simon and Martha Hornaday. Two children, Edith (deceased in infancy) and Mary, have crowned this union. The Doctor is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, belongs to the I. O. O. F., is a Master Mason, a Knight of Honor; has filled most all the official chairs in these societies and is at present Examiner of the one last named. In Masonry and Odd Fellowship, he belongs to the Grand Lodges of the State. He is a member of both county and State Medical societies, of the first of which he has been twice President. He is in the enjoyment of a lucrative position, owns a handsome property, is proud of his profession,and justly so of his successes; he votes the Republican ticket.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 233


BENJAMIN O. BUTTERFIELD, a wide-awake farmer, carpenter and mill-wright, of Ashland Township, was born August 17, 1835, in Owen County, Ind., and was the fifth of fourteen children born to Velorus and Clarissa (Badgeley) Butterfield, natives of New York and Virginia, and of English descent. They settled in Owen County very early, and built a water mill, and, selling this, they finally moved to Morgan County, and now reside here. Benjamin O. Butterfield lived upon the farm until his sixteenth year, when he learned the trade of millwright, and followed it for several years. He also worked at that for five years in Iowa, after which he returned home and purchased a farm. He and his brother bought a mill near the town of Centerton, in this county. They moved this to the town, and ran it for several years, when it was sold. Mr. Butterfield then purchased the farm which he now owns, and which consists of 139 acres, abundantly supplied with spring water, and well-cultivated. On September 22, 1859, Mr. Butterfield was married to Sylvania Moser. Three children were born to them-- Clarissa E., born November 7, 1860; Alfarata B., November 17, 1862; and Georgie A., December 6, 1864, died November 6, 1865. The mother died on December 24, 1865. On February 3, 1867, Mr. Butterfield married Samantha E. (Hedrick) Reeves. They had three children--Benjamin O., born November 27, 1867; Leota M., May 8, 1869; and Oliver P., Dec- ember 24, 1870. Mrs. Butterfirld was born February 20, 1839, and died September 25, 1872. Mr. Butterfield was next married to Mrs. Louzann (Brown) White, on February 14, 1879. She died June 1, 1880. Leota M., his daughter keeps house for him. His wives all belonged to the Christian Church, of which he is also a member. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is very public spirited. He is a Republican, and is noted for his generosity.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY ASHLAND TOWNSHIP
PAGE 334


BENJAMIN R. WATSON, farmer and carpenter, was born in this township October 21, 1838, and is the fourth of the five children born to Thomas and Mary (Royston) Watson, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, and respectively of Irish and English extraction. Benjamin Watson was reared on a farm, but received a good educaton at the subscription schools, and subsequently taught in the public schools of Morgan County for seven and one half years. November 22, 1859, he married Elizabeth Woodward, a native of Morgan County, who bore him four children--Thomas B., Mary M., Andrew I. and Alfred. December 14, 1874, Mr. Watson, having lost his wife, married Rachel M. Perisho, a native of Clarke County, Ill. As a farmer, Mr. Watson owns and manages a farm of fifty-six acres, and as a carpenter has followed the trade for over thrity yers. He was one year Secretary of Grange Lodge, No. 1246, at Brooklyn, Clay Township, and in politics he is a Democrat.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA MADISON TOWNSHIP
PAGE 357


BENJAMIN STAFFORD, pioneer farmer of this county, was born in Highland County, Ohio, May 28, 1810, and is the third of the seven children born to Robert and Sarah (Bullick) Stafford, natives of North Carolina, and of English ancestry. Benjamin accompanied his parents from Ohio to Indiana in 1818. They located in Monroe County, and remained there until March, 1820, at which time the family came to this county. The county was then a wilderness, and was not then organized, the Indians roaming at their sweet pleasure through the leafy forests. Robert Stafford entered land, and made a home in the wilderness, amid bears, wolves, panthers and other wild animals, and, with the poorest advantages for an education, Benjamin grew to manhood. On February 15, 1830, he was married to Ruthie Gifford, a native of Indiana, and a daughter of Jesse and Sarah (Marshall) Gifford. They had one child, Sarah (deceased), and the mother dying, Mr. Stafford was married to Margaret Price on March 17, 1835. Eight children were born to this union, of whom six are living--Nancy J. (Woods), John, Marion, William Benjamin, Barnard and Grant. Mrs. Stafford having departed this life, Mr. Stafford was again married. He took for his third wife Mrs. Susan Fry, by whom he has had seven children, of whom six are living--Mary (Passor), James, Priscilla (McKinley), Martha (Myrick), Emeline (Gooch) and Oliver P. M. Mr. Stafford and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Stafford began life by clearing out a farm in the wilderness, and enduring great privations. He has succeeded, and now owns seventy acres in this township. He alone has made from the green woods the home which he now occupies. His only help has been a faithful and saving wife, who has been indeed a helpmeet in all his struggles and adversities. Although Mr. Stafford is seventy-three years of age, he has a robust constitution and promises to live many years of usefulness in the township which he has helped to build up. He is very strong in Christian faith, and faithful in the performance of his duties, and has read his Bible through nearly fifty times during the last twelve years. He could not read a word until he was forty years old. Mr. Stafford is much prized as a good neighbor and citizen, and is fully appreciated in the community in which he has moved so long.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
CLAY TOWNSHIP, MORGAN CO., INDIANA
PAGE 269


