Jacob Becker, retired farmer of Wadesville, Ind., was born March 6, 1839, in Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, son of John and Katherine (Hirth) Becker. He came to the United States with his parents and three brothers in 1852. They came by sailing vessel, consuming seventy-two days in the voyage, and landed at New Orleans. They then came up the Mississippi river to Cairo, Ill., thence by the Ohio river to Evansville. The wife and mother died of cholera on the boat and was buried at Greenville, Ark. After a few years in Evansville they bought a farm in Robinson, Posey county. The four brothers are as follows: John, now retired at Evansville; Henry, deceased; Jacob, of this record; and Herman, deceased. Jacob Becker learned the shoemaker's trade at Evansville and in 1862 he removed to Posey county and opened a general store in Wadesville, which he conducted for eight years and then sold to his father-in-law, Finley Allison. He then opened a shoe shop in the same town, which he conducted for eighteen years, after which he bought his present farm of eighty acres at the edge of town. It is now one of the best improved in the vicinity. Mr. Becker has been married twice. On January 30, 1862, he married Miss Mary Allison, daughter of Finley Allison. She was born January 12, 1842, and died July 2, 1867. Two sons were born to this marriage: William H., December 15, 1862, now a railroad man at Indianapolis; John F., born May 12, 1866, a farmer of Center township. Mr. Becker took as his second wife Miss Emily Allison, who was a sister of his first wife. They became the parents of seven children: Mary, born June 19, 1868, married William H. Hidbrader, a farmer of Center township, and they have one child, Herman; Emma, born March 12, 1870, now the wife of John Wade, of Wadesville; Laura, born April 21, 1872, now the wife of Edward Goad, of Port Orchard, Wash.; Edward, born August 12, 1874, died March 22, 1877; Charles, born June 11, 1878, boilermaker at Evansville; Edward, born March 2, 1882, was married October 12, 1903, to Miss Emma Owens, daughter of Flavius and Pauline (Cox) Owens, of Center township. She was born October 28, 1883, in Center township. They have three children, Velma, born May 22, 1904, Melvin Joel, born December 25, 1911, and a son born in October, 1913. Pearl, the seventh child of Mr. and Mrs. Becker, was born August 4, 1886, and is now the wife of Edward Lockridge, of Evansville. Mr. Becker is a progressive, substantial citizen of the community and an active member of the Lutheran church. For many years he was an active worker in the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Harri Jara, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows, but has dropped all.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


John C. Leffel, editor and proprietor of the "Western Star" and one of the best known newspaper men in southern Indiana, was born in Blairsville, Posey county, May 8, 1850, a son of Daniel and Barbara (Reichenbacher) Leffel, both of whom were born in Karlsruhe, Baden, Germany, where they also married. In 1832 they immigrated to the United States and for several years resided in New York City. They changed locations several times and in the latter part of the '40s located in Center township, Posey county, where Mr. Leffel purchased large tracts of land, the town sites of Blairsville and Wadesville being a part of his original purchase. In 1854 he removed to Mt. Vernon and engaged in merchandising. His death occurred in 1873, at the age of sixty-six years, and that of his wife in 1894, aged seventy-nine. They were the parents of eight children, five of whom survive, viz.: Nancy, the widow of George Henrich; Elizabeth, the widow of William H. Lichtenberger; John C., of this review; Celia, the wife of Henry Baldwin, all of Mt. Vernon; and Mollie E., the wife of Valentine Kratz, of Los Angeles, Cal. Those deceased are: Caroline, who married William Derman, of Spokane, Wash., and died in July, 1911; Catherine and William, the former of whom died aged nineteen and the latter aged four. John C. Leffel was educated in the schools of Mt. Vernon and at the age of fifteen became an apprentice in a harness shop at St. Louis, Mo., where he remained until 1867, when he returned to Mt. Vernon and entered the office of the "Democrat" and assisted Tom Collins, the editor and proprietor, in getting out his paper. He remained on the "Democrat" until October, 1875, when he established the Mt. Vernon "Wochenblatt," the first and only German paper to be published in Posey county. In 1877 the first issue of the "Western Star" appeared, the founding of this paper by Mr. Leffel being the result of repeated requests upon the part of leading Democrats that he establish and edit a paper that could be counted on as the organ of the party in the county. From its first issue it has been the aim of the editor to make it alive with interest and with real, practical usefulness, and this has been done, with the result that it is, and has-been for thirty-five years, welcomed as a personal friend in the homes of Posey county. In 1885 the publishing of the "Wochenblatt" was discontinued, due to the demands upon Mr. Leffel's time by the "Western Star," which prevented him giving both papers the attention they deserved. He enjoys the distinction of having been the first publisher in Posey county to install power presses and is the only one who has purchased a linotype machine. The office and press room of the "Star" are in point of equipment the best in the county. The building in which they are located was constructed from plans furnished by Mr. Leffel and is especially adapted to the needs of his business. It is the one printing plant of the county in which typesetting is done by machinery. The job printing department of the paper is up to date in all particulars and its business exceeds by far any other establishment in this line in the county. As a newspaper man Leffel has never been surpassed in Posey county. He is a vigorous writer, has a wealth of energy, his editorials are worthwhile, and his paper has been conducted in an able and clean manner. He has attained the Council degree in Masonry and is a member of Beulah Lodge, No. 578. Mr. Leffel married on July 2, 1872, Miss Minnie Brinkman, the eldest daughter of Henry Brinkman, of Mt. Vernon, a review of whom appears on other pages of this volume. Mrs. Leffel was born in Mt. Vernon on June 8, 1853, and died on February 28, 1907. She is survived by her husband and the following children: Edward, born May 4, 1872, personal mention of whom follows this article; Lillie, born October 4, 1874, the wife of Philip Suddoth, of Mt. Vernon; Herbert, born April 24, 1877, who is associated with his father; Daisy, born September 14, 1874, who resides in Evansville; Otto, born August 24, 1881, agent at Oskaloosa, Kan., of the Missouri Pacific railway; John, born February 5, 1887, employe of the passenger department of the Shore Line railway at San Francisco, Cal.; and Minnie, born February 16, 1892, residing with her father.