BENJAMIN THORNBURGH (deceased) was born September 25, 1797, in Mercer County, Ky. In 1808, his parents moved to Indiana Territory, and settled one mile southwest of Salem, on Blue River, in Washington County. He lived with his father on the farm until his twentieth year, when he was married to Susan Monical on the 20th day of February, 1817, by Rev. James Harbison. During the war of 1812, he joined the Territorial army of the frontier under the proclamation of Gov. Jennings, and helped to build several block-houses for defense, into which the early settlers fled for protection from the Indians. He enlisted under Maj. William Hockett, and they sent out pickets who passed over the country from where Fredericksburg now stands to Livonia and Brownstown. They built a fort near Salem, in which his parents remained about three months before the close of the war. In April, 1822, he moved to Morgan County and settled on the east side of White Lick, near where Brooklyn now stands. He assisted his father-in-law, Peter Monical, in building the first permanent dam across White Lick, at Brooklyn. In about 1825, he entered the land from Congress, which he cultivated and lived upon until his death, which occurred on the 13th of November, 1883, at the advanced age of eighty-six. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in August, 1816, and was licensed as an exhorter in 1833, by Eli P. Farmer. He was a firm believer in the truth of the Bible and in the Christian religion, and tried to follow out every day, during his long and eventful life, the principles taught in that great Book. He was among the first to speak out against licensed saloons in Mooresville. He never had a law suit with any one, but peace seemed to crown his pathway, and he closed his life in full hope of immortality and eternal life.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 242


BENJAMIN W. TILFORD, physician and druggist, was born in this town November 8, 1859, where he was reared and attended the high school. In 1878, he began the study of medicine under his father's instruction; also attended lectures at the Indian Medical College at Indianapolis in 1879 and 1880; graduated in March, 1881; came home to Martinsville, and in the autumn engaged in the drug trade. He has a $2,000 stock, and has done a satisfactory business.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 211


BLUFORD CLARK WATSON, a farmer and stock-raiser of Ashland Township, was born July 9, 1852, in Morgan County, and is the ninth of eleven children born to Simon and Samirah (Bowman) Watson, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Kentucky. Our subject was reared a farmer, but received a good educaion from the public schools. At the age of twenty years, he commenced teaching school, and has taught, with the exception of one winter, ever since with good success. On February 3, 1876, he was married to Sarah A. Michael, a native of Morgan County, born August 9, 1857. Three children have been born to them--Minnie B., born September 22, 1877; Maud E., born May 17, 1880; and Ivy C., born September 29, 1882. Mr. Watson is a member of the Masonic fraternity at Eminence, this county. In politics, he is a stanch Democrat. He owns a fine little farm of 110 acres, acquired through his own thrift and industry. Mr. Watson is a genial, whole-souled gentleman, and very much respected by his associates and acquaintances.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA ASHLAND TWP.
PAGE 340


BRICE M. HOWELL was born in Hendricks County, Ind., January 7, 1847, and is one of the eight children of Millar and Martha (Deanty) Howell, both natives of North Carolina, the former born in 1808, the latter in 1814. They were married in Chatham County, N. C.; moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and later to Morgan County, where he now resides. Millar Howell was twice married, and the father of fourteen children--eight by his first, and six by his second wife. Brice M. Howell enlisted, July, 1863, in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Regiment; served 100 days; again enlisted February, 1865, in Company A, Thirty-third Indiana Regiment, and served until June, 1865. October 3, 1869, he married Isabella, daughter of Robert and Ellen Foster, a native of this county, born June 12, 1852. This union was productive of six children--Martha E. (deceased), Theodosia E., Emma R., Robert M., William W. and Ethel E. In 1869, Mr. Howell moved to the farm on which he now resides. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP
PAGE 330


CALEB A. PRITCHARD, a teacher in this township, was born on February 9, 1862, in Putnam County, Ind., and is the eldest of three children born to Greenbury and Margaret J. (Buis) Pritchard, both natives of this State, and of English and German extraction respectively. The father was born in Owen County, and his father moved to Morgan County in an early day. Greenbury, the father of our subject, moved to Illinois in the year 1862, and in the fall of 1864 he enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Illinois Infantry, remaining in the service until the close of the war. He took part in the engagements of Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort, which lasted fourteen days and nights; also in numerous skirmishes. He received his discharge at Baton Rouge, La. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and received a good education. He attended three terms at the Central Normal School at Danville, Ind., and two terms at the State University at Bloomington, Ind. He began teaching at the age of fifteen, and has taught seven terms very successfully. Mr. Pritchard has not really decided what profession he will follow, other than that in which he is engaged. He has a fine collection of books on miscellaneous subjects. In politics, he is an energetic, stanch Democrat.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY ASHLAND TOWNSHIP
PAGE 336


CALVIN CURTIS, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Randolph County, N. C., was born April 26, 1828, and is the eldest of the family . He was nine years of age when his father moved to this county, whom he assisted to make a home in the wilds of nature. When twenty-four years old, he located on eighty acres of timber land, from which he made his present home, having lived in a cabin until 1865, at which time he built a good house. The farm comprises 220 acres, 160 of which are in full cultivation; he also possesses a forty-acre tract in Gregg Township. March 24, 1852, he married Miss Rosie York, who died two years later, leaving one daughter--Martha. November, 1857, he wedded Miss Euphemia Johnson, who also left the world, March 22, 1879, leaving four children--David A. M., Lieudary A., Daniel and Laurena. Mr. Curtis is a practical farmer, an industrious man and good citizen; he raises a high breed of geese and turkeys, Plymouth Rocks, Light Brahmas, Golden Spangle chickens, etc. Mr. Curtis has been a prominent hunter, and is an expert rifle-shot.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY ADAMS TOWNSHIP
PAGE 300


CALVIN ELY is the fourth of the five children born to David and Mary E. (McCracken) Ely, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, and of English descent; was born in Clay Township, Morgan County, Ind., May 3, 1849, and passed his childhood on his father's farm. He received instruction at the public schools sufficient to enable him to become one of our county's teachers. Mr. Ely attended the State Normal School at Terre Haute during 1874 and 1875, and also graduated from the International Business College of Indianapolis June 1, 1872. As he was then fully competent as a teacher, he followed that profession for about eight years, at the same time engaging in book-keeping. In the meantime, he served as Deputy in the Auditor's, Treasurer's and Clerk's offices at Martinsville. On January 10, 1878, Mr. Ely was married to Frances A. Stafford, a native of Morgan County, and daughter of Wiley and Sarah (Slaughter) Stafford, natives of Morgan County, Ind., and of English and German descent. By this union they have had one child born to them--Charles, born August 2, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Ely belong to the Christian and to the Methodist Episcopal Churches respectively. Mr. Ely is a member of the A. F. & A. M. Since his marriage, he has been engaged in farming 192 acres which he owns, and has highly improved. On this place is a fine residence, barn, fences, orchard, etc.; it is stocked with hogs, horses, sheep and cattle, and further provided with all necessary farming implements. In collecting this, Mr Ely has depended upon himself only and has received nothing from any man.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY CLAY TOWNSHIP
PAGE 261


CAPT. PETER FESLER, Justice of the Peace and cabinet-maker at Morgantown, is a native of Botetourt County, Va., was born April 27, 1836, and is the third of the family of John and Rebecca (Bickner) Fesler, natives of Virginia and of German extraction, who came to this county in 1838, and remained until their deaths. Peter Fesler received a plain education, worked on the farm, and when eighteen years old settled to learn carpentering, which he afterward followed. April, 1861, he enlisted for three months in Company K, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was in the first engagement of the war at Philippi, Va. After this term he re-enlisted in Company G, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry; was made First Lieutenant and afterward Captain; served three years, and was in all the battles of the Potomac division. After his service expired, he was retained and given command of Company E, Seventieth Indiana Regiment, and so served until the end, being discharged at Washington, D. C. On returning to peace, he resumed his trade, and in 1880 began business for himself. December 31, 1869, he married Miss Emma Collett, of Johnson County, Ind., to which union have followed three children--Leo K., Mayo R. and Luna A. Mr. Fesler is an ardent Republican, and was made Justice of the Peace in 1882. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
JACKSON TOWNSHIP AND MORGANTOWN
PAGE 250


CAPT. SAMUEL M. ROOKER, citizen of Mooresville, Ind., is the third son of Jesse S. and Candace L. (Conduitt) Rooker, natives of Tennessee, and descendants from the German and the French, respectively. He was born at Mooresville May 22, 1824. He was trained to farm life, and educated at the public schools. His parents came into Morgan County in the year 1816, and here spent the remainder of their years, his father dying in 1843, at the age of forty-nine years, and has mother ten years earlier, at the age of thirty-eight years. He was married, February 24, 1844, to Nancy McNeff, by whom he had born to him six children--Mary Candace (deceased), Marion Howard (deceased), Kansas, Adalide, Otto E. and Mattie B. August 13, 1862, he entered the service of the United States as Captain of Company E, Twelfth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and five months thereafter was compelled to resign on account of physical disability. Through out but a short time, he saw considerable real service, having participated in the battle of Richmond, Ky., and any number of skirmishes. Returning from the war, he engaged in the mercantile business at Mooresville, from which he retired in about a year, and built the Magnolia Mills, and conducted them twelve or thirteen years. He has bought and sold over 4,500 acres of valuable lands in Brown Township; dealt extensively in grain, and been an active business man generally. The panic of 1875-76 cost him over $20,000, and in November, 1881, his residence in Mooresville was completely destroyed by fire. So, with all, Capt. Rooker has had his share of the ups and downs of life, and still rides the waves. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; high up in the order of Odd Fellows; a Democrat in politics; a farmer by occupation, and takes life easy in his new splendid residence, into which he has just moved.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 236