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Edward Leffel is the eldest son of John C. Leffel and Minnie (Brinkman) Leffel. He was born in the city of Mt. Vernon, Ind., on May 14, 1872, and is one of a family of seven children, viz.: Lillian (Leffel) Suddoth, Daisy and Minnie Leffel, and Herbert, Otto and John Leffel, Jr. Mr. Leffel attended the public schools of Mt. Vernon and learned the newspaper business in the "Star" office, which was conducted by his father. When a young man he worked for a short time in the Kellar Printing Company in Evansville, Ind., and the Government Printing Office in Washington, D. C. He held a position in the Indiana legislature of 1892 and later went to Washington. After working twelve or fifteen years in the newspaper and printing business he became engaged in the mortgage loan business, which business he is engaged in at this date, November 7, 1913. He is unmarried.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


William A. Oliver, extensive land owner and farmer of Center township, Posey county, and a member of one of the most prominent pioneer families of southwestern Indiana, was born on his father's farm in Robinson township on December 2, 1844, a son of Job and Elizabeth (Jones) Oliver. Job Oliver was born in Kentucky on December 18, 1820, his parents coming to Indiana shortly after his birth. They located in Posey county, then in a formative period, where the father located on land. Job attended the schools of that early day, did his due share of the day's work, endured the hardships common to the settler of the pioneer period, and became one of the large land owners of the county. He was actively concerned in the early development of Center township, a man of influence, and possessed the esteem of all. He was married twice. By his first wife he had six children, three of whom are living, viz.: William A., the subject of this review; Wilson and Samuel. Thompson, Cynthia and Joel are deceased. Anna Shaw, his second wife, bore him six children, viz.: George, Emmz, Nelia, James and Ella. Elizabeth is deceased. The town of Oliver was named in honor of Job Oliver, the townsite being a part of one of his farms. William A. Oliver was reared on his father's farm and his education was acquired in the schools of Robinson township. Farming has been his occupation since boyhood and he is recognized as not only one of the successful men in that field of endeavor within his county, but is also one of the influential citizens of his township. Political office has never appealed to him, although he takes an active interest in the questions of the day and never neglects his civic duties. He is a Democrat. His farm of 128 acres is well improved, well stocked and has been his place of residence since 1873. Mr. Oliver has been twice married. In December, 1866, he married Miss Rachel Causey, who died August 9, 1870. She bore him two children: John, born September 10, 1867, died October 22, 1867, and Walter, born July 13, 1870, died October 8, 1870. On January 16, 1873, he married for his second wife Miss Cornelia Fillingim, the daughter o f Gracchus and Lurana (Cox) Fillingim. She was born on January 15, 1849. Of this second union three children were born, of whom the eldest died in infancy. Otis L. Oliver, born December 3, 1875, died on February 3, 1892. Elsie M., born December 28, 1879, is the wife of William W. Hoggatt, M. D., of French Lick Springs, Ind. They are the parents of five children, viz.: Verne D., born January 16, 1900; Eunice M., born August 7, 1902 ; Vera Fae, born June 10, 1905 ; Doris and Dorothy, twins, who were born May 1, 1912.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Warren Wade, president of the Farmers National Bank of Wadesville, prominent farmer and stockman and popular citizen, is a native of Posey county and was born on October 27, 1859, a son of William D. and Hester C. (Fillingim) Wade. The family was founded in Indiana by Zachariah Wade, a native of North Carolina, born near Chester Court House, who came to Posey county in the early years of its settlement, became a prosperous farmer, attained influence as a citizen, and was the father of Wadesville, named for him. He was a Democrat, served as justice of the peace for many years, and was identified with practically every phase of the development of his township. William D. Wade was also a farmer. He was born on April 19, 1825, and died on May 14, 1904. On August 8, 1854, he married Hester C. Fillingim, a daughter of Ajax and Eliza (Moye) Fillingim, who, like his parents, were natives of North Carolina. They were the parents of the following children: Warren, the subject of this article; Albert, born December 6, 1861; a resident of New Albany, Ind.; and Jennie, born February 8, 1863, the wife of Sidney Johnson, a prosperous farmer of Harmony township. Three children: Roy, Carrol and Elvis, died in infancy. Warren Wade was reared on his father's farm in Center township, assisted in its operation until he was twenty-four years of age, and acquired his education in the district schools of his neighborhood. In 1894 he became the owner of a farm and has devoted his attention to agriculture and stock feeding and in each branch of endeavor has met with success. His farm property consists of 150 acres, its improvements are substantial and it has paid satisfactory returns. In 1907 he, with Dan Williams, promoted the organization of the Farmers National Bank of Wadesville, and on incorporation he was elected to its directorate. He became vice-president of the institution in 1908 and was elected president in 1909, and is still serving in that capacity. The following year, 1910, he retired from the active management of his farm. He is a Democrat in his political views, is influential in the affairs of his township and served for two years as trustee. In the administration of the affairs of this office he served with credit. He exercised sound financial sense in handling the township funds, was able to greatly improve the roads, building a considerable mileage, and at the same time reduced the levy from seventy-two to fifty-two cents. Mr. Wade married on October 21, 1853, Miss Mary Bailey, a daughter of Larkin and Martha A. (Fitzgerald) Bailey, of Harmony township. Larkin Bailey was born in Harmony township on January 5, 1838, and died December 3, 1878. His wife was also born in the township on September 7, 1837, and died December 15, 1869. Mary Bailey Wade was born on November 2, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Wade are the parents of one child, Herman Wade, born August 11, 1884. He is a graduate of the Wadesville High School, attended for one term the Oakland City College, and also Purdue University, in the latter institution specializing on agriculture and live stock. He is one of the successful and progressive farmers of Center township, and owns and manages 200 acres of well improved land, which is being scientifically farmed. On November 29, 1908, he married Miss Jessie Wiley, a daughter of James D. and Hannah (Penfold) Wiley, of Harmony township. She was born on August 7, 1884.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