CAPT. WILLIAM A. DILLEY was born in Darke County, Ohio, January 7, 1840, and is a son of Arthur M. and Elizabeth (McInturf) Dilley, the former born in Ohio, December 27, 1814, the latter in Tennessee, July 29, 1816; they were married in Preble County, Ohio, December 27, 1835, and in 1842, moved to and settled in this county. Their family was Sarah J., William A., Martha A., Mary E., John W., Lucretia E., Elmira M., Oliver C., James M. and an infant deceased. William A. Dilley enlisted April 20, 1861, in Company K, Seventh Indiana Volunteers; served three months and re-enlisted August 15, 1861, in Company A, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers. In January, 1863, he was made Orderly Sergeant, and in Febraury, 1864, again re-enlisted. In April, 1864, he married Lucy A., daughter of Stephen L. and Maria A. Dane. In November, 1864, he was promoted First Lieutenant, and March, 1865, Captain of Company A, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers, and served as such until July 21, 1865. Mr. Dilley saw considerable service; he was wounded in the left ankle at Thompson's Station, March 5, 1863, and was also a prisoner in the famous "Libby" one month. In 1866, he settled on his present farm, which he sold and moved to Wilson County, Kan., but returned and repurchased his farm in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Dilley have five children--Augustus M. (deceased), Minnie V., Effie M., Pearl M. and Ruby; they are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP
PAGE 327


CAPT. WILLIAM MOUNT, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, October 25, 1827, and is the eldest of the four children of Obadiah B. and Gitty A. (Skillman) Mount, both natives of Ohio, who moved to Union County, Ind., about 1837, on the 2d of February of which year Mr. Mount departed this life. William Mount received a fair education from the common schools, and learned the ancient vocation of farming, which he followed until the summer of 1862; then, together with W. W. Wingett, raised Company G, of the Sixty ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Mr. Mount being made First Lieutenant, but was acting Captain most of the time, that officer being on detached duty. He was in the following engagements: Richmond (Ky.), Arkansas Post, Thompson's Hill, Raymond, Baker's Creek, Black River Bridge, and with Gen. Grant at Vicksburg. After his regiment was transferred to Texas, he participated at the battle of Mobile, where he received a slight wrist wound and was mustered out, but discharged at Indianapolis in August, 1865. The war being over, he removed to Columbus, Ind., where he engaged in the grocery business for several years, when he sold the same, removed to Indianapolis, and was some time on the special police force; thence he removed to this county in 1879, where he has since resided on a good farm of 100 acres. December 1, 1846, he married Miss Eleanor Dare, with a result of one child--Edward F. (deceased). Capt. Mount is an energetic Republican, a liberal, charitable gentlemen, a shrewd man of business and a valued citizen. His mother resides with him, and is a member of the Presbyterian Church since girlhood.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
JACKSON TOWNSHIP AND MORGANTOWN
PAGE 257


CASPER LINGLE, a prominent stock-raiser and farmer, was born in Burke County, N. C., March 7, 1823, and is the eighth of the ten children of Adam and Catherine (Tipps) Lingle, of German descent. In 1829, he came with his parents to what is now this township; was reared to farming, and has been an important personage in the development of the county. The first township election was held at his father's house, and continued so to be for twenty years, when the same were held at Salem. June 7, 1845, he wedded Matilda, daughter of Henry and Rebecca (Goss) Ratts, who died about three months after his marriage. August 9, 1856, he married Catherine, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Sandy, to whch union succeeded five children-- John S., William A., James E., Jeremiah S. and Thomas Lincoln. In 1857, he removed to Missouri for three years, after which time he returned home. While there he built a Methodist Episcopal Church, the last payment on which he made after leaving that State. Mr. Lingle has been a successful man, having acquired a possession of 700 acres of land, but now having sold some, and given much to his children, retains only 132 acres, which are, however, well-cultivated, stocked, improved and adorned. His only ally was his faithful wife, who died August 9, 1882, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Lingle is an enlightened citizen, an advocate of public education, an active Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA RAY TOWNSHIP
PAGE 289


DR. CHARLES A. KESSINGER was born February 8, 1853, in Athens County, Ohio. He is the eldest child, and second son of Joseph L. and Mary (Jewett) Kessinger, natives of Ohio, who were married in their native place. The father was elected Sheriff of the county in 1852, and served for four years. In 1868, he was appointed Internal Revenue Collector, which office he filled for ten years. He served all through the war, and was commissioned Captain of the Fortieth Ohio for meritorious conduct. Charles A. Kessinger was reared in Athens County, where he received a good collegiate education in the Ohio University. In 1873, he began reading medicine with Dr. A. B. Frame, of Athens, and continued for three years, during which time he graduated at the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati in the spring of 1876. April 8, 1876, he was appointed Superintendent of the Ohio Penitentiary Hospital, and served five years. In March, 1883, he came to Martinsville and entered the regular practice, and is at present so engaged. On September 19, 1883, he was married here to Julia D. Blackstone, daughter of Dr. D. B. Blackstone, Mr. Kessinger is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Parmacetia Lodge, Athens, Ohio. Politically he is a Republican. He is eminent as a practitioner and respected as a citizen.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 194


CHARLES HASTINGS is a native of Franklin County, Ind., was born September 2, 1820, and is a son of Job and Keziah Hastings. Job Hastings was born near Pittsburgh, Penn., where he married; afterward removed to Franklin County, Ind., and thence, in 1835, to Morgan County, where he ended his life. His family was as follows: Matilda, Mary, Reese, Sarah, Charles, Kelly, Hannah C., Rebecca, Eliza J. and Martha A. The grandfather of our subject, Isaac Hastings, was a native of England who settled near Pittsburgh, Penn., but died in Franklin County, Ind., the father of nine children. Charles Hastings married , January 1, 1850, Susanna, daughter of John and Sarah Rudicel, and soon afterward located at his present home, which comprises a farm of 475 acres of fruitful and improved land. He is a genial gentleman and respected citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Hastings have been parents of four children--Louisa I., Mary A. (deceased), Evangeline and William C.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 189


CHARLES H. GUY was born September 1,1856, in Ray Township, this State, and is a son of Martin V. and Martha (Stout) Guy. Charles was reared as a farmer, and September 18, 1879, married Angeline A. Farr, daughter of Jefferson and Sarah Farr, by which union were born two children--Arthur Roscoe and William A. Mr. Guy died April 22, 1882. He was an active Democrat, and was elected Road Commissioner. He was a highly-esteemed citizen, and a member of the Baptist Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA BAKER TOWNSHIP
PAGE 364


CHARLES LONG is a native of Morgan County, Ind., and was born July 24, 1829, his parents being SAMUEL and NANCY (SMITH) LONG, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, and who at a very early time emigrated to this county, where they lived until overtaken by death. Samuel Long was twice married, and was the father of twelve children--JAMES R., CHARLES, ALEXANDER, MINERVA, WILLIAM, ELIJAH, LIZAH, ERASTUS, ERASPUS and three others. Charles, having remained in the county of his birth, married, November, 1849, ELIZABETH ASHER. They had a family of fourteen children--MINERVA, NANCY, ALICE, GEORGE (deceased), MARTHA (deceased), CHARLES, WILLIAM, ALEXANDER, COSEY, JULIA, EDWIN, and three who died in infancy. Mr. Long is a pleasant gentleman and a greatly respected citizen.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 195


CHARLES M. GRAVIS is the eldest son and third child born to Sebastian and Minerva (Barker) Gravis, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively, and married in Williamsburg, Ohio in 1839. In 1863, they removed to Indianapolis, where the father at present resides. The mother died in July, 1849. Charles M. Gravis was reared and educated in Ohio. When seventeen years of age, he enlisted in Company B, Eighty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, under Capt. William A. Townsend. He served for three years, during which time he participated in the battles at Hoover's Gap and Chickamauga. At the latter, he was captured, and put in the prison on Belle Island, but was soon after transferred to "Libby," where he remained for about two years. From there he was sent to Danville, Va., and incarcerated for five months, when he was transferred to Andersonville. He remained there for seven months when he was paroled, and soon after exchanged, immediately returning to his company. He participated in the battle at Bentonville and a number of skirmishes. At the close of the war, he returned to Clermont County, Ohio, soon after coming to Indiana, where he learned the brickmason trade with his father. He afterward studied medicine with Dr. D. Wiley, for three years. In March, 1871, he graduated at the Indian Medical College, at Indianapolis. In September, 1870, he was married to Sarah C. Smock, a native of Indiana. They had six children--Walter, Charles, William, Ursula, all of whom are dead; Gracie B. and Frederick L. are living. In 1871, he began the practice of his profession in Southport, Ind., and from there, eighteen months later, removed to Indianapolis. He there entered into practice, and in the drug business, which he continued for three years, returning thence to Southport, where he remained until September, 1880. He was in partnership with Dr. George Spees, in Glenn's Valley, where he remained eighteen months, when he came to Martinsville, where he is at present engaged in the practice of his profession. He has filled all the chairs in the I. O. O. F., Southport Lodge, No. 394, and of the Grand Lodge. He is also a member of the G. A. R., and is a Republican. Himself and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 185


CLARKSON C. HARVEY was born in Brown Township, Morgan County, Ind., October 12, 1852. His parents, Robert and Sarah (Hadley) Harvey, were natives of Ohio and North Carolina respectively, and of Scotch-Irish extraction. They are Quakers, and in 1833 settled in Brown Township on a farm of 200 acres, where they have since resided. Clarkson C. Harvey is the seventh son and ninth child in a family of twelve children, and being raised on the farm, received a very ordinary education in the district schools of his native township, remaining at home until in this twenty-first year, when he went into the employ of a grocery merchant in the town of Mooresville. About seven months later, he went to Illinois, and worked for some time at farming in Ford County. In September, 1874, he removed to Martinsville, where he opened a restaurant, and at present enjoys a lucrative business. Mr. Harvey is identified with the Republican party. He was married, January 14, 1877, to Annis H. Gregory, a daughter of M. W. and O. D. Gregory, pioneers of Morgan County. He is a member of the Methodist Church in good standing. His wife has been attentive to her duties as a member of the Christian Church. They have two children, Harlon and Olivia.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 189