George B. Wade, retired farmer, influential citizen, of Center township, and a resident of Wadesville, is a native of Posey county, a member of one of its prominent pioneer families and is a descendant of Zachariah Wade, for whom Wadesville was named. He is the son of Isaac George Washington and Eliza Jane (Nash) Wade, both of whom were born in Posey county, the father on February 15, 1829, and the mother on June 27, 1836. They were married in 1856. Isaac G. W. Wade was one of the most successful farmers of Center township, served for many years as a justice of the peace, was a Democrat and took an active part in the political life of his county, and accumulated a sizeable fortune. His death occurred on August 5, 1899. His wife, Eliza Jane Nash, was the daughter of Andrew and Mariah (Montgomery) Nash, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wade, and are as follows: William, born in 1858, died in infancy; Mariah, born October 10, 1860, is the wife of Henry-Heckman, a farmer of Harmony township ; George E., the subject of this sketch; Isaac Minor, born October 16, 1864, and Alvin Andrew, born August 16, 1867, both of whom reside on the home farm in Center township. George B. Wade was reared on his father's farm, secured his education in the public schools of Center township, and remained on the home farm until 1934, when he married, on June 22, Miss Della Moye, a daughter of George W. and Grace (Stallings) Moye, both natives of Posey county. Mr. Moye having been born in Center township on January 2, 1854, and his wife on February 22, 1859. Mrs. Wade was born on November 23, 1878. She is one of a family of ten children, the brothers and sisters being: Wyatt Gray Moye, Ora O. Moye, Minnie Pearl, the widow of Samuel Coomer, Iva Viola, the wife of Morris F. Wade, a farmer of Center township, Elizabeth Ellen, Elva Leona, the wife of Louis Garris, Malcolm Edward, in the naval service of the United States, Virginia Evelyn, a graduate of the Wadesville High School in the class of 1913, and George Lawrence Moye. Shortly after his marriage Mr. Wade bought a farm and engaged in business for himself. In 1904 he retired from active farm labor, became a resident of Wadesville, and has since been occupied in looking after his property interests, which are considerable. Political office has never appealed to him. He is a Democrat. His fraternal affiliations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. Wade are the parents of the following children: Eunice, born May 25, 1905; George Van, born October 4, 1906, and Mary Eliza, born March 30, 1909. The family attend the Regular Baptist church.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


James H. Moye, a successful farmer, extensive land owner and prominent citizen of Posey county, whose death occurred on July 16, 1907, was born on his father's farm in Center township, February 27, 1847. He was a son of Wyatt G. and Elizabeth (Owens) Moye, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Posey county. The family was founded in Indiana in 1830, when John Moye, a native of North Carolina, located in Posey county, in what is now Center township. He and his descendants, he was the father of eleven children, have had much to do with the development of this section of the county, and have been, without exception, men and women who have had the respect and esteem of their fellow citizens. James H. Moye acquired his education in the schools of his native township, was reared a farmer and upon his father's death became the owner of a part of the home farm. As a farmer he was successful, and added to his holdings in farm lands until he was one of the large land owners of his township. His political affiliations were with the Democratic party, and he took an active part in the carnpaigns, was influential in party councils, but had no inclination for public office. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and active in the work of his order. Mr. Moye married, in 1873, Miss Susan Cox, who died on September 9, 1877. Two children were born of this union: Walter G. Moye, born November 26, 1874, and LeRoy, who died in infancy. On February 23, 1879, he married Miss Luvina Hunsinger, a daughter of Lewis and Sophronia C. (McCrary) Hunsinger, who was born April 9, 1858, and who resides on the Moye farm two miles west of Wadesville. Her family were residents of White county, Illinois, of which State her father was a native; her mother was born in Posey county. With her brother, Calvin W. Hunsinger, she is the only survivor of the family of six children, four of whom are deceased, and are as follows: Seymour T., Isabell, Larkin Minor, and George Allen. To James H. Moye and 'Luvina (Hunsinger) Moye fourteen children were born, viz.: Sophronia Elizabeth, who died in infancy; Lewis, born September 29,1881; Fanny, born April 11, 1883; James Henry, born May 22, 1885; Joseph Wilburn, born December 31, 1886; Larkin Kenneth, born August 27, 1888; Edith, born September 9, 1889, the wife of Edgar W. Huck; Lilly, born April 8, 1892; Jesse Lawrence, born September 15, 1893; Helen, born June 15, 1896; Ruby, born March 12, 1898, and Susie, born January 5, 1900. The Moye farm is one of the best examples of modern farming in Posey county. Substantial improvements and modern equipment mark the progressive spirit of its owners. The family are active in the social and religious life of their community, possess the esteem of their neighbors, while the home is known for its hospitality.