CLEMENT H. NUTTER was born in Fayette County, Ky., December 7, 1820, and is descended from Hewitt and Susan (Talbott) Nutter, also natives of Fayette County, Ky., the former born in 1785, the latter in 1787. In 1823, they moved to Warrick County, Ind., and thence in 1828 to this county, where, in 1837, Mrs. Nutter died. Mr.Nutter died in 1846, having previously married Catherine Wilson. His family was as follows: Ellen, Rebecca, Sarah, John (deceased), Richard, Edwin, John, Cassandra, Clement H., Daniel G., David, William, Thomas, Mary A., Isaac W., Robert W., and an infant, deceased. Clement H. Nutter married in this county, November 13, 1846, Julia A., daughter of William H. and Julia Craig, and born in this county February 15, 1831; she died February 13, 1866, having borne a family of six--Sarah E., Mary A., Emma (deceased), Walter E., Hattie and William (deceased). Mr. Nutter is a greatly esteemed gentleman, and a consistent member of the Christian Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 200


CLINTON C. HADLEY, druggist, Mooresville, Ind., was born in Brown Township, Morgan County, Ind., May 11, 1855, and is the youngest of four children of Isaiah and Emily (Hadley) Hadley, natives of Ohio and Indiana respectively. He was but about two years of age when his father died. The first sixteen years were spent by Clinton C. upon the farm, and by devoting a portion of the time to his studies at the Mooresville school he acquired a good English education. At the age of eighteen, he began the drug business as clerk for Joseph Pool, and two years afterward, in the fall of 1875, he went to Mt. Carmel, Ill., and for one year had charge of a drug house belonging to his brother. Returning to Mooresville he clerked for Hadley & Harvey, druggists, until the summer of 1880, when he bought out the interest of the senior member of the firm, and shortly afterward became the sole owner of the establishment. Mr. Hadley is a "birthright" member of the Friends' Church, and fills official chairs in the Subordinate Lodge and Encampment of the I. O. O. F. He is unmarried, and in consequence very popular with the ladies, a wide-awake Republican politically, and possessed of all the essential requisites to an upright citizen and gentleman.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
BROWN TOWNSHIP AND MOORESVILLE
PAGE 223


COL. JAMES E. BURTON was born in Monroe County, Ind., September 23, 1824, is a son of JOHN and NANCY (WISHARD) BURTON, the former a native of Virginia, born 1784; the latter, a native of Delaware, born 1782, who, after their marriage about 1819, emigrated to Monroe County, Ind., where Mr. Burton built a mill and also engaged in farming. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was the owner of more than 1,000 acres at his death in 1860; his wife survived him sixteen years. Their family was SUSAN L., JESSE M., HENRY W., ELIZABETH J., JOHN W., SYTHA A., MARTHA L., JOSIAH P. and JAMES E. The grandfather of our subject, JOSIAH BURTON, was a native of England, who first located near Philadelphia, Penn., then moved to Virginia, then to Kentucky, and about 1826 to Morgan County, Ind., where he closed his life. He had been twice married and the father of ten children. James E. Burton was married March 23, 1848, to MISS CYNTHIA A., daughter of JAMES V. and MARIA BUSKIRK, and born in Monroe County January 31, 1830. They have had three children--DAVID P., JOHN M. (deceased) and JAMES S. Soon after marriage, Mr. Burton moved to and remained in Morgan County. In 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, of which he became Captain and served three years. He was wounded in the thigh June 22, 1864, and in September was promoted Colonel, which he held until mustered out, August, 1865. Mr. Burton has been Justice of the Peace, and is a member of the Masonic order and of the M. E. Church. He resides upon his own farm of 249 acres.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 175


COL. WILLIAM C. BANTA, M. D., was born in Hendricks County, Ind., August 31, 1839, and is one of ten children born to Cornelius and Rebecca (Eckles) Banta; both natives of Kentucky. The ancestors of the former were of Italian and Scotch ext raction. Cornelius Banta came to Madison County, Ind., at a date prior to the organization of the State. After a few years, he removed to what was known as the Brick Tavern, near Stilesville, Hendricks Co., Ind. His place was a regular stopping place for stage- coaches over the old National pike, running between St. Louis and Cincinnati. In 1838, he removed to Belleville, where he remained until 1850, when he removed to Whitley County, Ind., where he bought a farm and resided two years; then returned to Belleville, where he again engaged in mercantile pursuits and resided until his death, which occurred in 1857. Mr. Banta and wife were members of the Christian Church. William C. Banta, the subject, received a good common school and academic education, and was employed in his father's store until the latter's death, after which the support of the family devolved upon him. When in his eighteenth year, he commenced teaching school and studying medicine under the instruction of Drs. Moor and Kennedy, of Belleville. In April, 1861, he resigned his school, went to Indianapolis and enrolled in Company A, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, the first Indiana regiment recruited for the three months' service. They participated in the battle of Philippi. At the close of the three months' service, in August, 1861, Col Banta reorganized and filled up his company, A, from seventy to one hundred men, in a day and night, for the three years' service, and was chosen Captain. After about one year, he was promoted to Major, and soon after to Lieutenant Colonel. The Colonel of the regiment, I. G. Grover, was captured in the battle of the Wilderness, after which Col. Banta commanded until the regiment was mustered out. He also, for a short time, commanded the First Brigade, of the First Division, of the First Army Corps. Col. Banta participated in all the principal battles in which the Armies of West Virginia and the Potomac were engaged to the fall of 1864. In 1862, at the battle of Port Republic he was severely wounded in the right shoulder by a shell, and was mustered out with his regiment at Indianapolis, in September, 1864. He then engaged in the drug trade at Belleville, Ind. and continued the same some five years; he also resumed his medical studies. In the spring of 1870, he graduated from "The Indiana Medical College," at Indianapolis, and in June of the same year came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he has since practiced his profession with excellent success. He was married, August 25, 1861, to Elizabeth May, a native of Montgomery County, Ind. Eight children, three sons and five daughters, blessed their union, all of whom are yet living. The Doctor and wife are members of the Christian Church. He is a member of the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and has been a member of the Grand Lodge of the State in both orders. In politics, Col. Banta is a stanch Republican, and is one of the leading and representative men of the county.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY ADAMS TOWNSHIP
PAGE 295


CORNELIUS HILL, a native of Indiana, was born August 23, 1836, in Richmond, Wayne County. His parents, Thomas and Elizabeth (White) Hill, native of Indiana and North Carolina respectively, were married in Indiana in 1833, and locating in Richmond, the father followed the carpenter's trade. In 1838, they removed to Grant County, to a farm, where in August, 1843, the father's death occurred. The mother died in April, 1865. Cornelius was the eldest son and second child, and was reared in Grant County until eight years of age; then with his mother he went to Washington County. Shortly after, they removed to Orange County, where he obtained a good education. When seventeen years of age, he began working on a farm, which he continued until the fall of 1856, when he became to Morgan County and farmed near Mooresville for some time. In 1859, he went into the confectionery business, and about one year later, he went to Kentucky, farmed for some time, returning thence to Indianapolis. In 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, under Samuel Harriman, and served for nearly three years, acting as Corporal. He took part in the battles at Resaca, Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek, Averysboro, Cassville, Kenesaw Mountain and Bentonville. After the close of the war, he located in Martin County, Ind., as stationary engineer. In March, 1869, he was married to Letha A. Greeson, of Morgan County. They have one child--Mabel Pearl. In 1874, he went into the confectionery business again. In November of 1879, he sold a half interest and added a stock of groceries. In August of the next year, he went to Wabash and opened a bakery and confectionery, which he continued to run for one year, when he came back to Martinsville, where he is at present engaged in a lucrative business. Mr. Hill is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and of the G. A. R., and is politically a Republican. His wife is an active member of the Methodist Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 191


C. S. CRARY, born in Franklin County, Ind., March 21, 1845, is the youngest of seven sons and twelve children, and was reared in Indiana and Ohio. Of his father, the Martinsville "Republican" of August 16, 1883, publishes the following: "On the 14th inst., Gen Willis Crary suddenly died at his home, near Olney, Ill. Gen. Crary was eighty-one years old past. He was a native of Vermont, and moved to Cincinnati in 1813, where he resided for thirty years, when he removed to Franklin County, Ind. He was in his earlier days a prominent politician of Cincinnati. He was well acquainted with Gen. William Henry Harrison, and was a schoolmate and chum of his son, Scott Harrison, the father of Senator Ben Harrison. Shortly after he attained his majority, he was married in Cincinnati to Miss Almira Spencer, a native of New York State, who died in 1863. During the internal improvement furor in this State, he was a heavy contractor in the building of the White Water Canal, in which he lost over $20,000, which was a liberal fortune in those days. Of late years, he had resided in Illinois." In 1859, the subject of this sketch went with his parents to McLean County, Ill. He received a good English education, and in August, 1861, he enlisted in the Fourteenth Indiana Cavalry, under Col. T. Lyle Dickey, serving for four years. He took part in the following engagements: Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh (at which he was Orderly to Gen. Hurlbut). From exposure, he was taken with the typhoid fever, and after lying in the hospital for some time he was discharged for disability. In the fall of 1862, he assisted in raising a company and returned to the front. On the 19th of March, 1863, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois Infantry, and had the honor of being the youngest commissioned officer in Illinois, then being but seventeen years of age. In the battle of Port Gibson, his captain was wounded, and the First Lieutenant in the hospital, so he assumed the command of his Company through the battles of Raymond, the entire siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., and some few others, after which he was promoted to First Lieutenant. His regiment spent the winter of 1863-64 on the coast of Texas, after which they returned to New Orleans, and on the organization of th Red River Campaign, he was appointed on the staff of Gen. W. H. Baldwin, of the Second Brigade, Fourth Division of the Thirteenth Army Corps, and served in that capacity during the entire campaign. In 1865 he received an honorable discharge and returned home. He entered the State University at Bloomington, Ind., remaining one year. In 1866, he began farming in Morgan County, and five years later moved to Martinsville, renting his farm of 200 acres in Jefferson Township. He then went into the insurance business, and continued in it until 1881, when he went into the employ of the Gould Southwest Railroad System, with headquarters at Galveston, Tex, as traveling, freight and passenger agent, remaining nearly two years. In December, 1882, he resigned his position and returned to Martinsville, where he at present resides. He is a member of the G. A. R. and a Republican.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 180