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Clarence Cox, educator, farmer and trustee of Center township, Posey county, is a descendant on both the paternal and maternal sides from pioneer residents of Southwestern Indiana. He was born on his father's farm in Center township, on October 21, 1871, a son of Isaac N. and Harriet N. (Wade) Cox. The father was born on February 7, 1846, and died March 27, 1877. Mrs. Cox was born on December 10, 1843, and with her two children, Clarence, the subject of this sketch, and Elva, born April 18, 1873, who is the wife of William H. Ramsey, of Wadesville, Ind., survive. Isaac N. Cox was a farmer, well and favorably known in his section of the county, who died at a time when he was on the road to success and prominence. Clarence Cox was reared on his father's farm, educated in the public schools and in 1890 engaged in teaching. This profession he followed for sixteen years in the schools of Center township, where he became known as one of the successful educators of his county. In 1908 he was elected to the office of trustee of Center township, and is still serving in that capacity. His administration of the affairs of this office have been creditable to himself and his constituents. His financial policy has been sound, improvements have kept pace with the times, and the schools have benefited greatly through his long experience as a teacher. He has always taken an active interest in the questions of the day and is a consistent supporter of the principles and policies of the Democratic party. Mr. Cox married, on June 9, 1897, Miss Ida L. Moye, a daughter of John L. and Nancy J. (Randolph) Moye. She was born on July 11, 1873. They are the parents of two children: Mildred M. Cox, born September 21, 1900, and Myron M. Cox, born July 12, 1905.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Christ Reister, successful merchant, influential citizen and former treasurer of Posey county, was born in the town of Stein, province of Baden, Germany, on December 28, 1848, the son of Christ and Katherine (Zippese) Reister. Christ Reister, Sr., a tailor by trade, served in the German army during the revolution of 1848. He came to the United States in 1852, landing in New Orleans, and enlisted in the regular army. He was joined by his family in 1852 at Oswego, N. Y., and about three months afterward brought them to Evansville, Ind., where he located. The following year he became a resident of Haubstadt, Gibson county, and engaged in the manufacture of brick, in which he continued until he retired from active business, in 1876. His service in the United States army covered two terms in the regular and one in the volunteer army. He served throughout the Civil war and was captain of Company D, Thirty-second Indiana infantry. Christ Reister, Jr. was reared in Haubstadt and secured his education in the schools of that town. He became an employe in his father's brickyard and remained in this occupation until 1879, when he located in Cynthiana and engaged in the retail liquor business. In 1881 he established a general store and remained in this line of endeavor until 1903, when he retired. He was successful as a merchant and amassed a considerable fortune, which he has invested to advantage. Among his properties is a farm of r46 acres, situated one and one-half miles north of Cynthiana. Mr. Reister is best known to the citizens of Posey county through a residence of four years in Mt. Vernon, during which time he occupied the office of treasurer of the county. He has for many years been actively identified with the political life of the county and has been a leader in the Democratic party, of whose policies and principles he has been a consistent advocate. He served as inspector of the election board of Smith township for ten years, has attended, as a delegate, state and congressional conventions and has been one of the mainstays of his party in the county. He was honored with the nomination for treasurer in 1996, and was elected by practically a unanimous vote, only seven ballots being in the count against him. His conduct of the business affairs of this office was marked by the same business acumen as had characterized his commercial career. He was elected to succeed himself in 1908. His record as treasurer will stand as highly creditable to himself and his constituents. Since retirement from the office he has been occupied in the management of his farm and supervision of his various investments. Mr. Reister married on September 23, 1875, Miss Mary Triple, a daughter of George W. Triple of Haubstadt. They were the parents of one child, Ada Reister, born July 18, 1876, the wife of Jesse Wade, a successful lawyer of Mt. Vernon. Mrs. Reister died on October 19, 1879. On April 30, 1885, Mr. Reister married Miss Carry Deiteile, a daughter of Jacob and Anne M. Deiteile of Mt. Vernon. She is a native of that city and her father was for many years engaged in the retail market business and one of the four butchers who conducted stalls in the old city market building, erected from the fund donated by Dan Rice, the famous clown and circus owner. Three children have been born of this second marriage of Mr. Reister, two of whom died in infancy. Carolyn Reister, born December 27, 1904, is a student in the Cynthiana schools. Mrs. Reister is a member of the Christian Science church and popular in the social life of her home town. The family residence is one of the handsomest in the county and noted for its hospitality. Mr. Reister and his wife are generous in their support of the various churches and charities in Cynthiana.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Francis Marion Greathouse. To have attained so notable a record as did Captain Greathouse in connection with his service during the Civil war would prove sufficient to give precedence and reputation to any man, were this to represent the sum total of his efforts; but Francis Marion Greathouse is a man of distinct individuality, broad mental ken and strong initiative, who has been a leader in his township and the county as well. Captain Greathouse was born on his father's farm in Point township, Posey county, Indiana, April 10, 1840. He is the third child born to George Washington and Martha N. (Harshman) Greathouse. The family is of German descent, was founded in America previous to the war for independence, and in Posey county by David Greathouse, a native of Pennsylvania, who settled in what is now Point township prior to 1818, in which year is recorded his original land entry. He took an active part in the affairs incident to the early settlement of the county, acquired extensive land holdings and was one of the most influential men of his time and section. He married Sarah Callender, also born in Pennsylvania. They were the parents of four sons: Sampson, born December 8, 1808, who died February 2, 1887; George Washington, the father of Captain Greathouse, born July 4, 1810, who died February 4, 1843; John, born 1812, who died in 1842, and Lorenzo Dow, born 1818, who died in 1883. George Washington Greathouse was reared on his father's farm and followed the occupation of farmer. He was known among the men of his time for his integrity and high ideals, was a tireless worker and successful in his business undertakings. He was a builder-up of his properties, which during the pioneer period of the development of the county required hard labor and untiring energy. He married on June 14, 1832, Martha N. Harshman, the daughter of George and Dorcas Harshman, one of Posey county's early settlers, whose homestead was in Prairie Settlement. She was born in Virginia on January 8, 1815. Mr. Greathouse died on the fourteenth of February, 1843, and his wife on February 8, 1872. They were the parents of the following children: Sarah C., born May 6, 1833, and who died March 6, 1880. She married Joel Redmond, a farmer of Posey county. Julia, the second child, born January 17, 1835, married Thomas French, a prominent farmer of Lynn township, and is at the age of seventy-eight, enjoying the sunset years of life, surrounded by her grandchildren (see sketch of Raymond French). Matilda, the youngest child, born June 14, 1842, married Andrew Alexander, a man of sterling worth and intellectual ability, by which union, in 1864, her only child, Rosamond, was born. She became the wife of Dr. G. R. Peckempaugh, a prominent physician of Mt. Vernon, now a resident of Evansville. Mrs. Alexander was a woman of broad education, possessed intellectual ability of a high order and gained extended reputation as an author. She was the founder of the Alexandrian Library of Mt. Vernon (see chapter on Libraries), which she endowed liberally. Her death occurred on April 22, 1892; her husband on November 13, 1866. Francis Marion Greathouse, the third child born to George W. and Martha Greathouse, was reared on his father's farm, attended the schools of his district and assisted in the carrying on of the farm work until the breaking out of the Civil war. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, First Indiana cavalry, and upon its organization was elected first sergeant. He was several times promoted for meritorious service and valor. He was commissioned second lieutenant December 18, 1861, and first lieutenant June 6, 1863. He was mustered out on September 12, 1864. He was with his regiment in the battles of Fredericktown, Mo., December 16, 1861; Helena, Ark., July 4,1863; Pine Bluff, Ark., October 25, 1863; Mt. Elba, Ark., March 27, 1864, and Mark's Mills, Ark., April 25, 1864. It was during the time when he was detailed on scout duty that Lieutenant Greathouse won his greatest renown as a soldier, his work in this line of warfare being of the highest value to the Union cause, and was the result of careful planning and brilliant execution. His most conspicuous service, in point of value to the cause of the Union, was that of the Longview expedition, March 26, 1864, in which he was the ranking officer. The following extract from the official report of Col. Powell Clayton, dated Headquarters, Pine Bluff, Ark., April 1, 1864, concerns the results of this expedition: "The Longview raid reflects the highest credit to Lieutenants Greathouse and Young, and for brilliancy and success is almost without a parallel. One hundred men, fifty from the First Indiana and fifty from the Fifth Kansas cavalry, marched forty miles into the enemy's country, captured and destroyed a train of thirty-five wagons loaded with stores of great value to the enemy, their paymaster's safe containing over sixty thousand dollars, destroyed their pontoon bridge over the Saline river, captured and brought to Mt. Elba 260 prisoners, 300 horses and mules and a large number of contrabands ; all including the march of eighty miles to Longview and return in the surprising short space of twenty-four hours." There was not a man lost or a gun fired in accomplishing this capture. Lieutenant Greathouse was in command of his company from July, 1863, until mustered out, his captain being on detached service. He was detailed on scout duty in October, 1863, and served in this capacity until mustered out. His services while in this branch of duty were such as to win for him high commendation from his superior officers, and the results obtained by him were such as to place him among the foremost scouts of the Union army. On conclusion of his military service, Lieutenant Greathouse returned to his family home in Point township and resumed the care of the farm property. In 1872 he purchased land in Lynn township, where he has since resided. His holdings total 400 acres, the improvements are substantial and the farm is well stocked. He has realized a substantial success as an agriculturist, is one of the influential men of Posey county, where he is known for his high ideals, integrity and broad mindedness. He has taken an active part in support of those measures which have had in view the welfare and betterment of the community. He is a Republican. Political office has never appealed to him, and though often urged to accept nomination he has never permitted his name to go before a convention. He is a member of Harrow Post, No. 491, Grand Army of the Republic. On October 30, 1870, Captain Greathouse married Miss Maggie T. French, a daughter of James T. French, a farmer of Lynn township, and member of one of the oldest pioneer families of Posey county. She was born on August 15, 1845. Of the children born to Captain and Mrs. Greathouse, four are living, viz.: Cora, born August 14, 1871, the wife of James Bundy, of Lynn township; George Howard, born February 20, 1875, a hotel proprietor of Chicago, Ill.; Bertie, born October 19, 1879, the wife of Prof. C. J. Nelson, a teacher in the Mt. Vernon public schools, and Horace Elwood, born September 23, 1884, who resides with his parents and has the active management of his father's farm properties. A daughter, Grace, born May 22, 1873, a young lady of great personal charm, died on December 28, 1906.