CYRUS A. WATSON, farmer and stock-grower, was born in this township August 17, 1829, and is the eldest of five children born to Thomas and Mary Ann (Royston) Watson, natives respectively of Virginia and Tennessee, and of Welsh and Irish descent. They erected the first log cabin in Madison Township in 1819, and came here to reside in 1823, having purchased two farms, and also having entered about 400 acres of land. Here Thomas Watson, who had served his country in the war of 1812, died in 1856; his widow still survives, at the age of seventy-seven. Cyrus A. Watson was reared a farmer, and at his majority began for himself by clearing away the forest, the country still being more or less a wilderness; he is now the owner of a well improved and well stocked farm of 200 acres. December 12, 1869, he married Susan, daughter of Daniel and Frances (Langyer) Thornberry, all natives of Virginia. To this union one child, Samuel, was born January 17, 1871. Mr. Watson is a Freemason, an Odd Fellow and a Democrat, and has held the office of Township Trustee four terms. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA MADISON TWP.
PAGE 357


CYRUS E. DAVIS, attorney at law, was born in Washington County, Ind., December 17, 1856, and is a son of James and Martha E. Davis. Cyrus was reared on a farm; attended school during the winter, and when seventeen years old the Salem High School some time, in 1876 the Southern Indiana Normal School, and in the autumn of that year was enrolled in the State University at Bloomington; was a student four years, and graduated therefrom in June, 1880. In July of that year, he came to Martinsville, engaged in reading law under Col. Jordan; became a partner with Hon. A. M. Cunning in 1881; graduated from the Law Department of the Michigan University in 1882; returned to Martinsville; continued the practice with Mr. Cunning and afterward became associated with E. C. Steele, under the firm name of Davis & Steele. Mr. Davis is a member of the "Sigma Chi" fraternity.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE, MORGAN COUNTY, INDIANA
PAGE 182


CYRUS E. NICHOLAS (deceased), was born in Hendricks County, Ind., March 5, 1836, and was the third child in a family of eight children born to John and Parmelia (Huff) Nicholas, the former of whom was a native of Kentucky, and the latter of New York. They were of Scotch-Irish and French descent respectively. When a lad of some seven or eight summers, the parents of John Nicholas removed to Owen County, Ind. Here his father's death soon afterward occurred, in about 1815. His early education was extremely limited. Afterward, however, by his own exertions and the assistance of his wife, he acquired a fair practical education. From Owen County, while yet a single man, he came to Monroe Township, Morgan County, Ind., where he entered land and improved a farm. From thence he removed to Hendricks County, and afterward to Pulaski County, Ind. In the spring of 1868, he returned to Morgan County, Ind., settling at Eminence, where he was engaged in the general mercantile trade until his death, which occurred in March, 1870, in his sixty-third year. Himself and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which church he was for some forty years a local preacher. Mrs. Parmelia is yet living, and resides at Eminence, being now in her eighty-first year. Our subject, Cyrus E. Nicholas, received a fair common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he was twenty-one years old. He then learned the brick-mason's trade, which he followed for a number of years. In 1866, he engaged in the general mercantile trade at Eminence, Ind., and continued the same until his death, which occurred June 7, 1882. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the I. O. O. F. February 6, 1859, he was united in marriage with Hester H. Rhea, a native of Washington County, Va., and a daughter of George G. and Dorcas (Lowrey) Rhea (a sketch of whom will be found in this volume). Hester H. received a good common school education. She is and has been through life an extensive and careful reader, being well informed on all the current topics of the time, the current literature of theday as well as ancient and modern history. Since her husband's death, she has continued his business, that of general merchandising, at Eminence, being now in partnership with her son-in-law, Mr. John R. Mannan. She is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcoapl Church, and has been blessed with a family of three children, two of whom, both daughters, are yet living.

Submitted by: Diana Flynn
"COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN, INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL."
CHARLES BLANCHARD, EDITOR. CHICAGO: F. A. BATTEY & CO. PUBLISHERS. 1884. F. A. BATTEY. F. W. TEPPLE
MORGAN COUNTY ADAMS TOWNSHIP
PAGE 309