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Frederick Wolfinger, successful farmer, extensive land owner and veteran of the Civil war, was born on his father's farm in Marrs township, Posey county, Indiana, June 4, 1841, the son of John Wolfinger, a pioneer settler of that township and a native of Germany. There were six children in the family, all of whom, including the subject of this sketch, are deceased. The others were: John, Lewis, Charles, George and Elizabeth. John Wolfinger and his sons were important factors in the agricultural development of Marrs township, possessed energy, were thrifty, and enjoyed the esteem of their neighbors. Frederick Wolfinger was reared on the farm of his father, assisted in its carrying on, and secured his education in the district schools of his native township. L.incolnís call for volunteers found him ready for his country's defense and he enlisted in the Tenth Indiana cavalry. With his regiment he participated in many important engagements but was never wounded. His service in the Union cause covered a period of three years, and his record was excellent. On conclusion of his military service he returned to Posey county and engaged in farming and remained in this field of endeavor until 1902, when he retired from active labor and became a resident of the city of Mt. Vernon, his place of residence until his death, which occurred on November 9, 1909. As a farmer, Frederick Wolfinger was one of the most progressive and successful men of his section of Posey county. As a man of affairs, he was equally prominent. He possessed financial judgment, was an expert judge of land values and productiveness, seemed to sense the knock of opportunity and avail himself of it, and withal, possessed thrift. He was throughout his lifetime a buyer of farm lands and became the owner of a number of choice farm properties. Public office never appealed to him. He was a member of Mt. Vernon Post, Grand Army of the Republic, and of the General Baptist church. Mr. Wolfinger married, on December 16, 1868, Miss Nancy Benner, who was born in Marrs township, Posey county, on December 9, 1850, the daughter of John and Mary (Mills) Benner. Her father was a native of Germany, who came to America with his parents when but three years of age. He was a prosperous farmer of Marrs township. His wife was born in Black township and her parents were pioneer settlers in Posey county. Mr. Wolfinger is survived by his widow and the following children, viz.: Mary Elizabeth, born October 2, 1869, the wife of Robert Dixon, of Mt. Vernon; Joseph Welborn, born October 24, 1871; Otis Alvin, born June 20, 1878; James Arthur, born November 24, 1880, graduates of Lockyear's Commercial College, Evansville, and all three prosperous farmers of Marrs township; Fred B., born September 20, 1889, a graduate of Mt. Vernon High School, class of 1910, ticket agent of the Louisville & Nashville Railway at Mt. Vernon, Ill.; and Eleanor, born June 2, 1894, who graduated from the Mt. Vernon High School with the class of 1913. The third child of Mr. and Mrs. Wolfinger, a son, died in infancy.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Martin Golden, New Harmony. The venerable white haired gentleman whose name introduces this personal review, represents that type of mankind whom we all stop by the wayside to observe and admire. Mr. Golden is an actor of the old school, who for years shed his light on the American stage, furnishing instructive amusement to hundreds of delighted audiences. When he was in the prime of manly vigor his contemporaries were such men as Edwin Booth, Lawrence Barrett, and many others with whom he was associated, which almost causes the student to reflect on that epoch as the second Elizabethan age of the English drama. Mr. Golden knew well most of the actors of his time, and played with many of them, and he treasures many pleasant memories of the stage folk, great and near-great of his time. Our subject is a native of Ireland, born at Cork Hill, Parish of Screen, November 10, 1835. His parents were William Golden and Catharine Dunn, also natives of Ireland. Martin was one of a family of ten children, two of whom are now living: Thomas F., a druggist in New York, and Martin. The Golden family embarked for America in 1846, some of the older sons having preceded the other members several years. It seems that they were beset by one misfortune after another. The mother died during the voyage and was buried at sea. Shortly after the family reached Quebec the father was taken ill and died. After the death of his father Martin and a brother were sent to New Orleans to live with an older brother, who was a druggist there. Upon arriving at New Orleans they learned that the brother in New Orleans had died two weeks previously with yellow fever. He then went to live with a cousin there, where he remained and attended school until 1849. Then, at the age of fourteen, he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he secured employment in a wholesale dry goods store. From there he went to Hamilton, Ohio, and worked for a contractor as bookkeeper and timekeeper. In 1851 he returned to New Orleans, and during the next two years two of his brothers died there from yellow fever. In 1853 he decided to leave New Orleans and went to New York, where he had a brother and sister. After reaching New York and seeking his brother and sister he met a New Orleans acquaintance, Charles Gleason, treasurer of the St. Charles theater, New Orleans. Young Golden returned to New Orleans with him and accepted the position of doorkeeper at the St. Charles theater. He was very much interested in stage life and his position gave him an opportunity to meet many actors. He got dramatic books and applied himself to study. He became acquainted with Mr. Benedict De Barr, manager of the St. Charles theater, who booked young Golden for the princely salary of six dollars per week. This was in the fall of 1855, and the company opened the season at St. Louis in "The Hunch Back" with Miss Annette Inse as leading lady. Golden was assigned to take the character of "Holdwell." This was the beginning of his stage career and he made good from that minute, and remained with De Barr in New Orleans and St. Louis until the war broke out in 1861. He then came north and played in all the principal cities with marked success and was associated with many of the great actors of the time. He organized a traveling company, which he managed for several years. Later he took the management of Carter's play, "The Fast Mail," which he managed several years with great financial success. He has managed opera houses, and played entire seasons in no less than a dozen different large cities throughout the country. Mr. Golden was united in marriage, August 25, 1861, to Miss Emma Isabella Llewellyn, a native of St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Golden was a talented actress and played with her husband in the principal cities of the United States for years, until on account of her health she was obliged to give up the stage. To Mr. and Mrs. Golden were born four children: Martin T., born at Cleveland, Ohio, May !o, 1862, a leading business man of New Harmony; William E., born In New Harmony, June 9, 1865, a prominent educator of New York, and now principal of the Polytechnic Institute of that city; Grace, born in the Fontleroy House, November 14, 1867, and died November 14, 1903. She was an operatic singer of National fame. Her untimely death was universally mourned and was a severe blow to her immediate family and many friends; Frances Llewellyn, born September 7, 1877, at New Harmony. She, too, is an accomplished actress, well known on the American stage. Mr. Golden is a member of the Catholic church. He has had an active and eventful career, filled with many fond recollections and very few regrets. He is now spending the peaceful days of a ripe old age surrounded by his loved ones and enjoying the present to the fullness thereof, as well as the pleasant memories of a life well spent.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Raymond A. French. In the development of the agricultural resources of Posey county, which has placed her in the front rank among her sister counties of the State, it is probable no one family has been more numerously represented or has been of more material value in this development than that of which our subject is a worthy representative. The French family dates its founding in the county from the settlement of Doris French, who entered on land in what is now Lynn township in 1807. He was a native of Kentucky, born July 10, 1792. He married on March 17, 1818, Sarah Thomas, born October 9, 1801, who came to Posey county with her parents in 1814. Doris French was not only one of the first to settle in the county but was one of the most influential men among the pioneers, the leader of his section, and amassed, for his time, a comfortable fortune. His death occurred on August 28, 1855, and that of his wife on September 8, 1885. They were the parents of the following children: Zedoc, born September 19, 1819; James Thomas, born January 7, 1822 ; Samuel, born March 10, 1825; Maria, born October 4, 1827; Lardner Clark, born February 28, 1830; Ralph, born December 26, 1832; Thomas, born March 10, 1835, the grandfather of our subject, and Mary, born December 10, 1837. Thomas French attended the country schools of his neighborhood, assisted his father in the clearing of his forest covered land, farmed and incidentally underwent the hardships common to the lot of the early settlers. In 1855, when but twenty years of age, he married Angelina Calkins, who lived but thirteen months after her marriage. On March 15, 1857, he married Julia A. Greathouse, a daughter of George W. and Martha (Harshman) Greathouse (see sketch of F. M. Greathouse). In 1855 Mr. French purchased the farm now operated by his grandson. As a man among men, bearing his due share in connection with the practical activities and responsibilities of a work-a-day world, he was successful, but, over and above all, he gained a deep knowledge of the wellsprings from which emerge the stream of human motive and action. He was a man of high ideals, broad mind, and took an active interest in the questions of his time. He was a Republican in his political views, and though active in the interests of his party, was not inclined toward political office. His charities were many. Measures having for their object the welfare of the community received his active support. He loved the fields and flowers. He was a home builder. He believed in the sacredness of the hearth. He passed to his reward on March 11, 1910. To do justice to his memory within the limits of an article of this nature would be impossible, but in even touching the more salient points there may come objective lesson and incentive and thus a tribute of appreciation. His widow, aged seventy-eight, survives him and resides on the old homestead to which she came as a bride in 1857. They were the parents of one child, a son, Gustave French, born February 11, 1858. Gustave French acquired his education in the schools of Posey county. He was taught farming by his father, assisted in the carrying on of his farm properties and resided with him until his death, which occurred on June 6, 1891. While shooting squirrels among the trees in front of the farm residence his gun exploded, causing injuries from which he died. He married on February 23, 1882, Victoria Albright, a daughter of John T. and Mary (Jones) Albright, of Lynn township. They were the parents of two children: Raymond A., the subject of this sketch, and Gladys, born August 26, 1885. The widow and daughter are residents of Mt. Vernon. Raymond A. French was born on the family farm in Lynn township on April 5, 1883. After completing a course in the public schools of Posey county, he attended Columbia College, Evansville. In 1901 he sought employment in the West. Some two years were spent with cattle outfits in Wyoming and Utah, one year with a railroad constructing company. In 1904 he reached Seattle and secured the position of mail clerk on a steamer plying between that city and Victoria, B. C. In 1905 he resigned this position to accept that of freight clerk on a steamer plying between Seattle and Skagway, Alaska, and remained in this employment until 1908, when he returned to Posey county and took the management of the family farm properties. A student and close observer, his travels in the West and Northwest gave him opportunity for investigating at close range the scientific methods of farming in use there. He has applied the knowledge gained to the operation of his properties with satisfactory results. The French farms are well stocked, the improvements are modern and that order which only comes from system prevails in the conduct of carrying on. Mr. French married on January 15, 1907, Miss Katherine Gallick, a daughter of John Gallick, a native of Austria, who is a resident of Ossining, N. Y. She was born at Miva, province of Nitra, Austria-Hungary, on November 24, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. French are the parents of three children: Allen Raymond, born March 8, 1908; Doris Gustave, born September 5, 1909, and Ruth Anna, born March 9, 1913. The family attend the Episcopal church. Mr. French is one of the pushing, progressive men of the county, energetic and unassuming. He is in all respects a high type of the virile American and a worthy descendant of his pioneer ancestors. He is a member of New Harmony Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


Frederick Pierce Leonard, of Mt. Vernon, who holds an enviable place among his colleagues at law, has been a member of the Posey county bar for the past thirty-three years and this long period of efficient service in the legal profession and of public-spirited citizenship, entitles him to distinctive recognition in this publication. Mr. Leonard was born in Mt. Vernon, Ind., November 4, 1858, the son of Charles Frederick and Mary E. (Pierce) Leonard, the former a native of Bristol, R. I., and the latter of the State of Maine. Charles F. Leonard, the first of the family to settle in Indiana, came to Posey county about 1834, and located in Mt. Vernon, where he engaged in business and became one of the most successful and influential merchants of the county. He was an active and potent factor in the development of the city and took a prominent part in the political life of the county. He was a Republican, contributed generously in support of the campaigns of his party, but was not inclined toward public office. He was married twice. His first wife was Lucretia Knowles, a native of Connecticut, who died in Mt. Vernon in 1850, a victim of the cholera epidemic of that year. Of this union, five children were born, but one of whom is living, viz., Anna, the wife of Edward P. Elliott of Washington, D. C. Those deceased are: Mary, who married James F. Welborn of Denver, Colo.; Charles, Isaac, and William. The second wife of Mr. Leonard was Miss Mary E. Pierce, who was born in Maine. Five children were born to this union, viz.: Lucretia, who died in infancy; Martha, the wife of James B. Tate, of Evansville, Ind.; Frederick P., the subject of this article; Mark T. of Chicago, Ill., and Augustus H., deceased. Mr. Leonard died on March 31, 1884, aged eighty years, and Mrs. Leonard on July 1, 1913, aged eighty-nine years and three months. Both Mr. Leonard and his wife were exceptionally active, mentally and physically, for persons of their advanced age. Each possessed the esteem which comes from honorable living, and the affection which slowly develops from unselfish works. Frederick Pierce Leonard received his early educational discipline in the schools of Mt. Vernon, was graduated from its high school with the class of 1875, and subsequently entered the literary department of the Indiana State University, from which he received his Bachelor of Arts degree with the class of 1878. He next entered the law department of the University of Michigan and was graduated, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, a member of the class of 1881. On completion of his law studies he returned to Mt. Vernon and engaged in the practice of his profession. During the thirty-three years in which he has been a member of the Posey county bar he has had as associates, Judge Louden, who was with him for five years, and Judge Clements, now judge of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit, who remained with him for five years. His practice has been extensive, both as to the number and the character of the suits tried. He possesses an analytical mind, power of concentration, and an unswerving industry, and his briefs are marked for their directness and lucidity of expression. He has appeared in connection with the most important litigations in both the State and federal courts and is recognized as one of the most able lawyers of southern Indiana. Public office has never appealed to him, although he never neglects in the least his civic duties and obligations. He is a Republican. In local affairs he has always taken an active part, is independent as to party, and has served for one term as mayor of Mt. Vernon. Mr. Leonard married on October 26, 1892, Miss Easter Harrow, of Mt. Vernon. They are the parents of four children, viz.: Mark (deceased), Juliette, Frederick and John H. Mrs. Leonard is a woman of broad culture and popular in the social circles of the city in which she is a leader. The family residence, in which Mr. Leonard was born, is known for its gracious hospitality.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913


William C. Fuhrer, president of the Fuhrer-Ford Milling Company of Mt. Vernon, of which city he has been a resident since 1858, and one of the most prominent men of affairs in Posey county, was born in Pittsburg, Penn., November 25, 1837, a son of Gregory and Elizabeth (Johns) Fuhrer. Gregory Fuhrer was born in Alsace-Lorraine, France, his parents being of German origin, and about 1830 he came to the United States, located in Pennsylvania and there met and married Elizabeth Johns, a native of Westmoreland county, who was also of German descent. In 1858 he brought his family to Indiana and settled in Mt. Vernon, where he engaged in farming and market gardening. William C. Fuhrer was reared in Pittsburg, Penn., and acquired his education in the public schools of that city and was graduated from Duff's College. Shortly after the arrival of the family in Mt. Vernon, he secured employment as clerk of a wharf boat and was later bookkeeper for the dry goods firm of Mann, Larkin & Welborn. His initial venture as an owner was in the river trade in which he was a part owner in the steamers Hazel Dell, West Wind, and others of their class. He entered the commercial life of Mt. Vernon with Fred and John Decker - Decker, Fuhrer & Co. - and later with Walter L. Sullivan and Richard Sarlls he formed the firm of Sullivan, Fuhrer & Co., and engaged in the retail dry goods business. In 1867 he engaged in the grain business and in 1883 entered the milling business as a member of the firm of Fuhrer, Boyce & Co., his associates being George W. and William L. Boyce. He was the first to establish a cash grain business, paying on delivery of the commodity, a method of transaction which not only was of decisive advantage to him as a buyer, but enabled the growers to avoid possible loss through the failure of any of the grain dealers during the interval between the buying and marketing of cereals, which in those days consumed some little time as the principal market was New Orleans. In 1883 the firm of Fuhrer, Royce & Co. built the first "Peerless Mill," which was burned in 1899, and on its site the present mill was erected and is now operated by the Fuhrer-Ford Milling Company, who succeeded to the business of the original builders. A review of this enterprise is included in the chapter "Manufacturing and Commercial Enterprises." Mr. Fuhrer has also been interested directly and indirectly with many other business enterprises of his home city, and perhaps no one of its citizens has had more to do with the development and building up of Mt. Vernon than he. In truth he has been one of the foremost in every movement which had for its object the city's progress, thrift and substantial growth. His political affiliations have been with the Republican party, his first presidential vote having been cast for Abraham Lincoln. In 1876 he supported Tilden and Hendricks, his one deflection from straight party lines. Political office has never appealed to him. He has attained the Knights Templar degree in Masonry, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Fuhrer married, in 1860, Miss Ann Phillips, who was born and reared in Lynn township, Posey county. Three children were born of this marriage, viz.: Eugene H. Fuhrer, born March 11, 1865, secretary and treasurer of the Fuhrer-Ford Milling Company of Mt. Vernon; Minnie Fuhrer, born in 1867, wife of Charles E. Peperday of Jacksonville, Fla., who died there in 1905, and a boy who died in infancy.

History of Posey county, Indiana
John C. Leffel, Editor
Standard Publishing Company
Chicago 1913